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Marion County
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Genealogy and History

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BIOGRAPHIES

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Akers, Meredith T.

Almon, Charles P.

Bankhead, John H.

Bradley, Richard C

Clark, John B.

Collins, Dr. James W.  

Cooper, Daniel N.

Davis, Samuel

Davis, William C.

Dunkin, George M. G

Evans, William M.

Fite, Arthur Freeman

Fite, Ernest Baxter

Fite, Fred

Hamilton, Albert J.

Haley, Charles L.

Hall, William W.

Hollis, John D.

Hulsey, Nedom W.

Jones, George W

 Letson, William P.

Lindsay, James

Maxwell, G. W.

McWhorter, G.

Mitchell, C. E.

Nesmith, C. C.

Nesmith, Thomas

Northcutt, Woodson

Pearce, James P.

Pearce, Largus

Sargent, H. O

Stedham, Winston

Terrell, John D. Sr.,

Terrell, John D., Jr.

White, W. W.

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AKERS, MEREDITH THOMPSON, farmer, was born March 9, 1831, at Redeville, Rutherford County, Tenn.; son of Meredith and Nancy Jane (Thompson) Akers, the former a native of Crab Orchard, Va.; grandson of Claiborne Akers, and of Meredith and Elizabeth Thompson. He received a common school education; and has always been a farmer. In 1868 he entered upon the duties of sheriff, tax assessor and tax collector, of Marion County, in which he served for six years. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1875, from Marion County; and represented this county in the legislature of 1878 - 79.  He is a Mason; Methodist; and a Democrat. Married: July 21 1853, to Patience D.. daughter of Elijah C. and Keziah Green, of Goldmine. Children: seven boys and seven girls. Residence: Guin. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

ALMON, CHARLES POMEROY, lawyer and circuit judge, was born at Moulton, Lawrence County, July 19, 1872; son of William Micher and Bettie (Wasson) Almon, the former a brother of Representative Edward B. Almon (q. v.). Judge Almon was educated in the public schools, and at the Southern university, Greensboro; read law at Moulton; was admitted to the bar May 3, 1893; practiced at Moulton until September 1899, and at Hamilton until September, 1904, when he located in Russellville, where he continued the practice until he went on the circuit bench in November, 1906, and where he resided until October, 1910, when he located in Florence. He was a member of the house of representatives in 1903, from Marion County; was nominated as judge of the eleventh judicial circuit, in 1906, and elected to fill out an unexpired term of four years; was renominated and elected in 1910, without opposition, for six years; and again elected in 1916 for another term of six years. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason; a Knight of Pythias; an Odd Fellow; a Woodman of the World, and a member of the Golden Cross. Married at Booneville, Miss., December 27, 1894, to Mattie Lou, daughter of Lewis and Sallie (Davenport) Greene, and the granddaughter of Robert Davenport, for many years sheriff of old Tishomingo County, Miss. Children: 1. Bessie; 2. William Lewis; 3. Fannie Lou, deceased; 4. Charles Henry; and 5. Martha Davenport Residence: Florence. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

