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JOHNSTON, WILLIAM FRANCIS
William Francis Johnston, Attorney-at-law, was born in Pickens County, this State, July 10, 1853, and is a son of Robert T. and Mildred C. (Terry) Johnston, natives of South Carolina.
    He was reared and educated in his native county, and was admitted to the bar in 1873. In November of that year he was elected County Solicitor of Pickens; held the office one term, and in 1887 came to Anniston, where he formed a partnership with John M. Caldwell.
     Mr. Johnston is considered a brilliant lawyer, and one of Anniston's most enterprising and popular citizens. He was married October 13, 1880, to Miss Elizabeth B. Weir, the accomplished daughter of Gen. Andrew Weir, of Pickens County, and the names of the children born to this union are William Frank, Walter Weir and Edith A. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston are members of the Presbyterian Church.
     The senior Mr. Johnston, a lawyer by profession, came with his parents to this State in 1818. He was graduated from Danville (Ky.) College in 1837, and subsequently received the degree of A. M. from the Alabama University. He located in Pickens County, in the practice of the law, and there spent the rest of his life. In 1841 he edited the Pickens Register. He was twice a member of the Legislature, the last time while the capital was at Tuscaloosa. From 1858 to 1861 he was in charge of Pickensville Female Institute, and from 1861 to 1864 was in the employ of the Government as Tax Assessor, and was a colonel in the militia. From the close of the war until 1868 he had charge of the Pickensville Institute, and from 1868 to 1870 was in charge of a school at Mayfield, Ky. In the latter year he returned to Pickens County and resumed the practice of law. He died in February, 1877, at the age of sixty years.
     Of the five sons and three daughters reared by Col. R. T. Johnston, we have the following brief data: John D. (deceased) was a physician and soldier in an Alabama regiment during the late war; Robert T. J. (deceased) was captain of Company I, Seventh Alabama Cavalry. He studied law after the war; was an O'Connor Elector in 1873, and died at Mayfield, Ky., in 1874; Job C, now an attorney-at-law in Pickens County, was also a member of the Seventh Alabama; William F., the subject of this sketch, and Samuel T., a farmer in Texas.
     David Johnston, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Scotland; came to America in 1790, and was a planter in South Carolina. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


CALDWELL, JOHN M.
John M. Caldwell, Attorney and Counselor-at-law, Anniston, son of John H. Caldwell, Esq., was born at Jacksonville, this State, July 6, 1851. He was educated at the schools of his native town, and from the age of seventeen to nineteen years gave his time to teaching. He studied law under his father, and in February, 1873, was admitted to the bar. He came to Anniston in 1883, and was the first City Attorney authorized by this corporation. He is the present representative of Calhoun County in the Legislature. Though a young man, Mr. Caldwell is recognized as one of the foremost, if not the leading lawyer of Calhoun County. He was married in November, 1881, to Miss Carrie L. Randall, the accomplished daughter of Mr. E. O. Randall, of Gadsden, and has had born to him two children: Mary J. and Edith.
     In the Legislature Mr. Caldwell takes a conspicuous and active part and performs much arduous duty. He is chairman of the Committee on Corporations, and a member of the Committees on Judiciary and on Public Roads and Highways. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of the Masonic fraternity. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WILLETT, JOSEPH J.
Joseph J. Willett, Attorney-at-law, Anniston, is a native of Carrolton, Pickens County, this State, where he was born September 29, 1861, and is a son of Elbert D. and Candace (Bostick) Willett. He is a graduate of the State University, and received from that institution the degree of A. M., in 1880. He was admitted to the bar in 1882, and in 1883 located at Anniston, where he is recognized as one of the brightest young attorneys of the Calhoun bar.
     The senior Mr. Willett is a native of Tennessee, and a graduate of Emory and Henry College, Virginia. He came into Alabama in 1854. located at Carrolton, in the practice of law, and there, with the exception of the time spent in the army, has continuously remained. During the War he was major of the Fortieth Alabama. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1875, and of the Legislature, session of 1878-9. He is the father of five sons: Frank, Elbert, Joseph, George, and Archibald. His father was named Joseph Willett, also a native of Tennessee, and his grandfather was Zadok Willett, a native of Maryland. Zadok Willett was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and helped to fight the battle of King's Mountain under General Sevier. His father was also named Zadok, whose grandfather came from England with Lord Baltimore. The Bosticks came from England, and settled in South Carolina in the colonial days, and many of them have been prominent in various Southern States, in politics and at the bar. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


MAC DONALD, GORDON
Gordon Mac Donald, Attorney-at-law. Anniston, son of Dr. Alfred and Olivia (Cooper) MacDonald, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and Pennsylvania, was born at Mount Meigs, Montgomery County, this State, October 16, 1853. He received his primary education at home under private instructors. At the age of eighteen, in the office of Fitzpatrick, Williamson & Goldthwaite, he began the study of law at Montgomery, and in April, 1874, was admitted to the bar. He practiced his profession in Montgomery until April, 1887, when he located at Anniston, and formed a partnership with Howard Williams, Esq. In April, 1887, he was married to Miss Belle Cary, of Richmond, Va. She is the accomplished daughter of the late gallant Capt. G. A. Cary, of Virginia. To this union has been born one child, Olivia.
     Mr. and Mrs. MacDonald are communicants of the Episcopal Church.
     Dr. Alfred MacDonald was educated in Philadelphia, came to Alabama in 1840, and in 1855 was killed by one of his slaves. It appears that the negro had applied to the Doctor for permission to visit his, the negro's wife, and having been refused, he attacked the Doctor with a rail and killed him. The negro was burned to death for the crime. Of the doctor's three sons, Alfred was killed during the war, Robert T. is chief engineer of the Mexican National Railway, and Gordon forms the caption of this sketch. His only daughter, Louisa, is now the wife of Dr. Hallonquist. Dr. MacDonald's grandfather was born in Scotland, and came to this country with Alfred MacDonald's father after the Scotch rebellion in 1745.
     The Doctor's wife was a descendant of the celebrated tragedian. Thomas Cooper. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


VAN SYCKEL, N. DUNHAM
N. Dunham Van Syckel, principal of the Noble Institute for Boys, Anniston, was born at Bound Brook, N. J., October 30, 1861. He is a graduate of Rutgers (N.J.) College, and an experienced educator. After leaving college, he taught some time on Long Island, and was subsequently employed by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. In 188l,his health being somewhat impaired, he removed to Southwestern Virginia. In 1885 he came to Alabama, and at Birmingham was made principal of Paul Hayne Grammar School. He remained in that position one year, when he was promoted to principal of the Birmingham High School. This position he resigned in 1887 to accept the principalship of the Noble Institute.
     It is not the province of this work to state conclusions in writing of current men, but it is only justice to say in this connection that Prof. Van Syckel meets in an eminent degree, as professional educator, the highest expectations of his patrons.
      The Professor is a son of Elbridge and Bethany (Dunham) Van Syckel, natives of New Jersey. Elbridge Van Syckel was a son of Daniel Van Syckel, and in his day was a wealthy merchant of New York City. Daniel was a son of Aaron Van Syckel, a native of New Jersey. Aaron was the son of Rynier Van Syckel, whose father was also named Kynier, and whose grandfather, Ferenandus, came to this country from Holland in the latter part of the seventeenth century, and settled on Long Island. The Van Syckels are quite numerous in the Middle States, and many of them have filled high public positions. Both the Van Syckels and the Dunhams are among the oldest families of Hunterdon County, N. J.
    Bethany (Dunham) Van Syckel is a daughter of Nehemiah Dunham, a son of James Dunham, who was a son of Nehemiah Dunham, of Clinton, N. J. The latter Nehemiah Dunham distinguished himself as an officer in charge of commissary during the Revolutionary War, and his children were all ardent patriots.
     The Dunhams, also, are numerous, particularly in New Jersey, and many of them figure prominently in the history of Church and State. Nehemiah Dunham, last referred to, was a grandson of Rev. Edmond Dunham, who was born in New England in 1660, and Edmond was a son of Benajah Dunham, whose father, John Dunham, came to Massachusetts from Lincolnshire, England, in 1630, and was among the first settlers of Dartmouth. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


