Welcome to Alabama Genealogy Trails

line
Montgomery County, Alabama
Biographies
line

Home

CLEGHORN, WM. C. P.

Ellaville, Georgia WM. C. P. CLEGHORN was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, Jan. 5, 1813.  His father, Richard Cleghorn, was a prominent lawyer of Edinburgh and his mother was jean (Pierie) Cleghorn, the eldest daughter of Commodore John Pierie of Edinburgh.  W. C. P. Cleghorn was the sixth of a family of eight children.  He was brought up in Edinburgh and graduated from the Edinburgh College when fifteen years of age.  Very soon afterwards he became a sailor, which vocation he followed until 1834, when he settled in Jamaica, W. I., and married his first wife there.  He kept books until 1840, when he went to New York, but remained there a short time only, when he came south and located at Montgomery, Ala., and in that portion of the country taught school until 1857, when he removed to Americus, Ga., and followed school-teaching and bookkeeping until 1870, when he removed to Ellaville, Ga., and took charge of a school, over which he presided for several years.  Since that time he has been retired from active business.  His first wife was Catherine Delpratt, whom he married in 1834.  She bore him three children, all of whom died in infancy, and she herself died about 1839.  In 1841 Mr. Cleghorn married Drady J. Barton, daughter of Benjamin Barton of Montgomery, Ala.  To this union were born six children, viz.: William, Richard, Jane, Catherine, Isabella and Andrew J.  The second Mrs. Cleghorn died in 1883.  Mr. Cleghorn has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for more than forty years, and has been for many years a local minister.  He is a man of rare conversational powers and can relate many incidents in his life that are interesting to both old and young.  He has been in some seaport of every country on the globe, is one of the best informed men in the South, and is a Royal Arch Mason.[Biographical Souvenir of Georgia and Florida by FA Battey & Co., 1889-Transcribed by LA Bauer]


HARRIS, WILLIAM P., manufacturer: born Montgomery, Ala.; son of Samuel S. and Mary G. (Pickett) Harris; educated in private schools of Detroit; graduate University of Michigan, degree of B. L., 1890; married, Detroit, 1897, Miss Edna McGraw. Has resided in Detroit since 1879; connected with engineering department Michigan Central R. R., 1890-1900; secretary and treasurer Wolverine Manufacturing Co., since 1900. Member Board of Commerce. Member Michigan Navel Reserve for three years. Republican. Episcopalian. Clubs: Detroit, University, Detroit Boat, Country, Recreations: Automobiling, golfing, Office: 12th St. and Grand Truck R. R. Residence: 1751 Jefferson Av.
Source: The Book of Detroiters by Albert Nelson Marquis 1908, Submitted by Christine Walters


HOOKS, CHARLES, (great-grandfather of William Julius Harris), a Representative from North Carolina; born in Bertie County, N.C., February 20, 1768; when he was two years old his parents moved to Duplin County and settled on a plantation near Kenansville; became a planter; member of the State house of commons 1801-1805; served in the State senate in 1810 and 1811; elected as a Republican to the Fourteenth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of William R. King and served from December 2, 1816, to March 3, 1817; elected as a Republican to the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Congresses, and reelected as a Crawford Republican to the Eighteenth Congress (March 4, 1819-March 3, 1825); moved to Alabama in 1826, settled near Montgomery, and again engaged in planting; died near Montgomery, Ala., October 18, 1843; interment in the Molton family cemetery.  
Source: Biographical Directory of the United States 1774-present. Submitted by Linda Rodriguez