BANKHEAD, JOHN HOLLIS, farmer, legislator, Confederate officer, member of the House of Representatives and the Senate of the United States, was born September 13, 1842, on his father's farm near old Moscow, Marion, now Lamar County, died March 1, 1920, in Washington, D. C, and is buried in Jasper; son of James Greer and Susan (Hollis) Bankhead, natives of Union District, S. C, the former a planter and soldier of the Creek Indian and Mexican Wars, both buried in the graveyard at Sulligent, a modern town built upon part of their original plantation; grandson of George and Jane (Greer) Bankhead, natives of Union District, S. C, who removed, first to Tennessee, and, in 1816, to west Alabama, locating near the present site of Russellville, going two years later to Marion County, where they settled at what is now Crew's depot, on the military road, and where he acquired lands, became a planter and stock grower, built a home and the first mill in the county, which was located on the Palm Spring branch, died and is buried in the Jarrett graveyard, his wife surviving him and some years later dying at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William H. Duke, in Pontatoc. Miss., and of John and Letitia (Holliday) Hollis, who came to Alabama from Union District, S. C, and settled in Marion County, where he established a plantation home at the site of old Moscow, was a colonel of militia, standing six feet four inches, a progressive planter and sound scholar, bringing into his wilderness home a library of classics, died in 1867, and both are buried in the Armstrong graveyard; great-grandson of James and Elizabeth (Black) Bankhead, of Union District, S. C, where the former died about 1799, and of Daniel and Patsy (Knighton) Holliday, the former born on the "high hills of the Santee," in Kershaw District, S. C, where he was reared, entered the Revolutionary Army and became a sergeant, removed to west Alabama where he died in 1837, and is buried in the Armstrong graveyard, near old Moscow, and of John Hollis, born in Fairfax County, Va., removed to Pairfield District, S. C, where he died, was a captain in the Revolutionary War, serving with Gen. Francis Marion, with whom history says he was "a favorite young officer;" great-great- grandson of Daniel Holliday, of Kershaw District, S. C. The Bankhead family is of Scotch origin, while the Hollis family which migrated to Maryland, thence to Virginia, South Carolina and Alabama, is of English stock, as are the Hollidays. Senator Bankhead obtained the rudiments of an education in the country schools of his native county, and with this meager scholastic preparation, became, by wide reading and contact with the world, a man of solid and practical learning. Born and reared upon his father's plantation, located in a pioneer country, he enjoyed that freedom of action and close contact with the direct issues of life that early developed in him the qualities of mind and character that signalized his future career. At the outbreak of the war between the States, he enlisted as a private in Co. K, 16th Alabama infantry regiment, J. B. Powers, as captain and CoL William B. Wood, of Florence, as regimental conunander. He was in the conflict from the beginning to the end, and took part in the battles at Fishing Creek, Perryville, Murfreesboro, and all the battles of the Western Army, in which his command participated, except when disabled from wounds received in action. After the battle of Fishing Creek he was promoted to third lieutenant and became captain after the battle of Shiloh. He led the 16th Alabama regiment in an impetuous and successful charge, at Chickamauga, where he was wounded. As he retired, with his wound, the sedge field on which a part of the battle had been fought, caught fire and burned rapidly. He stumbled upon the prostrate form of John Custer, a private, an elderly man who had fought the day through beside three sturdy sons, and who was now wounded by a gun shot through the hips and his life imperiled by the rapidly approaching fire. Captain Bankhead, with one arm useless, lifted himself from the ground with Custer clinging to his neck, and thus bore him to a spot of safety. The rescued man survived the war many years, and was always the devoted friend of his benefactor. In 1917, when the United Confederate veterans held their memorable reunion in Washington, D. C, Captain Bankhead appeared on the floor of the senate, of which he was a member, clad in the grey uniform worn by the brave Confederate soldiers a half century before. Immediately upon his entrance that august body rose as a mark of respect to the venerable old warrior and statesman, and to the glorious valor of the Southern army. As soon as order was restored. Captain Bankhead said: "Today the shattered remnants of the army of Lee and Jackson, and the navy of the Confederacy, are in Washington, and with their sons will march in review before the President of the United States. Think, Senators, of the significance of this spectacle! A little more than half a century ago these same men, in arms, were hammering at the gates of Washington. Today, marching with feeble body and faltering step, on a mission of peace and love, not of hatred and bloodshed, in a spirit of resolute reconciliation and absolute loyalty to our flag, they voice in vibrant tones to all the world, the indissoluble union of the United States. I am grateful that God has spared me to see this day when my comrades in arms are in the capital of this nation which they struggled to destroy, but which none in this great republic are now more anxious to preserve. For four years I marched under the 'stars and bars.' Six immediate members of my family are today enlisted under the 'stars and stripes,' a son, two grandsons, two nephews, and my daughter, Mrs. Louise Lund, a volunteer Red Cross worker overseas. They will even up our records." On his motion the Senate then adjourned as a mark of respect to the Confederate veterans holding their reunion in the city. A few moments later, Captain Bankhead, clad in grey, with his colleague in the senate, Knute Nelson, of Minnesota, clad in blue, marched at the head of the Confederate hosts, and, typifying the healing of the wounds of the sections, drew the heartiest and most stirring applause of the memorable day. On the occasion of the visit of Marshal Jeffre to the senate, Senator Bankhead was presented to him by Senator Lodge of Massachusetts as the sole surviying Confederate soldier serving in that body. The great Frenchman embraced him, with a hearty "God bless you Sir," and expressions of appreciation of the high military qualities of the Confederate Army. After the close of the War of Secession, Captain Bankhead returned to his parental home and resumed his agricultural pnrsuits. He was elected to the Alabama legislature from Marion County and served during 1865 - 6; represented the twelfth senatorial district in the Alabama legislature, 1876-77, at which time he supported Gen. John T. Morgan in his first election by the legislature to the senate of the United States, a position to which he succeeded that distinguished soldier and statesman thirty years later. In 1880, he again served as a member of the lower house. His native ability so impressed itself upon the chief executive. Gov. Rufus W. Cobb, that he offered to him the wardenship of the State penitentiary, an institution requiring humane, sympathetic and practical handling; Under his regime as head of the State prison system many reforms were instituted and his urgent recommendation that a reform school for youthful delinquents be established was later fulfilled under the leadership of the club women of the State. One of his first official acts was the abolition of the small cells as sleeping quarters, and the disuse of instruments of discipline that characterized the "dark ages" in prison life in the State. On September 13, 1886, at Fayette court house, he was nominated to congress by the Democratic convention of the sixth congressional district, and elected to that office in November, serving continuously from. March 4, 1887, to March 4, 1907, a period of twenty years. He was a member of the committee on public buildings and grounds during his entire service in the national house of representatives, and chairman of that committee during the period of Democratic control, at which time the great and incomparably beautiful library of congress at Washington was built. He was able to secure for his own State, appropriations for a number of public buildings and was the consistent advocate of government owned buildings for post offices and other federal agencies. After March 4, 1897, he was appointed a member of the committee on rivers and harbors, and through his efforts, the Warrior River was made the longest canal fixed waterway in the world. In the early years of his labors for that stream it was of so little commercial importance, and held in such small esteem by some as a source of navigation that it was facetiously proposed by opposing congressional colleagues that the course be paved. But unmoved by ridicule or opposition he pushed steadily forward with his efforts. One of the gigantic locks, sixty-three feet high, and backs the water of the Warrior for a distance of seventy-five miles, and forms a splendid lake which was named in his honor, "Lake Bankhead." During the period of the European War, the Warrior River served as one of the arteries of trade which contributed to the defeat of the German empire. The government has made the Warrior River an integral part of its inland waterways system, and operates from the rich mineral, agricultural, manufacturing and wholesale district of Birmingham to the Gulf of Mexico, a line of self-propelled barges bearing a part of the commerce of the world, being one of the few inland trade arteries which the government is able to operate without an annual excessive appropriation to eliminate deficits. Concurrent with his efforts towards developing the Warrior River, Captain Bankhead worked for the deepening of the harbor channel in Mobile Bay, and soon that port became a deep sea shipping point. In a primary election, held August 27, 1906, in contest with six other aspirants, Captain Bankhead was nominated in the Democratic primaries of Alabama to assume the first vacancy that might occur in the State's representation in the U. S. senate. On the death of Senator John T. Morgan, June 18, 1907, Senator Bankhead's nomination by the people was confirmed by the legislature then in session. Upon taking his seat in the senate, he immediately undertook to impress on congress the feasibility of government cooperation with the states in the construction of highways. His views by some were regarded as chimerical and by many as socialistic, but in this as in his waterways work, he was unmoved by opposition. His first reward came in a congressional appropriation of $500,000 with which to make a practical test of federal aid to good roads. Such test was entirely satisfactory, and congress very soon agreed to an appropriation of $75,000,000. Within ten years after his first good roads appropriation was made by congress the people of the United States had caught his enthusiasm and instructed their representatives in congress to vote for the Bankhead good roads bill carrying an appropriation of $275,000,000. In recognition of his services, the United States good roads association, elected him its first president, and retained him at the head of the organization until his death. His name was given by a grateful public to one of the transcontinental highways, the "Bankhead Highway," which begins at the ''Zero Stone" in Washingrton, D. C, marking Jointly the beginning of the Bankhead and the Lincoln Highways, and terminating in San Diego, Calif. Under orders of the war department, a motor convoy traversed the Bankhead Highway during the summer of 1920. Senator Bankhead was for twenty-five years vice-president of the Alabama good roads association. He was the author of the amendment to the constitution of Alabama, which permitted the State to engage in building good roads and creating a State highway commission. Senator Bankhead collaborated and shared honors equally with Senator Underwood in securing congressional legislation which resulted in the development by the government of Muscle Shoals, in the Tennessee River, and the construction of plants for the filtration of atmospheric nitrogen, and the construction of Wilson Dam, destined to be when completed one of the greatest waterpowers in the world, involving in all the expenditure of more than 1100,000,000. In both houses of congress Senator Bankhead played a conspicuous part in the development of the many waterway projects of the nation, rivers, harbors and water power development. He was chairman of the senate committee on post offices and post roads and of the committee on postal salaries, and was an earnest advocate of mail efficiency and adequate pay for postal employes. At the expiration of his last term in the house. President Roosevelt appointed him to membership on a commission to make a scientific study of national waterways and power sites, but he took his seat in the senate prior to the organization of the commission, which later was dissolved because of some legal technicality in the act creating it. In 1912, Senator Bankhead managed the presidential campaign of Senator Underwood, of Alabama, the latter at that time being chairman of the ways and means committee of the house. This effort to nominate a southern man for that high office was the first serious and organized attempt following the War of Secession. Senator Bankhead was essentially a practical man, straightforward in his dealings, despising hypocrisy and pretense. His ability to read character enabled him to avoid many entanglements that often beset a public man, and his rugged honesty was a tower of strength in the accomplishment of his life's work. On November 18, 1916, Senator and Mrs. Bankhead celebrated their golden wedding anniversary at their home, "Sunset," in Jasper. The celebration also involved an appreciation of the election of their son, William Brockman, to membership in the house of representatives, U. S. congress. The election of the younger Bankhead to the house, while his father was serving in the senate was an unprecedented event in American history, and later it frequently happened that while the Senator was called by the vice-president to preside in his place in the Senate, the son would be presiding over the deliberations of the house at the request of the speaker. At the time of his death Senator Bankhead had served twenty years in the house and thirteen years in the senate, making a total of thirty-three years in the two houses of congress. He was a Mason, having at one time been grand master of the State; a Democrat; Methodist; Ku Kluz during the reconstruction period, a member of the Sons of the Revolution and United Confederate Veterans. Married: November 13, 1866, at Wetumpka, to Tallulah James, daughter of James Henry and Mary Elizabeth (Stairley) Brockman, natives of Greenville District, S. C, the former a merchant and planter, who died at the age of twenty-two, while the latter lived to the age of ninety-three, and is buried in Jasper; grand-daughter of Thomas Patterson and Mary (Kilgore) Brockman, the former a planter and merchant, colonel of the lower regiment, Greenville District, S. C. militia, member of both branches of the South Carolina legislature during a period of forty years, representing his district during some of the State's most crucial periods, member of the State conventions of 1832, called to nullify the act of congress imposing duties for protection, and in 1852, which convention was called for the purpose of seceding from the Federal union, he being all the while a firm and decided union man, but accepting the will of the majority, and later losing in the War of Secession his only remaining two sons, both high ranking officers, and of George and Parmelia (Lester) Stairley, of Greenville District, S. C; great-granddaughter of Archibald and Elizabeth (Crymes) Isster, of Virginia, and of James and Keziah (Greer) Kilgore, of Spartanburg, S. C, and of Henry and Susannah (Patterson) Brockman, natives of Virginia who removed to South Carolina about 1790, settling in Spartanburg or Greenville District, a planter and slave owner; great-great-granddaughter of Col. Benjamin Kilgore, and wife, who was a Miss McRary, the former a captain in the Indian campaigns during the colonial period and major of cavalry under General Brannon in the Revolutionary War and of John and Amelia (Martin) or (Edwards) Brockman, the founder of the family in America, natives of England, who located first in Virginia, probably in Givange or Albemarle Counties, their descendants going later to North Carolina and thence to South Carolina, and of George Crimes, of Virginia, son of Baronet Crymes of English parentage, born in Pockham, Wales, who inherited a barony and was made a knight of the garter by the King of England, migrated to America in the early colonial period, and settled in King and Queen County on the York River, where he built a home which he fortified with cannon against Indian attack; great-great-great-granddaughter of William Kilgore whose ancestors migrated from Carlisle, Pa., to Laurens and later Greenville Districts, S. C. The Brockman family was seated in Essex and Kent Counties, England, the homestead and estate "Beechborough," bought in the year, 1455, by Sir Henry Brockman, still stands, and is owned by members of the Brockman family. The church register shows an entry of the name in the year 1200 A. D. A further account may be seen in Burke's "Landed Gentry." Children: 1. Louise, m. (1) Col. William Hayne Perry, lawyer, planter, officer in Hampton's Legion, C. S. Army, member of congress, son of Govv. B. F. Perry, of Greenville, S. C, (2) Arthur Graves Lund, Washington, D. C; 2. Marie Susan, (q. V.) m. Thomas M. Owen (q. v.) ; 3. John Hollis, jr., (q. v.); 4. William Brockman, (q. v.); 5. Col. Henry M., (q. v.). Last residence: Jasper.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

