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1875, May 27 - Vernon Pioneer

COMMENCEMENT

The Closing Exercises of the present session of the Vernon District High School will take place on the 27th and 28th of June next.

PROGRAMME:

SUNDAY, the 27th at 10 a.m.  Sermon by REV. D. S. MCDONALD of North Port, Ala.  At 3 ½ p.m. Singing by the Sunday School.  At 5 p.m. Love Feast.  At 8 p.m. Sermon BY REV. R. D. CARVER, of Pickensville, Ala.

MONDAY, the 28th, at 7 p.m.  Meeting of the Board of Trustees (all of whom are respectfully requested to be present).  At 10 a.m. Literary Address by REV. G. R. LINCH.  At 10 ½ a.m. Original Speeches and Essays by the students.  At 3 p.m. Declamation of the part of the school.  At 8 p.m. Plays, Dialogues, etc.  All are invited to attend.

-          D. M. RUSH, Principal.

1877, Feb 23 - The Vernon Pioneer

MALE AND FEMALE SCHOOL.  Vernon, Alabama.

                The Trustees of the Vernon High School take pleasure in announcing that they have made an arrangement with REV. W. B. GILLHAM to take charge of their Institution for the ensuing school year – to commence on the 1st Monday in November.  Mr. Gillham’s long and successful experience as educator of the youth of both sexes warrant us in giving him our highest endorsement and soliciting for our School a liberal patronage.  In view of the great stringency in money matters, a reduction has been made from the usual rates of tuition for the present year.  We propose for the present year to have a first class English School, and when the patronage will justify, to add a teacher of ancient and perhaps modern languages.  Our school will be divided into the following grades and rates per session of 5 months:

PRIMARY

Alphabetical lessons, Spelling, First lessons in Reading, First lessons in Geography and Mathematical Tables.   $7.50

INTERMEDIATE

Written or Practical Arithmetic, Eng. Grammar, Descriptive Geography, Orthography, Reading, Penmanship, First lessons in English Composition and History of the United States.  $12.50

THIRD CLASS

Algebra, Geometry, natural Philosophy, Intellectual Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, Astronomy, English Composition, Rhetoric, Rhetorical Reading, English Grammar completed, Logic and Universal History.  $17.50

                All tuition fees due on the admission of the pupil, and the payments to be made punctually each quarter (ten weeks) except the first which must be made by the 25th of December.  No pupil will be admitted for a less time than the remainder of the session for which he enters, except by special notice at the time of admission.  Board including fires, lights, and lodging from eight to ten dollars per month.

EXTRA

Music on Piano, per month           $4.00

Use of Instrument per month          1.00

Vocal Music (science of per mo.) 3.00

                A contingent fee of 50 cents will be charged each pupil for the purpose of keeping up fires, etc.    For further particulars apply to:  Trustees  J. D. MCCLUSKEY, ARTY A. SUMMERS , T. W. SPRINGFIELD,  JASON GUIN,  M. W. MORTON

 1878, July 19 - The Vernon Pioneer

 COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES

                This is the week of weeks at Vernon being the Commencement Exercises at the Vernon High School.  Thursday night, the 18th of June, the exercises were introduced.  The Commencement was held in the Court House Hall, and the speeches, poems, declamations, &c., will not pass from the minds of the hearers as the morning dew from earth, but will remain and produce a train of thoughts which no other occasion unlike this can produce.  The manner in which the different subjects were presented are worthy of great praise: the clear voices; the happy choices of language, and the easy graces manifested in their delivery, are worthy of much comment.  The performers consisted of some of Lamar County’s most talented sons and daughters.  The gentlemen and little boys were handsome, but when we look upon the young ladies and little girls, dressed in the purest of white, the noblest of God’s handiwork, we wonder at the happy lot of the man who is to become the life-long partner of one of these angelic creatures.

                The exercises were opened with singing by the scholars, PROF. GILLHAM accompanying with the violin, which was quite enlivening to the audience.  In the whole of the exercises, we are sorry to say, there was but one original address, but all were taken from the sayings of the great men, who have long since been gathered to their fathers.

                Little SAMMIE MONROE, in “True Courage” showed that he possessed the oratorical powers of a great speaker.  In fact we think that this was the best effort of the night.  He threw all him vim and energy into the subject, speaking in a loud and clear tone.

                 The “Little Girl” by DONNIE GILLHAM, was very good for one so young.

                “The Rose” by ELLA MORTON was splendid, her gestures and language being good.

