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1837

A new post office has been established in Tar---- Creek Valley, Benton County at the house of WM S. ACKER.  The name of Goshen has been given to the Post Office and WM. S. ACKER appointed post master.  Source: Jacksonville Republican, Benton (Calhoun) County, AL April 20, 1837 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


1837

 A Bible Society was formed in this place on the 25th by Rev. SHOOK, Agent, the object of which is to provide the destitute of Benton County with the Scripture without note or comment.  Thirty-two persons are members, by donations to purchase Bibles and---ments to the amount of $38.25.  A constitution has been also adopted and the following officers elected:
            JOHN NESBIT, President
            E. L. WOODWARD, Vice-Pres
            M. M. HOUSTON, Treas.
            J. M. MITCHELL, Sec’y
Managers:
            ---N. GREGG
            ----- REMLEY
            ---- ARNOLD
            ----AS BURNS
            --- W. HOWELL
The society solicits contributions from the friends of the Bible everywhere. 
Source: Jacksonville Republican, Benton (Calhoun) County, AL April 27, 1837 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


1837 -

BATTALION ORDERS - The officers and privaters of the battalion of Cavalry (Benton Rangers) will attend at Alexandria on the first Saturday in May next by 10 o’clock, armed and equipped as the law directs. Also, on the third Saturday in the town of Jacksonville.  The public arms can be procured by each private by the first of April by applying to their respective Captains, to whom they will be delivered.  Co--- at our muster will be notified by the proper authority to attend on the first Saturday in May at Alexandria, to show cause if any, why they did not attend said muster.

            By order of WM. ARNOLD, Lieut. Col

            JOSIAH HOUSTON, Adjunct Corp Benton Rangers, March 4, 1837 Source: Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Benton (now Calhoun County, AL) March 16, 1837  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 


1837

Notice -- All persons are hereby forwarned from trading for a certain note of hand given by me to John LOWRY for one hundred dollars, as I have never received value for said note, and am determined not to pay it unless compelled by law.  Wm. CURRIER.  Nov. 23, 1837  Source: Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Benton (now Calhoun County, AL) Dec 7, 1837  - Transcribed by KT


1837 - ESTRAY NOTICES

State of Alabama, Benton County
Taken up by Isaac YOUNG, living on Chockolocca, two miles below White Plains two strays, one black mare, 7 years old, 13 hands 1 inch high - Also one Black Stud Mule colt, two years old - June 3rd, 1837
 M. M. HOUSTON, Clerk - [Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Ala, June 15, 1837 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney]

State of Alabama, Benton County
Taken up by Edmund BERRY, living on Muskadine Creek, a sorrel horse mule, four years old, and appraised to forty dollars before John G. Watkins, Esq. May 6, 1837
 M. M. HOUSTON, Clerk  [Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Ala, June 15, 1837 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney]

State of Alabama, Benton County
Taken up by James STRIN, living on the waters of Nance's Creek, a sorrel mare, eight years old, near fifteen hands high, both hind feet white, blaze face, and appraised to forty dollars.
 M. M. HOUSTON, Clerk   [Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Ala, June 15, 1837 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney]

State of Alabama, Benton County
Taken up by Redman G. Stewart, living on the head waters of Ohatchee Creek, one Sorrel Colt, with a small bell on, __ years old, left hind foot white, some white in forehead, and appraised to $32.50. 
M.M. Houston, Cl'k.  __ 9th, 1837. [Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Ala, Thursday, December 7, 1837 - transcribed by KT]

State of Alabama, Benton County
Taken up by Charles NORMAN, living on Tallapoosa, one stray filly, about 18 months old, a Brown bay with a white ring round the left hind foot - appraised to 55 dollars.  Nov. 20th, 1837  M.M. Houston, Cl'k Nov. 27, 1837 [Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Ala, Thursday, December 7, 1837 - transcribed by KT]

State of Alabama, Benton County
Taken up by Jonathan GRAY, one Yellow Sorrel Mare, supposed to be disordered in the shoulders and appraised to 10 dollars.  Nov. 20th, 1837.  M.M. Houston, Cl'k.  Nov. 27, 1837   [Jacksonville Republican, Jacksonville, Ala, Thursday, December 7, 1837 - transcribed by KT]