LAIRD, HARVEY WOODFORD , business man, was born June 26, 1869, at Beaver Ridge, Knox County, Tenn.; son of Orville Dyer and Mary Crawford (Stephens) Laird, the former who was born at Oneida Castle, N. Y., studied medicine in the University of Michigan and served, on the Union side, as lieutenant of artillery, in the War of Secession; grandson of Orville P. Laird, and of the Rev. Rufus M. and Nancy M. Stephens, who lived at Beaver Ridge. Mr. Laird was educated in the common county schools. He was in the newspaper business from about 1890 to the time of his entrance on deputy insurance commissioner's place, October 1, 1910. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: Lida Cassady. the daughter of Judge Benjamin F. Cassandy of Anniston. Residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LEAK, TILMAN, planter and merchant, was born April 1, 1809, at Zebulon, Pike County, Ga., and died August 11, 1872, at Montgomery; son of Rev. Samuel Leak, Baptist minister, of Zebulon. He was educated in the schools of Zebulon and Griffin, Ga., and engaged in farming. He served in the Indian war of 1833-36; and later, on the Mexican frontier. He removed to Alabama and settled at Wetumpka, of which place he was mayor, in 1850; later locating in Montgomery, he engaged in merchandising and planting operations. He was a Whig and then a Democrat; a Mason; and a Methodist. Married: October 20, 1831, in Zebulon, Ga., to Mary Ann Ford. Children: 1. Susan Providence, m. Alfred Franklin; 2. Rebecca Jane, m. Platt Croom Stout; 3. Charlton Sheppard; 4. Henry Cunningham; 5. William Wesley; 6. Tilman Ford, m. Rebecca McLemore; 7. Fannie Anna, m. J. R. Warren. Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LEE, H. A. G., Methodist minister; member of the Alabama conference; pastor of the Court Street church, Montgomery, 1837.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LETCHER, JOHN TALBERT, lawyer and city commissioner of Montgomery, was born December 2, 1881, at Shorter, Macon County, and died May 7, 1916, in Montgomery; son of Dr. Francis Marion and Claudia Caroline (Howard) Letcher, the former a native of Fish Pond, Coosa County, who lived later at Central Institute, Elmore County, in New Orleans, La. and Montgomery, the former a surgeon in C. S. Army; grandson of John David and Ann Matilda (Bozeman) Letcher of Elmore County, and William John and Ann Flewellen (Billingslea) Howard of Shorter; great- grandson of Giles and Agnes (Talbert) Letcher, the former a native of Edgefield District, S. C., who located in Alabama in early boyhood, and of James and Elizabeth (Slatter) Billingslea of Jones County, Ga.; great-great-grandson of Joseph Letcher, of John and Louisa (Stoner) Howard, and of James and Mary (Smith) Billingslea of Wilkes County, Ga.; great-great- great-grandson of Rhesa and Hanna (Few) Howard, the latter a relative of William Few, signer of the Constitution from Georgia, of Peter and Mary (Miner) Stoner of Virginia, and of Solomon and Nancy (Flewellen) Slatter; great-great-great-great-grandson of Joel and Frances (Bastin) Slatter of North Carolina, and great-great-great-great-great-grandson of William Flewellen and wife who was a Miss Branch. He received his elementary education in the public schools of Shorter and Cross Keys; was graduated from the Alabama polytechnic institute, B. S., 1901, M. S., 1902. He was master of Sewanee grammar school, 1902-03. In 1903 he was admitted to the bar, .and at once began the practice in Montgomery. He was elected alderman of Montgomery in October, 1909, and served until April, 1911; was appointed in May of that year city commissioner. He was a Democrat; a Baptist; a Red Man; Knight of Pythias; Mason ; and member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. Married: September 7, 1911, at Gadsden, to Lillian, daughter of William Thomas and Hattie Elizabeth (Hamrick) McCord of that place. Children: 1. Talbert, daughter. Last residence : Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LEWIS, B. E., primitive Baptist preacher, was born January 12, 1830, in Montgomery County, and died September 27, 1900, in Montgomery County. He served in the War of Secession in the C. S. Army, and joined the Primitive Baptist church in the fall of 1866, at Bethlehem church, Montgomery County. . A few years later he was chosen deacon and was set apart to that office by Elder B. A. Waker and O. H. P. Cook. After serving the Bethlehem church for several years, he joined the Bethel church in Montgomery County, and served there as clerk and deacon until his death. Married: December 20, 1854, to Elizabeth J. Talley. Two sons and two daughters died in infancy and two of his daughters are living. Last residence: Montgomery County.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LEWIS, BURWELL BOYKIN, lawyer, representative in congress, president University of Alabama, was born July 7, 1838, at Montgomery, and died October 11, 1885, at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; son of Paul Hamilton and Elizabeth (Shortridge) Lewis (q. v.). He was left an orphan when quite young, and made his home with his uncle, Judge George Short- ridge, at Montevallo. He was prepared for college in a private school, in Montevallo, taught by a Mr. Lewis; and was graduated from the University of Alabama, A. B., 1857, before completing his nineteenth year. The honorary degree of LL. D. was conferred upon him by his alma mater in 1880. He studied law with Judge John Haralson in Selma, and commenced the practice of law in Shelby County with Col. John S. Storrs, of Montevallo. On the outbreak of the War of Secession, he helped organize a company of cavalry for the C. S. Army and was offered the captaincy of the company but refused the position. He became second lieutenant, and was soon promoted to first lieutenant. The company was mustered in with the Second Alabama regiment of cavalry as Co. B, and served during the war in Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia, and the Caro- linas. Lieut. Lewis was, during the greater part of his service, in command of his company, and, often, of the battalion. At the end of the war, he resumed the practice of law at Shelby. After the death of Col. Storrs, he became at different times, the law partner of Judge J. T. Leiper of Columbiana, and of Gov. Rufus Cobb. He was elected to the State legislature from Shelby County in 1870, and was returned in 1871. He moved to Tuscaloosa in 1872, and formed a partnership with Col. A. C. Hargrove, which continued until he retired from the profession. He was elected to the U. S. congress in 1874 as a representative of the state at large, and was again elected in 1878, but resigned the office before the end of his term, in order to accept the presidency of the University of Alabama, and the professorship of constitutional and international law at that institution. He served in that capacity from July, 1880, until the time of his death. He was a Democratic presidential elector in 1868, and was very active in the reconstruction of the state after the war. He was a Methodist; a Mason; and was author of numerous pamphlets on current topics. He was writing a book on political economy at the time of his death. Married: Januarv 21, 1860, at the University of Alabama, to Rose, daughter of Dr. Landon Cabell and Louisa Frances (Garland) Garland (q. v.), third cousins, the former of whom was at that time president of the University of Alabama, who later was president of the University of Mississippi, was one of the founders of the Vanderbilt university, and was first chancellor of that institution, holding that position for more than twenty years until his death in 1895; granddaughter of David S. Garland, whose mother, Jane Meredith, was a niece of Patrick Henry. Both parents were descended from distinguished Virginia ancestry. Mrs. Lewis had thirteen cousins killed during the War of Secession. She is a former president and corresponding secretary of the Pelham chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, and a member of the Sumter chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. Children: 1. Elizabeth, deceased, m. (1.) Louis L. Bradfield, (2.) C. E. Morris; 2. Caroline Matilda, m. J. Alexander Montgomery, Birmingham; 3. Rose, m. Robert Eden Scott Rives, Birmingham; 4. Louise, artist, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Ga,; 5. Nan Meem, was graduated from Vanderbilt university, B. A., Miller school, Va.; 6. Nellie Bryce, Birmingham; 7. Bertha Boykin, m. Hugh Barr Miller, Hazelhurst, Miss. Last residence: University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LEWIS, W., Methodist minister, pastor of the Court Street church, Montgomery, 1911; transferred to Alabama from the Georgia conference. Deceased. Last residence: Atlanta,