EDWARDS, WILLIAM H.
William H. Edwards, Editor and Proprietor of the Anniston Hot Blast, one of the most popular newspapers published in North Alabama, and one whose opinions receives more attention and favorable comment at the hands of the metropolitan journals of the United States than probably any other paper in the State, barring the Montgomery Advertiser, is a native of Norfolk, Va. He was born in September, 1853, and is a graduate of the University of his native State.
     For some years prior to his coming to Anniston he was connected with the Baltimore Manufacturer's Record, an antecedent of eminent degree; and that he brings with him the highest endorsement of that great paper would be sufficient guaranty of his merit, were it needed, and were it not true that he is a man possessed of the happy faculty of establishing himself at once in the good graces of a community, nolens volens.
    Mr. Edwards took charge of the Hot Blast in June of the present year. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


McCARTEY, CHARLES C.
Charles C. McCartey, President of the Anniston Bloomary, is a native of Lewis County, N. Y.; son of Francis and Loxina (Dorwin) McCartey, respectively of the States of Massachusetts and New York; was born May 14, 1828. When eight years old, he, with his parents, emigrated to Green Bay, Wis. While there he learned the arts of the different tribes of Indians, to speak seven different languages (the French as fluently as his own), to excel in the use of the gun and the bow and arrow, and to paddle a canoe to the admiration of the red men.
     When eleven years old, he was pursued by hostile Indians, and ran ten miles to save his life, on a very hot day. For some time the white settlers lived in constant fear of being scalped. All retired at night with their clothes on, to be ready for the signal (which was the ringing of a bell) to flee to Fort Howard, Soon after this reign of terror, old Zack Taylor removed the hostile Indians to the Rocky Mountains.
     Mr. McCartey moved to Fon du Lac in 1842. While living there he engaged in different branches of business. He went to Glen Arbor, Mich., in 1855, and engaged in lumbering, wooding and milling; working between 300 and 500 men. At that point he built one of the largest and finest piers on the chain of lakes; it is known as Mack's Dock. He was also agent for the Northern Transportation Company of Ohio, running a daily line of steamers from Ogdensburg to Chicago. From Glen Arbor Mr. McCartey moved to Pontiac, Mich., and engaged in the hardware business and farming. He went to Knoxville, Tenn., in 1876 for his health, and there embarked in the wholesale drug trade, and in 1887 came to Anniston. While in partnership with Morrison Bros., he organized what is now known as the Anniston Bloomary, an incorporated concern, with a capital stock of $50,000.
     Mr. McCartey started in the world without money, but he was a genius, and in many things an expert. The results of his undertakings attest these facts.
     He was married in January, 1850, to Miss Elizabeth Darwin, of New York, daughter of Hubby and Elizabeth (Jones) Darwin. He and wife are Episcopalians, and Mr. McCartey is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities.
     This branch of the McCartey family sprang from an Earl of Scotland.
     Francis McCartey was a soldier in the War of 1812, and drew the first pay-roll at Sackets' Harbor. He was the son of Clark McCartey, who was an officer under General Washington, and who was with that General in his historical crossing of the Delaware in December, 1776. Tradition says that Washington asked who was in charge of the crossing, and when told "McCartey," exclaimed, " Thank God! it is in safe hands."
      The McCarteys were all a large, brave and powerful race. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


STEVENSON, HUGH
Hugh Stevenson is a native of Scotland, and was born in 1839. He was educated in his native town of Johnston, and there learned the moulder's trade. He came to the United States in 1871, worked some years at his trade in Brooklyn, N. Y., and came to Rome, Ga., in 1881, as foreman in the foundry of Noble Bros. From Rome he went to Cartersville, that State, where he began business for himself, and in 1883 came to Anniston, where, in partnership with Edward Murvey, he established the foundry works, which he has, since the death of his partner in 1885, continued to manage. He manufactures engines, general machinery, and everything in that line. He was without means when he came to this country, but his industry has been rewarded until at this writing he is side proprietor of a manufacturing establishment valued at $40,000.
     Mr. Stevenson was married in Scotland to Miss Annie Johnston; she died prior to his leaving that country. In 1878 he married Miss Annie Wilson, a native of England.
      Mr. Stevenson is a member of the city council, and is fully identified with the best interests of the progressive city of Anniston. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


LARNED, WILLIAM S.
William S. Larned, Vice-President of the Anniston Savings Bank and Safe Deposit Co., and Treasurer of the Oxanna Building Association, was born at Fishkill. N. Y., June 30, 1854. and is a son of Samuel and Sarah (Newell) Larned, natives, respectively, of Michigan and New York. He was an only son, and was given a classical education at Cornell University, after which he attended one year at an architectural school in Boston. From 1877 up to his coming to Anniston, in 1885, he was cashier of the Buffalo Courier Company. He came South in search of health, and, taking a fancy to the "Model City," located here. He was one of the prime movers in the organization of the Anniston, Oxford & Oxanna Street Rail way Company, of which corporation he has from its beginning been secretary and treasurer. Associated with his father, he established the South Anniston Hardware Company, and he was one of the organizers of the Anniston Savings Bank and Safe Deposit Co. and of the Oxanna Building Association. In addition to the above-named enterprise, he is more or less identified with and interested in various other incorporated and private concerns. He was married August 20, 1878, to Miss N. P. Livingston of Carlyle, Penn., and has one son, Samuel W. Mr. and Mrs. Larned are communicants of the Episcopal Church. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


PATRICK, WILEY A.
Wiley A. Patrick, Doctor of Dental Surgery, Anniston, native of Monroeville, this State, son of Miligan and Martha (Salter) Patrick, was born January 1, 1855. After receiving an academic education in his native town he spent a few years in a clerical position, and in 1884 took up dentistry. He was graduated from Vanderbilt University, with the degree of D.D.S., in 1886, and has since that time devoted himself, with marked success and manifest skill, to his chosen profession. He located at Anniston in 1888, and is at this writing in the enjoyment of a lucrative and aristocratic patronage. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


BREWER, SAMUEL BLOUNT
Samuel Blount Brewer, Dealer in Real Estate and Insurance, Anniston, is a native of Covington, Ga., son of the Rev. Aaron G. and Martha (Taylor) Brewer, and was born November 2, 1834. Prior to eighteen years of age he had devoted his time to such duties as were incident to rural life and to the acquisition of such education as was practicable at the common schools. His father located in Atlanta, Ga., about 1852, and was there in charge of the Christian Telegraph, subsequently the Southern Olive Tree, and Samuel was his assistant editor for two years. In 1854, he returned to Montgomery, this State, whence the family had moved to Atlanta, and taught school until 1859. In the latter year he was elected Assistant Clerk of the House of Representatives, and in 1861 joined the Third Alabama State Troops in their expedition to the Pensacola Navy Yard. He was called home by the Legislature to resume the duties of Assistant Secretary. Subsequently he acted as one of the secretaries of the Secession Convention. Some time later he was made Chief Clerk of the Commissary Department, and in 1863 he was commissioned major in the Confederate Army and placed in charge of the records of the Commissary Department at Richmond. He left the Confederate capital in company with Mr. Davis, and was acting Commissary when they reached Greensboro, N. C.
     After the war Major Brewer returned to Montgomery, and in 1865 was elected Journal Clerk of the Provisional Legislature in the permanent State Government, a position he held until ousted by Reconstruction in 1870. In 1874 he was elected Secretary of the State Senate, and in 1877 he returned to Atlanta, where he was in business until 1883. In July of that year he came to Anniston, where he has since been actively engaged in real estate and insurance business.
     He was married, October 1, 1861, to Miss Marion G. McFarland, of Richmond, Va., and has had born to him eight children: Maggie G., Daisy, Walter, Annie T., Charley B., Alpine G., Mary H., and Irving K. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
     Rev. Aaron G. Brewer was born near Trenton, N. J., in 1795; was ordained as a preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church by presiding Elder Soule, afterward the distinguished Bishop Soule, and became a prominent minister in New York City. He severed his connection with the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1821, and, associated with four others, organized the Methodist Protestant Church, in New York City, in 1826. He was sent South by the new denomination in 1830, and organized stations therein at many places in Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. He died at Opelika, in 1877. At the time of his death he was President of the Methodist Protestant Conference of this State. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