1886

ANNISTON, MAY 25 - GRASSMERE FARM
        Just one mile and a half in line, and five miles by the public highway, from Anniston, lies Grassmere Farm, one of the most extensive Jersey farms in Calhoun County.
        It is now two years and a half since it has passed into the hands of its present proprietor, T. G. Bush of Mobile.  Up to that time for the fifty years preceding, it has been run in corn and cotton, until the last vestige of its original fertility had been exhausted.  Under the arrangement of S. G. Armentrout, it has in the brief time above mentioned become one of the most charming sports of the Choccolecco Valley.  In ten years at the present rate of improvement, its value will be hard to estimate in dollars and cents.  Besides the mountain air, the pure water and the abundant yield of clover and grasses are pre-eminently adapted to the wants of the Jersey.
       This departure from the long established methods of farming in this valley is watched with interest.  The cotton planter side by side is now in trouble (22nd of May) his king is not up, is to be planted over as soon as the rain stops and the ground dries off.
        Grassmere is rejoicing in the showery weather.  Corn, wheat, rye, oats, clover, grasses of various kinds, pastures, her of fat Jerseys, colts, Plymouth Rock chickens, bronze turkeys, extensive garden of growing vegetables, altogether constitute an oasis in this wilderness of cotton, more cotton.
         Certainly after the disastrous winding up of this current year, many a Grassmere will be established in our beautiful valley to make it blossom as a rose.  Source: Lamar News, Lamar County AL, June 10, 1886 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 


1887

Anniston is to have a new daily, it is to be called the Hot Blast. Source: Lamar News, Lamar County AL, February 17, 1887 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

The woods around Anniston are full of "blind tigers" Source: Marion Herald, Marion County AL, May 26, 1887 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 

J. L. Martin, formerly city editor of the Montgomery Dispatch is now city editor of the Anniston Hot Blast. Source: Lamar News, Lamar County AL, May 12, 1887 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 


1888

Anniston now has street cars.  The first cars commenced running June the 1st. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County AL, June 8, 1886 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 


1890

Eliza Freeman, a 15-year old white girl, living in West Anniston, disappeared from her home a few nights ago and no trace of her can be found. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, January 2, 1890  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

At a meeting of the citizens of Jacksonville, Ala. Monday, it was unanimously resolved to change the name to Tredegar, and resolutions were passed asking the change of the name of the post office, railway station, express office, and telegraph station. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, June 5, 1890  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

Mr. Alex Doyle, the sculptor, was in Anniston recently to meet the committee in charge of the Noble monument.  He is the sculptor who designed and executed the confederate monument at Montgomery.  He is also the designer of the Henry Grady monument to be erected in Atlanta, Ga. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, July 24, 1890  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 


1891

Springvale” Captain Jas. Crook’s jersey farm, in Calhoun county contains nearly 800 acres of land, and has on it one hundred Jerseys of the purest St. Lambert strain. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, January 1, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

Anniston becomes a wet town on January 1st.  It is thought then men will take out the license of $1,000 which will be $10,000 for the city revenues. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, January 8, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

At Anniston the father of young Sam Miller, Mr. Ike Miller, who lives at Eastaboga, has signified his intention to bring suit against the city for the injuries which his son received, not long since, while being arrested.  The young man is yet in bed. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, January 8, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 

Wm. H. Zinn of Boston is about to start a kindergarten in AnnistonSource: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, February 12, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

            

Anniston is running wild over Jemmie Cook, the 13 year old Georgia Methodist preacher, who is holding forth at the Methodist church. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, February 12, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

A New England syndicate is being formed to build a new town at the East and West Junction, four miles north of Jacksonville.  Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, March 5, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

Mrs. Warren, a widow living at Francis Station in Calhoun county, is thought to be the oldest person in Alabama.  She is 107 years old and enjoys excellent health, besides her eyesight is said to be better than many people tree quarters of a century younger.  Source: Hamilton Times, Marion County AL, April 30, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

