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HISTORY CLASS

 All items transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney unless otherwise noted 

Hamilton News Press, May 16, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this Department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Pikeville, Ala.

                The object of this department is to encourage and stimulate historical research and to promote a healthy national spirit.  Questions will be asked and suggestions made that, it is hoped, will enable one to obtain a clear view and comprehensive understanding of American history, to which we will confine ourselves for the present.  Teachers, and others who feel interested, are invited to make suggestions and propound questions for investigation.  Those who send questions should also send therewith correct answer, whenever practicable, to be published later, as my library is very limited.  Thos e sending answers should give the number of the question, as all reference to questions after their first publication will be by number.

                Hoping that this department will prove of interest and benefit to the readers of the News-Press, and inviting their co-operation in making it so, I am, very truly,

                W. F. GREEN

 

1.  Where and by whom was the first European settlement made on the American continent?
2.  What influence caused England to stand aloof so long while Spain was acquiring territorial possession and assuming dominion over the new world?
3.  Why was the name America applied to his continent?
4.  Where was Columbus buried?
5.  During the revolutionary war, the colonists, while warring with Great Britain, invaded Canada.  Prior to the revolutionary war, when fighting for Great Britain, they invaded Canada.  Why this apparent inconsistency?
6.  Next to Washington, whom do you consider the most effective worker for American Independence?
7.  Why did the puritans come to America?
8.  Explain what is meant by Mason and Dixon’s line.
9.  Define the Monroe Doctrine
10.  Name our most eminent literary, political and scientific writer.
11.  Answers to these questions will appear in the issue two weeks hence.  I would suggest that those who take an interest in this department should keep a complete file of the paper, as differences of opinion will likely occur and references to back numbers may be necessary to an intelligent understanding of the question involved.

Hamilton News Press, May 30, 1895

ANWERS

Following are answers to questions which appeared in this Department on May 16, Nos. 1, 3, 6, and 8 were furnished by Mr. IRA HUGHES, Pikeville, Ala:

1.       At Darien, by the Spaniards

2.       Soon after the discovery of America, the pope issued a bull by which he gave to Spain all the land which had been or might be discovered beyond an imaginary line 300 miles west of the Azores.  Henry VII, who was then king of England, being a devout Catholic, respected the papal authority.

3.       A man named Amerigo Vespucci visited the mainland and wrote a book describing it.  The printer, in giving a title to the book, called the country America.

4.       At Seville.  The remains were afterward removed to San Domingo, and in 1796 to the cathedral at Havana.

5.       Canada was a British province during the revolutionary war.  It was a French province when the colonists invaded it on behalf of Great Britain.  It was the American colonists who conquered Canada and made it a part of the British Empire.

6.       Franklin

7.       They were persecuted in the European countries.

8.       The boundary between Pennsylvania and Maryland was the source of much dispute.  It was finally settled in 1767, when two surveyors, named Mason and Dixon fixed the present boundary, which has since been known as Mason and Dixon line.

9.       In one of President Monroe’s messages to Congress he declared that any attempt by a European nation to gain dominion in America, would be construed by the United States an unfriendly act.”  [There has lately been a good deal of loose talk about the Monroe Doctrine, in the newspapers and by politicians, and it is a pertinent subject for inquiry and study]

10.    Benjamin Franklin

 

Hamilton News Press, May 23, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Pikeville, Ala.

                The object of this department is to encourage and stimulate historical research and to promote a healthy national spirit.  Questions will be asked and suggestions made that, it is hoped, will enable one to obtain a clear view and comprehensive understanding of American history, to which we will confine ourselves for the present.  Teachers, and others who feel interested, are invited to make suggestions and propound questions for investigation.  Those who send questions should also send therewith correct answer, whenever practicable, to be published later, as my library is very limited.  Thos e sending answers should give the number of the question, as all reference to questions after their first publication will be by number.