BRADLEY. RICHARD CARRINGTON, public official, was bom in 1839, at "Auburn," near Cartersville. Cumberland County, Va., and died March 20. 1902, at St. Petersburg, Fla.; son of William Royal and Ellen Sarah (Carrington) Bradley, natives of Virginia who emigrated to Alabama in 1848, settled in Marion County, and followed farming. Mr. Bradley was reared in Marion County, and attended the public schools there. In 1860, when he was twenty- one years old, he was elected clerk of the circuit court of that county, and was re-elected in 1864. He enlisted for service in the C. S. Army, and was made captain of his company, which was soon after mustered out because it was not needed at the time. He enlisted again, later, but was rejected on account of his health. During the war, the country about his home was infested with bands of robbers and stragglers from demoralized armies. On the night of April 9. 1865, when he was returning home from a call upon a neighbor, the house in which he boarded was attacked by three robbers. He was the only man about the place except a very old one, and being unarmed, was forced to stand and see them, unresisted, carry off the plunder and march him with it to a neighbor's house. They were in the act of robbing that, when Mr. Bradley seized a shot gun, lying on a bed by him, and shot the captain of the squad dead. The others escaped but were subsequently caught and executed by lynch law. Following this event, Mr. Bradley was the leader in a movement to rid the county of these bands of tories, and was successful in their extermination. In 1868 he moved to Elyton, and in 1872, to Oxmoor, where he resided until appointed county clerk for a term of six years. Following the expiration of his term of office in 1886, he moved to St. Petersburg, Fla., and engaged in fruit culture. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. Married: September 6, 1866, Sarah, of Pickens County, daughter of Rev. Jeremiah Godi and Mary Ann (Stokes) Gurley. of Detroit, Marion County, and later of Jefferson County. Children: 1. John Gurley Bankhead (q. v.); 2. Lee Carrington (q. v.). Last residence: St. Petersburg, Fla.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

CLARK, JOHN BUNYAN, teacher, was born June 6, 1884, near Hamilton, Marion County;son of Henry Turner and Missouri Ann (Carpenter) Clark, who lived on a farm near Hamilton, the former of whom was a farmer, carpenter. Primitive Baptist preacher, merchant, and machinist, was a member of the State legislature at one time, and was organizer in the work of the Farmers' Union; grandson of Ellis Jasper and Jamie Catherine (Cantrell) Clark, who lived at Spartanburg, S. C, and of Ellis Carpenter, of Newnan, Ga. He obtained his early education at Macedonia church or schoolhouse, and at other schools near Hamilton; attended West Alabama agricultural school, 1902-1906, teaching schools during the summer months of those years; and was graduated B. S., from the Alabama polytechnic institute at Auburn, 1908. During the summer of 1906, he taught at Goldmine, Marion County, and after graduation, became principal of the Union Springs high school, 1907-1908, declining a fellowship at the Alabama polytechnic institute in order to teach. He was principal of the Nanafalia high school, 1908-1909; received a scholarship to Vanderbilt university and became a fellow there, 1909-1910; received the degree of M. A. from Vanderbilt university, 1910; became a student on a scholarship at Harvard university, 1910-1911, receiving the degree of A. M., there, in 1911; and registered as candidate for the Ph. D. degree in history and political science at Harvard. He was superintendent of the public schools of Linden, 1911-1912; principal of Marion County high school, 1912-1913; and was re-elected to that position, 1913-1914. He is now assistant professor of history at Alabama polytechnic institute. He is a Democrat, and was a member of the Harvard Democratic Club, 1910-1911; and is a teacher in the Sunday school of the Missionary Baptist church. Mr. Clark is author of a "Sketch book of Alabama History," which has never been published. Married: August 30, 1911, at Hamilton, Lillie Pearce, daughter of Judge Mack Pearce of Winfield. She is a graduate of Athens College, B. S., 1908, and of the University of Alabama, A. B., 1911. She was principal of the Double Springs School, 1906- 1907, and taught at Athens College, 1908-1909. Since her marriage, she has taught as her husband's first assistant. Residence: Auburn. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

COLLINS, Dr. JAMES W. , a prominent physician and surgeon of Guin, Marion County, Ala. was born in Lamar County, December 17, 1851, the sixth in a family of eleven children born to James T. and Mary M. (SHAW) COLLINS, natives respectively of Georgia and Tennessee.  The paternal grandfather was GEORGE COLLINS of Georgia,and the maternal grandfather was JOSEPH SHAW of Tennessee.  JAMES W. COLLINS was reared in Alabama,and received his early education at private schools, preparatory to his entrance into the Louisville Ky. Medical College in 1874 where he was under training for one session, after which he returned to Lamar County, Ala. where he practiced medicine until 1890, when he removed to Guin, Marion County,w here he now has a lucrative list of patients.  he is also a merchant and farmer.  In his capacity as merchant he carries a stock valued at $3,000 and his farm of 300 acres is a model of neatness.  Besides his farm he owns town property valued at $5,000 and is altogether a prosperous and honored citizen.  The marriage of the doctor took place in 1878, to Miss FRANCES TAYLOR, a native of Alabama and daughter of PINCKNEY TAYLOR of Georgia.  This union has been favored with the birth of five children named as follows: WILLIAM O., CHARLIE E., THOMAS E., JAMES E. and AGGIE.  The doctor is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and of the Masonic fraternity, in both of which bodies he has the admiration and esteem of all the other members.  In politics he is a democrat, and although he has never himself aspires to political preferment, he does all in his power to elect good and efficient democrats to the county and state offices.  Dr. Collins a a self-made business man.  He began his career at the age of twenty, with no capital save determination and a sound intellect, his present comfortable circumstances being the result. Source: Memorial Record of Alabama.  By Hannis Taylor,  Brant & Fuller Publishers,  Madison, Wis. 1893.  Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