At Anniston the police force was increased from eleven to thirteen men. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 21, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

At Anniston, J. H. Duke handed in his resignation as a member of the Board of Education, and P. B. Browd was elected to fill the vacancy. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 21, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

               

At Anniston the City Council awarded the city printing for the next two years to the Evening News for $135 per year.  The Hot Blast bid was $200. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 21, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

               

The monument to the late Samuel Noble, founder of Anniston, will be unveiled in September.  It will be located on Quintard Avenue, between 10th and 11th Streets. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 21, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

               

At Anniston the Board of Education last night recommended the Council that they locate two additional public schools for white children and one for colored children. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 21, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 

At Anniston City Treasurer C. H. Parker has sent in his resignation to the city council to take effect at once.  His successor has not yet been elected. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, June 4, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 

W. H. Zinn, of Boston, Mass, who owns considerable Anniston property, is trying to interest the people of Anniston in a move to fix up a public garden or park in some conveniently located portion of the city. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, June 4, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 

At Anniston, Mrs. F. R. Jones of Lexington, Ky through her agents in that city, J. C. Keith & Bro. has let the contract for erecting a handsome three-story block at the corner of Eleventh and Noble streets, to be completed in four months. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, June 4, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 

For two consecutive terms Alabama has furnished the first honor man at the Naval Academy at Annapolis Me.  Last year a Greensboro boy wore the laurels, and this year R. G. Roberts of Oxford stood at the head of a class of sixty-nine. (Hamilton Times, Marion County AL, June 25, 1891 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney)

 

The electric street railway at Anniston has about been completed. The last pole for the wires has been planted, and all but a short distance of the track has been laid. The trucks for the cars have arrived, and in a very short while electric cars will be substituted for the present dummy. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, July 2, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 

A special from Anniston says: One of the largest rattlesnakes ever seen in this section was killed just north of the city yesterday by M. W. Bullard.  It measured eight feet in length, seven and one-half inches in circumference and had tusks half an inch long.  It had undoubtedly been here a long time as it had twenty-seven rattles. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, July 2, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

Two houses were burned in West Anniston shortly after 12 o’clock on the night of July 5th.  Total loss was about $1800.  John Streatman lost his stock of goods, amounting to about $75 and Mrs. Cole, sister of W. Brakefield, whose residence burned, last $140 cash ,which she had secreted about the house. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, July 16, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

Joe Gentry, colored, is Anniston’s wonder.  He is as stiff as a board from head to toe.  But he runs a blind tiger and makes money just the same. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, December 10, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

G. W. Jones, Anniston’s famous second baseman, has accepted a position to play second base for the Pittsburg league next year. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, December 31, 1891  - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 


1892

At Anniston, H. W. Blake has invented an automatic water tank flusher, and has the papers ready to send on to Washington to get a patent. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, January 7, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

 Roller skating is all the rage in Anniston, and the rink is doing a land office business. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, April 14, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

An effort is being made to raise $45,000 for properly equipping the fire department in Anniston.Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, April 14, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

Annistonians are holding meetings and raising money to form an industrial association. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 12, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

An Anniston broker sells an average of ten tons of hay per week, the money goes to northern farmers and middlemen.Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 12, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

The stockholders of the West Anniston land and improvement company will hold their annual meeting on the 17th of May. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 12, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

Last week the Anniston furnaces shipped twelve carloads of pig iron daily to Dayton O., Boston, the Radford pipe works in Virginia and Canada.Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 12, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

The Anniston Evening News gives Jacksonville 3,000 people, Piedmont 2,500, Oxford 2,500 or 3,000, Oxanna 1,500 and Anniston an indefinite number above 10,000. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, May 12, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

W. H. Pyron killed ninety-six leather wing bats in a single hollow tree on Choccolocco.  He says there were fully 300 in the hollow, but he only succeeded in killing the above number with a brush as they emerged from a hole at the root of the tree. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, July 14, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

The residence of J. M. Ragin, on Tyler Hill, Anniston, was partially destroyed by fire the other day.  The furniture was also badly damaged.  The loss is about $8,000 covered by insurance.  The cause of the fire is unknown. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, August 11, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