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LINN, E. W.,bank cashier, was born in 1852, in Montgomery; son of Charles Linn, founder of the First national bank of Birmingham. He was educated in the public schools of his native city, and in 1870 entered the University of 11linois, from which he graduated two years later. For several years after completing college he conducted a farm; was a commercial traveler, for a Cincinnati hardware firm. for one year; appointed secretary and treasurer of the Linn iron works and held that place until he entered the First national bank as exchange clerk and collector, advancing to assistant cashier and finally to cashiershlp. In addition to his banking connections he was director of the Birmingham gas and illuminating company, and secretary-treasurer of the East Birmingham land company. He also acquired considerable real estate. Residence: Birmingham.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LIPSCOMB, ANDREW ADGATE, Methodist minister, educator, and author, was born September 6, 1816, in Georgetown, D. C., and died November 23, 1890, in Athens, Ga.; son of Rev. William Corrle and Phoebe (Aigate) Lipscomb and grandson of John and Elizabeth (Degge) Lipscomb. He received his fundamental education in the best schools in Virginia, attending the Military academy at Georgetown. He entered the Methodist ministry in 1834; was pastor in Baltimore, Md., Alexandria, Va., and Washington, D. C., 1834-42, removing to Montgomery, during the latter year. His superior abilities were quickly recognized by his brethren, and he was elected president of the Alabama conference. Owing to ill health he withdrew from the active ministry and established the Metropolitan institute for young ladies in Montgomery, whicli was soon after destroyed by fire. In 1857, he was made president of the Female college, Tuskegee, and two years later chancellor of the University of Georgia. From 1860 to 1874 he held the latter position, except during the war period when the institution was closed. From 1875 to 1890 he was professor and professor emeritus of philosophy and criticism at Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn. He received the honorary degree of D. D. from the University of Alabama in 1851 and LL. D. from Emory college, 1853. He was a profound Shakesperian scholar and critic and was esteemed as one of the most learned men of his generation. Author: wrote editorials for Harper's magazine, and for more than forty years was a regular contributor to the Independent Methodist recorder, and Christian advocate. During his travels in Europe he wrote frequent letters to the senior class of the University of Georgia which were printed in the current press, the topic being principally a description of the educational institutions of the Old World. His public addresses were frequently printed in pamphlet form by the associations before which he had spoken. Other published works are "Our country;" "The Social spirit of christianity;" "Christian Heroism;" "Lessons in the life of St. Peter;" "Studies in the forty days." Married: (1) in Baltimore, to Blanche Henrietta, daughter of Rev. Benjamin Richardson of that city; (2) in Alabama, to Susan Dowdell. Children: by the firgt marriage, 1. Francis Ad- gate, adjunct professor of ancient languages, 1869-72, and professor belles-lettres and rhetoric. University of Georgia, 1872-78, died 1875. Last residence: Athens, Ga.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LITTLEPAGE, EMILY (LIPSCOMB), educator and patriotic worker, was born November 13, 1832, at Poplar Grove, King William County, Va., and died October 22, 1916, in Montgomery; daughter of Ambrose and Maria (Guthro) Lipscomb, who lived near Dill ware Town, Va., a planter; granddaughter of Ambrose Lipscomb, and of Dr. Simon and Elizabeth (Quarles) Guthro, the former a native of Bordeaux, France, who came to America in 1776, graduated at the Philadelphia medical college, served as surgeon in the Revolutionary War and spent his remaining years in King William County, Va., where he practiced until his death in 1842. The Lipscomb family is of English origin, and furnished soldiers to the Revolutionary Army. Mrs. Littlepage received her early education in the private school of Mrs. Thomas Dabney, in King William County, Va., and later attended the Midway seminary, Essex County, Va., 1848. She taught in a private school in Montgomery, 1861; president of the Montgomery female institute, 1875 ; principal of the Hull Street, and later of the Lafayette, public schools of Montgomery, until 1907. She was intensely patriotic and took an active part in all the Work done by the women of her section during the Mexican, Secession, Spanish-American and European Wars, from 1857 to 1916. Married: July 29. 1860, at Mount Hope, Va., to Hardin B. Littlepage, son of Col. Edmund and Martha A. (Hilliard) Littlepage of Oakdale, Va.; grandson of Hardin and Eliza Littlepage of Oakdale, Va.; grandson of Hardin and Eliza Sutherland (Quarles) Littlepage, the former justice of King William County, 1799; great-grandson of Thomas and Ann (Burnly) Littlepage, justice of King William County, 1793; great-great-grandson of Edmund Littlepage; great-great-great-grandson of Richard Littlepage, II, burgess New Kent, 1685; great- great-great-great-grandson of Richard Little page, I, a native of Kent, England. Children: 1. William C., Texas; 2. Emilie B., m. Thomas W. Hannon, Montgomery; 3. Hardin Beverly, Knob, Shasta County, Calif. Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LOCKWOOD, J. L., business man, was born December 15, 1843, in Dubuque, Iowa; son of Ezekiel and Ann B. (Warren) Lockwood, both natives of New York, residents of Montgomery after 1846, the former a Baptist minister. Major Lockwood was educated at Lima, N. Y., and at Williamsburg, Mass., leaving the latter place in 1860, and locating in Montgomery. He entered the Confederate service in 1861, as a member of the "Dixie Rifies," which was afterwards assigned to the 22nd Alabama infantry regiment; promoted ordnance sergeant, and at the battle of Shiloh, to sergeant major; was made aide-de-camp on the staff of Gen. Frank Gardner, 1862, and served in this position until the battle of Murfreesboro; was transferred to the trans-Mississippi department and served there until the fall of Port Hudson; joined the Army of Tennessee at the battle of Chicka- mauga, and was commissioned adjutant of the 22nd Alabama regiment; served through the Georgia campaign and was badly wounded at Jonesboro. When the army was consolidated in 1864, he was promoted major and served with this rank until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, where he was twice wounded; Corinth, was wounded in the retreat to Saltillo, Perryville, and slightly wounded, Crab Apple Orchard, and a week's fighting on the retreat, Murfreesboro, Port Hudson, where he was twice wounded, Chicka-mauga, Missionary Ridge, Dalton, Resaca, Ken-esaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, where he was badly wounded, Franklin and Boonville, N. C. After the cessation of hostilities, Major Lockwood returned to Montgomery and kept books. In 1871 he removed to Birmingham and went into the mercantile business, adding contracting. He became president of the Ellis drug company; director in the North Birmingham oil and asphalt company; a stockholder in a number of successful business enterprises; and served two years as alderman. He is a Mason;  Knight of Pythias; Odd Fellow; Knight of Honor; a Democrat; and Episcopalian. Married: (1) in May, 1873, to Jodie C., daughter of Dr. Thomas Martin, of Elmore County; 2. to Abigail H., his deceased wife's sister. Children: by the first wife,'l. and 2. both died in childhood; by the second wife, 3. Henry W. Residence: Birmingham.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LOEB, JACQUES, wholesale merchant, was born March 31, 1855, at Reichshofen, Alsace, France, and died March 29, 1912, at Montgomery; son of Gabriel and Caroline (Baroch) Loeb, of Alsace, France. He was educated in Alsace, and came to America soon after the Franco-Prussian War in 1872, and settled in Montgomery. He entered the grocery and dry goods business and conducted that business until his death in 1912. He was president of the Winter Loeb grocery company of Montgomery; vice-president of the chamber of commerce, Montgomery; director of the New Farley national bank; secretary of the United Hebrew charities of Montgomery; a trustee of the Carnegie Library; a trustee of the Leo N. Levi memorial hospital, Hot Springs, Ark.; a member of the State militia of Alabama under Capt. John G. Winter and Capt. A. B. Garland of the Montgomery True Blues; a member of the Standard and Thirteen Clubs of Montgomery; a Democrat; president of the Young Men's Hebrew association; a member of B'nai B'rith; a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. Married: January 28, 1885, in Montgomery, to Selena, daughter of Henry and Jeanetta Weil, who lived at Montgomery. Children: 1. Lucien S., Montgomery; 2. Cecile L., m. Gaston J. Greil (q. v.), Montgomery; 3. Blanche L., m. Louis A. Weil, New Orleans, La.; 4. Raphael J., m. Myrtle Kaufman, Montgomery. Last residence : Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LOMAX, CARRIE (BILLINGSLEA), patriotic worker, was born March 17, 1825, in Clinton, Jones County, Ga., and died June 30, 1907, in Montgomery; daughter of James and Elizabeth (Slatter) Billingslea. On her maternal side she was descended from a Revolutionary soldier. She was active in church work and a charter member of the Ladies memorial association. Her portrait hangs in the statehouse between the pictures of her two husbands, both distinguished in Alabama history. She was a Methodist. Married: (1) in 1848, to Reuben C. Shorter, (q. v.) of Eufaula, brother of Gov. John Gill Shorter (q. v.) ; (2) Col. Tennent Lomax (q. v.). Children: by the first marriage, 1. James Billingslea; 2. Reuben Clarke; by the second marriage, 3. and 4. twins, Carrie Elizabeth, died in childhood, and Tennent Lomax, jr., (q. v.). Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LOMAX, TENNENT, lawyer, colonel, C. S. Army, was born September 20, 1820, in Abbeville, S. C., and was killed June 1, 1862, at Seven Pines, Va.; son of William and Eliza (Tennent) Lomax, the former a lawyer in Abbeville, who served in the South Carolina legislature; grandson of James and Jane (Dillworth) Lomax, and of William Peter and Martha (Middleton) Tennent; great-grandson of Maj. Hugh Middleton, of the Revolutionary Army. James Lomax emigrated from Rockingham County, N. C., to Abbeville District, S. C., where he built a colonial home and reared his family. He was the son of William Lomax, who came from England to America, and who was descended from Laurent Lomax, a companion of William the Conqueror. The original colonial ancestor of Gen. Lomax in the Tennent branch was Rev. William Tennent, a Presbyterian minister, who, in 1727, established the log college, from which sprang Princeton theological seminary. Four sons of William Tennent were Presbyterian ministers, and one of these, William Tennent, jr., was the founder of Tennent church, at Freehold, N. J. His son, Rev. William Tennent, of Charleston, S. C., father of William Peter Tennent, was known as the "preacher and patriot," and a slab commemorating him is on the walls of the Archdale church of Charleston, S. C. Gen. Lomax's mother died at his birth, and his father died during his boyhood. He was educated at Randolph-Macon college, graduating fourth in a class of which Justice Clopton vol. rv— 5 of the Alabama supreme court, was valedictorian, A. B., 1840. He received the degree of A. M. in 1851. After his graduation, he moved to Alabama, and read law in the of&ce of John C. Calhoun, at Eufaula. On completing his studies, he was admitted to the bar, and engaged in the practice of law and in planting at Eufaula. Upon the outbreak of the war with Mexico, he raised a company, and became its captain. The organization became Co. D, First battalion Alabama infantry, and was on duty in the Department of Orizaba while Orizaba was occupied by the United States troops in 1848. Soon after his return to civil life, he moved to Columbus, Ga., where for several years, he became one of the proprietors and the editor of the Columbus "Times and Sentinel." He was elected State printer of Georgia, by the legislature of that state, and was president of the Democratic convention which first nominated Senator Joseph E. Brown for governor of Georgia. He was at one time tendered the position of charge d'affaires of the United States to Belgium, but declined the appointment. He returned to Alabama in 1857, and engaged in planting at Montgomery. While a resident of Columbus, Ga., he was captain of a military company for several years, and shortly after his removal to Montgomery, he became captain of the Montgomery True Blues, a position he held until the outbreak of the War of Secession. Through his infiuence the Second volunteer regiment was raised soon after the Harper's Ferry raid, and in 1861, as colonel of that regiment he was ordered to Pensacola by Gov. Moore to assist the Florida authorities in taking possession of the forts and navy yard. Forts Barancas and McRae were surrendered to him by Lieut. Slemmer of the U. S. Army, who withdrew to Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa Island. Not being allowed to take Fort Pickens by assault. Gen. Lomax wrote to Gov. Moore asking their recall, and shortly after its return to Montgomery, the regiment disbanded. In April, 1861, Gen. Lomax was elected lieutenant colonel of the Third Alabama infantry regiment, and repaired with it to Virginia. He became colonel by the promotion of Col. Withers, and was commissioned a brigadier-general just before the battle of Seven Pines, but remained in command of the regiment for that battle. On June 1, 1862, while at the head of his regiment, he was instantly killed. His body, which fell into the hands of Federal troops, was subsequently recovered and buried in the cemetery at Montgomery. Married: (1) in 1849, to Sophie Shorter, who died, March 18, 1850, daughter of Gen. R. C. Shorter of Eufaula, and sister of Gov. John C. Shorter; (2) Mrs. Caroline (Billingslea) Shorter, widow of Reuben C. Shorter, by whom she had two sons, daughter of Augustus and Elizabeth (Slatter) Billingslea, of English descent. Children: 1. a daughter, d. in infancy; 2. Tennent (q. v.). Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LOMAX, TENNENT, lawyer, county solicitor, and member constitutional convention of 1901, was born April 29, 1858, at Montgomery, and died at that place November 21, 1902; so of Gen. Tennent Lomax (q. v.) and Carrie Shorter (Billingslea) Lomax (q. v.). He was educated in the public and private schools of Montgomery, and at the University of Alabama, receiving the M. A. degree in 1878, and B. L. in 1879. In July of the latter year he was admitted to the bar, and practised his profession in Montgomery continuously until his death. From 1878 to 1888 he was secretary of the Democratic State executive committee; lieutenant of the Montgomery True Blues, 1882- 1887; delegate to the Democratic national conventions of 1888, 1896, and 1900. He was president of the Auditorium company of Montgomery, 1901; director of the Montgomery commercial and industrial association; the Capitol City bank, and the People's cotton factory. In 1902 he was elected as a delegate from the State at large to the Alabama constitutional convention, and served as chairman of the committee on preamble and declaration of rights. He was appointed assistant solicitor of Montgomery County under Capt. Fred S. Ferguson, in 1880, soon after entering the practice and upon the latter's retirement in 1886 was elected to succeed him as county solicitor, an office he occupied by successive elections for twelve years, and was filling at the time of his death. It has been said: "As a student, lawyer, political leader and business man Mr. Lomnx was a leader of marked strength. As a parliamentarian and orator he was at the head of the young men of his generation and equal to many of his seniors in years and public service." He was a Democrat; Methodist; Knight of Pythias; member board of trustees, University of Alabama; Alabama historical association; Alabama bar association; Red Man; Odd Fellow; and commandant, Camp Holtzclaw, United sons of Confederate veterans. Unmarried. Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LONDON, ALEXANDER TROY, lawyer, was born February 28, 1847, at Wilmington, New Hanover County, N. C., and died August 27, 1908, while on a visit to Chautauqua, N. Y.; son of Mauger and Rachel Jane (Troy) London, who lived at Wilmington, N. C., the former a native of that place, a prominent lawyer of the old school; grandson of John and Anne Thorney (Mauger) London, who were married at Charleston, S. C., and lived at Wilmington, N. C., the former a native of London, England, who came to North Carolina before the Revolutionary War, having been married for the first time in England, and settled on the coast just below Wilmington, N. C., the latter a native of the Isle of Jersey, who came to Charleston, S. C., with her father in 1783, and who was descended on her mother's side from French Huguenots, and of Alexander and Francis (Shipman) Troy, who lived near Whiteside, Columbus County, N. C., the former who served for a long time as district solicitor, and died on his circuit and was buried at Wadesboro, N. C. ; great-grandson of John and Mary (Wollaston) London, both of Brandon, Suffolk, England, of John Mauger, and of Michael and Jane (Potts) Troy, who were married in Pennsylvania, and moved to North Carolina at the time of the Wyoming Valley troubles, and settled in Salisbury, the former of whom came with his Mother, Matthew Troy, from Londonderry, Ireland, about the year 1711 and settled in Pennsylvania. Mr. London attended private schools in Wilmington, N. C., and read law in the office of his father. He was admitted to the bar at Wilmington, June 30,1869, and began the practice of law in North Carolina, continuing his profession at that place until 1884, when he moved to Montgomery. He entered a law partnership with his uncle, Daniel Shipman Troy, and Henry C. Tompkin, at that place, and maintained that association until 1890, when he moved to Birmingham. He continued his practice in Birmingham until his death. He was elected a representative in the State legislature from Jefferson County in 1902. During the War of Secession, he served as first lieutenant and adjutant of the First North Carolina regiment, junior reserves. He was a Democrat, and an Episcopalian. Married: December 6, 1892, at Selma, to Mary L., daughter of Clifford Daniel and Louisa (Swift) Packe, who lived at Selma, the former a physician. Children: 1. Mary Packe; 2. Rachel Troy; 3. Alexandra Mauger, Birmingham. Last residence: Birmingham.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