COOPER, DANIEL N., United States Commissioner, with residence at Hamilton, Marion County, Ala, is of ante-Revolutionary stock and of Scotch-Irish extraction.  He was born in Knox County, Ohio, March 31, 1842, the fourth in a family of six children, born to THOMPSON and REBECCA (CRAIG) COOPER.  His paternal grandparents were DANIEL and ELLEN COOPER of New Jersey, the former being a relative of JOHN WITHERSPOON, of that state - a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The maternal grandparents were WILLIAM and MARY CRAIG, natives respectively of New Jersey and Pennsylvania.  DANIEL M. COOPER was educated at Mount Vernon (Ohio) High school and passed his early years in the state of his birth.  In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, Ninety-Sixth Ohio infantry, was commissioned first lieutenant of the company, ann served until the close of the struggle, taking part in the siege of Vicksburg, the battle of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, around Mobile and at Grand Couteau.  He was in Buell's Army during that general's race with Bragg through Kentucky, and was finally mustered out at Mobile.  In 1867 he came to Alabama and engaged in cotton planting in Lawrence County for ten years.  In 1878 he was appointed Deputy United States Marshal, and filled the position four years, doing much to exterminate the "moonshiners" in western Alabama; he was then appointed United States commissioner, the office he at present holds.  He is quite prominent in state politics, and has been a member of the republican state executive committee for a number of years.  He was a delegate to the republican national convention at Chicago in 1888, and to the convention at Minneapolis in 1892.  Mr. COOPER has not only taken an active part in politics in Alabama but has also interested himself in her material progress.  He was a director in the Warrior Coalfield Railway Company, whose road was designated to penetrate one of the finest mineral regions of the state, and is very liberal in his contributions to all enterprises tending to develop the state's natural resources.  He is the owner of 2,500 acres of fine land, of which 200 are under cultivation, and considerable other property.  He is a thorough-going business man, full of enterprise and public spirit, which qualities have gained for him the high position he holds in the esteem of the community in which he so happily cast his lots. Source: Memorial Record of Alabama.  By Hannis Taylor,   Brant & Fuller Publishers, Madison, Wis. 1893.  Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

COOPER, DANIEL NELSON, business man, was born March 31, 1842, in Knox County, 0.; son of Thompson and Rebecca (Craig) Cooper; grandson of Daniel and Ellen Cooper of New Jersey, the former a relative of John Witherspoon, a signer of the Dedaration of Independece, and of William and Mary Craig, natives respectively of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. His maternal ancestors were Scotch-Irish, one of them being an aide-de-camp to William of Orange at the battle of the Boyne. Another ancestor was an officer in the British navy, and sympathizing with the struggle for independence, resigned his commission and remained in this country. The Cooper family moved west in the early part of the nineteenth century, located at Mt Vernon, O., and went into the iron foundry business and the manufacture of plows. Mr. Cooper was educated at Mt Vernon high school. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. A., Ninety-sixth Ohio infantry, U. S. Army, was commissioned first lieutenant of the company, and served until the dose of the war, taking part in the siege of Vicksburg, the battles of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, around Mobile and at Grand Couteau. He was in Buell's army during that general's race with Bragg through Kentucky. After being mustered out of the service, he returned home and began the study of law under his brother. Col. W. C. Cooper. He was ordered south for his health, and located in Huntsville, in the summer of 1866. He went into the cotton buying business at that place, and moved from there to Courtland, where he engaged in planting on a large scale. In 1878 he was appointed deputy U. S. marshal, and filled the position for four years; and then was appointed U. S. commissioner. In September, 1897, he was appointed by President McKinley U. S. marshal of the northern district of Alabama. He is a Republican, and has been chairman of the county and district, and a member of the state, executive committees for years. He has been a delegate to four national Republican conventions, and in 1898 was nominated on the Republican and Populist tickets for congress from the sixth congressional district, but was defeated by Hon. J. H. Bankhead. He was a personal friend and supporter of President McKinley. He was at one time a director in the Warrior Coalfield Company. Residence: Hamilton, Marion County.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

DAVIS, SAMUEL

Samuel McGee Davis was born April 24, 1844 in Gwinnett County, Georgia. He was the son of Jesse B. Davis and Elvira McGee, both natives of South Carolina who moved with their families to Georgia, and after marrying moved to St. Clair County, Alabama. Samuel was just seventeen years old when he enlisted in 1861 while a resident of St. Clair County, and he served until the end of the war. In 1864, Samuel married Emily Lacy, daughter of Abner and Martha Lacey. By 1870, the couple is living in Itawamba County with their children, but in 1880, the family had moved just across the state line into Marion County where they purchased a farm on Bull Mountain Creek. Children of Samuel and Emily are: William Columbus Davis (Lt. Governor of the State of Alabama 1927-1931), Lula E. Davis, Jesse Abner Davis, Mary Emma Davis, Sheriff Morgan Davis, Webster Bonaparte Davis, and Pearl Davis. Samuel and Emily are buried in Providence Cemetery in Itawamba County, north of Tremont. (Researched and submitted by Mona Robinson Mills)

DAVIS, WILLIAM COLUMBUS, lawyer, was born August 5, 1867 in luka. Miss.; son of Samuel McGee and Emily J. (Lacy) Davis, the former a native of Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Ga; removed in early life to St Clair County; and at seventeen years of age joined the Confederate Army, serving throughout the struggle; grandson of Jesse Davis, and of Judge Abner W. Lacy, both of St Clair County. Mr. Davis was educated in the Mississippi common schools; and at the age of eighteen had attained such efficiency that he began teaching. He later studied law with CoL Harvey Murphy, of Aberdeen, and began the practice of his profession at Fulton, in that state. Soon afterward he removed to Marion County, locating at Hamilton; served as solicitor of that county; In 1892 was elected a member of the State Democratic executive committee, and re-elected in 1894. In 1894 he was elected to the house of representatives from Marion County, and served three terms in succession, 1894-95, 1896-97, and 1898-99. While in the legislature he secured the passage of a hill, establishing five additional agricultural schools and experiments stations, located in the first fourth, fifth, sixth and ninth congressional districts. He removed in 1899 to Jasper, where he has since resided, engaged in the practice of law. In 1915 he was again elected to the house of representatives, and was chairman of the Judiciary committee. In 1904 he served as presidential elector for the sixth congressional district He is a Democrat; a Baptist; and a Mason. Married: July 24, 1895 to Maude Elizabeth, daughter of Alanson J. and Elizabeth J. (Nethery) Gray, of Choctaw County. Mrs. Davis is a sister of H(Mi. Oscar L. Gray (q. v.). Residence: Jasper. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

DUNKIN, REV. GEORGE M. G.

Rev. G. M. G. DUNKIN was born in Marion County, Ala., May 2, 1854; and died at Moulton, Ala., in September 1888.  He was born of the Holy Spirit on the Yorkville Circuit.  When only twelve years of age he joined the Chuch.  in his eighteenth year he was licensed to preach, and joined the North Alabama Conference in 1875.  He served the following charges; North River Mission, one year; Pikeville Mission, three years; Waterloo Circuit, two years; then Moulton Circuit until death ended his labors.  Brother Dunkin was ordained deacon by Bishop Keener at Gadsden in 1877, and elder by Bishop McTyeire at Oxford in 1880.  His education was limited; but having a strong mind, by close application to books he constantly improved in knowledge.  His last year's work was marked by a devotion and a faithfulness that led to happy results in advancing every interest of the Chruch under his pastoral care.  In his last days, while sick, he was firm in faith, instant in prayer, and joyful in hope.  Patient, resigned, and confident, he passed off without fear, praying that his ministerial mantle might fall upon his only son.  Thus ended the comparatively brief life of a man who had reasonably expected a longer period of service for his Lord in the earthly vineyard. But the will of God is accomplished.  Source: Memorial Sketches of the Lives and Labors of the Deceased Ministers of the North Alabama Conference - Methodist Episcopal Church South 1870 - 1912. by Rev. W. T. Andrews - 1912. Found on InternetArchives.org

FITE, ARTHUR FREEMAN, lawyer, was born February 29, 1880, in Franklin County; son of Bloomer Rankin and Jennie (Hogue) Fite, the former a native of Gainesville, Hall County, Ga., for many years a lawyer of Hamilton, Marion County, and was register in chancery of that county for fifteen years, the latter was from Collinsville; brother of Ernest Baxter Fite (q. v.) Mr. Fite was eduated in the West Alabama agricultural college, and read law under his father. He was admitted to the bar at Hamilton, where he practiced until 1902, when he removed to New Decatur. He was elected city attorney of New Decatur by the city council in 1903. He later removed to Hamilton. He is a Democrat; Methodist; and a member of the Odd Fellows. Residence: Hamilton.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