                Hoping that this department will prove of interest and benefit to the readers of the News-Press, and inviting their co-operation in making it so, I am, very truly,

                W. F. GREEN

11.  Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?
12.  By whom was the Bartholdi Statue of Liberty presented to the United States, and where is it located?
13.  Who was selected by Congress to deliver Washington’s funeral oration?
14.  Who first explored the territory now comprised within the State of Alabama?
15.  Who was the author of the saying, “Millions for defense, but not a cent for tribute?”
16.  What was the “Missouri Compromise?”
17.  By whom was the declaration made that he “Had rather be right than president?”
18.  Who framed the United States Constitution?
19.  After whom was Marion county named?
20.  When was Alabama admitted into the Union?
Hamilton News Press, June 6, 1895

ANSWERS

The following answers are to questions which appeared in issue of May 23.  Nos. 11, 14, 15, 19 and 20 were furnished by Mr. IRA HUGHES Pikeville, Ala:

11.  Thomas Jefferson.  The following composed the committee that reported the Declaration to Congress: Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and H. R. Livingston.

12.  The Bertholdi Statue of Liberty was presented to the United States by the people of France to commemorate the friendly relations of the two countries during the revolutionary war.  It is located on Bedloe’s Island, in New York Bay.

13.  Richard Henry Lee

14.  Ferdinand DeSoto

15.  Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

16.  The Missouri Compromise was an agreement between the then dominant political parties represented in the United States Congress that Missouri might come into the union as a slave state, but that slavery should be prohibited in all other territory belonging to the United States west of the Mississippi and north of parallel 35 deg. 30 min. the southern boundary of the state.  The measure was proposed by Henry Clay, and adopted to avert a war which the bitter feelings engendered by the discussion of the slavery question seemed about to precipitate.

17.  Henry Clay

18.  Gonverneur Morris

19.  General Francis Marion

20.  1819


Hamilton News Press, May 30, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Pikeville, Ala.

21. What kind of tree was it under which William Penn’s famous treaty with the Indians was negotiated?

The following nine questions were propounded by Hon. W. A. DUNN, county superintendent of Education:

22. When and where was a convention held in a barn, and the Bible adopted as a constitution?

23. Whom did Christopher Columbus marry?

24. Where is the famous Stone Mountain?

25. What fishes build nests?

26. The waters of what river can be detected three hundred miles out at sea?

27. Where was Captain John Smith’s life saved by Pocahontas?

28. Who were the “American Daughters of Liberty?”

29. What was the pine tree money?

30. By whom taught, when and where was the first school on Alabama soil?

 

(Hamilton News Press, June 13, 1895)

ANSWERS

21.  An elm.

22.  At Juinipiac, Conn. April 13, 1638 by the settlers, who afterwards laid the foundation of a city and called it New Haven.

23.  While at Lisbon, in 1484, Columbus was accustomed to attend religious service at the Chapel of the Convent of All Saints. In this convent were certain ladies of rank, either resident as boarders, or in some religious capacity.  With one of these Columbus became acquainted.  She was Dona Felipi, daughter of Bartolomeo Morris de Berestrello, an Italian cavalier, lately deceased, who had been one of the most distinguished navigators under Prince Henry, and had colonized and governed the Island of Porto Santo. The acquaintance soon ripened into attachment, and ended in marriage. It appears to have been a match of mere affection, as the lady was destitute of fortune.  There were two sons born, Diego and Fernando.

24.  In DeKlab County, Ga. It is a huge mass of granite rising almost perpendicular several hundred feet above the surrounding country.

25.  The Sticklebacks.  The species of stickleback are all natives of fresh water with one or two exceptions.  They are found in the Ottawa River, while the marine species have lately been discovered among the weed of the Saragasso Sea.

26. The Amazon, which is so charged with sediment that its waters can readily be detected by their discoloration this distance from its mouth.

27.  In Gloucester County, Va. at a place called Mironocomcoco, or Werowacomoco.  It is situated near Mobjack Bay, which is an inlet near the mouth of York River.

28.  A society formed in Philadelphia on June 13, 1780, for the purpose of supplying the soldiers with clothing.  The city was divided into ten districts, and four appointed to each district to solicit subscriptions.  Their donations amounted to two thousand and thirty shirts and they obtained seventy-seven shirts and three hundred and eighty pairs of socks from New Jersey.