LUCAS, JAMES, soldier of the American Revolution. Mary, wife of James Lucas, a resident of Montgomery County, was enrolled on January 12, 1838, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, ?600. — Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. She resided in Montgomery County, June 1, 1840, with Jane W. Freeney, aged 80. — Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


MARTIN, EDMUND W.
This distinguished son of Conecuh was born near the city of Montgomery, on December 15th, 1821. He received his mental training at West Point. Through the influence of Senator Dixon H. Lewis, an ardent friend and relative of Mr. Martin, a cadetship was secured for him at the National Military Academy. Returning to his home from West Point, Mr. Martin's gifts led him into the forum, rather than the field. Having taken a course in law, he was admitted to practice, and commenced his career, as a lawyer, at Hayneville, about the year 1843. When the conflict with Mexico began, in 1846, Mr. Martin raised a gallant company in the county of his adoption, known as the "Lowndes County Volunteers," was made their captain, and went immediately to Mobile to offer their services to the government. Here they were received and mustered into the service of the government, but lack of transportation prevented their being transferred to the scene of action, and the war closed without their being able to participate. In 1849 Mr. Martin removed to Sparta, where he began a career which enabled him to make quite a reputation for himself as a practitioner of law. He was regarded by his brethren at the bar, as a close, calm reasoner, dignified, and keenly conscientious with regard to all questions of ethics. He was one of the readiest of speakers. A subject was quickly grasped by him, and even while the thought was warm, fresh from its new creation, he was giving it expression in elegant diction. During the war Mr. Martin raised a company of volunteers, of which he was made captain. Subsequently he became the major of the regiment to which his company was attached. During the battle at Dalton, Georgia, on the 24th and 25th of February, 1864, Major Martin was wounded by the fragment of a shell. In his command he was admired for the wonderful combination of kindness with firmness, in the exercise of discipline. At one time one of the men under his command became somewhat refractory, and it became necessary for him to give him some peremptory orders, which, with relutance, the soldier proceeded to obey, but with a protest in a low, under tone of voice, but sufficiently loud for every one to hear him say, " Well, never mind, every dog has his day." To which Major Martin replied, "That may be, if there are not more dogs than days." In politics, Major Martin was a life-long Democrat. In 1872 he was elected to the State Senate, from the district composed of Butler and Conecuh counties, but upon a contest, his opponent. Miller, was seated, not because he had received a majority of the popular vote, but because the Republican Party was dominant in the Senate. In 1874, however, when the Democrats again attained the ascendency. Miller was legally ejected, and Senator Martin re-seated. The Montgomery Advertiser in referring to his restoration to his seat in the Senate Chamber, said of him : " He is an able and watchful Senator, and possesses to the fullest extent, the confidence and esteem of his associates." He was the leading candidate for Lieutenant Governor in the Convention of 1874, and came within a fraction of a two-thirds vote upon the nomination. Also, in 1878, he was conspicuous as a candidate for Congress, and came within one vote of the nomination. On the 22nd of October, 1878, he died at his home, at Evergreen.  (Source: History of Conecuh Alabama by B. F. Riley 1881 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney)
 