CANFIELD, C. H.
C. H. Canfield, President of the Anniston Granite Company, was born at Augusta, Ga., July 15, 1834, and is a son of Joseph G. and Emily Canfield, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter of Georgia.
     The senior Mr. Canfield, in early life, located in Georgia and there died of yellow fever in 1839. His widow survived him but two years, and his son was reared principally by his grandparents, who educated him at the common schools.
     April 28, 1861, C. H. Canfield joined Company H, Fourth Georgia Regiment, Confederate States Army, from which he was transferred the following September, at Yorktown, Ala., to Cobb's Cavalry.
     In December, 1861, he was promoted to Junior second lieutenant, and in September, 1862, "for distinguished gallantry in action," he was promoted to the rank of major. In a cavalry charge between Buckstown and Middleton, Md., September 13, 1862, he was seriously wounded.   Major Canfield remained in the army to the close of the war, when he returned to Georgia and embarked in mercantile business. In 1887 he came to Anniston and engaged in real estate business. He was one of the organizers of the Granite Company, and has been its president from the first. He is a director in the Anniston Savings Bank, and is variously interested in other popular enterprises.
     In December, 1855, Major Canfield was married in Stewart County, Ga., to Miss Sarah M. Talbot. She died November 4, 1884, leaving one daughter. The present Mrs. Canfield, to whom the major was married in August, 1886, was Mrs. J. F. Alston, of Columbus, Miss. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


McPHERSON, JOHN J.
John J. McPherson, Dealer in Real Estate, Anniston, son of Neill and Eliza McNair McPherson, natives of Richmond County, State of North Carolina, was born in Walton County, Fla., August 17, 1847.
     The senior Mr. McPherson, after his marriage in North Carolina in 1829, migrated to Florida, where he practiced law for several years, and held various official positions up to 1862. During the Creek and Seminole War he held the rank of adjutant in the regiment commanded by Col. Levin Brown, and was, altogether, a man of considerable prominence and influence. He held a United States office during the administration of Presidents Pierce and Buchanan, and up to the commencement of the civil war in 1861. He also held various minor civil offices in Walton County; and was elected, six years in succession, Enrolling and Engrossing Clerk in the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida, and was elected Secretary of the Senate of the State of Florida.
     In 1863, he came into Alabama, located at Haw Ridge, and from there, in 1866, moved to Union Springs. In 1884 he came to Anniston, where he yet resides. He is now in the eighty-first year of his age, and his wife, who died on the 20th day of April last, was in her seventy-eighth year. They reared a family of three sons and two daughters, of whom we have the following brief information: William was a member of the Third Florida Regiment during the war, entering the army as a private, and coming out with the rank of captain. After the war he moved to Los Angeles, Cal., and there practiced law until the day of his death. His only son, William B. McPherson, is now a resident of Paducah, Ky. Sally C., deceased, was the wife of Mr. George Shackelford. Annie Bell is the wife of Robert W. Allen, a teacher at Palestine, Tex. Malcom is a merchant in Anniston; he was a member of the Sixth Florida Regiment.
     The grandfathers, McPherson and McNair, came originally from Scotland. John J. McPherson and his sisters and brothers, acquired the principal part of their education at a school taught by the Rev. John Newton, a Presbyterian preacher, at Knoxhill, in Walton County, Fla. At the age of sixteen years he entered the drug business as a clerk and a student of pharmacy, and was thus employed for a period of twelve years. In 1873 he established a pharmacy of his own at Union Springs. He came to Anniston July 1, 1884, and was engaged in the drug business here until July 1, 1887. He was in real estate business until January 1, 1888. He was married, November 6, 1876, to Miss Fannie A. McCarty, daughter of Rev. W. A. McCarty, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, at Midway, Bullock County, Ala.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WILLIAMS, WILLIAM HOWARD
William Howard Williams, Dealer in Real Estate, Anniston, is a native of Williamsport, Maury County, Tenn.; was born March 6, 1846, and reared and educated at Columbia, that State. In 1864 he joined the First Tennessee Cavalry, and remained in the service until the close of the war. He began business in Columbia in 1865 as a druggist, and was afterward dealing in clothing, he came to Anniston in 1883, and was here in the clothing business three years. Since 1886 he has been giving his entire attention to real estate, although he is now much interested in manufactures.
     Mr. Williams is regarded as one of Anniston's most enterprising and successful business men. His wife, before marriage, was Mary E. Sarven, daughter of Mr. John Sarven, a large carriage manufacturer of Columbia, Tenn. They were married in June, 1873, and there has been born to this union the following named children: Nellie, Sadie, Howard S., James E., Mary and Edith. Mr. Williams is an elder in the Presbyterian Church and is a Knight Templar Mason.
     Edward and Elizabeth (Dedman) Williams, parents of the subject of this sketch, were married in Tennessee. The Williams family were North Carolinians. They came early into Tennessee, and the town of Williamsport was named in honor of them. Edward Williams is now about seventy years of age. He has long been an active business man; was a merchant at Columbia, and was the president of the Dutch River Valley Railroad. He was largely interested in building that road, and has been officially connected with it from its inception. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


COMER, BRAXTON B.
Braxton B. Comer, extensive Planter and Wholesale Dealer in Merchandise, Anniston, is a native of Barbour County, this State, son of John F. and Catherine (Drewry) Comer, and was born November 7, 1843. He was educated in his native village, at the State University, and at Emory and Henry College, Virginia, graduating from the latter institution in 1869. He is now one of the largest farmers in the State; runs a retail store at Spring Hall; is the owner of extensive orange groves, pineapple orchards, etc., in the South, and is interested in milling and various other enterprises. He came to Anniston in 1886, and, in partnership with S. B. Trapp, established the present wholesale concern with which he is identified. His wife, before marriage, was Miss Eva J. Harris, of Cuthbert, Ga., and his children are named, respectively: Sallie B., J. Fletcher, MacDonald, Mignon, Catherine, Beverly and Eva. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and of the Masonic fraternity.
     The senior Mr. Comer came from Georgia to Alabama in 1849, located at Spring Hill, and there erected the first steam mill of that county. Before leaving Georgia he had been Judge of a nisi prius court, and after coming to Alabama he served in the Legislature. He died at the age of forty-seven years. He reared a family of six sons.
    His father, H. M. Comer, was a native of Virginia, and of English descent. He migrated to Georgia at an early day, and there became an extensive planter. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


McCARTY, M. F.
M. F. McCarty, is a native of Bullock County. Ala., son of Dr. W. A. and Belinda (Connor) McCarty, and was born July 4, 1846.
     Mr. McCarty was educated at the East Alabama Male College - now known as the Agricultural and Mechanical College - and at the outbreak of the late war was attending the Military Institute at Glenville. In the spring of 1863 he enlisted in Company A, Sixty-first Alabama, and remained until the close of the war, participating in the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, around Petersburg; etc. He was captured at Spotsylvania, but paroled in time to take part in the last battles about Petersburg. He surrendered with General Lee at Appomattox, returned immediately home, and for several years devoted his time to planting. So soon as he had accumulated means sufficient, he entered college. While in the senior class, he met and married Miss Sallie Judkins, of Montgomery, and soon thereafter, in his native county, resumed farming. In 1880 he engaged in the drug business at Auburn, and in 1883 located at Anniston. Here he established the second furniture house started in this place. He sold out his furniture business in 1887.
     Dr. W. A. McCarty came from South Carolina and settled in Bullock County when a young man, and preached regularly as a Methodist minister for about thirty-five years. Of his two sons, M. E. only is living. William E. was a member of the Sixth Alabama Regiment during the late war, after which he moved to Texas, and there died. The Doctor's four daughters are all married; two living in Florida and two in Alabama. Before entering the ministry the Doctor was a lawyer by profession.  Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


SAWYER, BENJAMIN F.
Benjamin F. Sawyer, Mayor of the city of Oxanna, a suburb of Anniston, is a native of Talladega County, son of Ansel and Sarah (Norris) Sawyer, and was born May 18, 1833, at Jumper's Springs, now the town of Mardisville. He was reared to manhood on a farm; is self-educated and from the age of 18 to 23 superintended the business of his mother. He began business as a merchant at Columbiana, continued there four years, and was farming when the war broke out. In June, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company K, Tenth Alabama, and in July following was commissioned to raise a company. This he proceeded to do; and he armed and equipped them at his own expense. At the head of this company, then an independent command, he participated in the battles of Belmont and Columbus, and was shortly afterward assigned to heavy artillery. In the fall of 1861, he joined a Mississippi regiment, and at the battle of Shiloh was wounded. This retired him from active service for a short time, but he rejoined the army in September, 1862, and was at the battle of Mumfordsville, from which place, on account of his wound, he was assigned to post duty at Chattanooga. He re-joined his command at Shelbyville, where his company was transferred to the Twenty-fourth Alabama in the spring of '63. At Murfreesboro he was again wounded, but slightly. About this time Captain Sawyer was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and as such he participated in the battle of Chickamauga, the Atlanta campaign, and in Hood's Tennessee campaign. After the battle of Franklin he was promoted colonel, and for some time before the close to the final surrender he commanded a brigade. For a few years succeeding the war he was variously employed in farming and mercantile business, and in 1869 he established the Mountain Home at Talladega. He edited this paper about a year, and in 1870 took charge of the Rome (Georgia) Daily. From the Daily, within a short time, he transferred to the Rome Courier, which paper he edited about five years. He then established the Rome Tribune, and conducted it about two years. In 1874 he edited the Atlanta Evening Commonwealth, and in 1879, he was at Newark, N. J., in the interest of an invention of his for the manufacture of paper bags.
     Colonel Sawyer came to Anniston in 1883, and soon afterward established the Oxanna Tribune. At this time his literary work is confined principally to correspondence, and he contributes variously to the Atlanta, Philadelphia, Boston, and New York papers. In 1887, associated with S. and W. S. Earned, he established the South Anniston Hardware Company.
     September 7, 1857, Colonel Sawyer was married to Miss Charlotte Ambrester, of Talladega County. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


