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Robinson, David Matthew - contrib by Mona Robinson Mills

Robinson, Henry Mayfield - contrib by Mona Robinson Mills

ROBINSON, DAVID MATTHEW

Contributed by Mona Robinson Mills

Information about this family was found in a family file at Itawamba County Historical Society, as submitted by Lionel G. Summerford in 1993. Mr. Summerford’s notes indicate that his information came from his Grandpa Henry Mayfield (Major) Robinson and his mother Vera Cruz Robinson Summerford.

Robinson Family:

David Robinson b 1824 Great-grandpa

Henry Robinson b 1860 Grandpa

Vera Cruz Robinson Summerford b 1890 Mama

Lionel Glenn Summerford b 1925

David Robinson my great grandfather - Prior to the Civil War - probably during 1860 because Grandpa was his youngest son and was born in 1860 (David) was killed in a hunting accident. Passenger pigeons were plentiful. They were killed for food. People would shoot up into a mass of birds and then clean and salt them in barrels. Some birds were sold but most were eaten later. Since the birds were so numerous, they blotted out the sun and made a huge noise. When a gun was fired the shooter could not hear the shot or see the result. Many times a muzzle loading gun would "hang fire". The shooter would blow into a barrel to see if smoke came out. This also helped clear the barrel of any burning embers that would ignite the next powder charge. In this case, the gun finally shot while Great Grandpa Robinson was clearing the last shot. This is all I ever knew of his death. This is said to have happened near Pikesville Community, Marion County, Alabama.

Annise Kennedy Robinson, my great grandmother had eight children. She lived in their home (cabin) at Pikeville near the Bear Creek in Alabama. During the Civil War, 1861-1865, food and other supplies were very hard to find. Salt was an important item to preserve food and to add as seasoning. None was available to buy. She dug soil from beneath their smokehouse and boiled the salt out for their use. Since she was alone with her children she had a very difficult time in raising them. My Grandpa never knew his father due to his early death. He always had an extra strong feeling for his "My Ole Mama".

During the battles of Corinth (Shiloh) and Iuka, they could hear the cannons shooting. One night after that battle was over, they heard a knock on their door. It was a ragged, hungry soldier. He was an uncle of Grandpa's. I do not know his name. His horse was thin and worn out. His uniform was in rags and he was hungry, which was typical of our Southern Army.

MORE information about David Matthew Robinson, collected from various sources:

Patentee: DAVID M ROBERTSON (actual grant indicates David Matthew Robertson)

State: MISSISSIPPI

Acres: 160.1

Metes/Bounds: No

Issue Date: 1/13/1845

Land Office: Pontotoc

Cancelled: No

U.S. Reservations: No

Mineral Reservations: No

Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)

Document Nr.: 18460

Accession/Serial Nr.: MS3100__.290

BLM Serial Nr.: MS NO S/N

Comments: LANDS IN ALABAMA

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1850 Census

Marion County, Alabama

Living next door to Henry J. Robinson and John E. Robinson

David Roberson 26 SC (born 1824)

Annis 23 AL

Elizabeth J. 6 AL

Missepa 4 AL

Josiah 3 AL

Sarah Ann 1 AL

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1860 Census

Marion County, Alabama

Living next to or near the following households: George Emerson, John E. Robinson, James Robinson.

David M. Roberson 36 SC (born 1824)

Annise 33 AL

Elizabeth 16 AL (Elizabeth Jane m Solomon Wigginton Ita Co)

Emelina 13 AL

Joseph 11 AL (Josiah K., married Nancy Angeline Barnes)

Sarah 9 AL (Sarah Ann m James Polk Donham Marion Co)

Salina 7 AL (m William Andrew Jackson Henley)

Eliza 5 AL

John 3 AL (m Sarah, named son Matthew)

Henry 1 AL (m Mary Candace Wiginton)

ROBINSON, HENRY MAYFIELD

Contributed by Mona Robinson Mills

Information about this family was found in a family file at Itawamba County Historical Society, as submitted by Lionel G. Summerford in 1993. Mr. Summerford’s notes indicate that his information came from his Grandpa Henry Mayfield (Major) Robinson and his mother Vera Cruz Robinson Summerford.

Robinson Family:

David Robinson b 1824 Great-grandpa

Henry Robinson b 1860 Grandpa

Vera Cruz Robinson Summerford b 1890 Mama

Lionel Glenn Summerford b 1925

When someone was writing a history of Alabama in about 1930, they contacted Grandpa Robinson since he was one of the early settlers of North Alabama.

After the Civil War, many southerners moved westward to Texas in order to make a new start after the devastation and defeat during the war. Some of the Robinsons settled in Itasca, Hill County, Texas. Grandpa Robinson later returned to Marion County. The Community of Bexar probably got its name from Bexar, Texas. (Pronounced Bay-har' in Spanish)

Grandpa's family was Wigintons and Kennedys. The Robinson name was sometimes spelled Robison or Roberson. Grandpa Robinson built a log house and raised his family near Bexar. Grandma Robinson died after her last child was born. The Collus Colburn Family, who were black and lived on his farm, helped raise their family after her death.

Grandpa had about 100 bee hives and a shop where he made and repaired the hives. The sale of honey was one source of income. He had a blacksmith shop and did blacksmithing for other people. He maintained a grist mill run by steam engine and later converted it to diesel engine for power. He farmed and raised cotton, corn, peanuts, watermelons, pigs and cows. He was the casket maker for the community and his daughters sewed the lining for the caskets. Once a year he made a trip to Aberdeen, MS to buy supplies for the coming year. During this trip, he purchased material for his daughters to make their dresses.

One time when I was about four years old (1929) Mama took me with Uncle Elbert (her brother), Mary Ellen Robinson, Elbert's daughter, Ray and Clinton Lindsey, first cousins of mine, to Texas to visit Aunt Genera, her sister, and Uncle Cliff Goggins. They lived in the vicinity of where Grandpa Robinson lived many years before. We went in a large touring car (make not known). As I recall, we went on U.S. 78 to Memphis. We crossed the Mississippi River on the Old "Harrihan" Bridge. Later we crossed several other rivers by ferry boat. Each night we camped near the road. We cooked food over an open fire. One of the men stayed awake to guard us from robbers. They had a pistol and a shotgun. They kept the fire bright.

Aunt Genera lived in a house in an open field typical of this area of Texas. Water was scarce. They had a cistern in which the rain water was drained from the tin roof into this area for their use. Their cistern was like a large dug well lined with timbers and with a tin cover over it.

After Grandpa died in 1945, at this time I was serving in World War II and was stationed on Guam, Uncle Elbert and Ray Lindsey burned the house and all of the contents. The house was old and believed to be germ laden. [end of Mr. Summerford's notes]


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