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ABERNATHY, MILES WASHINGTON, planter and public official, was born July 21, 1801, at Mountain Creek. Lincoln County, N. C., and died July 22. 1877, at Jacksonville; son of John D. and Susan (Forney) Abernathy, a native of Virginia, but later resident of Mountain Creek, where he owned iron works and plantation lands; grandson of David and Nancy (Turner) Abernathy of Virginia, and of Jacob and Maria (Bergner) Forney of Mount Welcome, Beattle's Ford, N. C. He was well educated in the schools of his native county. His abilities were early recognized, and he was sent as a representative from Lincoln County, to the North Carolina legislature where he served two terms. He was then made county Judge, and held that office until his removal to Alabama In 1837. He bought a plantation in Benton, now Calhoun County, and settled his slaves upon it and also formed a partnership in the mercantile business with his brother-in-law. Col. John D. Hoke. In 1842 he was elected to the house of representatives of Alabama, and served for two terms. In 1866 he was elected to the senate, where he remained four years. It was because of his admiration for John C. Calhoun, to whose political opinions he subscribed, that he caused the name of the county to be changed from Benton to Calhoun. The monument to his legislative service however, is the State school for the deaf and dumb, located at Talladega, which under his leadership was established In 1857- 58. He was one of a committee of three appointed by the legislature In 1847 to receive the new capitol building at Montgomery. At the outbreak of the War of Secession he tendered his service to the Confederate cause; was appointed major, and his home was turned into a receiving hospital for sick soldiers. He was a Lutheran, and Democrat. Married: June 18, 1836, in Lincolnton. N. C, to Ann, daughter of Daniel and Barbara (Ramseur) Hoke of that place; granddaughter of Jacob A. and Sabina (Swope) Ramseur whose parents emigrated from Alsace on the Rhine, settling first in Pennsylvania and later in North Carolina. Children: 1. Fannie E. m. T. W. Francis, Jacksonville; 2. Anna M. m. D. P. Loretz, Jacksonville; 3. Mary A., m. H. L. Stevenson, Jacksonville; 4. Macon, student University of Alabama, 1859, private in Co. O, 10th Alabama Infantry regiment, C. S. Army, mortally wounded at Frazier's Farm, Va., June 30, 1862, d. at Richmond July 1, 1862; 5. Julia Swope. m. J. D. Smith. Last residence: Jacksonville.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictioary of Alabama Biography, by Thomas McAdory Owen, LL.D., 1921, Transcribed by C. Anthony
ALEXANDER, WILLIAM J. was born in Calhoun County, Ala., in May, 1842, and is a son of Arthur T. and Rebecca (Borden) Alexander.       
     The senior Mr. Alexander was born in North Carolina, and when a child taken by his parents to Habersham County, and thence to Carroll County, Ga. He came to Calhoun County, this State, in 1832, and settled eight miles east of Cross Plains (now in Cleburne County), where his father entered lands and improved them. He died in 1851, and a few months later his wife followed him. They left two sons and four daughters, all of whom lived to maturity. The Alexanders and Bordens are of English ancestry. 
     The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, received a common-school education, and at the age of seventeen years began life as a farmer, which he has continued ever since. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Twenty-fifth Alabama Infantry, and was in the first battle of Farmersville, Tenn., south of Shiloh. He participated in the Kentucky invasion, was taken prisoner at Glasgow, Ky., and was exchanged about two months later. He joined his regiment again at Shelbyville, Tenn., and was in the battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, in all the fights from Chattanooga to Atlanta and New Hope Church to Atlanta. When Hood made his raid into Tennessee, our subject joined Wheelers cavalry, with which command he remained until the surrender. At the close of the war he resumed farming. In 1871 he was appointed sheriff of Cleburne County, and in 1874 was elected to that office. He served in this capacity about six years. In 1878 he was elected to the Lower House of the Legislature, reelected in 1882, and in 1884 was elected to the Senate from his district, which office he holds at the present writing (1888). Mr. Alexander was married in August, 1866, to Sarah Cornelia, daughter of Henry A. Smith, of Floyd County, Ga. This union has been blessed with two children, William H. and Bessie E.  Mr. Alexander and wife are members of the Christian Church.  Source: Northern Alabama: Historical and Biographical, Published by Smith & DeLand, Birmingham, Ala., 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


 ALLEN, LUCIUS L., son of Hudson H. and Nancy (Corneilson) Allen, was born in Gwinnett County, Ga., June 23, 1831, and was educated at Emory College, that State. In 1862 he enlisted in Company D, Fifty-first Alabama Cavalry, and with that command participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Knoxville, Chickamauga, and the Atlanta and Dalton campaigns. His father came into Alabama in 1835, purchased a large tract of government land, and other lands from the Indians, and became one of the most extensive planters and slaveholders in his neighborhood. Mr. Allen was reared on a farm, and to agriculture has devoted his time and his talents. He was married in November 1854, to Miss Emma Pyles, daughter of Lewis and Catherine (Perrin) Pyles, and his children are: Susan C. (Mrs. Hudson), Lelia J. (Mrs. Snow), Nancy Lulu, Lilly A. and Alice C. The family are all members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Allen is a Mason.
     The senior Mr. Allen died at his home, near Oxford, January 8, 1885, at the age of 83 years: his wife died in 1869. They reared a family of three sons: William H., Asa F., and the subject of this sketch. Asa F. is a Baptist minister, and resides on the old homestead.
     Asa Allen was the name of the grandfather of Lucius L. He married a Miss Jones in Georgia, whither he had migrated from Virginia at an early day. He reared a family of four sons and four daughters, and in l834 or 1835 moved to Limestone County, Ala., where he died in 1840 at the age of 69 years.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


ANDERSON, GEORGE THOMAS, soldier, was born in 1824 in Georgia. In 1855-58 he was captain in the first United States cavalry. He was a confederate soldier and veteran of the Mexican war; and attained the rank of brigadier-general. He died April 4, 1901, in Anniston, Ala.
[Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]


BARRY, THOMAS H., Merchant and Manufacturing, Oxford, son of Reese and Ann S.(Manson) Barry, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Maryland, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 4, 1836, and in that city received his education. Accompanying his mother, in 1855, he moved to San Antonio, Tex., and was there engaged in mercantile business until the outbreak of the late war. Early in the spring of 1861, he enlisted as a private soldier in Company G, Eighth Texas ("Terry's Rangers"), and remained in the service until the close of the war, participating in the battles of Woodsonville, Ky., Shiloh, Murfreesboro, and all the engagements from Chickamauga to New Hope Court House. At the latter engagement he was wounded, and fell into the hands of the enemy, but escaped while en route to Rock Island, rejoined his command, and took part in the battles around Atlanta. At Waynesboro, November 28, 1864, he was severely wounded, and from that date to the close of the war remained in hospital. Returning to Texas in 1865, he engaged at his former business, and was there until 1872, when he came to Oxford. Here he has since been, in the mercantile business, and was one of the organizers of the Barry & Draper Manufacturing Co. This company was organized in 1824, and Mr. Barry has been its president from the beginning. He is also president of the Oxford Building & Loan Association, and is otherwise identified with various other industries. Mr. Barry was married March 6, 1865, to Miss Emily F. Gray, of Georgia. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Knights of Honor, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Masonic fraternity. The senior Mr. Barry moved to Cincinnati when he was a young man, and was engaged at steamboating the rest of his life. He died in 1840, leaving three children, to-wit: William D., Thomas H., and Caroline E. His father, Daniel Barry, was a farmer in Virginia, where he lived and died. The family came originally from Ireland, and the Mansons appear to be of French origin.   Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


BORDERS SAMUEL K., was born in Jackson County, Ga., January 12, 1822, and died at Oxford Ala., December 26, 1881. His parents were John and Cynthia Borders. The senior Mr. Borders in early manhood migrated from Virginia to Tennessee, and from there to Georgia, where he was married. From Georgia he moved to Mississippi, where he was engaged at planting, and from Mississippi in 1833 or 1834 he came to Calhoun County. Here he located near Oxford, and became one of the most extensive planters of his neighborhood. He reared a family of two sons and six daughters, namely: Samuel K., Abner, Mary (Mrs. Brooks), Virginia (Mrs. Cunningham), Adaline (Mrs. Bush), Ann (Mrs. Jenkins), Eliza (Mrs. Pondor), Evaline (Mrs. Bush), and buried one daughter, Georgia, in early girlhood. The subject of this sketch was educated at Athens, Ga., and after graduating began the study of medicine. At the request of his father he gave up the idea of professional life, and thereafter turned his attention to farming. He served through the Mexican War as a member of Company I, First Regiment Alabama Volunteers, and through the war between the States as a member of the Fifty-first Alabama Cavalry.  March 1851, Mr. Borders was married to Miss Sallie Williams, daughter of Dr. John Williams, and had born to him seven children: Georgia (Mrs. Christian), Mary (Mrs. Waters), Hattie (Mrs. Wilson), Annie, Sallie, Lillie and John.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