LE GRAND, JOHN CLARK
John Clark Le Grand, M.D., prominent Physician and Surgeon, Anniston, is a native of Calhoun County, this State, son of J. C. and Martha A. (Watson) LeGrand, and was born December 6, 1854, at the town of White Plains. He spent the first eighteen years of his life on his father's plantation, and in attendance at the common schools. He subsequently attended a high school in Georgia, read medicine and graduated from Atlanta Medical College in the spring of 1880. He began the practice of his profession in his native county, and was located at Weaver's three years. In autumn of 1883 he located at Anniston, and here readily took rank among the foremost of his profession. He was one of the charter members of the Calhoun Medical Society, organized April 30, 1880, and has been its secretary ever since. He is at present Assistant Health Officer for Calhoun County at Anniston, and the representative of the county society to the State Medical Association. He is a member of various fraternities and societies, and is altogether one of the most promising young professional men of East Alabama. He was married December 2, 1880, to Miss Jennie Lee Ayers, of Carnesville, Ga., and his three children are named, respectively, Mary Ruth, Bessie and Annie Forney. The Doctor and his wife are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Doctor is prominent as a Mason, Odd Fellow, Knight of Honor and United Workman.
     Since coming to Anniston the Doctor has been not only successful in the practice of medicine, but it appears from the records that his investments in real estate have been highly profitable.
     The senior Mr. LeGrand came from Georgia to this State, settled near White Plains, followed teaching several years, entered the Confederate Army in 1863, and died at Atlanta in April, 1864. He reared a family of four sons and two daughters. His father was a native of South Carolina, and the LeGrands were French Huguenots. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WALKER, THOMAS A.

 


Thomas A. Walker, whose portrait embellishes this chapter, was born in Jasper County, Ga., January 5, 1811, and his parents were Thomas F. and Feribee (Smith) Walker. The family came to Alabama in 1819, and here afterward made their homes.
     Thomas A., familiarly known as Judge Walker, was educated at the State University; began the study of law when twenty years of age, and was admitted to the bar two years later. He located first in the practice at Elyton, and remained there until 1836. He had been elected Solicitor for the Ninth Judicial Circuit in 1835, and it was the year following that he moved to Jacksonville. He is now the only man living at this place who was here at that time.
     At the outbreak of the Creek Indian War, he was holding the office of brigadier-general, and by order of Governor Clay, he raised a battalion of troops for the service, and led them to Columbus, Ga., where they were mustered into the command of General Jessup.
     Judge Walker has served three terms in the Representative branch of the State Legislature and six years in the Senate. At the time of his first election to the lower house (1839), he was holding the office of Solicitor, which disqualified him as a legislator. However, a new election was at once held in his county, and he was again chosen, and took his seat two days before adjournment of the session.
     He was first elected to the Senate in 1842, for a term of three years; and he was the president of that body at the close of the late war. Under the Reconstruction Act he was for a time disfranchised. The negroes that blacked his boots and groomed his horses could vote and hold office, but the Judge, having had intelligence enough to entertain opinions of his own, and courage enough to express them, was not the sort of man a carpet-bag and blatherskite Congress deemed fit to exercise the right of franchise in the South. Under the domination of that scum of Northern society that settled down upon the Southern States like a pestilence, in the wake of the triumphant army, the servant was to become the master, ignorance and crime should wield the lash, and intelligence and virtue should tread the wine press. But it is God that directs the destinies of Nations, and in the fullness of His own good time all things are righted.
     While Judge Walker has survived many of the evils that beset him in those days and seen many of his unofficial opinions verified by the highest tribunal of the land, he has not held or sought to hold any office since his re-enfranchisement. Prior to 1858, he was nine years a Circuit Court Judge. From 1858 to the close of the war between the States he was president of the Alabama & Tennessee Railroad Company and that road was built under his administration from Columbiana to Blue Mountain station in Calhoun county. The road was afterwards completed to Dalton, Georgia, by New York parties, and later on went into bankruptcy and the Judge was made one of its receivers.
     Judge Walker was married August 30, 1836, to Sarah McGehee. She died in April, 1880. Thomas T. Walker, Judge Walker's father, was a native of Hancock County, Ga. He came to Bibb County, Ala., in 1819, and in 1820 moved to Montevallo, in Shelby County, where he remained until his death.
     The father of Thomas T. Walker was named David Walker, a native of Buckingham County, Va. He was a soldier under Washington in the Revolutionary War. The family originally came from England. Feribee Smith, the wife of Thomas T. Walker, was a daughter of Ezekiel Smith, a native of South Carolina. He was also a Revolutionary soldier, and was descended from English parentage. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

LANE, REV. MARSHALL HALL
Rev. Marshall Hall Lane, D.D., of the Baptist Church, Jacksonville, was born at Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., July 9, 1845, and is a son of Dr. James H. and Mary C. (Simpson) Lane, natives of the same county.
     Dr. J. H. Lane was educated at Mercer University in classical course, and was a graduate from the medical department of the State University. He is devoted to his profession, and has been a remarkably successful physician. He reared three sons and two daughters. He is a member of the Baptist Church and of the Masonic fraternity.
     His wife is a daughter of William Simpson, one of the original settlers of Wilkes County. Mr. Simpson was a native of Virginia, and of Scotch-Irish ancestry. The Simpson family are among the oldest and best known families in the State of Georgia.
     Dr. Lane's father, Rev. Micajah A. Lane, of the Baptist Church, came from Virginia to Georgia when he was but six years of age. After a long and popular service in the ministry, he died in 1887, at the great age of ninety-seven years.
     The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county; educated at Wright and Hoyt High School, and at the age of seventeen years entered the army as a member of Wingfield's Battery of Cutt's Battalion (A. P. Hill's Corps), Army of Virginia. He was at the battles of Gettysburg and Petersburg, and all the engagements from Gettysburg to the close of the war; but was at home on a furlough at the time of the final surrender.
     Immediately after the war he attended Rockby Institute, Georgia, taught by Col. R. M. Johnson, a prominent Southern author. From this institution he entered the University of Virginia, and studied law two years. Returning home he formed a partnership with Generals Toombs & Du Rose, and practiced law three years. Since then he has given his whole attention to the ministry and the cause of education. He has been pastor of several churches in Georgia; of the Central Baptist Church, Nashville, Tenn., from which place he returned home on account of ill health; traveled two years as an evangelist in Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas, and for six years prior to his coming to Alabama had charge of Hern Institute, Cave Springs, Ga.
     He came to Jacksonville to live in December, 1877 he had been pastor of the church here five years while living at Cave Springs, Ga. It may be said that during his pastorate at this place the membership of the church grew most wonderfully, having increased from a roll of twenty-one to one hundred and thirty-seven. He has also been pastor of Alpine Church, in Talladega County, for two years, and during the two years the membership of that church has been more than doubled. The honorary degree of D.D. was conferred upon him by the Alabama State University at the commencement exercises of 1886.
     Dr. Lane was married October 6, 1868, to Undine Brown, of Hancock County, Ga. She is a daughter of the celebrated Dr. Algeron S. Brown, one of the most celebrated physicians who ever lived in Georgia. To this happy union were born twelve children, viz.: John S., Edward McIntosh, Mary Undine, Louise E., Sidney B., Eugene C, Bluebell C, James A., Marshall H., Jr., Marguerite T. and Reynolds. One boy died in infancy.
     Dr. Lane is one of the most brilliant pulpit orators in the State. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