29.  At the first mint for coining silver money established in Massachusetts, the three-pence, sixpence, and shilling sterling, had stamped upon one side of them the effigy of a pine-tree; hence these pieces were called pine-tree money.

30.  The first American school established in Alabama territory, was taught by John Pierce, on Tensas Bay, above Mobile, in 1790.  Pierce was a New Englander, and his pupils were a motley lot, including a number of half-breed Indians, among whom, however, were the Weatherfords, McGilloways, and others noted in the days when Alabama was a bloody border land.

 Except No. 21, the above answers were furnished by Hon. W. A. DUNN, county Superintendent of Public Education.  Correct answers to Nos. 21 and 23 were also furnished by Mr. IRA HUGHES, Pikeville, Ala.

 

Hamilton News Press, June 6, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Pikeville, Ala.

The following questions were used in the teacher’s examinations in this county last year:

31.  Why was America so named?

32.  Describe the character of the first colonists at Jamestown, Va.

33.  Describe the travels of DeSoto in America.

34.  When did the puritans come to America?  Why did they come?

35.  Tell of Captain John Smith.

36.  Where did the Spaniards, English, Dutch, and French each settle?

37.  What caused the war of Revolution?

38.  When and where was the first President of the U. S. inaugurated?

39.  Tell about the Salem Witchcraft

40.  Where and by whom was Alabama settled?

 Hamilton News Press, June 27, 1895)

ANSWERS

31.  This question was answered in issued of May 30.

32.  The character of the first Jamestown colonists was of the worst possible sort of the great undertaking of planting a settlement in a wilderness.  Many of them were gentlemen, unaccustomed to any kind of work and they did not take kindly to the hardships and deprivations which were inevitable. There were a few mechanics, and the remainder of the colonists were lazy and shiftless.

33.  In the early summer of 1539, DeSoto landed in the neighborhood of Tampa Bay, on the Florida coast.  He followed the coast northward, and settled for the winter near the site of Tallahassee, from whence he sent out several exploring expeditions.  The following spring, he explored the country as far north as South Carolina, in avian search for gold.  Disappointed in this direction, he turned his course westward, passing through the upper part of Georgia and Alabama, and at last wandered down the valleys of the Coosa and Alabama rivers to where the city of Mobile now stands, but which was then an Indian village.  Here a desperate battle was fought with the Indians, in which 2500 of the latter were killed, the Spaniards losing eighteen men, besides their baggage and a number of horses.  They then turned their course to the northwest, spending the winter in northern Mississippi, where they had other collisions with the Indians.  In the spring of 1541, they discovered the Mississippi river, which they crossed and continued their journey as far north of the present State of Missouri.  They turned southward and wintered near Hot Springs, Ark. and in the spring of 1542, they followed the valley of the Washita and Red Rivers to the Mississippi in which noble stream found a grave, having succumbed to a fever.

34.  In 1620, because they were persecuted in European countries.

35.  Capt. John Smith was a man of great ability, who figures extensively in early colonial history.

36. The Spaniards settled in Florida; the English in Virginia and Massachusetts; the Dutch in New York; and the French in Canada and the Mississippi Valley.

37. The persistence of the British government in refusing to the colonists the rights of Englishmen.

38.  George Washington, First President of the United States, was inaugurated in the city of New York on Thursday Aril 30, 1789

39.  A delusion that seized upon the minds of the people of Salem, Mass. in 1692, which resulted in the establishment of a special court for the trial of people charged with witchcraft.  From June to September this tribunal was active twenty persons being committed and executed, thirteen of them women.

40.  The first settlement of Europeans in the territory now comprised within the state of Alabama, was in 1702 by the French, under the command of Le Moyne de Bidenville, who built the fort St. Louis de la Mobile, at or near the spot now known as Twenty-one Mile Bluff, on Mobile River.

Correct answers to Nos. 31, 34, and 38 were furnished by Mr. IRA HGURES, Pikeville, Ala.