BULLARD, AURELIUS F., M. D. prominent Physician and Surgeon, Oxford,[AL] was born at Bennington, Vt., September 15, 1848, and is the son of William H. and Roxanna A. (Moon) Bullard, natives of Massachusetts and Vermont, and of Irish and Scotch extraction, respectively. Doctor Bullard received his primary education in the common schools of Vermont, and at the Wesleyan Institute of Willbraham, Mass., and at the age of fifteen years went to sea as a sailor before the mast. In 1869, as second mate of a ship, he came South. The crew, while at Mobile, were taken with yellow fever, from the fatal effects of which, it appears, that he and his captain were the only ones to escape. He made his way to Wilmington, where another crew was organized, and as first mate he sailed to Boston, where he abandoned seafaring life. Returning to Alabama, he attended school at Montgomery, and graduated in 1871. In the meantime he took lectures at Jefferson College, Philadelphia. Since engaging regularly in the practice of his profession, he has been recognized as one of the most careful, studious, and reliable physicians of Oxford, and he is at this writing in the enjoyment of an excellent practice. He is a member of the various medical associations, and is held in high esteem by the members of the profession throughout the State. He was married August 28, 1876, to Miss Julia B. Goodhue, daughter of Prof. Amos B. Goodhue. The Goodhues are also of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and came South about thirty years ago. Professor Goodhue is now retired. The senior Mr. Bullard came South in 1868, and to Oxford in 1872. He reared three sons: the subject of this sketch, William E. and Oliver H. Doctor Bullard is a member of the Knights of Pythias, of the Masonic fraternity, and of the Baptist Church. His children are: William G., Alice A., and Elerslie W. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


CALHOUN, OTIS VAUGHN, Methodist minister, was born January 23. 1879. In Jackson County, Miss.: son of Charles Wesley and Laura Ann (Vaughn)Calhoun, the former a native of Clarke Sounty, who was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, south, Mississippi conference; grandson of John Calhoun, who lived In Clarke County, and whose ancestors came from Scotland to the United States soon after the Revolutionary War. He received his early education under the Instruction of D. M. Callaway at Selma, and J. T. Collins, at Thomasvllle; was graduated from Southern university, B. P., 1899; and was a student In the theology department of Vanderbilt university for one year. He joined the Alabama Conference. Methodist Episcopal church, South, at Greenville, In December. 1901, and Is now stationed at Calhoun. He is a Democrat; a Knight Templar; and a Shrlner. Married: February 26, 1907, at Mobile, to Mary Cameron Byrne, daughter of Robert D. and Elizabeth (McCasklll) Byrne, who lived at Mobile. Children: 1. Charles Robert; 2. Elizabeth Vaughn; 3. John Byrne; 4. Mary Catherine. Residence: Calhoun. Source: History of Alabama and Dictioary of Alabama Biography, by Thomas McAdory Owen, LL.D., 1921, Transcribed by C. Anthony


CALLAWAY, ROBERT BAKER, educator, was born July 21, 1852. In Summerfleld, Dallas County, Ala.; son of Rev. Christopher Columbus Callaway and his wife, Zerllda Emerlne Denton, who was a daughter of John Francis and Elizabeth Denton, who lived In Winston County, Miss. Rev. Callaway was born in Lincoin County, Tenn., and for many years was pastor of the Methodist church at Greensboro. Ala.; also financial agent of the Southern University; and presiding elder of the Tuscaloosa district. Robert Baker Callaway began his education under the direction of Miss Emma Meors and afterward attended schools taught by her brother. Dr. Meors, both from the north, Prof. O. F. Casy and Capt. A. H. Hutchinson. Subsequently he was a student at the Southern University but quit before graduating to go to work. He began teaching in 1872 In Mississippi; filled the chair of mathematics In Stonewall Institute, 1875-8; and has since taught in Sumter County. Ala. most of the time In Livingston. In 1893 he was appointed county superintendent of schools by Major John G. Harris, and by reelection has since filled that position. He is a Democrat; a Methodist, taking an active part in church and Sunday school work and Mason and Knight of Pythias, having filled offices in both lodges. Married: December 12, 1882, at Livingston, to Margaret Elsie Edmundson, who was born October 9, 1859, In Nashville, Tenn., a daughter of John King and Matilda Greer (Wilson) Edmundson. of Nashville. Children: 1. Maggie Bryan, d.; 2. Helen, m. J. Graham Putnam; 3. Robert Baker, d.; 4. Maude Bordeaux; and 6. Marguerite Catherine. Residence: Livingston, Ala.  Source: History of Alabama and Dictioary of Alabama Biography, by Thomas McAdory Owen, LL.D., 1921, Transcribed by C. Anthony


CAMBRON, ELY LEWIS, minister of the gospel; born Calhoun Co., Ala., Nov. 1, 1860; English descent; son of J.W. and Martha (Jester) Cambron; father’s occupation blacksmith; educated in Tenn.; married Emily E. Gattis July 9, 1879; Democrat; member of Church of Christ; engaged in the mercantile business at Winchester, Tenn.  Source: Who’s Who in Tennessee, Memphis: Paul & Douglass Co., Publishers, 1911; transcribed by Kim Mohler


COWAN, JAMES H., son of David and Matilda Cowan was born in Benton county, Alabama, Dec. 24, 1840. His parents moved to Tenn. and from there to Missouri in 1853, and settled where the subject of this sketch now lives, on Big Sugar creek near Cyclone. He attended school at the Love school house in Elk Horn township. In 1872 he was united in marriage with Miss Hannah Phillips, but she died two weeks later. The next year he married her sister Mary. She lived twelve years and bore five children, three of whom are living — Nancy (Cook), Marcus Andrew, and David C., all in this county. Mr. Cowan is a farmer by occupation, a staunch Republican in politics, and for fifteen years has been a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He enlisted in Co. M. Sixth Mo. Cavalry September 1, 1861; again in Fifteenth Mo. Cav. Nov. 1, 1863. He served as Corporal for some time, and was elected Lieutenant, but the war closed before his commission came. Source: History of McDonald County, Missouri, by Judge J. A. Sturges, 1897, Submitted by Linda Rodriguez 


DAILEY, JACOB F., was born in Lincoln County, N. C, December 3, 1817, and is a son of Aaron and Mary (Albernathy) Dailey, natives of Ireland and of North Carolina, respectively. The senior Mr. Dailey came to America with his parents (about 1795), and settled in Lincoln County, N. C. He was a farmer and also superintendent of an iron furnace. He reared a family of four sons and three daughters, and died in 1858 at the age of forty years. His widow survived him many years, and died at the extreme old age of ninety-six years. She was a strong and hearty woman up to the time of her death. 

Jacob F. Dailey, our subject, was reared in North Carolina by his uncle, Miles W. Abernathy; received a common-school education, and at the age of sixteen years began life as a sailor, which avocation he followed six years, and at the age of twenty-one entered into business on his own account at Lincolnton Court House, N. C. In 1847, he came to Cross Plains, [AL], entered into a general merchandise business, and continued it with success ever since. His was the first store erected in this village. In 1849 he purchased several hundred acres of land, and in connection with his merchandise business, has been farming ever since. He now owns several large farms near Cross Plains. In 1862 he was appointed member of the Advisory Board with headquarters at Jacksonville, this State. Mr. Dailey was married August 19, 1841, to Jane M. Kibler, daughter of Michael and Catherine (Lawrence) Kibler, of North Carolina, and has had born to him two children: Mary Catherine, wife of Alexander McCollister, and Jacob Kibler. The family are communicants of the Episcopal Church. Mr. Dailey is a prominent Mason; is a wide-awake, public-spirited citizen, and is always alive to the development of enterprise in his section of the country. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