PARKER, JOHN W. JR. M.D., Since his honorable discharge from army duty as specialist in gastrointestinal diseases at the Base Hospital at Camp Wadsworth, Doctor Parker has located at Greenville and now gives all his time to his specialty, in which he is one of the foremost authorities in South Carolina. Doctor Parker has practiced medicine in this state since graduating from the University of Maryland.

He was born at Durham, North Carolina, April 16, 1880, a son of John W. and Jane (Lunsford) Parker of Durham. He grew up in the famous tobacco city, was educated in Rutherford College and the University of North Carolina, and did his work in preparation for the medical profession at the University of Maryland where he graduated in 1905. The first three years he practiced in Lee County, South Carolina, and from that time until 1914 at Williamston in Anderson County. He had become well established in his profession at Greenville when the World War came on, and he volunteered his services in the Medical Reserve Corps. Upon being taken into the National army he was assigned to duty as specialist in gastro-intestinal diseases at the Base Hospital at Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, and was on continuous duty there from January 3rd until September 8, 1918. Doctor Parker has specialized for a number of years in gastro-intestinal diseases, and his skill and success have brought him well deserved recognition from the medical profession. He has every advantage bestowed by experience, personal skill and complete facilities. These facilities in his fine suite of offices in the Wallace Building at Greenville include the latest Bellevue Model X-Ray machine of the Woppler Electric Company.