GIBSON, CARLETON BARTLETT
Carleton Bartlett Gibson, President of the State Normal College, was born at Mobile, Ala., September 18, 1864, and is a son of James S. and Antoinette Julia (Powers) Gibson.
     The senior Mr. Gibson was born in South Dumfries, Scotland, in 1824, and at the age of eighteen years came to the United States. He settled in New York City, and in 1846 moved to Mobile, where he was engaged in the commission business, lie was a first lieutenant in the British Guards under Capt. Daniel Wheeler during the late war. Afterwards he moved to Clarke County, Miss., where he conducted a large cotton farm. He was married in New York, and reared a family of eight sons, viz.: James S., a sea captain; Francis S., wholesale and retail grocer of Mobile; Wallace W., clerk in Mobile; Jefferson Davis, deceased: Frederick P., teacher in Clark County, Ala.: Emile L., student; and Alex J., student in the State Normal College. The senior Mr. Gibson was a member of the Presbyterian Church and died in 1872. His wife was a native of New York, and of English extraction.
    The subject of this sketch was reared in Mobile. He was graduated from the University of Alabama as A. B. in the class of 1884, and received from the same institution the next year the honorary degree of A. M. After having taught school at Mulberry, Autauga County, this State, about one year, he was elected a member of the Faculty of the State Normal College (through the influence of Colonel Lewis, of the State University), and after the resignation of J. H. Chappell. He was elected president of the College, which position he is now filling.
     Professor Gibson has certainly won for himself much distinction, having worked his way up to the present position by his own energy and hard study. He is regarded as one of the most brilliant educators of the State. He is an eloquent speaker, a ready debater, and a man capable in all respects of filling the high position to which he has been called. He is a member of the Baptist Church. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


HAMMOND, JOHN D.
John D. Hammond was born in St. Clair County, Ala., October 27, 1838, and is a son of Richmond and Mary (Ash) Hammond.
     The senior Mr. Hammond was born in Lawrence District, S. C, in August, 1801. He came to Alabama with his parents in 1816, and settled on the west bank of the Coosa River, near Greensport; there entered lands, and remained until his death, which occurred in July, 1861. He was an active farmer, and succeeded in accumulating a large fortune. At his death lie owned about six thousand acres of land. He was in the Legislature at different times from 1835 to 1848, and assisted in the organization of many of the earlier counties and did much toward shaping the development of the State. He reared six children, as follows: Mary E., wife of Isaac Looney; Jane C, wife of William Cross, of Shelby County; William C, of St. Clair County; Richmond F., deceased; Peter LaFayette, physician, was killed at Shiloh; and the subject of this sketch. The grandfather of our subject was a native of South Carolina, and was a descendant of English ancestry
     The mother of our subject was a native of Franklin County, Ga. She was a daughter of Colonel John Ash, who was a soldier in the war of 1812. The Ash family came originally from Ireland.
     The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in his native county. He was married May 18, 1858, to Fannie A. Whisenant, daughter of William J. Whisenant, of Calhoun County, this State. To this union were born seven children, viz.: Walter E., Willie B., Anna L., Peter L., Mary A. E., Fannie W. and Katie. Mrs. Hammond died in 1884.
     Mr. Hammond entered the army in the fall of 1863, as a member of a cavalry company of State troops. He served until the close of the war, when he resumed farming. He was engaged at farming until coming to Jacksonville in 1867; here he run a hotel about ten years.
     Mr. Hammond was elected to the Legislature from Calhoun County, in 1880, and served two terms, taking an active part in the passage of the Railroad Commission Bill and in the law regulating the convict system of the State. He was indefatigable in the interest of education, and was conspicuous in the establishment of normal schools at Jacksonville and Livingston, and in aiding the State University, the A. and M. College, and the common schools.
     His politics, like those of his father's, have always been Democratic. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and of the Masonic and Knights of Honor fraternities. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


HAMES, WILLIAM MARK
William Mark Hames, Attorney-at-law, Jacksonville, was born in Hancock County, Ga., and is a son of William and Rizpah Z. (Moore) Hames, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively.
     Mr. Hames' parents were married in Hancock County, Ga., and there reared five sons and two daughters. The elder Mr. Hames died in December, 1857. He was many years a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and was much beloved by those who knew him. His wife was a daughter of Jeremiah Moore, a native of Scotland.
    The subject of this sketch was reared and educated at LaGrange, Ga. In 1844 he came to Macon County, Ala, where he taught school four years, removing thence to Oxford, where he taught two years. He read law under A. J. Walker, and was admitted to the bar at Jacksonville in September, 1855. He has been in the practice ever since and has built up for himself a reputation as a brilliant and successful attorney.
     Early in 1861, Mr. Hames entered the Second Alabama State Troops as a first lieutenant, and later became captain of Company A, Second Alabama Regiment. This command was disbanded at Fort Pillow, and he returned home, reorganized his company, and joined the Fifty-first Alabama Cavalry as captain. He was out but a short time, when, on account of his ill-health, he was compelled to resign and return home.
     In 1857-8, he was Assistant Clerk of the State Legislature, and in 1863-4, was elected member of that body. In 1875 he was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, and took an active part in its deliberations.
     In January, 1866, he was married to Mary E. Jones, daughter of James Jones, of Tennessee. The children born to this union are: Leonidas G., Lizzie R., James G., John N., Ezra and William. The family are members of the Old School Presbyterian Church. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


BROTHERS, SAMUEL D. G.
Samuel D. G. Brothers, Attorney-at-law, Jacksonville, was born in Calhoun County, this State, June, 19, 1858, and is a son of Dr. Philip H. and Jennie (Downing) Brothers, natives, respectively, of St. Clair and Calhoun Counties, this State.
     Doctor Brothers has been a practicing physician in Calhoun County, nearly all his professional life; he spent five years in Texas and Louisiana. He and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. They reared eight children. viz.: Samuel D. G.; William P., now deceased; was a graduate of the University of Alabama and College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md. ; Elizabeth F., Mary Emma, George A., Philip H., Zulah Zarah and Thomas J. The Brothers family were originally from England.
     Mrs. Doctor Brothers is a daughter of Thomas J. Downing, an early pioneer of St. Clair County. He was a descendant of Irish parentage, and was born in Tennessee or North Carolina. He located in Calhoun County in 1835, where he died in 1860.
     The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county; was graduated from the University of Alabama in the class of 1880, and from the law department in 1881. After leaving college he located at Jacksonville and formed a partnership with Willett & Willett, of Anniston, the style of the firm being Brothers, Willett & Willett.
     Mr. Brothers was married October 21, 1885, to Ella Wyly, of Jacksonville. She is a daughter of Benjamin C. and Elsie (Snow) Wyly, natives of Georgia and Alabama, respectively. Mr. Brothers and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


CALDWELL, JOHN HENRY
John Henry Caldwell, Attorney-at-law, Jacksonville, son of John M. and Emily G. (Bell) Caldwell, natives, respectively, of the States of Kentucky and Virginia, was born at Huntsville, this State, April 4, 1826. He was educated in his native town, and at Bacon College, Harrodsburg, Ky. At the age of seventeen, he began teaching school, and continued at that vocation four years in Limestone County. He came to Jacksonville in 1848, and for four years had charge of the Jacksonville Female Academy; the succeeding four years he was in charge of the Male School at Jacksonville, and in 1851 and 1852 edited the Jacksonville Republican. In 1855 he assumed the editorship of the Sunny South, and was conducting this paper in 1857, when he was elected to the Legislature. In 185l he was elected Solicitor of the Tenth Judicial Circuit, was reelected in 1863, and in 1865 was removed for political reasons by Governor Parsons. He was immediately re-elected to the Legislature, but for similar reasons was removed by the military in 1867. Having been admitted to the bar in 1850, he at once entered the practice of his profession. He was elected to Congress in 1882, and re-elected in 1884.
     Mr. Caldwell is a talented gentleman of easy address, an agreeable and fluent speaker, and in all of his official trusts has acquitted himself with dignity and credit. He was married in November, 1840, to Miss Mary D. Greer, of Fayetteville, Tenn.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