DODSON, JOHN L., President of Oxford Male and Female College, Oxford, is a native of Georgia, and was born April 10, 1837. His early life was spent on his father's plantation, in his native State. His education was acquired at some boarding school, the County Academy, and at Davidson College, North Carolina. He came to Alabama in 1860, and at Jacksonville taught school one year. From Jacksonville, as professional educator, he taught successfully at various places in this State and in Georgia, during the period of the war. After the declaration of peace, he returned to Calhoun County, and at Brock's school-house taught two years. In 1868, he located at Oxford and, associated with Mr. W. J. Borden, founded Oxford College. One year later he became sole owner and proprietor of this popular institution of learning, and to it has since given his time and talents. Professor Dodson, as will be seen by this brief recital, has given almost his entire life to the cause of education, and of him it may be truthfully said, that that great cause has appreciated as much from his efforts as from that of any one man. The success of Oxford College attests at once his superior ability as an organizer, disciplinarian, and educator, and the people of this vicinity are justly proud of him and his institution. July, 1883, Professor Dodson, at Oxford, led to the altar Miss Fannie S. Gladden, the accomplished daughter of James A. and Martha (Kelley) Gladden, of this place. The Professor and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic fraternity. Samuel and Rebecca (Gardner) Dodson, the parents of the subject of this sketch, were natives, respectively, of Green and Morgan Counties, Ga. The senior Mr. Dodson, a farmer by occupation, was born in 1788, and participated in the war of 1812. He was partially reared in South Carolina, and spent a portion of his early manhood in Mississippi. His father, Joshua Dodson, was a native of Virginia, and his grandfather came from England. He reared a family of six sons and four daughters. One of his sons, James W, now a farmer in Texas, took part in the Florida War and the Confederate War; another son, Joshua M., was in the Confederate service during the late war as quartermaster in the Trans-Mississippi Department. He died in Texas. Christopher C., another son, was in the Mexican War from Texas, as a lieutenant, and during the late war commanded a troop of Indians from Arizona. He died in Tucson, Ariz. The fourth son, Samuel P. died in Texas; Elijah M. was major of the First Confederate Georgia Regiment, and is an attorney-at-law at Chattanooga, Tenn., and George W. was in the Fifty-first Alabama Regiment, and is a farmer in Georgia. The Gardner family, in the person of the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Christopher Gardner, on account of political troubles, came from Ireland away back in the eighteenth century, settled in Virginia, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and was severely wounded at Brandywine. He died in Georgia, after having reared a large family of daughters and two sons. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


DU BOSE, REV. ROBERT MEANS
Rev. Robert Means Du Bose, of the Presbyterian Church, Anniston, was born at Liberty Hill, S. C, in July, 1849, and is a son of the Rev. Julius J. and Margaret (Thompson) Du Bose.
     The elder Du Bose, also a minister of the Presbyterian Church, attained prominence as a preacher and as editor of the South Carolina Temperance Advocate. He was also at one time Treasurer of the State of South Carolina. He died on the eve of his removal to Alabama, in 1852. After his death, instead of coming direct to Alabama, as was previously purposed, the family remained many years in South Carolina. Of his three sons, Dr. W. S. Du Bose, now of Shelby County, this State, was a surgeon in the Army of Northern Virginia, during the late war; Rev. Hampden C. Du Bose (of the Presbyterian Church) also served through the late war as a member of the State Cadet Corps of South Carolina. He married a Miss McAlpine, of Talladega, Ala., and has been for fifteen years a missionary in China.
     The subject of this sketch, was reared at Darlington, S. C, and was graduated from the University of that State, in 1871. Subsequently, in the spring of 1874, he was graduated from the Theological Seminary at Columbia, S. C and came at once to Alabama. From here, within a short time, he removed to Tennessee, where he remained about two years. From there he returned to Lawrence County, Ala., and spent five years in evangelistic work. In January, 1883, he accepted a call from the Fourth Presbyterian Church, at Louisville. From there, in the spring of 1884, he was called to Fayetteville, Tenn., and in September, 1887, he came to Anniston. He was married July 4, 1876, to Miss Kate G. Garth, daughter of George M. and Kate (Gilchrist) Garth, and the three children born to this union are named, respectively, Nannie, Margaret and Katharine.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


FOSTER, FELIX W.
Felix W. Foster, Mayor of the city of Anniston, son of Rev. W. S. and Jane (Hancock) Foster, natives of South Carolina, was born in Union County, S. C, March 12, 1845. The senior Mr. Foster, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, migrated from South Carolina to Cherokee County, Ga., in 1852, and is there living at this time (1888) at the age of seventy-six years. His father came from England to South Carolina, as did also the Hancock family. Dr. Hancock, an eminent physician, came to this country prior to the Revolutionary War, settled in South Carolina, and was one of the original importers and dealers in negroes as slaves. He reared a family of five daughters, one of whom became the wife of the Rev. W. S. Foster.
     The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and educated in Georgia. He entered the army in March, 1862, as a member of Company E, Cobb's Georgia Legion of Cavalry, and with that command, participated in the battles of Upperville, Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Williamsport, Funkstown, Culpepper, Brandy Station, Manassas, Stevensburg, siege of Petersburg, etc. At the battle of White Oak Swamp he acted courier for Generals Young and Hampton, and finally surrendered at Greensboro, N. C.
     At the close of the war Mr. Foster returned to Georgia, and for ten years followed farming. After merchandising for a period of five years in Georgia he removed to Mississippi, where he for three years followed farming, and in November, 1882, located at Anniston, in the real estate business. In 1885 he engaged in the lumber business, to which he is yet giving attention, and in January, 1888, was elected Mayor of this city.
     Mr. Foster was married, August 10, 1885, to Miss Emma Evans, daughter of Major T. D. Evans, and the children born to him, are Minnie G., Mattie B.. Thomas W., Jennie J., Emmet Everett, and Ella May.
     The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Foster is a Mason.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


GUNNELS, DANIEL P. was born in Franklin, Ga., near Bold Spring, October 6, 1823, and his parents were Nathan and Nancy (Hunt) Gunnels, natives of Wilkes and Franklin Counties, Ga., respectively. The senior Mr. G. moved to Franklin County at an early day, and there subsequently made his home. He was a planter by occupation, and died in 1870 at Atlanta, at the age of seventy years. He was an officer in the War of 1836, and was a member of the Georgia Constitutional Convention. He was quite a politician in his day, of the Clay and Webster faith, and a man of no little influence in the vicinity where he lived. His children were - Daniel P., Sarah F. (Mrs. J. M. Alexander). Joel D., Nathan C, Mary E. (Mrs. Shephard), Elmira (deceased), and John H. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, receiving an academic education, and in 1845 located at Boiling Springs, in Calhoun County, Ala., where he was several years clerk in a mercantile establishment. He subsequently purchased an interest with his employer, and later on became sole owner of the concern. He came to Oxford in 1854, where he continued in the mercantile business until 1872. It is proper to explain, however, that from 1862 to the close of the war he found it expedient to suspend the mercantile business and was, during that period, in the employ of the Oxford Iron Co. Though the war swept away his fortune in common with the fortunes of other men, he has since succeeded in amply replenishing his exchequer. Since 1872 he has given most of his time to planting.  March, 1857, Mr. Gunnels was married to Miss Susan E. Cunningham, daughter of William N. and Nancy E. (Pratt) Cunningham, natives of South Carolina, and his children are: Nancy E. (Mrs. Warnock), John N. and James N. (twins), Esther L., Elmira P., Henry C. and Willie Francis.  The family are all identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Gunnels is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


HARRIS, JOSEPH W., born November 7, 1839, at Warrenton, Va., is a son of William and Elizabeth (Anderson) Harris, natives, respectively, of Talbot and Warren Counties, Ga. The senior Harris was a farmer until his marriage, when he was elected sheriff of Warren County, which office he held for two years. In January 1846, he located in Talbot County, entered into the merchandise business, and died there in June 1848. He served in the Seminole War. He reared three sons and three daughters, viz: Sarah, William, Joseph, Mary, Martha, and Thomas. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. The grandfather of our subject, Henry Harris, came to Georgia as one of the earliest settlers of that State, about the year 1800. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in the common schools at Fayetteville, and at the age of seventeen began his business career as clerk in a general merchandise store of that town, which position he held six months, after which he spent three years at Montevallo. September 10, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-sixth Alabama, and participated in the first battle of Fort Gibson, the battle of Baker's Creek, siege of Vicksburg, the battle of Missionary Ridge, campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, the battle of Nashville, and the last fight at Bentonville, N. C. In 1863 he was commissioned third lieutenant of the regiment, and at Dalton, in 1864, was promoted to second lieutenant, and shortly after, at Palmetto Station, Ga., was again promoted, to first lieutenant. He was captured at Tupelo, Miss., in December, 1864. After the war he returned to his home and engaged in farming, and in the fall of 1865, accepted a position with the Alabama & Tennessee River Railway, in the capacity of agent, express agent, and telegraph operator. In the fall of 1872, he went to Birmingham, as express agent, thence to Montevallo, in 1873, where he engaged in merchandising, and in 1876 went to South Alabama, and merchandised two years. In December 1881, he came to Cross Plains, as telegraph operator for the East Tennessee Railway, where he has since continued to live. In connection with the railroad business he is running a hotel. In December 1861, Mr. Harris was first married to Martha J. Wilson, daughter of Henry Wilson, of Columbiana, Ala., and has had born to him seven children, three of whom are now living: Rolling, of Talladega; Ernest, clerk and book-keeper, of Burkville, Ala., and May. Mrs Harris died in November 1881, and in February, 1884 Mr. Harris was married to Nannie Jones, of Cave Springs, Ga., and to this union two children were born: Jones and Albert. Mr. Harris is a member of the Baptist Church, and his wife is of the Congregational Methodist Church. He is of the Masonic fraternity and Knights of Pythias. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