  (Hamilton News Press, June 13, 1895)

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Pikeville, Ala.

41.  Who were the first United States Senators from Alabama?

42.  Who was the first member from Alabama of the United States Supreme Court?

43.  Who was the first Governor of the State of Alabama?

44.  Who was the first President of the United States Senate?

45. By what officer was the official oath administered to George Washington as the first President of the United States?

46.  Who was President of the United States one hundred years ago?

47.  What four European nations laid claim to the Territories which ultimately became the United States?

48.  By whom and to whom was the following message sent: “We have met the enemy and they are ours?

49.  Who was the author of the saying: “Be sure you’re right, then go ahead.”

50.  Who was the author of the saying: “I am not worth purchasing, but such as I am the King of Great Britain is not rich enough to buy me?”

Hamilton News Press, July 4, 1895

ANSWERS

41.  The first United States Senators from Alabama were William R. King and John W. Walker.

42.  John McKinley was the first member from Alabama of the United States Supreme Court.  He was appointed April 22, 1837.

43.  William B. Bibb

44.  John Langdon was the first President of the United States Senate, having been chosen for the sole purpose of counting the votes and declaring the result of the first Residential election.

45.  The oath of office as first President of the United States was administered by the Chancellor of the State of New York.

46.  George Washington

47.  England, Spain, France and Holland.

48.  After the fight of Lake Erie, Capt. Perry announced the result to Gen. William Henry Harrison, his superior officer.

49.  David Crockett, a most unique figure in American history, was, though a very illiterate man, the author of may wise sayings beside the one quoted.  He was killed at the Alamo massacre in the war for Texas independence.

50.  An attempt was made by British agents during the revolutionary war to bribe Gen. Joseph Reed, of Philadelphia, to desert the cause of his country, and the quotation was the honest old solder’s reply.

 

(Hamilton News Press, June 27, 1895)

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Pikeville, Ala.

The following questions are from Hon. W. A. DUNN, County Superintendent of Education

51.  Where and when did the first General Assembly of Alabama convene?

52.  When did the General assembly of Alabama pass an act establishing the State University?

53.  Who was the Bachelor President of the United States?

54.  What was known as the Walking Purchase?

55.  When did the United States first coin money?

56.  What money was used by the United States before it struck its own coin?

57.  Who was Poor Richard, and why so called?

58.  Of whom and by whom was it said: “He smote the Rock of National resources and abundant streams of Revenue gushed forth?”

59.  Who said and when, “To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace?”

60.  What battle in the civil war is known as “The battle above the clouds?”

 Hamilton News Press, July 11, 1895

ANSWERS

Prof. W. A. DUNN, County Superintendent of Education, furnished the following answers:

51.  The first General Assembly of Alabama convened at Huntsville in October 1819.

52.  At the second session of the General Assembly of Alabama an act was passed establishing the University of Alabama.  The act was passed Dec. 18, 1820.

53.  James Buchanan was called the “Bachelor President.”

54.  Land deeded by the Indians to the successors of Pepp granting as much as a man could walk over in a certain direction in a day and a half was known as the “Walking Purchase.”  An undue advantage was taken of the Indians by laying out a road and training men to walk.

55.  In 1792 in Philadelphia the first United States money was coined.

56.  Spanish and English coins were used in the United States before striking U. S. coin.

57.  For a number of years Benjamin Franklin published “Poor Richard’s Almanac, and from that fact he was known as poor Richard”

58.  Daniel Webster said, “Alexander Hamilton smote the rock of National resources and abundant streams of revenue gushed forth.”

59.  George Washington said, “To be prepared for war, is one of the most efficient means of preserving peace.”

60.  The capture of Lookout Mountain by Gen. Joseph Hooker, is known as the “Battle Above the Clouds.”

Hamilton News Press, July 4, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this Department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Pikeville, Ala.