FITE, ERNEST BAXTER, lawyer and legislator, was born February 21, 1882, at Belgreen, Franklin County; son of Bloomer R. and Jennie (Hogue) Fite; and brother of Arthur F. Fite (q. v.). He is a practicing lawyer of Hamilton; was a member of the State senate in 1911, from the thirty-first senatorial district, and of the house of representatives from Marion County, 1915. He is a Democrat Married: December 30, 1914, at Montgomery, to Minnie Watt, daughter of Capt. Hubbell and Mary C. (Myers) Pierce, of that place. Residence: Hamilton.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

FITE, FRED, lawyer and member Alabama legislature, was born May 2, 1891, at Hamilton, Marion County; son of Bloomer R. and Jennie (Hoge) Fite, and brother of Arthur F. Fite (q. v.). He was educated in the public schools of Alabama; at the West Alabama agricultural college; and at the University of Alabama, where he graduated. LL. B., 1912. He located in Tuscaloosa for the practice of his profession, but later removed to Birmingham. He enlisted in Battery C, Alabama national guard, and later became second lieutenant in Troop B, 1st Alabama cavalry, but resigned before the troops were ordered to Texas for border duty. He re-entered the service when war was declared against Germany and served in the air forces of the United States. After the war ended he returned to his law practice in Birmingham. Mr. Fite was a member of the house of representatives of 1916, from Tuscaloosa County. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason; a Knight ot Pythias; and a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity. Married: in Birmingham, to Wilbur Leake. Residence: Birmingham. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

HAMILTON, ALBERT J. - of Hamilton, Marion County, Ala. is a native of the county, and was born December 7, 1838, the second of eight children born to JOHN and JANE (HAMILTON) HAMILTON, natives respectively, of Georgia and Tennessee.  MARTIN HAMILTON , his paternal grandfather, was a native of Indiana, and his maternal grandfather, GEORGE HAMILTON was born in tennessee.  ALBERT J. HAMILTON was reared and educated in his native county, and in 1861 enlisted in Company G, Sixteenth Alabama Infantry, in which he performed active duty for fifteen months, when he was released on account of ill health.  After an absence from the army of about four months, he assisted in organizing Company E, Fifth Mississippi Calvary, and was elected its third lieutenant, and was wounded at the battle of Thompson's Station, while leading his company.  After serving some time in this company, he raised a company in Marion County, Ala. of which he was made captain, and which became Company F, of the Seventh Alabama regiment.  This company he led until the end of the war.  During his military service he took part at Thompson's Station, Harisburg, Nunon and Athens.  In the battle at Thompson's Station he was wounded as above mentioned, in the left shoulder, by a minie ball, which caused his retirement for two months, after which he returned and fought until the close of hostilities, when he was paroled at Decatur.  Capt. HAMILTON has taken quite an active part in the politics of Marion county and of the state, being an ardent democrat, and never having voted any other ticket.  In 1865, he was elected sheriff, and served one term; he also served in the legislature in 1869, 1872-4 and 1875, with much credit to himself, and to the entire satisfaction of his constituents.  In his vocation as planter he has been altogether successful, and in conjunction with farming, he conducts a grist mill.  His real estate interests comprise 8,000 acres, 300 of which he keeps under cultivation.  In 1865 the captain was happily married to Miss MARY L. TERRELL, a native of Alabama, and daughter of Judge JOHN D. TERRELL, of Georgia, who was a judge of probate for forty consecutive years in Marion County, Ala.  To the union of Mr. and Mrs. HAMILTON seven children have been born, viz: ALBERT J., ELLA, IDA, EFFIE, JOHN, ICY, and HARRY.  Mr. and Mrs. HAMILTON are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, while Mr. HAMILTON has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for many years, and the family enjoy the respect of the entire community. Source: Memorial Record of Alabama.  By Hannis Taylor,   Brant & Fuller Publishers, Madison, Wis. , 1893.  Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

HALEY. CHARLIE LITTLE, live stock dealer, was born July 22, 1859. at Haleys, Marion County; son of Green M. and Juliet Ann (Wright) Haley, the former born near Bowling Green, Ky., who lived at Haleys, Marion County, was a minister of the Christian church, and represented Marion County in the State legislature at one time; grandson of Allen Haley, and of Charlie Wright, who lived in St Clair County. He was educated in the common schools of Marion County, and attended college at Bradyville. Tenn. He was a merchant at Thorn Hill, 1883-1888; moved to Winston County in 1888, and opened a mercantile business on the new railroad at the site of the town of Haleyville. which was named for him; sold his mercantile business in January, 1906, and established the Traders and Farmers Bank, of which he was president for three years; resigned the bank presidency, and located in Florence as a live stock dealer. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1901 from the Seventh congressional district; was a delegate to the national Democratic convention which met at Kansas City, Mo., July 4, 1900; and was chairman of the Democratic executive committee of Winston County in 1901. He is a member of the Christian church and a Mason. Married: December 18. 1879 at Thorn Hill, Marion County, to Martha Phillips, daughter of John R. and Mahalle Phillips, who lived at that place. Children: 1. Cora L., m. Pinkney Curtis; 2. Allen B.; 3. Arthur C; 4. Ida A., m. Clarence Gravlee; 6. Charlie L., jr.. m. Ninion Wallace; 6. James H.; 7. Emmett L.; 8. Joseph Wheeler; 9. Ruby L. Residence: Florence. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

HALL, WILLIAM WALKER, farmer and legislator, was born June 25,___ , at Halls Mills, Marion County; son of William Rufus and Martha Jane (Morrow) Hall; grandson of Morris and Sarah Hall, who removed to Lawrence County, from North Carolina in 1821, where they resided the rest of their lives, and of Samuel and Hanna Morrow, of Dallas, later Perry County. He was educated in the common schools of his native county. He is a farmer. He has twice been sheriff of Marion County, 1892-96, and 1900-06. He represented his county in the legislature of 1919. Married: Mary Lou Ellen, daughter of John Middleton and Temperance (Brown) Goggans; granddaughter of Col. Kimbrough T. Brown, representative in the State legislature from Marion County, 1851, and 1855-59. Residence: Hamilton. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

HOLLIS, JOHN DORMAN, business man, was born June 29, 1874, near Moscow, Lamar County; son of Daniel William and Sophronia (Guyton) Hollis, the former a native of Moscow, Marion County, who lived at that place until the War of Secession, served in Co. K,Sixteenth Alabama regiment, and received two wounds at the battle of Murfreesboro, and represented Sanford County in the State legislature; grandson of Derrill U. and Mary (Goodwin) Hollis, who moved from Spartanburg, S. C, to Moscow, the former who represented Marion County in the State legislature in 1881, 1882, 1833, 1834, 1838, and 1863, and of John B. and Sarah (Kennedy) Guyton, who moved from Spartanburg, S. C, to Tipper County, Miss., in 1846. Mr. Hollis attended the country schools of Lamar County, and was graduated from West Alabama agricultural school in 1898, receiving the first diploma issued by the school and the only one issued that year. He taught as principal in the Sulligent academy, 1898-1899; taught at Pocahontas, Walker County, September 1, 1899; became store manager of the Gilreath coal and iron company; and later of the Pratt consolidated coal company. He has studied mining and holds a first class mine foreman's certificate; is a Justice of the peace; a Democrat; a Methodist; a Royal Arch Mason; an Odd Fellow; and a' Knight of Pythias. Married: June 26, 1902, at Littleton, Jefferson County, to Mertie L., daughter of John Sidney and Mary (Morgan) Waldrop, who lived near Jasper. Children: 1. lone; 2. Dorman W.; 3. Paul Edd; 4. Mary Kate; 6. John Sidney; 6. Ruth. Residence: Quinton. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, Vol III, Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