Doctor Parker is a member of the County, State and American Medical Associations. He married Miss Andrina Anderson of Anderson County, a daughter of George W. and Narcissa (Nesbitt) Anderson. George W. Anderson was born in Greenville County, South Carolina, March 7, 1828. He was the son of John Anderson, a native of Ireland, who came to America with his parents, Thomas and Nancy (Ewing) Anderson, in his childhood and settled in Greenville, Greenville County, where he died in 1837. Of ten children living at the time of John Anderson's death, Major Anderson and his sister are the only ones surviving. Thomas and Nancy Anderson, the grandparents, spent the remainder of their lives in Greenville County, the latter living to be nearly 100 years old. The mother of Major Anderson was Mary Terry, who survived her husband a great many years, dying at the age of seventy. Four sons of John and Mary Anderson served in the Confederate army; James, John, David and George W. James died in 1863 from sickness contracted in the service; John was captured at the fall of Petersburg and died from the effects of his treatment on the boat while on his way to Charleston to be released; David survived the war and farmed in Alabama until his death in 1896. George W. was educated chiefly at the Cokesbury High School. He taught for one year in Alabama, but began a mercantile business in Laurens County, South Carolina, in 1851. For several years before the war he was a major in the state militia, commanding the upper squadron of the Tenth Regiment of cavalry. In the fall of 1863 he entered the army as a private in Company K, Seventh South Carolina Regiment of cavalry, commanded by Col. A. C. Haskell, and served with it to the close of the war. He was in the battles of Drewry's Bluff, and shortly afterward detailed as a courier for Gen. G. T. Beauregard, serving as such for some time, after which he returned to his command, and participated in the battle of the Crater. He was present at Lee's surrender at Appomattox. Major Anderson located in Williamston, South Carolina, in 1868. As a merchant after the war he was very successful. He was a very active and loyal churchman and at that time when prohibition was very unpopular, he took a strong stand in support of it and was instrumental in the publication of a prohibition paper. To the poor and needy he was unusually kind and generous. He was married February 21, 1860, to Miss Nancy Narcissa Nesbitt, who survived him nine years, and died November 27, 1901, leaving seven children, four sons and three daughters. Her maternal ancestry includes the notable Nesbitt family of Spartanburg County. She is a granddaughter of James Nesbitt and a great-granddaughter of Jonathan Nesbitt of Spartanburg County. Jonathan Nesbitt was a Revolutionary hero. At the battle of Cowpens the breech of his gun was shot off by enemy fire. He was participant in a number of other battles in North Carolina, and at his death was buried with military honors in old Nazareth Presbyterian Church in Spartanburg County. The Nesbitts were among the founders of this historic congregation. They had located in Upper South Carolina a number of years before the Revolutionary war and represented some of the finest of the Scotch-Irish stock in that vicinity. One of the prominent members of the family was Col. Wilson Nesbitt, who was a member of Congress in 1817-18, and had in this and otherwise a brilliant career. He married Miss Susan Tyler DuVal of Washington, District of Columbia, and he died at Montgomery, Alabama, to which place he had removed from Spartanburg County later in life.

The two children of Doctor and Mrs. Parker are: Andrina Anderson Parker and John W. Parker, III.
Source: History of South Carolina, Volume 3 Edited by Yates Snowden and Harry Gardner Cutler, 1920 – Transcribed by AFOFG


PICKETT, WILLIAM RAIFORD, planter, was born April 2, 1833, at Montgomery, and died April 7, 1889, in the city of his birth; son of Albert James and Sarah Smith (Harris) Pickett (q. v.). He was educated in the public and private schools of Montgomery and attended a university. At the outbreak of the War of Secession he entered the army and held four commissions from the Confederate government, the last was that of quartermaster general for Alabama with station in Montgomery. He was an Episcopalian. Married: July 14, 1859, at Montgomery, to Laura, daughter of Samuel Doak and Laura (Hall) Holt (q. v.). Children: 1. Mary Alston, m. Josiah Morris Davidson, three children, (1) William Pickett, m. Bessie Werden, (2) James Armstrong, captain 31st Division, A. E. F.; (3) Florence, m. William B. Taylor, of Mobile; 2. Samuel Holt, died in infancy; 3. Albert James, m. Florence Lascellls Collins, general freight agent for the Mobile and Ohio railroad company, three children: (1) Albert James, jr.; (2) Robert William: (3) Laura Kate. Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Submitted by AFOFG