HIGGINS, WILLIAM F., is a native of Butts County, Ga., a son of Joseph and Judith W. (Key) Higgins, and was born June 11, 1838. The senior Mr. Higgins came from Edgefield District, S. C, into Georgia, when a boy, there married, and in 1844 settled in Chambers County, Ala. He located at Oxford in 1875, and died in 1880, at the age of sixty-six years. He was a jeweler by trade, but the latter part of his life was devoted to farming. His father, William Higgins was a native of South Carolina, there married a Miss Ashley, and subsequently became one of the early settlers of Georgia.  William F. Higgins was reared and educated at Lafayette, in Chambers County, and while a young man learned the jeweler's trade. He entered the army in 1863, and remained until the close of the war. After the war he resumed the jewelry business; moved into Oxford in 1868, and in 1874, turned his attention entirely to farming. He began life at the close of the war without money, but has succeeded in accumulating a handsome competency. He was married May 29, 1869, to Miss Virginia Dennis, daughter of Sumeral and Mary (Hanchett) Dennis, natives of South Carolina. Mr. Dennis came into Alabama in 1832; removed thence to Tallapoosa County, and died at Dadeville. He was a captain in the Mexican War, and also in the late Confederate Army. Mr. Higgins and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. H. is of the Masonic fraternity. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


HILL, THOMAS CARTER, prominent Physician and Surgeon, son of Thomas H. and Miranda (Gregory) Hill, natives, respectively, of the States of Virginia and North Carolina, was born in Green (now Hale) County, this State, November 14, 1830. After acquiring a thorough preliminary education at some of the leading colleges of the State, he, at the age of nineteen, began the study of medicine, and pursued it successively through medical institutions of learning in New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, graduating from Jefferson Medical College, in the latter city, in 1860. Early in 1861, young Hill enlisted as a private soldier in the Fifth Alabama Regiment, and was in a short time promoted to Assistant-Surgeon. In 1864, after having followed the fortunes of his regiment through its various campaigns, he was transferred to the Valley District of Virginia, as Medical Director, with the rank of a full Surgeon, and remained in that department to the close of the war. Returning to Alabama, at the close of hostilities. Dr. Hill first located at Dayton, Marengo County, in the practice of medicine, and remained there until 1884, at which time he moved into Oxford. Since coming here, he has devoted his time to real estate and other business enterprises, to the exclusion of the profession. As a physician. Dr. Hill stood very high. He was, probably, as well taught in the science of material medica as any man in Alabama. Not satisfied with the most thorough training possible at the finest institutions of learning in America, he, in 1870, studied arduously under the greatest instructors in Europe; and it is to the loss of the profession, that he has withdrawn from the practice. Dr. Hill was married in Marengo County, May, 1870, to Miss Margaret Lee, daughter of Columbus W. and Elizabeth (Parker) Lee, and has had born to him five children: Columbus L., Thomas C, Margaret, Myra C. and Harry. The Hon. Columbus W. Lee, native of Georgia, was many years a member of the Alabama Legislature, and was one of the most prominent men of his day. He was a Pierce and King presidential elector in 1852 and a Douglas elector in 1860. He opposed secession and canvassed the State for Douglas, although he went with his State in her subsequent efforts in behalf of the Southern Confederacy. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1865, and made the race for Congress that same year against Joseph W. Taylor, and was beaten. He was an original speaker and the master of thought and sarcasm. He died in 1868. Thomas H. Hill, father to the subject of this sketch, migrated in early manhood to North Carolina, there married, and in 1812 settled in Green County, Ala., where he became an extensive planter. He reared a family of two sons and three daughters. He died in 1860, at the age of seventy-eight. His father, Joseph Hill, was a native of England, and came to America prior to the Revolution and settled in Culpeper County, Va. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


 HUGHES, ROBERT F., born in Calhoun County, Ala. is a son of John T. and Mary T. (Brown) Hughes, natives of South Carolina. The senior Mr. Hughes came to Alabama in 1832, and settled near Weaver's Station, where he engaged in farming. He represented Calhoun County, in its early history, as a member of the Legislature. He reared three sons and seven daughters, of whom William J. T. died in the war; John W., of Atlanta, served through the war and was in prison at Fort Delaware two years. Mr. Hughes was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and died in 1875, at the age of seventy-four years. His widow, who is still living, moved to Cross Plains. The Hughes family are originally from Ireland. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and received a common-school education. He was engaged in farming up to 1879, when he entered mercantile business, which he has conducted successfully ever since. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


LAIRD, DR. ORVILLE D., born in Columbus, Ga., January 20, 1840, is a son of Dr. Orville P. and Nancy (Dyer) Laird, natives of Oneida County, N. Y. Doctor Laird was reared in New York; received an academic education, and at the age of nineteen years began life as a clerk. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh Ohio Regiment, with which command he served three months, and then joined Company C, One Hundred and Sixteenth New York Infantry. In 1863 he was promoted to the Quartermaster's Department at Nashville, and early in 1865 was commissioned lieutenant of light artillery. He was mustered out in July of the latter year. In 1839 Mr. Laird was graduated as M. D. from Ann Arbor, and after the war practiced in Tennessee, locating at Clinton in 1866. In November 1869, he engaged in the railroading and furnace business. In 1884 he was appointed United States Commissioner for the District Court, Northern District of Alabama, and in 1886 came to Cross Plains. Dr. Laird was married October 25, 1865, to Mary C. Stevens, daughter of Rev. R. M. and Nancy (King) Stevens, natives of Tennessee. They have had born to them three children: Harvey, George Edgar, and James G. The Doctor and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Dr. Orville P. Laird, the father of the subject of this sketch, was a practical dentist. He spent the winters in Georgia, and the summers in New York up to 1857, after which he lived in Ohio and Michigan in order to be more convenient to his business interests. He reared four children, and died at Adrian, Mich., in 1886. The Laird family originally came from Scotland. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


McCLELLEN, ELISHA D., born near Jacksonville, Ala., October 24, 1847, is a son of Samuel D. and Deborah (Price) McClellen, natives of East Tennessee. The senior Mr. McClellen came to Alabama with his parents in 1834, and settled in Talladega County. In 1844 he removed to Calhoun County, where he was engaged in farming, he represented the county in the Legislature one term, and assisted in removing the Indians from the State. He died in December 1887. The McClellens are descendants from Scotland. The Price family came from Ireland.  The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and received an academic education. He worked on a farm until 1868 when he came to Jacksonville, where he was engaged in mercantile business with his father. In 1883 he was engaged in the livery business for a short time, and in January, 1884, came to Cross Plains, started in the millinery business, and subsequently engaged in general merchandising. In 1887 he was running a brick business in connection with farming and merchandising.   In January 1874, Mr. McClellen was first married to Dollie Barron, of Jackson County, and had born to him one child. Mrs. McClellen died in 1878, and in December 1886, Mr. McClellen was married to Sallie Glover, of Cherokee County.   Mr. McClellen is a member of the Baptist Church and is also a prominent Mason. His wife belongs to the Presbyterian Church.   Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


McKLEROY, JOHN MARTIN
John Martin McKleroy, prominent Attorney and Counselor-at-law, Anniston, son of William H. and Martini Gill (Shorter) McKleroy, was born at Eufaula, this State, May 13, 1843. He was graduated from Howard College in 1860, and the following year migrated to Texas. After a few months' service with a Texas frontier company in Indian Territory, he, in May, 1861, enlisted as a private soldier in the Third Texas Cavalry, and with that command served one year in the West. In 1862 he was appointed adjutant of Hilliard's Legion," with the rank of first lieutenant. With the "Legion" he saw service in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia and the Carolinas.
     At the formation of the Tenth Confederate Cavalry, of which Hilliard's command formed a part, McKleroy was elected third lieutenant of Company A. He was afterward made captain of that company, and later on, his superior officers having fallen into the hands of the enemy, commanded the regiment for a time. He was wounded, March 10, 1865, near Fayetteville, N. C. and returned to Eufaula soon after the final surrender.
     Immediately upon reaching home, Captain McKleroy began the study of law, and in November, 1865, he was admitted to the bar. Entering at once upon the practice, he rose rapidly to a conspicuous position in the profession.
     He was elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction in 1874, held the office one term, and declined re-election. In 1876 he was a member of the State Legislature, acquitted himself with distinguished credit, declined re-election, and in 1882 was a formidable candidate for gubernatorial honors. He was chairman of the State Democratic Executive Committee in 1886, and exhibited therein eminent executive ability.
     January, 1887, Captain McKleroy was made president of the Anniston City Land Company, and soon thereafter located in this city.
     He is a director in the Woodstock Iron Company, and in the Anniston & Cincinnati Railway Company besides being financially interested in various other important corporations.
     Captain McKleroy is regarded as one of the very brilliant attorneys of Alabama, and in the management and direction of the Anniston City Land Company has proved himself a financier of far more than ordinary ability. He was married February 28, 1867 to Miss Martha I. Woods, daughter of Clayton R. Woods, of Eufaula, and the two children born to this union are named, respectively, William H. and Hattie H.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