HULSEY, NEDOM W., merchant and farmer of Guin, Ala. is a native of Carroll County, Ga. and was born July 23, 1843.  He is the third of a family of eleven children born to KENION and MILLIE (SANDERS) HULSEY, also natives of Georgia.  His paternal grandparents were CHARLES and NANCY (PATE) HULSEY, and his maternal grandparents were JONATHAN and LUCY (ADAIR) SANDERS, all of the state of Georgia.  In 1849 KENION HULSEY came to Alabama, and settled in cherokee County, where he followed farming until 1856, when he removed to Jefferson county, and there passed the remainder of his days, dying in 1872, highly respected by all who knew him.  NEDOM W. HULSEY was reared in Alabama and here received his education.  In 1862 he enlisted in Company D, Third Confederate Cavalry, Gen. Joe Wheeler's Corps, and took part in the battles of Fort Donelson, Bowling Green, Murfreesboro, Nashville, Chickamauga, New Hope Church, Atlanta, and Franklin.  He rose to the rank of captain, and served in that capacity for two years.  While at home on furlough, he was captured in Jefferson county, Ala. and was sent to Montgomery, and detained as a prisoner of war twenty-one days, when he was paroled.  On his return home, he engaged in farming, which vocation he followed until 1876, when he became a merchant at Guin, in which business he still continues, in conjunction with farming.  he is still the owner of 200 acres of good land in Jefferson county; he owns beside five building lots in Guin, and his store is well stocked; he does a thriving trade, which justifies him in placing some of his surplus capital at interest.  Mr HULSEY has been twice married.  His first wife, whom he wedding in 1868 was Miss SARAH A., daughter of NICHOLAS J. SANDERS of Alabama and to this union was born one child, PARLEE. For his second wife, Mr. HULSEY chose Miss MARGARET, daughter of MOSES EDES, of the same state, and this marriage has been blessed with one child, JULIUS. Mr and Mrs. HULSEY are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, while he is a Mason in good standing.  He began his business life at the age of twenty-one, without any capital; but strict application to business, economy and fair dealing, have brought their reward. In politics he is a democrat, and though he aspires to no political office, he exercises his franchise toward the election of good and capable men to the various offices of the county and state, within the gift of the people. Source: Memorial Record of Alabama.  By Hannis Taylor,   Brant & Fuller Publishers, Madison, Wis.  1893.  Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

JONES, GEORGE W. of Bastrop, [TX] was born in Marion County, Alabama, September 5, 1828; was raised in Tipton County, Tennessee; removed to Bastrop, Texas in the winter of 1848; his education was limited; is by profession a lawyer; in 1856 he was elected District Attonrey; when the war came on in 1861 he strongly opposed secession, but acquiesced in revolution; entered the Confederate army as a private; was elected Lieutenant Colonel and returned to his home in Bastrop County; he was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1866, from the county of Bastrop, and on the adoption of the constituion made by said convention was elected Lietuenant governor of the state; he, with others, was removed by General Sheridan as "an impediment to reconstruction;" was elected to the Forty-sixth Congress and was re-elected to the Fourty-seventh Congress as a Greenbacker, receiving 22,941 votes against 22,708 voters for S. Shepartd, Democrat. (Source: Forty-Seventh Congress Congressional Directory, compiled for the use of Congress by Ben Perley Poore, Clerk of Printing to December 11, 1882 - Seriel Set Vol No. 2083; Report: S. Misc Doc 8)

LETSON, WILLIAM PALESTINE of Glen Allen, Ala., was born. Dec. 4, 1870, at Falls City, Winston county, Ala.; is the son of William Henry and Susan Emeline (Sleward) Letson, the former of Fredonia, Chambers county, Ala., the latter of Jasper, Walker county, Ala.; and the grandson of George John and Nancy ( Martin) Letson of Fredonia, Ala., and of Manly Palestine and Susan Steward of Jasper, Ala. The great-grandfather Letson was a soldier of the Revolution, and the grandfather Letson was in the War of Secession, in Va. The family came of Dutch ancestors. G. J. Letson removed from Georgia to Chambers county, Ala., in 1848, and in 1866 to Lawrence county where he died in 1905, age 88 years. William P. Letson was educated in the common schools, and at Glen Allen. He is a teacher, and was once County Sunt, of Ed. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason and an Odd Fellow. He was married, March 29, 1903. in Marion county, Ala., to Martha Elizabeth McWhirter, the daughter of Rev. Andrew Jackson and Nancy Jane McWhirter of Strickland, Ala. On her maternal side her great-grandfather, Archibald Whitehead, was with Gen. Andrew Jackson in the Creek War, 1812. Source: Alabama Official and Statistical Register - by Alabama Department of Archives and History. Compiled by Thomas M. Owen, LL. D., Director , Montgomery, Ala. THI Brown Printing Company 1911 - Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

LINDSAY, JAMES, soldier of the American Revolution, and a resident of Marion County; private, particular service not show; enrolled on August 22, 1835, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20 --- Pension Book, State branch Bank, Mobile

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer

MAXWELL, GEORGE WASHINGTON, farmer and legislator, was born January 25, 1843, in Union Township, Hunderton County, N. J.; son of Henry and Christeann (Manning) Maxwell, of that place; and great-grandson of William Maxwell, a Revolutionary soldier. He is of Scotch Irish descent; was educated in the common schools of his native state, and came to Alabama in 1869, where he has since resided, and farmed. He represented Marion County in the legislature of 1900-01. He is a Democrat; and while not a church member, holds to Presbyterian belief. Married: November, 1867, in Tennessee, to Mary Catherine Inman. Residence: Hamilton. Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Biography by Thomas McAldory Owens.  Published by S. J. Clark Publishing Company 1921.  Submitted by Veneta McKinney

McWHORTER, GEORGE TILGHMAN of Riverton, Colbert County. was born, April 11, 1849. at this place, and is the son of George Washington and Elvira Caroline. (Tucker) McWhorter and the grandson of Hansell McWhorter and of John Tucker, who lived at Bexar, Ala. Hansell McWhorter was one of the early emigrants to Madison county, and later lived in Lawrence county. His son, George W. McWhorter lived in Lawrence county in his boyhood; afterwards was a merchant in Tuscumbia; and in 1836 was 1st lt. of a rifle company commanded by Capt. Tom Cooke that served that year in the Seminole War. John Tucker was the son of George Tucker, an English immigrant to Virginia, later to North Carolina, and was the father of Governor Tilghman M. Tucker of Miss. Senator McWhorter's early education was received in the schools of East Port, Miss.; his academic education in the Caledonia high school in Lowndes county, Miss . and his medical education was received in the Medical College of Louisville, Ky. in 1872'1873. For 34 years has practiced medicine in Riverton: served as representative from Colbert county in the Legislature from 1884 to 1886; is vice-president of the Tennessee River Medical Association; and in 1905 was president of Colbert county branch of Southern Cotton Association; and is now Senator from the thirty-first senatorial district of Alabama. He is a Democrat, and has served on various committees of the party; is also a Mason. As an author he has published many monographs on different diseases. On April 2, 1882, was married to Susan, daughter of Kibble and Mary Anne (Marchbanks) Terry.  Source: Alabama Official and Statistical Register  1907- by Alabama Department of Archives and History. Compiled by Thomas M. Owen, LL. D., Director , Montgomery, Ala., Brown Printing Company 1907 - Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

MITCHELL, CHARLES ERASTUS of Hamilton, Marion county, was born in that place, Sepr. 2, 1868, and is the son of Andrew D. and Lourilda E. Cagle (Mitchell), who was the daughter of Lloyd Cagle of Winston Co., Ala. Charles Erastus Mitchell received his primary education at Thorn Hill. Alabama, and was graduated from the Florence Normal College in June, 1890. Since 1893 he has practiced law in Hamilton; was a member cf the board of aldermen of Hamilton, 1896-1900; was superintendent of education of Marion county, 1896 to 1898, and 1900 to 1904; and was Democratic nominee for Marion county to the proposed constitutional convention in the spring of 1898. From 1904 to 1906 was chairman of the Democratic executive committee. He is a Mason, an Odd Fellow, and a Woodman of the World. On Nov. 25, 1896, at Hamilton, he was married to Leota, daughter of Jason Parks and Adaline (Weatherford) Ford, all of Marion county.Source: Alabama Official and Statistical Register  1907- by Alabama Department of Archives and History. Compiled by Thomas M. Owen, LL. D., Director , Montgomery, Ala., Brown Printing Company 1907 - Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