GRANT, LEONIDAS W.
Leonidas W. Grant, Editor and Proprietor of the Jacksonville Republican, was born August 8, 1843, in this city, and is a son of J. F. and Elizabeth (Riley) Grant, natives of Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively.
     The senior Mr. Grant came to Calhoun County, Ala., in 1834, to take charge of a Baptist paper. In 1837, he became proprietor of the paper, changed its name to the Jacksonville Republican, and published it until the day of his death. In 1870 he was elected State Treasurer, and in 1872 was re-nominated for that office, but in common with the Democratic State ticket, was defeated. He was a prominent Mason, and an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He reared one son and four daughters.
     The subject of this sketch was reared and educated at Jacksonville. He attended the Wesleyan University at Florence, and was about to enter upon the junior year when the war broke out. In June, 1861, he enlisted in the service as a private in Company G, Tenth Alabama Regiment, and in 1862 was promoted to sergeant-major. In 1863 he was promoted to adjutant of the regiment. He participated in the battle of Dranesville, and in all the engagements in which his regiment took part, except the battles of Cold Harbor and the Wilderness. He surrendered with General Lee.
      In 1867, Major Grant founded the Gadsden Times, remained with that paper until his father was elected State Treasurer, when he returned to Jacksonville and purchased a half-interest in the Republican. In 1874 he was elected to the lower house of the State Legislature, and in 1880, was elected to the State Senate, in which body he served with distinction four years. At this writing (1888), he is the Democratic nominee for State Senator from the Seventh District.
     He is a brilliant speaker, a terse and vigorous writer, and one of the most enterprising men of North Alabama. He is prominently identified with the Masonic and Knights of Pythias fraternities, and is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
     Major Grant's wife was Miss Annie Foster, the accomplished daughter of Chancellor John Foster, of this city.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


CROOK, JOHN M.
John M. Crook, M.D., Physician and Surgeon, Jacksonville, was born August 4, 1847, at Alexandria, Calhoun County, this State. He was reared in his native village, received a common school education, and, at the age of fifteen years, entered the University of Alabama, where he remained until he reached the senior class, when he enlisted as first lieutenant in the Army of the Confederate States. After his father's death he took charge of his plantations, and subsequently, in 1872, at Alexandria, engaged in mercantile business, and continued thereat until 1878. In the last named year he moved to Jacksonville, and remained there four years, engaged, in the meantime, at farming. In 1883 he began the study of medicine, and in 1885 was graduated from Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons. Immediately after graduating he was appointed resident physician of the Maryland Woman's Hospital: remained there one year; spent six months at Bay View, and returned to Jacksonville, where he has since devoted his time to the practice of his profession.
     Dr. Crook is one of the most accomplished physicians in Northeastern Alabama, and is held in highest esteem by the people and the profession generally. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and is always identified with every movement tending to advance the best interests of the community in which he resides. He served the city of Jacksonville from 1880 to 1883, inclusive, as Mayor.
     In April, 1876, the Doctor was married to Miss Annie Whateley, the accomplished daughter of the gallant Col. George C. Whateley, who fell at the head of his regiment, the Tenth Alabama, at the battle of Sharpsburg, Md. Mrs. Crook died in January, 1878.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


MONTGOMERY, CHARLES H.
Charles H. Montgomery, M. D., of Jacksonville, was born at La Grange, Troup County, Ga., January 2, 1845. He was reared in his native town, where he received a good education and was prepared to enter the senior class of the Southern University at Greensboro, this State.
     On the announcement of the secession of Alabama, his heart beat in unison with the people of his adopted State, and in April, 1861, he enlisted in an artillery company made up at Selma, and commanded by his father. The first year of his service was in Virginia; after which he served in artillery with Forrest's Cavalry, in whose command his company saw much active service. At Selma, for "courage and bravery," he was recommended for promotion to a lieutenancy. His last engagement was at West Point, Ga., in April, 1865.
     Immediately after the war, he settled at Evergreen, Conecuh County, Ala., where he began the study of medicine, and in 1868 was graduated as M. D. from the Washington University, Medical Department, Baltimore. He attended lectures also at Atlanta, where he afterwards practiced his profession for a long time. For the past fourteen years he has been located near and at Jacksonville, where he has met with much success, and is regarded as one of the best and most skillful physicians of North Alabama.
     Dr. Montgomery was married, January 6, 1870, to Jennie Chamberlain, whose father was a nephew of General Warren, of Revolutionary fame. Two children, Paul and Julia, bless this union. The Doctor is a member of the Presbyterian church, of the Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and of the Knights of Honor and Improved Order of Red Men.
     The father of Dr. Montgomery, Col. Joseph T. Montgomery, was born in the Waxhaw Settlement, N. C, and when a boy came with his parents to DeKalb County, Ga., where he was reared. He was the founder of LaGrange Female College, and was widely known as a most thorough educator. He moved to Summerfield, Ala., in 1857, and there presided over Centenary Institute. From the latter city he entered the army as captain of the Jeff. Davis Artillery, and later on he was advanced to lieutenant-colonel of the Fourteenth Georgia Artillery, in General Bragg's army. Impaired health compelled him to resign before the close of the war, and in 1870 he moved to Marshall, Tex., where he founded the Marshall Female College, and where he remained until his death, which occurred in July, 1872.
     He was an active and leading member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and was a man of superior mental ability. He was regarded as one of the most popular educators of the South, and was highly respected and beloved as a citizen and Christian. He married Julia A. F. Cameron, of Troup County, Ca. They reared three children, viz.: Charles H. (our subject), Walter V. and Mamie E., who died at Jacksonville in 1885. She was an eminent teacher, and at the time of her death was a member of the Normal School faculty, at Jacksonville. Walter V. Montgomery is a member of the Doctor's family, and is at present studying medicine with him.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


CROOK, JAMES, Jr
James Crook, Jr., was born at Alexandria, Calhoun County. Ala., October l2, 1841, and is a son of John M. Crook, Sr., and Margaret (Miller) Crook, natives of Spartanburg District, S. C.
    John M. Crook, Sr., was born in 1810, and came to Alabama in 1834. He was a lawyer and farmer by profession and occupation, and took an active part in politics, though declining all official position for himself. He was a delegate to the Secession Convention of 1860, and took a prominent part in the deliberation of that body.
    The Crook family came originally from Wales, settling first in Virginia, and moving from there into South Carolina. James Crook, Sr., the paternal grandfather of Maj. James Crook, Jr., was reared and educated in South Carolina, and had the honor of representing the county (then district) of Spartanburg, at different times in both branches of the State Legislature. He married a Miss Owen, a lady of Scotch-Irish descent, and, in l834, came to Alabama. Here he purchased large tracts of fertile lands and devoted himself to agriculture. Samuel Miller (the maternal grandfather of Maj. James Crook, Jr.) and his wife, who was a Miss Dean, were of Scotch-Irish extraction, and Samuel Miller was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. A few years prior to the War for Independence, a large number of Scotch-Irish settled along the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Pennsylvania, Virginia. North and South Carolina, when their farther pilgrimage was arrested by the beautiful scenery, fertile lands, and salubrious climate of upper South Carolina.
     Here they built their cabins near springs of cool and delicious water, erected school-houses and churches, and were soon living in peace and plenty, such as they had never known in the Mother Country. There both had been denied them by the cruelties of religious persecution.
    No grander specimens of humanity have been produced anywhere on earth than those who were born and reared in this Piedmont Region, and should we take their achievements from American history, it would be robbed of some of its grandest success in war, in statesmanship and religion.
     Not long were those noble pioneers left in the enjoyment of the blessings which Providence had so bountifully bestowed upon them. When the oppressions of the Mother Country began, some of those same Scotch-Irish were the first at Mecklenburg to declare their independence of a government which they had learned to distrust before crossing the ocean. Among the first to take up arms, were Crook, Owens, Dean and John Miller, of the Tiger River settlement, in what is now called Spartanburg County, S. C. All four of those men were great-grandfathers of Maj. James Crook, Jr., the subject of this sketch. The three first named served gallantly throughout the War for Independence in the American Army. The last named, John Miller, was killed by Tories and Indians during the year 1775. The assassins were hidden under a bridge over which he had to pass on his way from Fort Nicholas to his home. Fort Nicholas was situated a short distance from the scene of the occurrence, on North Tiger River, and Miller was going for supplies for his own and other families then being protected at the Fort. A thrilling account of his death is recorded in Howe's History of the Presbyterian Church in South Carolina. He left one son, Samuel Miller, who, seven years later, took part in the battle of Cowpens. The last named was the maternal grandfather of Major Crook, who thus had four great-grandfathers and a grand father in the Revolutionary War - an honor of ancestry which can be claimed by but few living men. Samuel Miller was subsequently sheriff of Spartanburg County, at a time when that office combined the duties of the present clerk and probate judge.
     Major Crook was educated at the Universities of Alabama and Virginia. From the latter institution he took his departure a short time before the end of his last term, and in June, l861, enlisted in Company D, Tenth Alabama Regiment, as a private soldier. In 1862 he was promoted to first-lieutenant; in 1864 he was made captain, and later on was promoted to the rank of major of Cavalry. Soon after his transfer to the Cavalry service, he was captured, and was imprisoned on Johnson's Island until the close of the war. Prior to his capture he had participated in many hotly-contested battles.
      After the cessation of hostilities, he returned to Alexandria, and during the following year, at Jacksonville, began the study of law in the office of Hon. W. H. Forney. He was admitted to the bar in 1867 and at once entered upon successful practice of his profession. In that year he was made chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee of his county, in which capacity he served for six years, and was contemporaneously a member of the State Democratic Executive Committee. In 1868 he was a Seymour and Blair elector, and made a very thorough and active canvass of his district. In 1869 he was elected as the nominee of the Democratic Party to the lower House of the General Assembly. In 1876 he was appointed by Governor Houston to the highly honorable and responsible position of a trustee of the State University, and in 1883 he was made, by statute, a director in the Normal School at Jacksonville, in both of which capacities he is still acting. He continued to give his attention to the practice of his profession until 1881, when he was elected Railroad Commissioner, with Hon. Walter L. Bragg as president and Hon. Charles P. Ball, associate. He continued in this position four years, since which time he has been giving his attention to his private business - principally manufacturing, farming, and the breeding of blooded stock.
     Major Crook was married to Miss Annie E. Ponder, of Montgomery, Ala., in 1868, by which marriage he has a son, James Flournoy Crook. Mrs. Crook died in 1869, and in 1871, Major Crook was married to Miss Reynolds, a daughter of Major Walker Reynolds, an influential citizen of Talladega County. To this union four children have been born: Hannah, Walker R., Martin and Eppie, the latter now deceased.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