MONK, REV. ALONZO
Rev. Alonzo Monk, D.D., Pastor in charge of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Anniston, son of the Rev. Francis M. and Margaret (Henderson) Monk, natives, respectively, of the States of Georgia and South Carolina, was educated at DeWitt College and Vanderbilt University. In 1872, at Pine Bluff, Ark., he joined Conference, having been on the 12th of October of that year duly licensed to preach. The following three years he was on circuit work, stationed four years in Little Rock, Ark, and four years in Camden. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Kavanagh, and Elder by Bishop Keener, of New Orleans. Coming to Alabama he spent four years at Tuscaloosa, and in December, 1887, came to his present charge. He is now only thirty-four years old. The State University of Alabama conferred upon him the degree of D.D., June 22, 1877. November 14, 1887. He was married to Miss Betty Carl, of Somerville, Tenn., the accomplished daughter of Jacob E. (Cart Wright) Carl, and the four children born to this union are named, respectively, Carl, Era, Alonzo and Marion.
     The senior Mr. Monk was born in 1829, and gave his lifetime to the ministry. He died in Little Rock, Ark., December, 1880. He was considered one of the bright lights of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and was a distinguished Mason. He was chaplain of the Fifty-sixth Alabama Cavalry during the war, and commanded that regiment a short time toward the close of hostilities. He reared a family of six sons and one daughter, viz.: Walter, deceased; Camilla, wife of G. A. Harris (she was first married to W. H. Hagan, of Little Rock): Alonzo, subject of this sketch; Bascom, Methodist Episcopal minister, in Arkansas; Frank, deceased; Harry, a fanner, in Arkansas and Simeon a teacher.
     Simeon Monk was the name of the grandfather of the subject of this sketch. He was born in Alabama in 1792, and died in 1876. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and also in the war with Mexico. He reared a family of three sons and six daughters. The Monks came originally from Scotland.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


MOODY, MARTIN T. was born at Belmont, Sumter County, Ala., November 4, 1845, and is a son of Theophilus and Mary L. (Little) Moody, natives respectively of South Carolina and Georgia. The senior Mr. Moody moved with his parents from South Carolina to Mississippi. In 1831 he came to Alabama and joined the Alabama Conference in 1832 at Tuscaloosa, of which he was one of the original organizers. He lived in Alabama until his death, which occurred at Gadsden, March 13, 1879. His wife died at Gainesville, Ala., in 1854. He reared two sons and two daughters. viz: William R., Martin T. (our subject); Fannie A., wife of Milton Jenkins, Camden, Ala.; and Sarah E., wife of George W. Caldwell, also of Camden. Mr. Moody was one of the pioneer preachers of this State, and was a very popular and well-known man.  The mother of our subject was a daughter of William Little, a leading attorney of Carnesville, Ga. He was a prominent and wealthy citizen, and died about the close of the war.  The subject of this sketch was reared in Alabama and educated principally at Summerfield, Dallas County. In the spring of 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Twenty-eighth Alabama, as a private, and served until health failed. From an attack of brain fever, he lost his hearing and was detailed in the niter mining service as a clerk in which capacity he remained until the close of the war.  At the close of hostilities he returned to Camden, where he served as Clerk of the Probate Court four years, going thence to Selma, and served four years in the Probate Court of that County. In 1873 he came to Cross Plains and engaged in the drug business, which he has continued ever since, with marked success.  September 15, 1869, Mr. Moody was married to Sarah E. Scurry, daughter of Dr. John R. Scurry of Cross Plains. They had born to them seven children, to-wit: Arthur R., May Louise, Anna, Lucy, Ida, Martin T., Jr., and Harry. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


NUNNALLY, REV. G. A.
Rev. G. A. Nunnally. D.D., Pastor of the Twelfth Street Baptist Church, Anniston, is a native of Walton County, Ga., son of William B. and Mary Talbot Nunnally, and was born March 24, 1841.
     The senior Mr. Nunnally, a native of Virginia, migrated to Georgia in 1817. He was a farmer by occupation, and had been a gallant soldier in the War of 1812. He was a son of John Nunnally, also a native Virginian, and who had been a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His wife was the daughter of Edmond Talbot, also of Virginia. The Talbots likewise moved into Georgia at an early day.
     The subject of this sketch graduated from the University of Georgia in 1859, and soon thereafter was elected to a professorship in the Female College at Hamilton, that State. He was subsequently, and for many years, principal of Johnson Institute, at Monroe, Ga. During the war he was quartermaster, with headquarters at Rome, and in 1865 he entered the ministry. In connection with the discharge of his duties as minister he was teaching until 1876. At that time he accepted the pastorate of the church at Rome, and since that date has devoted his entire time to the ministry. In 1885 he received a call to Eufaula, Ala., where he remained two years, and had the satisfaction of seeing the congregation over which he presided greatly augmented by the addition of many new converts to the cause of the Master. In July 1887, he came to Anniston, in response to the urgent call of a newly organized church. Here his efforts have been amply rewarded, and he is held in the highest esteem, not alone by the members of his congregation, but by all who know him.
     Dr. Nunnally is a profound scholar, and a man of fine literary tastes. Since he was sixteen years of age he has been connected variously with different publications. He was for some time editor of the Christian Index, a denominational paper, published at Atlanta, Ga., and is still indirectly connected with it. He is devoted to the cause of temperance, and has been for many years prominently identified with that movement. While in Georgia he was one of the prime movers of the temperance legislation that has since brought that State so conspicuously before the eyes of the world as a stronghold of prohibition.
     November, 1859, Dr. Nunnally was married to Miss Mary Briscoe, the accomplished daughter of Ralph and Sarah (Dougherty) Briscoe, of Georgia, and his children are named, respectively, Alonzo H.. William J., Lucius M., Sarah and Kate.  
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


ROBERTS, Rev. GEORGE WASHINGTON
Rev. George Washington Roberts is one of the prominent men and pioneer ministers of Bosque county [Texas] , arriving here in October, 1867, and now makes his home at Iredell.
        He was born in Gwinnett county, Georgia, about thirty miles from Atlanta, on the 28th of January, 1833. His father, Step Roberts, was a native of North Carolina, and a son of William Roberts, who was of Welsh descent and served in the Revolutionary war. On reaching man's estate the father of our subject was united in marriage with Parnella Burgess, who was born in North Carolina and was a daughter of John Burgess, whose father was an officer in the Revolution. The Burgess family also had representatives in the war of 1812, the Mexican war and the civil war. In 1836 Step Roberts, accompanied by his family, removed to Calhoun county, Alabama, where both parents died, the father at the age of eighty-two and the mother at the age of sixty-nine years. The household included ten children, five sons and five daughters, namely: Martha, William, John, David, Mary, George W., Step M., Sarah, Virginia and Nancy. The father was a planter, and in political sentiment was an unswerving Democrat, to which party his children also adhered.
        Our subject early became familiar with farm work in all its departments, and acquired a fair education in the public schools, and by study at home. He was a close student of the Bible and in 1862 was ordained a minister of the Baptist church. He has ever been an active and zealous worker in the vineyard of the Master and in Alabama had charge of congregations at Harmony Grove, Providence, and Shoal Creek.
        In 1867 Mr. Roberts, with his family came to Texas, making the journey with a wagon and buggy drawn by five mules. They left Georgia on the 10th of October, and on the 8th of December they arrived at their destinations, which was on the Brazos river six miles south of Kimball. In August of the following year Mr. Roberts purchased land in Bosque county south of Iredell, and there built up a good farm of four hundred and fifteen acres, comprising one of the valuable places of the county. Upon the place he erected a comfortable dwelling, substantial barn and other outbuildings, and the water was supplied from an ever flowing well. There he lived until 1894, when he removed to Iredell, where he built a pleasant residence.
        In Calhoun county, Alabama, in January, 1853, Mr. Roberts married Miss Susan Jane Walker, a daughter of William Walker, a Virginian by birth, whose father was of Irish extraction and a Revolutionary soldier. Eight children were born of this union, three of whom died in early life in Alabama; and George W. died in his twenty-first year, while attending college and Waco. Those living are Mrs. J. N. McDaniels, of Hamilton county, Texas; Mrs. Susan P. Welch, of the same county; Robert Lee, of Hamilton county; and Ida B., wife of J. P. Williamson, of Iredell. The mother of these children passed away in 1885, and the following year Mr. Roberts wedded Miss F. M. Brennan, who was born in Alabama and is the daughter of James W. and Depsy (Thompson) Brennan, both natives of South Carolina. To her parents were born the following children: Martha, Jane, Luella, Ann, F. M., wife of our subject, May E., Carolina J., Rebecca E., J. A. and J. W.
        In October, 1868, Mr. Roberts organized a Baptist church two miles north of Iredell, with twelve members, but this grew until it had a membership of one hundred and fifty. In November, of 1868, the Baptist churches of Erath, Bosque, Hood and Comanche counties held a convention at which twenty delegates were present. At that time the Indians were so troublesome that a man had to stand guard to keep them from stealing the horses, and the preachers all wore fire-arms strapped to their waists. The Baptist church at Iredell was organized in 1881 with little over thirty members. It grew and prospered until 1894, when there arose a difference of opinion in the congregation on a doctrinal point, which was brought about by the call of Rev. Joseph Lockhart as pastor, who propagated doctrines known as Martinism. This resulted in a division of the congregation, and in July, 1895, the second Baptist church was organized, with Rev. J. H. Johnson, as pastor.
        In all the walks of life, Mr. Roberts has taken as his guide the precepts of the scriptures, and has been foremost in every movement for the religious advancement of the community. Of him it may be well said that he is in “soul sincere, in action faithful, and in honor clear.”
Source: History of Texas, Central Texas, Vol I, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1896 - Transcribed by Debbie Gibson