The following questions are from Mr. L. C. BOTTOMS, Knowles, Ala:

61.  Who were the Puritans and whey were they so called?  When did they come to America?

62.  Give a short sketch of Roger Williams’ work toward the Haley Worship.

63.  How did the Puritans go to Church?  Why?

64.  When and where was the first continental Congress held?

65.  What was the “Boston Massacre?

66.  What was known as the “Starving Time?”

67.  Who were the “Minute Men?”

68.  By whom and when was the Proclamation of Emancipation issued, and when did tit take effect?

69.  What President learned the English alphabet after he was 18 years old?

70.  Where was the capital of the Confederacy of America?  Who was President?

 Hamilton News Press, July 18, 1895

ANSWERS

(The following answers were furnished by MR. L. C. BOTTOMS, of Knowles, Ala.)

61.  The Puritans, or Pilgrims who separated themselves from the Church of England, were people who chose to worship God and according to the established laws of England.  They were so called because they did not leave the Church, but sought to purify it.

62.  Roger Williams, a minister at Salem, Mass. was banished from the colony on account of his peculiar views on several political and religious subjects.  He went to the head of Narragansett Bay and established a settlement on the principal of entire religious liberty.

63.  The Puritans carried their guns to Church as regular as their Bibles, on account of the outrageous Indians who sought to kill them.

64.  The first “Continental Congress” was held in Philadelphia in 1774.

65.  Troops were quartered on the colonies at the expense of the people.  This the people did not like.  The people arose against the troops and three people were killed.  This was known as the “Boston Massacre.”

66.  After Captain John Smith went back to England, nearly five hundred people were in Virginia.  The settlers soon got into trouble with the Indians, who lay in the woods to kill them.  There was no chance for corn or food now.  The people ate hogs, dogs, horses, mice, rats, etc.  They also ate the dead bodies of their companions who strolled into the woods and died.

67.  The “Minute Men” were men formed into companies by the Americans, who were ready to fight at a minutes’ warning.

68.  The Proclamation of Emancipation was issued by Abraham Lincoln, Jan 1st, 1863.  It gave freedom to the negroes forever after.

69.  Andrew Johnson learned his English alphabet after 18 years of age.

70.  Montgomery, Ala. was, for awhile, the capital of the confederacy of America.  Richmond, Va. was the capitol at the close of the war.  Jefferson Davis was President.

Hamilton News Press, July 11, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this Department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Abaline, Ala.

71.  When did the first trouble arise in reference to slavery?

72.  What was used instead of money by the colonists?

73.  When was the printing press introduced into America?

74.  When was the Constitution of they United States adopted?

75.  What two political parties came into existence at this time?

76.  What three presidents have died on the 4th of July?

77.  Who were the first inhabitants of America?

78.  Who was spoken of as “First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen,” and who first used the expression?

79.  Who was called the “Father of New France?”

80.  When were the stars and stripes adopted as the emblem of our nationality?

Hamilton News Press, August 1, 1895

ANSWERS

71.  The first slavery troubles arose in the convention that adopted the Constitution of the United States.  Violent disputes arose between the representatives of the two sections concerning the ratio of representation, the northern members claiming that hey ought not to be counted and ht southern insisting that they should. A compromise was finally effected by which five slaves were counted as equal to three white men.  This political power was ex—sed by the owners, however, and not by the slaves, thus giving the white men of the south much greater power than an equal number of northern men.

72.  In Virginia, for a long time, tobacco was used as money; in New England, Wampum, made of shells; in New York, beaver skins.

73.  The printing press was introduced in America in the year 1639.  An English printer named Stephen day set up, at Cambridge, the first printing press. The first newspaper appeared in 1704, and was called the “Boston News Letter.”

74.  The United States Constitution was adopted September 17th, 1787 by a convention at Philadelphia, which was called to revise the articles of Confederation, which had been found fatally defective.

75.  The two political parties that came into existence at this time were the Federalist, who favored the new Constitution and advocated a centralized government; and the Republicans, who advocated the doctrine of State sovereignty and opposed a central government with such power as the new Constitution conferred.  The leaders of the Federal party were Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay.  Thomas Jefferson was the head of the Republican party.

76.  Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died July 4, 1826; James Monroe died July 4, 1831.