SWAN, ISAAC LEONIDAS
Isaac Leonidas Swan, Clerk of the Probate Court, Jacksonville, was born September 24, 1832, in McMinn County, Tenn., and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Woods) Swan.
     The senior Mr. Swan was born in Knox County, Tenn., in 1798; was a captain in the Seminole War in 1836; died in Bradley County, Tenn., to which he moved, about 1840; left living seven children, of whom three were sons, viz.: Isaac L., our subject, Samuel Jones, a farmer of Tennessee, who served in the Southern Army from that State, and William Alexander, who died in Arkansas. His father married a Miss Gamble, and was one of the pioneers of Knox County, Tenn., where he lived until his death. He reared a large family. The Swan family came originally from England, and the Woods family are of Scotch origin.
     Isaac Leonidas Swan was reared and educated in Tennessee, and in September, 1853, came to Jacksonville, where he was soon afterward appointed Clerk of the Probate Court. He filled this office six years, and then accepted a position as book-keeper for J. B. & G. H. Forney. In the spring of 1861 he entered the army as a member of Company G, Tenth Alabama, and participated in the battles of the second Manassas, Wilderness, Petersburg, a short siege below Richmond, and other minor contests.
     At the close of the war he returned to Jacksonville, and shortly removed to Selma, where he was employed as book-keeper until 1870. From Selma he returned to Jacksonville, and in 1874 was appointed to the position he has since continuously filled: Clerk of the Probate Court. He is identified with the leading industries of Jacksonville, and is a member of the Knights of Honor.
     Mr. Swan was appointed County Treasurer in 1875, and having been elected to that office in 1877, held it until 1880. He was married June 6, 1866, to Miss Mary F. Cannon, of this city. Her father, Judge L. W. Cannon, a native of South Carolina, was among the early settlers of Calhoun County.
     The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Swan are named, respectively: Mary E., William Gordon, Mattie P., Fannie Lee, Emma A. J., Samuel L., John R., Flora Alabama, Hannah Cleveland, and James Hugh.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WEAVER, JOHN P.
JOHN P. WEAVER, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Jacksonville, was born near Weaver's Station, Calhoun County, February 26, 1860, and is a son of Lindsey and Lucinda (Pace) Weaver, natives of Putnam County, Ga.
     The senior Mr. Weaver came to Calhoun County about 1836, and here followed farming the rest of his life. He and his wife were members of the Baptist Church, of which he was a deacon, he died in 1861, at the age of fifty-seven years, and she in 1879, at the age of sixty-four years. They reared nine children, viz.: Richard. David F., Thomas L., John P., Lizzie (Mrs. Woodruff); Louisa, wife of Judge James Aiken, of Gadsden; Fannie, wife of P. M. Watson; Hattie, wife of A. Scarbrough; and Arcadia, wife of W. J. Allen, of Bessemer, Ala. Richard, David F. and Thomas L. are farmers by occupation; the two first named were soldiers in the Southern army during the war between the States.
     The Weavers came originally from Germany, and Lindsey Weaver's father was one of the pioneers of Putnam County, Ga. Richard Pace, Mrs. Weaver's father, was one of the early settlers of Calhoun County. He was a Baptist minister, and as such was held in highest esteem.
     The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm in his native county, and at the age of fifteen years engaged as clerk for the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railway, at Weaver's Station, a position he held until 1886. In August of that year he was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court.
     Mr. Weaver is a member of the Baptist Church, and a popular citizen of Jacksonville. 
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


MONTGOMERY, HENRY FLOYD
Henry Floyd Montgomery, United States Commissioner, was born near Atlanta, Ga., in November, 1846, and is a son of James F. and Elizabeth (Young) Montgomery, natives of South Carolina. He was reared on a farm, and educated at the common school. February, 1864, he entered Ferrel's Battery (General Forrest's command), and subsequently took part in the battles of Decatur, Florence, Selma, etc. He was paroled at or near Atlanta May 14, 1865. After the final surrender he returned to Georgia, and from there later on moved to Texas, where he remained until 1867.
     Returning again to his native State, Mr. Montgomery engaged in mercantile business, and in 1869 he came to Jacksonville. He was here in business till 1871, and after a few years, absence returned in 1880 and is now here with at least a degree of permanency.
     Mr. Montgomery has been very successful in business, and is a man of more than ordinary intelligence and judgment. He was married in February, 1873, to Miss Mary Linder, daughter of Dr. D. P. Linder, of Jacksonville, and has had born to him six children, viz.: Bessie, Floy, Lillie, Joe Linder, John and Grace. The family are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which Mr. Montgomery is an elder. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Knights of Honor.
     James F. Montgomery, the father of Henry F., when a boy, accompanied his parents to Georgia where he was reared and educated, and where he became a substantial planter. During the Florida War, (1836) he held the rank of captain and took part in several hard fought battles. He reared a family of four sons and two daughters, of whom three are now living, viz.: Henry F., William R. and Emma Haynes. He was a highly esteemed citizen and a man of considerable local influence. He died in 1847, and his widow, some years afterward, married Matthew Osborne, of Marietta, Ga.
      Mr. Montgomery's father, Maj. James M. C. Montgomery, was a son of James Montgomery, who came from the north of Ireland in 1740, and settled in South Carolina. Prior to 1821 he moved to DeKalb County, Ga., and located on the Chattahoochee River, near Atlanta. Here he met, and, in due process of time, married Nancy Farlow, a noble Christian woman, native of South Carolina. Their home was in what is known as the South Bend of the Chattahoochee, and was a familiar rendezvous for the early travelers through that part of the State. The old gentleman, remembered now by few of the many who enjoyed this hospitality, the rest having, like himself, joined the silent majority, was of the same stock from which descended Gen. Richard Montgomery, who fell at the Battle of Quebec in 1775. He was well-informed on all topics of the day, and represented his county in the Legislature several terms. He was noted for his charity and for the kind treatment of his slaves, and was beloved and honored by all who came in contact with him. He reared a family of six sons and five daughters, all of whom received the best education that was available, and who in later years became worthy citizens of this section of the country.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


ROWAN, PEYTON
Peyton Rowan was born in Pendleton District, S. C., October 18, 1816, and is a son of James and Sarah Rowan, natives of the same place.
     The senior Mr. Rowan was a planter by occupation and reared five sons and three daughters. In about 1820 he came to Jefferson County, near where Birmingham is now situated, and in 1824 removed to St. Clair County, where he spent the rest of his life. He died in September, 1880, at the advanced age of ninety-three years. His wife died about 1862. The grandfather of our subject was a native of Spartanburg District, S. C, and of Irish extraction.
      The mother of Peyton Rowan was a daughter of William Pullen, a native of Virginia. He took part in the Revolutionary War, and soon afterward moved to South Carolina, whence, in 1820 he came to this State and settled near Birmingham, where he died at the age of ninety-six years.
     The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in this State. At the age of eighteen years he entered a store as salesman at Ashville, and in 1842 became a partner, which partnership lasted until 1865. In 1866 he came to Jacksonville, where he engaged in the mercantile business, and in January, 1871, took in as partners W. H. and Walter Dean; the firm name being Rowan, Dean & Co. This firm has done, and is at the present writing doing, the largest business of any house of the kind in Calhoun County.
     Mr. Rowan was married April 10, 1856, to Miss Ann Forney, sister of General Forney, of Confederate fame. This Union has been blessed with four children, viz: Dr. John F., of New York City; Sallie L.; Emma M., wife of Bernard Gaston, of Montgomery; and George H.
     The family are communicants of the Episcopalian Church, and Mr. Rowan is a member of the Masonic fraternity.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney



DEAN, WILLIAM H.
William H. Dean was born in St. Clair County, this State, October 6, 1845. He was reared and educated in his native county, and from there, in 1861, entered the Southern Army, as a member of I Company A, Tenth Alabama Infantry. He was with his command in its many engagements up to and including Gettysburg. On the retreat from the latter place he fell into the hands of the enemy and was imprisoned at Point Lookout and Fort Delaware for several months. He located at Jacksonville in 1867, where he has since been actively engaged in business. Mr. Dean was married July 24, 1884, to Miss Ida M. Steel. Mrs. Dean died in 1885.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


CROOK, EMMETT F.
Emmett F. Crook was born at Alexandria, Calhoun County, this State, July 27, 1851, and is a son of John M. and Narmeza (Woodruff) Crook.   Mrs. Crook is a daughter of Caleb Woodruff, a native of Spartanburg, S. C, who came to Calhoun County in 1834. His father was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and was of English ancestry.
     The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in his native county, and at the age of seventeen years entered a store as salesman. In 1874 he engaged in general merchandising at Alexandria, and he continued thereat until 1883. In 1880 he was elected Probate Judge. He has always been active in politics, has taken part in all the State conventions since 1876, and was chairman of the county conventions of 1882 and 1884.
     Mr. Crook was married December l9, 1872, to Miss Sallie Walker, daughter of Whitfield and Mary (Mangum) Walker, natives of South Carolina. Mr. Walker was colonel of an Alabama regiment during the war. He is now Collector of Internal Revenue for the District of Florida. Mr. Crook has had born to him four children, viz.: Maud, Ida, Whitfield Walker and John M. The family are members of the Baptist Church, and Mr. Crook is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Knights of Honor.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


ELLIS, GIDEON C.
Gideon C. Ellis, Attorney-at-law, was born in Blount County, this State, November 7, 1825. He was reared in his native county and received his primary education at the common schools. He came to Jacksonville in 1851, and in the office of Mr. Geo. C. Whately began the study of law. In 1852 he was admitted to the bar, and at once formed a partnership with his preceptor.
     This partnership continued until April, 1861, at which time Mr. Ellis enlisted in defense of the South as a member of the First Alabama Regiment. He had been but a few months in the service, however, when his protracted ill-health necessitated his discharge. Soon after returning home he resumed the practice of law, and has since devoted his time and talents thereto.
     In 1855 Mr. Ellis represented Calhoun County in the Legislature: during the period of the war he held the office of Register in Chancery, and in 1865 he was returned to the Legislature and kept there two terms. This seems to constitute the sum of his office holding. As a legislator he was faithful, active and efficient, in fact it is doubtful if Calhoun - somewhat prolific in the production of talented men - has ever been better represented in the General Assembly than during the period of Mr. Ellis' incumbency. A lawyer of rare attainments, he not only knew the needs of his people, but he had the ability to present them, and, if need be, the courage to defend them.
     As an attorney and counselor-at-law, he is ranked among the foremost of the Calhoun bar, and as an advocate his reputation is by no means local. He is recognized by all who know him as a gentleman and a scholar; and as a citizen of Jacksonville he is held in high esteem.
     Mr. Ellis was married in January, 1866, to Miss Mary Turney, the accomplished daughter of the Hon. Hopkins L. Turney, late United States Senator from Tennessee. She died in 1883. The present wife of Mr. Ellis was a Miss Combs before her marriage to Mr. King, her first husband. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


GABOURY, JOSEPH A.
Joseph A. Gaboury, distinguished as having, as civil engineer, constructed the first practical and successful Electric Street Railway system in the United States viz., that of Montgomery, Ala. - is a native of Montreal, Canada, and was born in April, 1852. After a thorough preparatory training in his native city, graduating from St. Hyacinthe College, he visited Paris, France, and there completed his study of mining and civil engineering. Returning to Canada in 1871, he followed his profession until 1874. In that year he came South, where his eminent ability as civil engineer found ready recognition. In the practical pursuit of his profession he visited the principal cities of the Gulf and South Atlantic States, and in 1883 located at Montgomery, where, as before noted, he constructed the Electric Street Railway system of that city.
    Mr. Gaboury came to Jacksonville in September, 1887, and in February, 1888, associated with others, perfected the organization of the Jacksonsonville Mining and Manufacturing Company, a gigantic joint-stock concern with $500,000 capital.
    It is to Mr. Gaboury that the people of this vicinity are indebted for the discovery near here of the immense beds of kaolin, which chemists and porcelain men pronounce equal to any found in the world. Under his direction and management this kaolin is to be developed, and as its virtue and quantity is unquestioned. Jacksonville may be looked to at an early day as the seat of one of the most important industries of the South.  
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


WATKINS, THOMAS A.
Thomas A. Watkins was born in Calhoun County, this State, December 25, 1856, and is a son of James P, and Mary (Walker) Watkins, He was reared on a farm and educated at Calhoun College, Georgia, and at Jacksonville, this State.
     In early life he moved to Texas, but soon afterward returned and engaged in business at Jacksonville, from which place he came to Etowah County. Here he engaged some years in farming, and for the last four years has given his attention principally to real estate.
     He has bought and sold over 100,000 acres of mineral land since engaging in the business, and now owns several fine farms in this part of the country. In 1888 he established the Atalla Herald, a sprightly newspaper of much local popularity. Mr. Watkins is public spirited, and one of the progressive men of the county.
     He was married in October, 1879, to Mrs. Lizzie E. Coleman, the daughter of Rev. Enoch Ellis, of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Coleman was a native of South Carolina, moving thence into Georgia before the war, and later on into Alabama.
     Mr. and Mrs. Watkins are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Watkins is a Mason.
Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


DOYLE, C. C.
Henderson, Tex
[Texas] Representative from the Twenty-Sixth District, Rusk County, was born in Knox County Tennessee, September 12, 1832. His parents were John Doyle, a tanner and native of Knox County, Tenn., who Came to Texas in 1849, from Calhoun County, Ala., and died at Overton in 1861; and Mrs. Nancy (Wear) Doyle, also born in Knox County, Tenn., who died in Alabama in 1844. Eleven children were born to them, of whom the subject of this notice was the tenth child and only two of whom besides himself, survive, viz: Mrs. Harriett Dodson, of Henderson, Texas, and Russell H. Doyle, a farmer residing near Albia, in Wood County, this state
     C. C. Doyle completed his education at Bunker Hill Institute, Bunker Hill, Texas; taught school in Rusk County until the beginning of the War Between the States; served as First Lieutenant of Company D., Fourteenth Texas Cavalry, until the final surrender, participating in the battle of Shiloh and other engagements in which his command was brought into action; was elected to the House of Representatives of the Twelfth Legislature, but did not serve in that body, as his seat was contested and the contest decided against him by a partisan majority; was Tax Collector of Rusk County for four years (from 1888 to 1892), and is in 1896 was elected to the House of the Twenty- Fifth Legislature, in which body he is a member of the following committees: Education, State Asylums, Commerce and Manufactures, and Mining and Minerals.
     He has introduced a bill providing for the working of County convicts, and short term state convicts on the public roads; a bill providing for a uniform system of text books; a joint resolution submitting an amendment to the constitution that will permit the Legislature to pass laws to encourage the establishment and growth of manufactories in this stale; and several bills of minor importance.
     He has always been a Democrat, has attended various conventions of his party, has often stumped his district in the interest of Democracy, and has at all times labored zealously in the cause of good government.  He is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and Masonic, Knights of Honor, and Knights and Ladies of Honor fraternities.
     He was married in Rusk County in 1869 to Miss Mattie L. Finley, daughter of the late John J. Finley, and has five children, viz: Finley, twenty-four; Lelia, twenty; Walter, eighteen; Clarence, sixteen, and Perla, twelve years of age.  Mr. Doyle is engaged in the grocery business at Henderson and for many years has been one of the leading men of that place, where he is esteemed, by all, both high and low, who know him.   (Source: Texas State Government: A Volume of Biographical Sketches and Passing Comment, E. H. Loughery, McLeod & Jackson, 1897 - Transcribed by sd )

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