RUSSELL, REV. GEORGE BRYANT, was born in Cherokee County, Ala., May 11, 1846, and is a son of Rev. Samuel R (born in Virginia, January 22, 1801) and Nancy Ann (Gamble) Russell, native of East Tennessee.
     The senior Mr. Russell was a minister in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He came to Alabama in 1832, and settled near Jacksonville. He reared eight sons and two daughters: James E., Robert A., Samuel L., John G., William C, George B., Andrew B., Marcus M., Elizabeth A. and Mary J. Of the sons the following served in the war: James E., Samuel L. (lieutenant and chaplain), John G. (orderly sergeant, was killed at Chickamauga), and William C. (was killed at Shiloh). The senior Mr. Russell died September 30, 1876, at the age of seventy-five years: his wife died at the close of the war at the age of sixty-two years. The Russell family were of Scotch-Irish parentage, and the Gamble family came originally from Ireland.
     George Bryant Russell was reared on a farm; attended the common schools of the neighborhood, and was graduated at Galesville, Ala., in 1873. He subsequently spent two years at Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., and in 1874 began teaching. In 1877 he migrated to Cross Plains, where he was occupied teaching and farming until 1881, when he moved to Jacksonville and taught one year as Assistant Principal of Calhoun College. On his return to Cross Plains he took charge of the Cross Plains Educational Institute, which was soon afterwards chartered. Mr. Russell having received his license to preach September 10, 1870, and being ordained September 22, 1873, is now a preacher in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He has represented his Presbytery in the General Assembly several times; has served Calhoun County as Superintendent of Education twelve years, and is at present second Vice-President of the Alabama Educational Association. Mr. Russell was married September 23, 1873, to Sarah A. Hampton, daughter of John Hampton, of Cherokee County, Ala. They have had born to them three children, namely: Samuel Hampton, deceased, John Floyd and James Gordon. Mr. Russell is a member of the Masonic fraternity and Knights of Honor. He has ever been a temperance worker; was elected by the County Temperance Convention in 1880 to the State Convention, and was of Committee on Resolutions in that convention. He was elected President of the County Temperance Convention at Anniston in 1886. Our subject bears the reputation of being one of the best educators in the State.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


SAVAGE, ROBERT R., Judge of the Probate Court of Cherokee County, was born in Union District, S. C, September 23, 1831, and at the common schools of his native place acquired a fair education. He was married February 24, 1852, to Miss Louisa J. Geer, daughter of Willis and Cynthia E. (Hall) Geer, of Cherokee County, and from that date until 1869 was here engaged in farming. In the latter named year he was elected Tax Collector, held that office two terms, and in 1880 was elected Probate Judge, a position he has continued to hold, having been re-elected in 1886. February 1862, Judge Savage enlisted in Company E, Forty-seventh Alabama Regiment, and was elected first lieutenant. He resigned at the end of nine months, returned home, and soon afterward joined General Wheeler's escort, and remained in the service until the close of the war. Judge Savage is one of the substantial citizens of Cherokee County. He has reared a family of six children. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. James P. Savage, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in South Carolina, and in 1848 settled at the town of Goshen, Cherokee County, Ala.; from there in 1873 he moved to Cross Plains, Calhoun County, where he died in 1874. He reared a family of nine sons and three daughters. His father, James Savage, was a native of Pennsylvania, and his grandfather came from Europe. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


SHARP, CLAIBORNE A. was born in Iredell County, N. C. January 12, 1848, and is a son of Claiborne I. and Courtney A. (Johnson) Sharp, natives of the same county. The father of our subject was a farmer and stock-raiser; came to Alabama in 1854, and settled on a farm near Cross Plains, where he remained until 1868, when he entered into mercantile business. He reared five sons and six daughters, of whom are now living four sons and two daughters. Three of the four sons now living served in the late war. Our subject's grandfather was a farmer of North Carolina, and was of Scotch origin. He served in the War of 1812, and died in his native State. The maternal grandfather was also a farmer of North Carolina, and of English ancestry. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and received a common school education. He enlisted in Company G, Third Alabama Cavalry, and in the fall of 1864 was in Wheeler's command. After the war he farmed until 1880, when he engaged in the livery business for one year, after which he purchased a half interest in his father's store. He is still in the merchandise business, and is very successful. Mr. Sharp was married in December 1869 to Miss Julia F. daughter of John Chancellor, of Cherokee County, this State. To this union have been born six children: Charles C, Oliver W, Mary G., Claude, Nellie D., and Annie H. Mr. Sharp and family are members of the Baptist Church.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


 SMITH, JOHN F. is a native of Cleburne County, where he was born December 15, 1839, and is a son of John and Sarah Ann (Lambert) Smith. The senior Mr. Smith immigrated to Alabama from Georgia in 1833, and moved from Cleburne County to a point on the Tallapoosa River, south of Edwardsville in 1851, and there died in 1853, at the age of forty-two years. He reared two sons: the subject of this sketch and Samuel H.   John F. Smith was reared on a farm; was educated at the common schools, and at the age of eighteen accepted a clerkship in a store. In 1858 he went to Wetumpka, and from there the year following to Talladega, where he engaged in business in partnership with J. B. Gay. This partnership lasted but a short time, when he sold out and resumed employment as a clerk.   In 1861 Mr. Smith enlisted as a private in Company H, Tenth Alabama, and remained in the service until the close of the war. Soon after the battle of Dranesville he was promoted to third lieutenant, and when he left the service he held the rank of first lieutenant, and had been for some time in command of his company. From first to last he participated in many of the hardest-fought battles of the war, and was wounded three times. Returning from the war, he located at Selma, and from there, in 1866, came to Oxford, where he has since made his home. In 1869 he moved upon his farm, at Boiling Springs, and from that date has given most of his time to agriculture. He was married in 1869, to Miss Augusta G. Caver, daughter of Thomas J. and Eliza (Davis) Caver, and has had born to him four children: Kate E., Nannie Gay, Carrie Lee and Thomas F.   Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


SNOW, CLARKE, Merchant, Oxford, was born at this place July 5, 1846, and is a son of Dudley and Priscilla (Munger) Snow. He was reared on the farm, and at Howard College and the schools of Talladega acquired a fair English education. At the age of twenty-one years, at Selma, he accepted a situation in a mercantile establishment, remained there one year, returned to Oxford, and with C. Snow & Co. embarked in the grocery business. In 1870 he formed a partnership with C. J. Cooper in mercantile business, and from 1871 to 1874 devoted his time to farming. In the latter year, associated with James Stewart, under the style and firm name of James Stewart & Co., he engaged in the leather and carriage business. This firm was dissolved in December, 1882, since which time Mr. Snow has conducted the business alone, and has been thereat quite successful. In addition to his mercantile business he is largely interested in various other enterprises.  In the fall of 1863, Mr. Snow entered the Fifty-first Alabama Cavalry, and, though not an enlisted soldier, he participated with that command in the battles of Maryville, Rockford, and Knoxville. In May, 1864, he regularly enlisted, and thereafter took part in the battles of New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Rome, and the battles around Atlanta. At Decatur, Ala., he was wounded, and at Salt Creek participated in his last engagement. He was married, November 26, 1868, to Miss Roxy C. Elston, of Davisville, and the children born to this union are: Corinne, Ada, Ruth, Maxie, Norman, and Mary.
     Dudley Snow was born in Graceland County, Va., December 25, 1803, and his parents, John and Elizabeth (Hale) Snow, migrated to North Carolina in 1812. From there they moved to Tennessee in 1832, and from Tennessee Dudley Snow moved to Oxford, where he died in 1863.  The Snow family came originally from England, and the Mungers from Germany. 
     Henry Snow, a brother of Clarke, entered the Confederate Army from Texas, as a private in the First Texas Infantry. At the re-organization of this regiment, in 1862, he was made first lieutenant, and he participated in all the battles of Northern Virginia, and at the Seven Days' Fight around Richmond was seriously wounded. 
  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