NESMITH, CHRISTOPHER C. lawyer, was bom October 29, 1878, near Pikeville, Marion County; son of Hon. Thomas Benton and Minnie Catherine (McLean) Nesmith, the former who was a native of Morgan County was a lawyer, resided at Vernon after 1875, was a member of the constitutional convention of 1876, a member of the legislature of 1884- 85, was solicitor of the circuit comprising Lamar, Marion, Winston, Walker, Jefferson and Tuscaloosa Counties; grandson of Thomas and Elisabeth (Roberts) Nesmith of South Carolina and Tennessee; great-grandson of Alexander and Elisabeth (Martin) Nesmith, and of Lochius Roberts of Pennsylvania; great-great-grandson of Thomas Nesmith, a veteran of the Revolutionary War, and who was one of the earliest settlers in Alabama. Mr. Nesmith received his early education at the Vernon institute, and later entered the University of Alabama, from which he was graduated A. B., 1894. He was admiUed to the bar in 1894; became a partner of Walter Nesmith at Vernon, 1895; was deputy solicitor for Lamar County, 1898-1903; was register in chancery; was a member of the constitutional convention of 1901; in 1908 formed a partnership with Hon. Jesse F. Stallings and Judge Zell Gaston in Birmingham; and in 1903 was elected State senator from the twelfth district .  He is a Democrat, and for several years was a member and secretary of the Lamar Democratic executive committee and attended many state conventions. Married: December 14, 1899, to Helen Claudia Morton, daughter of William L. and Eudocia J. Morton, of Vernon. Children: 1. Marjorie. Residence: Birmingham.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

NESMITH, THOMAS B., lawyer, was born June 13, 1832, in Morgan County; son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Roberts) Nesmith, the former a native of South Carolina, who came  to Morgan County with his father in 1824, and spent the remainder of his life there, and the latter of Tennessee; grandson of Alexander and Elizabeth (Martin) Nesmith, and of Zacheus Roberts of Pennsylvania; great-grandson, of Thomas Nesmith, a hero of the American Revolution and one of the earliest settlers of Alabama. He was educated in private schools, taught school two years, studied for one year at the academy at Somerville, taught school for seven years in the meanwhile studying law; began practice in 1866 at Pikevllle, and in 1876 moved to Vernon; was nine years county solicitor of Marion, and during that period was county superintendent of public instruction; was delegate to the state constitutional convention; was general county administrator for several terms, and from 1876-80 was solicitor for the third judicial circuit; represented Lamar County in the State legislature in 1882-88, and 1884-85. In addition to his law practice he gives considerable attention to agriculture. He is a Democrat. Mr. Nesmith is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and is a Freemason and an Odd Fellow. Married: June 11, 1869 to Minnie C. McLain, who died June 7, 1882. She was the daughter of Allan B. McLain and a native of Alabama. Children: 1. Allan, deceased; 2. Christopher C. (q. V.) ; 3. Daisy; 4. Thomas B. Residence: Vernon, Lamar County.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

NORTHCUTT, COL. WOODSON

E. Vickery of Winfield ....attended the Annual Session of the Grand Lodge of Masons at Montgomery on the 1st inst and during his stay he visited the cemetery and among the graves he found that of Col. WOODSON NORTHCUTT, who was representing this county at the time of his death.  The following epitaph is on his monument:  To the memory of COL. WOODSON NORTHCUTT, who was born in Virginia April 25th in 1797.  He served in the U. S. army in 1814, removed to Tennessee in 1817, and was four times elected to the legislature of that state.  In 1843 he moved to Alabama and was elected to the House of Representatives of the legislature of this state in 1845 and 1849 from Marion County.  He died Dec. 19th, 1849 while that body was in session, much respected for his integrity and sound judgement.  This monument is dedicated to his memory by the state in whose service he died. (Marion Herald, Dec. 19, 1889)

PEARCE, JAMES PIZARO, farmer, miller, merchant, and member constitutional convention, was bom June 4, 1845, at Hickstown, Paulding County, Ga.; son of John Mackeywood and Elizabeth (Skinner) Pearce, of Hickstown, Paulding County, Ga. He received his early education at Pearce's Mill. He entered the C. S. Army, June 10, 1862, as second lieutenant Co. K, 5th Alabama cavalry regiment, was commissioned captain of Co. M, that regiment, 1863, and served until the surrender. He is a farmer, miller, merchant and man of affairs. He is a Democrat; member of no church but subscribes to the Methodist doctrines. He was elected to the Constitutional convention, 1901, and served in that body. He is the unde of Largus Pearce, a native of Guin, Marion County, who has made a comfortable fortune in a mercantile association with him. Married: in March, 1866, near Pickensville, Delia Elizabeth, daughter of William Clarke of Marion County. Children: 1. Clovis Marvin, merchant and planter, Carbon Hill. Residence: Pearce's Mill.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

PEARCE, LARGUS, a propserous young merchant, was born in Guin, Marion County, Ala. where he still resides, on November 12, 1862.  He is the second in a family of twelve children born to A. C. and ADELINE (WEST) PEARCE, natives of Alabama and of Irish extraction. His paternal grandpartents were JOHN M. W. and ELIZABETH PEARCE of Georgia, but residents of Alabama since 1840.  His maternal grandparents were WILLIAM M. and MARY WEST, natives of Alabama.  LARGUS PEARCE was reared and educated in Mississippi until he had atained the age of twenty-one, when he returned to his native state and engaged in merchandising, being the junior partner in the firm of JAMES PEARCE & Co., which firm carries a well selected stock of general merchandise, valued at $5,000, and doing as good a trade as any firm in the county.  On March 20, 1888. Mr. PEARCE married Miss AGNES MONTS, of Mississippi, and to this happy marriage has been born one child, LUCY F.  Mr. PEARCE, though still a young man, has acquired a fine reputation in the community in which he lives.  He began his business life with little or no capital, and has made all he possesses through his own industy and a strict adherence to honest dealing. Source: Memorial Record of Alabama.   By Hannis Taylor,  Brant & Fuller Publishers  Madison, Wis., 1893.  Transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

SARGENT, HARVEY OWEN, teacher, was born October 24, 1875, near Russellville, Franklin County; son of Harvey Gholson and Rebecca (Harris) Sargent, the former a member of the 16th Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. Army, wounded twice at Murfreesboro and lost his left arm from a wound; grandson of Oran and Mary (Gholson) Sargent and of Benjamin and Nancy Harris of Franklin County. He was educated in the common schools of Franklin County and the Alabama polytechnic institute where he graduated with degree of B. S., in 1901, and with the degree of M. S., for poet graduate work, the same year took special course in agriculture and chemistry at that institution. He has taught at the Ninth district agricultural school, Jackson; president Sixth district agricultural school, Hamilton, since 1905 to the present time. He is a Democrat; a Baptist; Mason; Knight of Pythias; Odd Fellow. Married: October 17, 1906, at Hamilton to Minnie Mack, daughter of Judge Mack Pearce of Marion County. Children: 1. Mack Pearce; 2. Gwendolyn; 3. Eloise. Residence: Hamilton.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