                “Burns” by D. W. GILLHAM, was excellently spoken, and showed that he had been well trained in this particular.

                MISS S. B. GILLHAM, in Poe’s “Raven” done credit both to herself and the subject.  having heard Davenport and Kidd recited this difficult piece, we have no hesitation in saying that with a little more experience MISS GILLHAM would be well fitted to recite the Raven before any audience.

                “Time” by DAVID SUMMERS was very good.

                WALTER NESMITH, in a stump speech, brought down the house.  It was merely a burlesque on the “People’s Meeting”, or their candidate, it is hard to tell which.  He brought in “LITTLE” SID SMITH, stating that he could fly around and run the Democratic and Conservative Convention like a double-triggered whirlwind.  He was roundly applauded.

                “Live for Something” by M. H. EVANS was very good.

                “The Dying Soldier” by JALA GUIN, although spoken in too low a tone of voice, was excellent.

                M. E. MORTON, in “Genevra” was sweetly spoken in a loud and full voice, and with gestures perfectly faultless, she commanded the hearty approval of the entire audience.

                “The Departed” by NANNIE MIDDLETON was splendidly rendered.  The piece was spoken in a monotone, as it should be, but the audience kept up such a noise that it was scarcely heard in the rear of the room.  Her voice and accent was something after the style of a n actress.  With the exception of one or two promptings, she acquitted herself handsomely.

                The “Federal Board” by MISS HATTIE COBB, a charming young lady, was very affecting in the style in which she rendered it.

                “Courage” by WILLIE SUMMERS shows that if he lives up to what he told the audience, he will make a brave and dauntless man.

                “Jeptha’s Daughter” by JEDDIE METCALF, went to show that this accomplished young lady was mistress of all she surveyed.  Gestures good, but the piece was spoken a little too low.

                M. M. GILLHAM, in the “Pilgrim Fathers” evinced much spirit in the young lady.

                PROFESSOR GILLHAM requested that some one in the audience come forward and deliver a stump oration, when ALONZO GUIN  sprang upon the stage with all the agility of an Indian on the war path, bringing roars of laughter from the audience as he delivered “Ben Buster’s Stump Oration” in an inimitable manner.

                “Our National Banner” by LONNIE BURNS was delivered with enthusiasm.

                “Sut Loven Good at a Candy Party” by TOMMIE BANKHEAD, was funny especially so where he lost the gable end of his pants.  TOMMIE has been there before.

                “South Carolina” by H. BANKHEAD was of the political order, and was well delivered.

                “The Dying Child” by MARY LAWRENCE, a most beautiful little girl, dressed in white, which contrasted greatly with her loveliness, was one of the best efforts of the night.  She spoke in a full, clear and melodious voice, and the audience were held almost spell-bound during the recital.

                A stump speech by WILL GUIN.  “Woman Suffrage” was well conceived.  It was merely a reply to WALTER NESMITH.

                “Your Last Chance” by RUTH CASH, was spoken too low.

                JIMMIE STEVENS, in “Midnight Musings” showed a great deal of oratorical power in his delivery.  He won many words of praise.

                PROFESSOR GILLHAM in a neat little speech thanked the audience for their kind attention during the performance, and that he would be pleased to see them on the next evening.

                A voluntary song, which was not down on the bills, was produced by MR. ARTY SUMMERS, JR.  Too high a compliment can not be paid to this young gentleman’s singing proclivities.  The rendition was perfect, being in the key of A minor.  We were not informed as to the title of the song, but it resembled the “Nursery” or “Babyland.”

                All in all, the Commencements exercises for this session were decidedly a success.  It is a fair representation of the interest taken by both scholars and teachers.  In last night’s performance they achieved victories and won laurels which they will never forget, but will go with them down to posterity.  There are, perhaps, some whose faces we shall never see again at Commencement.  Some, perhaps, will be teaching schools of their own; others engaged in the different walks; while again others will have been called to their Maker.  But, students of the Vernon High School, may you, whenever you are called to perform the duties of this life, may the Commencement exercises of the year 1878, be a green spot in your minds, and may your thoughts revert back to your old Professor in kindness for the good he has done you; the cares and pains he bestowed upon you while under his tutorage; and to the many friends and associates you have become endeared to since coming here.