77.  The name “Mound Builders” is applied to the first inhabitants of America, because of the great mounds and earthworks to be found in different parts of the country of which they are the supposed builders.

78.  Gen. Henry Lee, of Virginia, who was selected by Congress to deliver Washington’s funeral oration, referred to the dead soldier statesman as “First in war, first  in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

79.  Champlain was called the “Father of New France,” because it was by his heroic exertions that the French colonies were established in America.

80.  The “Stars and Stripes” were adopted as the emblem of our Nationality June 14, 1777.  The thirteen stripes, seven red an six white, alternating, represent the thirteen original states, and in a blue field in the upper left hand corner is placed a star for each state included in the Federal Union.

 

Hamilton News Press, July 18, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this Department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Abaline, Ala.

81.  When and where was the first legislative assembly ever held in America?

82.  When and by whom was negro slavery introduced into the colonies?

83.  To whom belongs the honor of having first established religious freedom?

84.  What Alabamian has been elected Vice President of the United States?

85.  Who was President of the United States when George Washington died?

86.  Who was Governor of Alabama during the civil war?

87.  Who was the Reconstruction Governor of Alabama?

88.  Why do Americans celebrate the 4th of July?

89.  Why do we celebrate February 22?

90.  Who was “Old Rough and Ready?”

Hamilton News Press, August 1, 1895

81.  The first representative legislative assembly ever held in America was at Jamestown in 1619.

82.  In 1620 a Dutch vessel bro’t negro slaves to Virginia and sold them to the colonists.  This was the beginning of negro slavery in America.

83.  The Roman Catholics of Maryland are entitled to the honor of having first established religious freedom in American.

84.  Wm. R. King, of Alabama, was elected Vice-President in 1852, on the ticket with Franklin Pierce.

85.  John Adams was President of the United States when George Washington died.

86.  Thomas H. Watts was Governor of Alabama during the civil war.  He died about a year ago in Montgomery.

87.  Lewis E. Parsons sr. was the reconstruction Governor of Alabama.  He lives in Talladega.

88.  The 4th of July is celebrated by Americans because of the Declaration of Independence having been promulgated on that day.

89.  George Washington was born on February 22.

90.  Gen. Zachariah Taylor was called “Old Rough and Ready.”

 

 Hamilton News Press, July 25, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this Department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Abaline, Ala.

91.  Who is known in American history as the “Great Pacificator?”

92.  Who used the expression, “You can fool all the people part of the time, and part of the people all the time, but you can’t fool all the people all the time.”

93. Was Gen. Jackson going toward New Orleans, or coming from there, when he opened the military road that runs by Hamilton?

94. Who was the Mexican General at the Battle of Buena Vista?  The American General?

95.  Who is known as the “Father of the Constitution?”

96.  Who was the “Hero of Tippecanoe?”

97.  Who was Governor of Alabama during the war of Secession?

98. Who were the Commanding Generals, respectively, of the Union and Confederate forces at the close of the war?

99.  What is an alien?

100. What is a foreigner?

NO MORE ANSWERS APPEARED IN THE COLUMNS OF THE NEWSPAPERS

 

Hamilton News Press, August 1, 1895

OUR HISTORY CLASS

Matter intended for this department should be addressed to W. F. GREEN, Abaline, Ala.

101.  What was the Kansas-Nebraska Bill?

102.  What was the “Gadsden purchase?”

103.  Who was Daniel Boone?

104.  What political party had for its motto: “The Union, The Constitution, and the Enforcement of the Laws?”

105.  What nation contested with the French for the territory about the mouth of the Mississippi River?  What nation disputed their right to the headwaters of that river?

106.  By what treaty did France relinquish its claim to the entire Mississippi Valley?

107.  Name a college which existed in colonial times in (1) New England, (2) the Middle Colonies, (3) the Southern Colonies.

108.  What was meant by the political cry: “Fifty-four forty or fight?”

109.  Who was the conqueror of Mexico?

110.  Who was the “Mill Boy of the Slashes?”

NO MORE ANSWERS APPEARED IN THE COLUMNS OF THE NEWSPAPERS

 


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