STEDHAM, WINSTON, delegate Secession Convention, 1861, farmer and surveyor, was born November 10, 1810, at Winchester. Franklin County, Tenn., and died September 29, 1895, at Bexar; son of Isaac and Mary (Hallmark) Stedham of Franklin County, Tenn., after whose death the latter and her children removed to Blount County; grandson of Benjamin Stedham and wife, both of whom migrated from England and settled in Tennessee. He attended school but three months, his education being acquired by study at home. When nineteen years of age he joined a surveying party and went to Marion County and in 1829-30 helped to survey the original land lines west of Gaines' Trace. In 1832 he located on a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits the remainder of his life. He was a justice of the peace in Marion County for twenty years; senior delegate from his county, with Lang Allen, to the secession convention, 1861; senior member Alabama legislature, with John Hollis Bankhead, 1866; a Douglass Democrat and voted against Alabama leaving the Union; a Methodist, and a Mason. Married: (1) in 1831, near Bexar, to Mary Ann Markham who lived at Bamesville; (2) in 1838, at Shotville, to Miss Stone, daughter of John Stone who was born in Virginia in 1785, and died in 1896, being among the early settlers of Marion County. Children: by first wife, 1. Serena, m. ____Clayton; 2. Nancy Elvira, m. ____Hayes; 3. Carter W.; by second wife, 4. Sopronia Jane, m. William Shotts; 6. Lacinda Emmaline, m. J. M. Shotts; 6. Mary Evaline, m. ____Lindsey; 7. Mahala Caroline, m. Asbury Ballard; 8. Elvira Elisabeth, m. William Lindsey; 9. Telitha, m. John Duke; 10. Kansada; 11. John Haben; 12. Dillmus LaFayette. Last residence: Bexar.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

STIDHAM, WINSTON, (same book - different spelling) farmer, member secession convention, 1861, was born November 12,1810, near Winchester, Franklin County, Tenn., and died September 15, 1894, at Bexar; son of Isaac and Mary (Halmark) Stidham; grandson of Benjamin Stidham, and a Mr. Halmark, both  of whom came to America from England and settled in Tennessee in early boyhood. He had few educational Advantages, and later engaged in farming. He was a member of the secession convention, which met in Montgomery in January, 1861, and was a member of the legislature from Marion County, from 1865-66, and 1866-67. He was a Methodist and a Mason. Married: (1) Susan Markham, deceased; (2) Mary, daughter of John and Mary (Smith) Stone, who lived at Shottsville. The Stones came from South Carolina to Alabama in the early part of the nineteenth century. Children, by first marriage: 1. Nancy, deceased, m. Joe Hays; 2. Serena, deceased, m. John Clayton; 3. Carter, deceased; by second marriage: 4. Sophrona J., Bexar, m. William P. Shotts, deceased; 5. Lucinda E., m. John M. Shotts, Shottsville; 6. Mary, m. Thomas W. Lindsey, both deceased; 7. Mahala, Bexar, m. Isaac A. Ballard, deceased; 8. Elizabeth, m. Stephen E. Lindsey, Bexar; 9. Telitha Ann, m. John M. Duke, Bexar; 10. John H.. m. Hepzi-Ann Stone, both deceased; 11. Dilmus L., m. Ellen Lindsey, Bexar; 12. Canzada, d. in childhood. Last residence: Bexar.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography. By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

TERRELL, JOHN DABNEY, SR., surveyor and planter, was born about 1760, at Hanover Court House, Hanover County, Va., deceased; son of Harry and Anne (Dabney) Terrell, the former who was a native of Hanover Court House, Va, and resided in Virginia, and in North and South Carolina; grandson of Joel Terrell, who lived in Hanover County, and of Cornelius and Sarah (Jennings) Dabney, who lived in Hanover County, Va., the former who was a veteran of the Revolutionary War; great-grandson of William and Susanna Terrell; nephew of David, Joel, and Pete Terrell; great nephew of Henry Terrell; and a relative of Alexander Terrell of Austin, Tex., ex-minister to Turkey, of Edwin H. Terrell of San Antonio, Tex., ex-minister to Belgium, and of Joseph W. Terrell, ex-governor of Georgia. He was a surveyor and planter, and helped to survey the Chickasaw land in Alabama and Mississippi. He was a member of the Alabama constitutional convention of 1819, and was county judge of Marion County. He was a Whig and a Baptist. Married: to Elizabeth Warren of North Carolina. Children: 1. Edward Garland, m. Rachael Land of Georgia, both of whom died and are buried near Military Ford on the Buttahatchie, and whose descendants live near Hamilton; 2. James, m. A. Hughes, who died at Dangerfield, Tex., and whose descendants live near there; 3. William Henry, lived and died in Noxubee County, Miss., and who was disinherited because he was a Presbyterian and a Democrat; 4. John Dabney, jr. (q. v.); 5. Sarah, m. (1) Harvey Tuttle, deceased, who was a lawyer from Vermont, county clerk of Martin County, and whose descendants live at Chickasha and Minco, Okla., (2) Judge Harvey, child, Henry Harvey, who lived near Dangerfield, Tex.: 6. Eliza, m. a Mr. Smith of Chickasaw Co., Miss., both deceased; 7. Bocia, m. Robert Clark, they lived, died and were buried at Fulton Bridge on the Buttahatchie. and their descendants reside at Hamilton; 8. Alpha, m. J. T. Neal, a veteran of the War of 1812, and the son of Thomas Neal, a veteran of the Revolutionary War, who lived and died on their farm at Neal's Ferry, and whose descendants reside near Commerce, Tex.; 9. Sarah, m. James Bankhead, and lived and died three miles west of Sulligent. Last residence: Pikeville. (History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921)

TERRELL, JOHN DABNEY, Jr., planter, probate judge and circuit clerk, was born in 1801 near Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., and died in 1885, in Pikeville; son of John Dabney and Lydia (Warren) Terrell of Hanover Court House, Va., the former a profound student, gifted orator, practical surveyor, member of the Alabama legislature, member constitutional convention from Marion county, and probate judge of Marion County for a number of years; grandson of Col. Harry and Anne (Dabney) Terrell of Hanover County, Va., and either Virginia or North Carolina respectively, a colonel in the Continental Army of Virginia, whose children received five thousand acres of land granted on account of his military services. John Dabney Terrell, jr., owing to the lack of advantages afforded in the pioneer period in which he spent his youth, received but a limited education. He was a successful planter, and on account of the scarcity of physicians, practiced rudimentary medicine without charge. He was county clerk of Marion County and later was probate judge of the county until disqualified by age and infirmities. He was at one time treasurer of the county and also circuit clerk. His ancestry was of Quaker stock and he was bitterly opposed to war. He was also opposed to any form of secret orders. Prior to the war he was a Whig in politics, but after 1874 he voted the Democratic ticket. Married: in 1834, in Pikeville, to Eliza (Bugg) Meadows, a widow. Children: 1. Rosa Ann, m. John Mitchell Allman; 2. William Tazewell, member of Company H, 26th Alabama infantry regiment, who died at Richmond, Va., 1862; 3. Mary, m. Albert James Hamilton of Hamilton; 4. Sarah Catherine, m. Judge John A. Pope; 5. Medora Ann, m. Berry Middleton Cantrell of Barnesville. Last residence: Pikeville. (History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921)

WHITE, WILLIAM WTATT, physician, was born September 13, 1858, at Decatur, Morgan County; son of John Wyatt and Martha Jane (Cox) White, the former who was a native of Franklin County, and was a Methodist minister; grandson of Samuel and Anna White, who lived at Russellville, and of Henry Elijah Cox. Dr. White was educated in the schools of Russellville; attended the Florence normal school, 1880-83; and the Kentucky school of medicine, 1885. In 1885 he began to practice at the Falls of Bear Creek, Marion County; represented that county in the legislature of 1886-87; and represented Franklin County in the legislature of 1915. He is a Democrat; a member of the Methodist church, which he has served as steward; and a Mason. Married: (1) on March 5, 1890, at Newburgh, to Mary Harris Jones, daughter of Edward S. and Ann S. (Reynolds) Jones; (2) to Martha Clayton Wilson, daughter of Rufus and Mattie (Hargett) Wilson of Russellville. Children: by first marriage, 1. Jones Allen; by second marriage: 2. Wilson Wyatt; 3. John C. Residence: Russellville.

(History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography by Thomas McAdory Owen, The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921)



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