TATE, AUGUSTUS WALTER, educator, was born February 2, 1861, at Arbadioochee, Cleburne County; son of Thomas James and Martha Susan (Watson) Tate, the former born near Jacksonville, Calhoun County, who lived at Arbachoochee; served in the C. S. Army, in Lee's army in Virginia, Longstreet's corps. Hood's division, under Capt. Denman, Forty-fourth Alabama regiment, was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness and again in May,1864, and surrendered at Appomattox Court House, 1865; grandson of Cooper Bennett and Nancy (White) Tate, who lived at Carnesville, Ga., the latter living in Calhoun County, before her marriage, and of John B. and Mary (Furlow) Watson, who came from Milledgeville, Ga., to Alabama in 1844. The Tate's descended from Anglo-Saxon stock; the great-great-grandfather Tate came from England with his brother before the Revolutionary War, ran away from home when he was fourteen years of age, and joined the revolutionists at Green Mountain. The great-great-grandfather Watson came from Holland before the Revolution and settled in Carolina. Mr. Tate's early education was obtained in the rural schools. For his professional education, he studied systems and methods of some of the old European countries, and formulated his own methods. He taught in the rural schools in 1880, attended the State normal college at Florence, 1881-1885, and was graduated in the latter year. After his graduation, he resumed teaching. He founded the Baptist collegiate institute at Newton in 1898, beginning in a two-room building with twenty-six pupils, and remained principal of the school for many years. He is a Democrat and a Baptist Married: (1) to Katherine Barnes, daughter of Willam H. Barnes, a. paper manufacturer at Detroit. Mich.; (2) to Florence Victoria Stanford, daughter of James Polk and Elizabeth Ellen (Bolin) Stanford, who lived at Crews, Lamar County; granddaughter of James Stanford and great-grand-daughter of William Stanford, who emigrated from Ireland to Georgia, and whose ancestors on her mother's side were descendants of the Ann Bolin family and settled In North Carolina before the Revolutionary War. Children, by first marriage: 1. Thomas Barnes, d. in infancy; by second marriage; 2. Katherine Belle, 3. Nellie Claire; 4. Augusta Mae; 5. Lygla Lee; 6. Mary Ellen; 7. Ouida Maude, deceased; 8. Augustus Walter, jr.. deceased; 9. Annie Florence, deceased; 10. Samuel Franklin; 11. Alfred William. Residence: Newton.  Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol IV, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney


TATUNS, JOHN W. was born in Calhoun County, Ala., in 1835, came into Cherokee County in 1868, and in January of that year married the widow of M. J. Alexander, a daughter of Dr. William and Rebecca W. (Parker) McElrath. Mr. McElrath was born in Spartanburg District and his wife in Tennessee. The Doctor graduated in medicine from the Cincinnati Medical College, and in 1836 located in Coosa County, Ala. In 1839 he came into Cherokee County, and settled within three miles of Centre, where he practiced medicine until 1837. In that year, his wife's health having become impaired, he gave up his practice and turned his attention to farming.   The Doctor was a public-spirited man, noted for his charity, and for his interest in the general good of his neighborhood, he died in 1885 at the age of eighty-seven years, leaving a large estate. His wife had died the year before. His father was a native of Ireland.   John W. Tatuns at his death, in 1884, left three children: Samuel C, Leonora I., and Westly S. He was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a highly respected citizen.   Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


 THOMASON, ROBERT P., Merchant and Banker, Oxford, was born in Harris County, Ga., December 21, 1851, and is the son of John Thomason, a planter, who came to Alabama in 1853, lived in Tallapoosa County till 1868, and removed thence to Elmore County, where he now resides.
     The subject of this sketch spent the first seventeen years of his life on his father's plantation in Tallapoosa County, and by dint of perseverance and application to study, without the aid of professional instruction, acquired something like an elementary education. He began life for himself as a salesman, at the age of seventeen years, and at the age of twenty-one embarked in business.  From 1879 to 1883, he "drummed" for a New York grocery house, and in the latter year established the wholesale grocery business over which he now presides at Oxford.  This was the first jobbing concern opened up in this part of the State, and from a limited affair, with a capital of $10,000, it has grown until its trade roaches throughout Northeastern Alabama and into Georgia, and now employs a capital of $100,000. The style of the company at present is C. J. Cooper & Co.  In addition to his mercantile business, Mr. Thomason is largely interested in real estate at Oxford and Anniston, and in the banking house recently established in connection with his grocery concern.  Remembering the fact that young Thomason came to Oxford penniless, the preceding details need no comment at our hands to elaborate his success as a business man.  Mr. Thomason in July l875, at Talladega, married Miss Mary Scott, the accomplished daughter of Wm. Scott, Esq.
     The senior Mr. Thomason was a gallant Confederate soldier during the late war: his father served through the war with Mexico, and his grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. His great-grandfather, Cooper Thomason, came from Scotland prior to the War for Independence, and settled in Virginia, where he lived to the remarkable age of 104 years. Old Cooper Thomason had eight or nine sons in the Colonial Army during the Revolution. It might be remarked that the war record of the Thomasons is also a matter that needs no elaboration at the hands of the writer. They all appear to have been well-to-do planters.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


VANDIVER, JEDU WELLINGTON
 (From Volume 4, History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, by Thomas M. Owen.)
Lawyer, editor, lecturer, Mr. Vandiver was born September 17, 1850, at Alexandria, Calhoun County; son of John Harrington and Mary Eliza Emma (McAfee) Vandiver, the former who was born in Spartanburg District, S. C., practiced medicine, was selected as electoral messenger for the state of South Carolina in 1848, engaged in the drug business, removed from South Carolina to Alabama, settled in Alexandria, and in 1857 settled in Talladega; grandson of John and Winnie (Cannon) Vandiver, who lived in Spartanburg District, S. C., and of Judge Green Taliaferro and Charlsie Ann (Hall) McAfee; great-grandson of John and Elizabeth (Llemastre) Vandiver, who removed from Pennsylvania to Surrey County, N. C., and in 1791, to Spartanburg, S. C.; great-great-grandson of John Vandiver; Great-great-great-grandson of  William Van Der Wer, who was the ancestor of the South Carolina and West Virginia Vandivers. The immediate ancestors of the Van der Veers, or Van de Wers, the name later being changed to Vandiver, came from the north Netherlands, and reached New York in 1653. Some settled in the Mohawk valley, others went down the Delaware, and in 1655 Jacob Van de Wer, the progenitor of the family in America, served as sergeant in the army of Peter Stuyvesant, and assisted in the capture of Fort Christina, Wilmington, Del. Adam Vandiver, of Tallulah Falls, Ga., was a veteran of the Indian battle of Talladega. Mr. Vandiver received his education in the schools of Talladega, was a member of a boy company named the Invincibles in 1863, and served as water carrier for a short time; studied law in the offices of Bradford and Martin of Talladega, in 1872 was admitted to the bar, and in 1868 was clerk of the senate judiciary committee. In 1873 he removed to Galesville, Tex., where he edited the Sun; returned to Alabama, and was county solicitor for St. Clair County, 1875; was elected circuit solicitor of the tenth circuit, 1876; was register in chancery for Talladega County, 1886-1910; was president of the Alabama Chautauqua, 1889-1910. He returned to Texas, where he founded The Gadsden News, which was afterwards consolidated with The Times, under the name of the Times-News, where he remained from 1881-82; was mayor of Talladega, 1901-07; mayor and president of the city board of Commissioners, 1913-20, He has written many articles for the Montgomery Advertiser, and for the Age Herald, notable among which are "Sunshine in Alabama," and "Yarns of the Court House Gang." He has also written short articles for Puck, Judge, Life, and the Black Cat magazine. He is a Democrat, Methodist, and Knight of Pythias. Married: June 4, 1878, at Gadsden, to Florence Alveretta Cunningham, daughter of Joseph L. and Elizabeth (Wharton) Cunningham, who lived at Gadsden, the former who was state senator from Cherokee, St. Clair, and Etowah Counties, in 1878-79, was a lawyer, served first as captain and later as major on the staff of Gen. Tracey, Wheeler's cavalry, C. S. Army, the latter who was a member of the Wharton family of Etowah County. Children: 1) Almuth Cunningham, who graduated B.S., in 1898, from the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, and B. L., from the New York University, 1904, served as district attorney under William Travers Jerome, 1906-08, was law partner of Gov. Whitman of New York, 1909-10, and of U. S. Senator O'Gorman, of New York, 1914-19, was judge advocate under Gen. Crowder with rank of major, 1918-19, m. Eleanor Williams, residence, New York, N. Y.; 2) Annabel, m. Howard L. Smith, who is assistant attorney for the "Katy" railroad system, for the state of Oklahoma, residence, Muskogee, Okla.; 30 William Reeves, manager of the storage warehouse, New York, m. Elaine Casey, resident, New York. Residence: Talladega. Source: The Alabama Historical Quarterly; State Department of Archives and History; Vol.16, Spring Issued (1954); transcribed by Vicki Bryan