 

COMMENCEMENT NOTES

     PROFESSOR GILLHAM, as a violinist, is a success.  The National air, “Hail Columbia” was well played by him. We are surprised at the large number of pretty girls Vernon can turn out on occasions like that of last night.  MR. JIMMIE STEVENS, who had a part in tonight’s programme, had to go to his home, near Aberdeen, on account of sickness in the family.  We have the copy in hand of the speech of MR. WALTER NESMITH, which will be published in our next issue.  If there had been one of two babies less in the audience the performance would have passed off more pleasantly. The room was well filled with people, without distinction of color.   Fans, straw hats, fur hats, old hats, and pieces of hats were brought into use.  Better order should be preserved tonight than there was last.  The elite of Vernon turned out enmasse.

 

1880, Sept 24 - The Vernon Clipper

VERNON MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMY.  I will open a Male and Female School in Vernon on the first Monday in November 18820.  The school will be divided into four grades as follows:

1.                   Primary, embracing Spelling, Reading, Primary Arithmetic, and first lessons in Geography.

2.                   Intermediate, embracing physical and Intermediate Geography, Intellectual Arithmetic, elements of written Arithmetic, first lessons in Grammar, and Writing.

3.                   Grammar School, embracing Practical Arithmetic, Practical Grammar, Composition, History, Etymology, and Elocution.

4.                   High School, embracing University Arithmetic, Natural and Intellectual Philosophy, Geology, Physiology, Astronomy, Algebra, Geometry, &c, &c, &c

The School will be divided into two Seasons of four months (80 days) each.  Tuition due and payable at end of each session as follows: 

Primary Grade,                  per month, per scholar $1.50

Intermediate Grade,         per month, per scholar $2.00

Grammar School,              per month, per scholar $2.50

High School                        per month, per scholar $3.00

Incidental fee                      per month, per scholar    ___

Board                                    per month, per scholar $7.50

For further particulars, address, J. M. I. GUYTON, Principal, Vernon, Lamar County, Ala.

1880, November 26 - The Vernon Clipper

The Normal Musical School conducted at this place by PROF. A. J. SHOWALTER, assisted by Mr. CHAS. J. MILLER, closed last Saturday night with a very entertaining concert.  Several glees and sacred pieces were sung with much feeling and expression by the entire class.  Among them “Stars of the summer night” “My mountain Home,” “Trust in Jesus”, “Touch us gently Time” were greeted with unbounded applause.  One of the most pleasant feature of the entertainment was the Juvenile class whose melodious bird like voices trilled with delightful freshness, “The Little Pilgrim,” and “By and By.” – “She Sleeps, My Lady Sleeps, “ a quartette, was rendered finely by the mellow manly voices of Messrs. MILLER, MOLLOY, SPRINGFIELD, and SWANSAY.  The laughable round “‘Twas you sir,” sung by Messrs. MILLER, OWEN, and DORSEY, was greeted with roar of laughter by the delighted audience; as was also “A Little Farm well tilled” which was sung with inimitable humor by Messrs. BRADLEY, MILLER, and JOUDON.  The sweet ballad, “When Mary was a lassie,” rendered by the rich, mellow magical voice of PROF. SHOWALTER, aided by his wonderful power of expression, pervaded the very hearts of the audience with the thrill that a perfect musical voice only can awaken.

                The closing song by the entire class, “Good night” wafted us home with feelings of regret that the entertainment which closed at ten o’clock could not have been prolonged all night.

                PROF. SHOWALTER and MILLER have acquitted themselves admirably and have put in motion a progress in the science of vocal music in this county which has elicited enthusiastic encomium from all lovers of this fine “art,” and which will be kept alive long after their visit to Alabama.

                It is probably that PROF. SHOWALTER will instruct another class at this place next year.  We hope he will, as do all who have witnessed the improvement in singing in consequence of his untiring energy and patience in the course of instruction given here.

1890, October 16, 1890 - The Vernon Courier

PROGRAMME FOR FRIDAY AFTERNOON AT VERNON INSTITUTE

Music – Claton’s March – Miss ELLIE MORTON

Recitation – Miss ADINE COBB

Vocal Solo – M. D. MORTON

Declamation – G. H. YOUNG

Selections from “The Little Tycoon” – Miss ADINE COBB

Recitation – Miss DAISY NESMITH

Declamation – M. D. MORTON

Vocal Duet – Misses ELLIE MORTON and IDA JONES, and Mr. G. B. WIMBERLY

Patrons and friends are earnestly requested to be present.