At Anniston the Woodstock Guards presented a fine minstrel entertainment the other night to a large audience.  Many local hits, new topical songs, etc were rendered, and the minstrels were a great success from every point of view. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, September 8, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

A considerable sensation has been raised by the discovery of a white male infant at the home of Mary Frazer, a colored woman in South Anniston. The boy is a healthy little fellow, about a month old, and nicely dressed. The woman says it was brought to her by a hackman and was told to keep it and take care of it and she would be well paid for her trouble. She will not disclose the name do the hackman.  A well dressed man called to see the child Thursday night, and left money to pay its expenses, but the colored woman said she didn't' know him.  Several rumors are afloat as to the little fellow's probable parentage and the affair will be thoroughly investigated. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, September 29, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

The barn of L S. Green of Alexandria Valley, Calhoun county, with all its contents, including five head of horses, was destroyed by fire.  Loss about $1700; insurance $500. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, December 15, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 

J. W. LeGrand, the largest merchant at Weaver's station, has been burned out. Eight hundred dollars in greenbacks, which had been left in the cash drawer over night, were lost. Source: Vernon Courier , Lamar County AL, December 15, 1892 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney 


1893

Warren Harris, of Calhoun county is 90 years old, and one day last week he walked three miles over his farm.  He is the pioneer settler of Calhoun county, and is as strong and vigorous as he was twenty years ago.  Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County AL, March 30, 1893 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

Oxford's municipal election resulted in the election of W. H. Griffin, mayor: T. M. Draper, T. S. Bayley, T. A. Howie, A. L. Higginbotham, J. M. Steward and A. M. Yoe councilmen. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County AL, March 30, 1893 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

WILL MARCH TO CHICAGO
An Anniston dispatch says: The Woodstock Guards of this city propose to test their powers of endurance by marching to the national encampment at Chicago.
 The distance is something over 800 miles and the boys think they can accomplish the march is six or seven weeks.  Each man will carry his arms and knapsack, while wagons in charge of the quartermaster sergeant will transport the heavier luggage, including cooking utensils. By this trip the guards will not only taste the sweets and bitters of a true soldier's life but will pass leisurely through a long stretch of pretty country.  The route has not been selected, neither has the time of departure been set, but these and the other many preliminary arrangements will be made at once. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County AL, March 30, 1893 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

The town council has put an end to bicycle riding on the sidewalks in that city by an ordinance against it in Oxford. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County AL, June 15, 1893 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

The Anniston Evening News has been suspended, and Editor McKay has taken charge of the Hot Blast.  Milton A. Smith, editor of the Hot Blast, assumed his duties as Anniston's postmaster on the 1st but still owns the paper.  Source: Hamilton Times, Marion County AL, July 6, 1893 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


1903 -

 

ANNISTON BOY MISSING - Cecil, the 15-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. HARMON, is missing. The boy was sent on an errand Thursday afternoon and has not been heard form since.  Mr. Harmon lives near the Anniston yarn mill, and with party of friends searched all Thursday night for the missing boy, visiting old wells and searching up and down Snow Creek, thinking that he had an epileptic fit, which he is subject to, and fell in the creek while playing on the banks.  Source: Marion County Democrat, Marion County AL, April 16, 1903 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

 

ANNISTON BOY WINS - In the competitive examination held at Calera for the cadetship in the West Point Academy J. C. Williams, of Anniston, carried off first honors and he will be appointed by Congressman Bowie at once. The appointment, however, will not go into effect until June 15, 1904 Source: Marion County Democrat, Marion County AL, November 5, 1903- Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

 


1908

AFTER LONG SERVICE JAILER QUITS - Bart F. Hubbard, the popular jailer of Calhoun county for several years past, has resigned that position to accept one as a salesman for the Anniston store of the Anniston Hardware Company.  Joe Harmon will succeed Mr. Hubbard as keeper of the county Bastille, and has taken charge of that institution.  Source: Marion County Republican, Marion County AL, October 14, 1908 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


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