VANDIVER, JOHN HARRINGTON
John Harrington Vandiver, M.D. is a descendant of John Vandiver, a Pennsylvania planter, who migrated to South Carolina prior to the American Revolution, and there married into the Cannon family, of Carolina, one of the largest and staunchest families of that State, The ancestors of both families were of Welch descent.
     John Harrington Vandiver, M.D., was born in Spartanburg District. S. C, January 17, 1815. He was reared on a farm, received a common- school education, and, when nearing manhood, began the study of medicine in the city of Spartanburg, S. C.
     In 1844 he was selected by the Electoral College of South Carolina as the messenger to carry the presidential vote of that State to Washington, and immediately thereafter he entered Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, from which institution he graduated in March, 1845.
     In the autumn of that year he located in Calhoun County, Ala., where he practiced his profession twelve years, removing to the city of Talladega in 1857.
     In 1847 he was married to Mary Eliza Emma McAfee, daughter of Hon. Green Taliaferro McAfee, the first County Judge of Talladega County, and one of the earliest and most prominent settlers in this city.
     In 1858, in addition to his professional duties, Dr. Vandiver engaged in the drug business at Talladega, which he has continued uninterruptedly for thirty years.
      He is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, a Royal Arch Mason of forty years standing, and a conservative man in all things. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WEST, REV. SAMUEL P.
Rev. Samuel P. West, Pastor of the Glen Addie Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Anniston, was born at Montevallo, Shelby County, this State, October 30, 1858, and is a son of John P. and Mariah (Mills) West. He received his education at the schools of his native county, and afterward taught for a period of two years. He was licensed to preach in November, 1881, and assigned as his first charge to Cullman. From Cullman he was sent to St. Clair County, where he remained two years. He was ordained Deacon in November, 1883, and Elder in the fall of 1885. In the autumn of 1884, he was assigned to Talladega, remained there three years, and in December, 1887, came to his present charge.
     Mr. West is a successful and popular minister of the gospel. All the churches that have been under his charge have prospered. He was married July 5, 1886, to Miss Ava Cowen, the accomplished daughter of Elijah and Ruth Cowen of Talladega. He is a member of both the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities.
     The senior Mr. West, now a farmer in Shelby County, entered the Confederate Army at the out-break of the late war as captain of a company; was soon afterward promoted to the rank of colonel, and assigned to the Tenth Alabama Cavalry. He commanded that regiment four years. Prior to the war he had served his county as sheriff, and had represented it in the lower house of the Legislature. His father, Joshua West, migrated from Rockingham County, Va. to East Tennessee at an early day, and in 1816, came from the latter place to Shelby County, He was a physician and a minister of the gospel.
     The Wests came originally from England. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


 WHITESIDE, WILLIAM W., prominent Attorney-at-law, Oxford, is a native of what is now Calhoun County, this State, where he was born February 13, 1858. His early life was spent on his father's plantation and in attendance at the old-field school, completing his education, however, at Oxford College, from which institution he was graduated in 1879. Prior to his graduation he taught school and, in the meantime, read law. He completed his law studies at Cumberland University, Tenn. in 1881, and located immediately in the practice at Oxford, where he has since remained. In the practice of his profession he has met with much success, and, though a young man, he is at this time regarded as one of the brightest lights at the Calhoun Bar. In 1881 he was elected to the lower house of the Legislature, and in that body took a conspicuous part, acquitting himself with much credit and to the entire satisfaction of his constituency.  Mr. Whiteside was married at Alexandria, December, 1884, to Miss Alice Cooper, the accomplished daughter of W. P. Cooper, Esq., and has had born to him two children: William Cooper and Kenneth Whittington. Mr. Whiteside and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is identified with the order of the Knights of Honor and the Masonic fraternity.
     Josiah W. Whiteside, the father of the subject of this sketch, was a native of North Carolina, and came with his parents in 1837 to Alabama: his wife was Elizabeth J. Small, a native of McMinn County, Tenn. She died in 1873, leaving four children, viz: Lizzie, James M, Joseph, and William W.   His second wife, Amanda Little, of Calhoun County, to whom he was married in the fall of 1875, is the mother of one child: Worth.  
     The Whiteside family are probably of English origin, and came into North Carolina at a very early date in the history of our country. John Whiteside, the grandfather to the subject of this sketch, was a native of North Carolina, and his wife was a Miss Hemphill; they reared a family of six sons and two daughters: J. W. Leander, Adolphus, Thomas, William J., James M., Mary, and Ellen. Mary married Dr. S. C. Williams; she and her husband are both dead.  William W. Whiteside's grandfather, Matthew Small, was a Cumberland Presbyterian minister. He married a Miss Buchanan, at McMinn, Tenn., and settled in Alabama about 1835. In 1845 he moved into De Kalb County, and in 1875 located at Sulphur Springs. He died in 1883. He reared a family of four sons and two daughters. His sons were all soldiers in the Confederate Army. The Small family came originally from Scotland.   Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WILLIAMS, ABNER,  Merchant, Oxford, was born in Jefferson County, this State, November 21, 1824, and his parents were Jordan and Edna (Atkins) Williams. He was reared on his father's farm, attended the old-field schools, and in 1844 began life as a school teacher. The year following he accepted a clerkship in a store at Talladega, for which service he received, at the beginning, five dollars per month. He remained with that concern three years, another firm three years, another one year, and for his last year's labor received $375. In 1853, at Curry's Station, he began business for himself, and in 1855 removed to Selma, where he was engaged in cotton business until 1862. At the close of the war he returned to Selma from Talladega County, resumed his old business, and was there until 1884. In August of that year he came to Oxford and engaged in the millinery business.  December 23, 1852, Mr. Williams was married to Agatha A. Heacock, daughter of Dr. Joseph D. and Rachel M. (Garner) Heacock, of Talladega County; and of the six children born to them we have the following data: Curry E., Emma R. (widow of H. A. Singleton), Mollie E. (wife of Dr. B. D. Williams, of Utah Territory), Joseph, Albert. Abner J. P., and Lillie B.
     Jordan Williams was born in South Carolina, August 31, 1794; served through the war of 1812 as a member of the Eighth United States Infantry; married Edna Atkins in Abbeville district, South Carolina, May 5, 1816; settled near Elyton, Jefferson County, Ala., in 1818; from there moved to a farm near Trussville, and subsequently, or about March 1, 1833, settled in Talladega County, he was stricken with paralysis while preaching to the Confederate conscript soldiers at Talladega, September, 1862, and died near Tallasahatchie Baptist Church, fifteen miles south of Talladega, November 24, 1862. He was a farmer, and a minister of the Baptist Church.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WILSON, WILLIAM A., Postmaster at Cross Plains, was born in Campbell County, Ga., October 24, 1832, and is a son of Craven and Lucinda (Langston) Wilson. The senior Mr. Wilson was a native of Virginia, from which State he removed into North Carolina, thence to Hall County, Ga. In December, 1832, he migrated to Alabama and located about four miles east of Cross Plains. He was a farmer, and at his death, which occurred in 1875, he was the possessor of about 1,200 acres of land. He reared five sons and two daughters, to-wit: William A. (the subject of our sketch), John J,, Daniel S. (deceased), Jerry C, Benjamin C. (who died in his youth), Nancy E. (deceased), and Mary Ann Croft (deceased). All of the sons served in the war between the States. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson were communicants of the Episcopal Church. The Langston family were of German descent.
     The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, received a common school education, and at the age of twenty-one years began life on his own account. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army as a member of Company E, First Alabama Cavalry, and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and all the principal fights from Chattanooga to Bentonville, N. C. Company F was detached from the First Alabama after the Kentucky campaign and assigned to General Wheeler's command. Mr. Wilson was captured at Bentonville, N. C, and imprisoned at Point Lookout until July 2, 1865, when he was released. He immediately returned home and resumed farming. He was appointed postmaster at Cross Plains in November, 1883, which position he is now filling. Mr. Wilson was married in December 1857, to Martha M. Harris, daughter of Warren and Mary (Statum) Harris, of this county. She is noted as being the first white female child born in this county. Mr. Wilson and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a Mason. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

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