                L. B. SELF, principal

1890, November 13 - The Vernon Courier

HONOR ROLLS

                The following is the Honor Rolls of the Institute for the Second month ending November 7th

              FIRST HONOR ROLL– 90 - 100 Per Cent

R. R. YOUNG, WM. D. HANKINS, J. T. SPANN, CARRIE BRADLEY, FANNIE MCCLUSKEY, ELLIE MORTON, DALSEY NESMITH, and CORA PENNINGTON

               SECOND HONOR ROLL– 85 – 90 Per Cent

IDA JONES, GEORGIA MORTON, ICIE SUMMERS, ADINE COBB, MILLIE COBB, PEARL MIDDLETON, CLAUDE MORTON, MISSOURI GILMORE, JOHNNIE MCCLUSKEY, MINNIE WILKERSON, MOLLIE PENNINGTON, M. D. MORTON, JEFF PENNINGTON, A. C. SAYLORS, SHIELDS MORTON, D. C. MORTON, E. R. BURNS, and ROBERT PENNINGTON.

                Miss EMMA GUIN made highest grade in first roll, 95.

                Mr. A. C. SAYLORS made in second roll in High School Department, 88 3-5

                CLAUDE MORTON, JOHNNIE MCCLUSKEY, MISSOURI GILMORE and MINNIE WILKERSON, highest grade in Primary Department, each 89.

                L. B. SELF, Principal

1890, December 11 - The Vernon Courier

 THE INSTITUTE HONOR ROLLS

The following is the Honor Rolls of The Vernon Institute for the month ending December the 5th:

                FIRST HONOR ROLL – 90 to 100

DAISY NESMITH, CARRIES BRADLEY, FANNIE MCCLUSKEY, EMMA GUIN, ELLIE MORTON, PEARLE MIDDLETON, JOHNNIE MCCLUSKEY, R. R. YOUNG, W. D. HANKINS, DICK MORTON, J. T. SPANN.

                SECOND HONOR ROLL – 85 to 90

M. D. MORTON, E. R. BURNS, EDWARD L. YOUNG, JEFF PENNINGTON, SHIELDS MORTON, FLINT MORTON, ELLIOTT JONES, MISSOURI GILMORE, GEORGIA MORTON, MILLY COBB.

                Miss ELLIE MORTON made highest grade in High School Department – 95.

                JEFF PENNINGTON made highest grade in High School, second roll – 88

                J. T. SPANN made highest grade in Primary Department – 97.

                MISSOURI GILMORE made highest grade in second roll, Primary Department

                L. B. SELF, Principal

1891 - October 8 - The Vernon Courier

THE VERNON INSTITUTE

The Vernon Institute will open its next session October 12, 1891 and will continue for a term of nine months.  Students of this Institution are prepared for entrance into the higher classes of our colleges and Universities

EXPENSES

Board………Per Month  $7.00

Primary……………………1.50

Intermediate………………2.00

High School……………….2.50

Incidental Fee per session ..0.50

                An efficient department of Instrumental Music will be maintained by Mrs. SHIELDS.  Those desiring to take lessons in music may do so at the small expense of $3.00 for twenty lessons per month.  The Institute is located in a quiet pleasant little town, noted for its morality and refinement.  For full particulars address J. T. HUFFSTUTLER, B. P. Principal

1892 - September 22 - The Vernon Courier

THE VERNON INSTITUTE

This school will open on the 19th day of September 1892 with a competent corps of teachers.  the term will be nine scholastic months.

                The rates of tuition will be as follows:

Primary branches $0.75 per month

Intermediate         $1.50 per month

Higher branches, (including Mathematics, Science, Languages, etc…$2.00 per month.

Calisthenics and Free-hand Drawing , Free of Charge

Incidental fee 50 cents

Music Department – Mrs. S. J. SHIELDS – Twenty lessons per month, with use of instrument for practice, $3.00

                The principal will be ably assisted by Miss HATTIE STOKES.

                Miss SALLIE PATTY, Principal, Vernon, Ala.

Honor roll of pupils of Mrs. S. J. SHIELDS school in writing and spelling for the week ending May 18th: Writing, ENDOCIA MORTON, MAGGIE COBB, PEARL KEMP, WALLACE COBB, JIM  COBB, HATTIE KEMP, ANNIE MATTOX, MAMMIE BLACK, OLIVER YOUNG, WALTER LEE KEMP, LONIE ROBERTSON, MINNIE JONES.
    Spelling: HATTIE KEMP, ANNIE MATTOX, ALBERT YOUNG, ALEX MORTON, JIM COBB, PEARL KEMP, MAGGIE COBB, OLIVER YOUNG, MINNIE JONES, LOUIE ROBERTSON, WALTER KEMP. (Vernon Courier, May 20, 1897)


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