RAY, WILLIAM O., business man, was born in Mt. Meigs, Montgomery County, and died in Montgomery; son of John Washington and Martha (Conyers) Ray, of Greene County, Va., who removed to Mt. Meigs, among the early settlers of the county; grandson of Ross and Betty (Denson) Conyers, of Franklin County, N. C., who removed to Georgia; great-grandson of William and Mary (Ross) Conyers, of Sumter, S. C., the former a soldier in the Revolution; great-great-grandson of Capt. Richard and Margaret (Arrundel) Conyers, of North Carolina, who came from the Bermudas, before the Revolution, and who assisted in establishing American independence. He was educated in the schools of Mt. Meigs community; removed to Montgomery and engaged in business, as a cotton-broker and a wholesale grocer. He was a Democrat and a Baptist. Married: about 1849, in Mentgomery County to Mary Steele. Children: 1. Sallie, m. Thos. Wilkerson; 2. Mattie, m. Capt. William B. Jones; 3. John, m. Maggie Smith. Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Transcribed by AFOFG
 


RUSHING, FRANCIS M., physician, was born in 1833, in Montgomery County, deceased; son of Malachi and Telitha (Dykes) Rushing, both natives of Beaufort District, S. C., who removed to Montgomery, in 1818, the former a farmer and a soldier in the War of 1812; grandson of Mathew Rushing, who was born, lived and died in South Carolina, and whose wife moved to Alabama and died in Pike County. He was left an orphan, when he was about twelve years old and with a brother went to Pike County, where he lived with an uncle, worked on the farm, and attended school in the winter. When he was sixteen years old, he started life for himself, and worked on farms, attending school as he had means, and succeeded in obtaining a fair education. In 1855, he became a clerk in the office of P. D. Costello, then probate judge, where he remained until 1857, when he became a clerk in a store, and at the same time read medicine with Dr. Blue and Dr. Moore. He was graduated from the medical department of the University of Louisiana, M. D., in 1861, and commenced practice at Elba, where he remained, until 1862, when he was made surgeon of the Twentyfifth Alabama, and spent some time at Corinth, Miss. He resigned because of ill health, returned home, and practiced at Bullock until 1863, when he joined the home guards as first lieutenant and served at Pollard, Pensacola and other places. He was a member of the State medical association, was one of the counselors for six years, and president for some time of the Coffee County Medical Society; was elected to the legislature in 1878, and in 1880, to the senate from Coffee, Henry, Dale, and Geneva Counties, during which time he introduced several measures that became laws; and in August, 1892, was elected probate judge of Coffee County. He was a Mason. Married: in 1859, to Fannie V. Yelverton, who died in 1877, daughter of Judge G. T. and Mrs. Yelverton, the former who came from Georgia to Alabama, located at Elba, was an attorney, a member of the legislature, county judge of Dale and Coffee Counties, commissioner to Florida to negotiate for the transfer of West Florida to Alabama, a member of the secession convention, and raised a regiment for service in the War of Secession, but was not called into active service. Children: 1. Martha A., m. John B. Harper of Geneva; 2. William M.; 3. John Burrell, cadet, U. S. Military Academy, West Point, N. Y., 1885-87, register in chancery, Coffee County, 1891-99, clerk, probate office, Coffee County, 1899-1900, d. June 21, 1900, m. Mary Ada Ham; 4. Grappa M., physician at Nevada, Tex.; 5. Fannie M.; 6. Tupp; 7. Delia; 8. Mineola. Last residence: Elba.
[History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Volume 4 by Thomas McAdory Owen and Marie Bankead Owen, 1921 - Transcribed by AFOFG]


STOKES, JOEL ALLEN, planter, was born in 1815, in Caswell County, N. C., and died April, 1847, in Bonham, Texas; son of Sylvanus and Rebecca Stokes, the former a planter, member of the North Carolina legislature for several times and Stokes County, that state, was named in his honor. He was educated in the common schools of North Carolina; at the Danville, Va., male academy, and the Normal college of North Carolina. In 1836, he removed to McGehee's Switch, Montgomery County, carrying with him his slaves, and buying a plantation near that of his brother-in-law, Col. Albert Gallatin McGehee, but later sold that land and purchased a plantation on the Norman Bridge Road. He was a successful planter and was for a number of years justice of the peace in the beat in which he lived. He was a Whig and a Methodist. Married: in 1836, in Amelia County, Va., to Elizabeth Caroline, daughter of William and Sarah Scott (Hudson) Payne of that place. Children: 1. Walter Scott, m. Martha Shakelford, Montgomery; 2. Sarah Ann; 3. Jane Frances, m. Rev. W. W. Lewis. Last residence: Montgomery County.
Source: History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Transcribed by AFOFG


STONE, BARTON WARREN, planter, was born March 24, 1800, at Oglethorpe, Ga., and died January 14, 1884, in Montgomery; son of Warren and Martha (Bedell) Stone; grandson of John and Mary (Warren) Stone, the former a Revolutionary soldier. After her husband's death Mrs. Stone removed to a farm near the Dan River, Pittsylvania County, Va., below the Blue Mountains, carrying her children and servants. Her sons, Boston, Absalom and Warren, settled at a very early date west of Montgomery. Barton establishing himself upon a large plantation ten miles from the present city of Montgomery and built a handsome residence which he furnished suitably. He was a Methodist. Married: (1) to Caroline Walton, widow, of Macon County, Ga.; (2) to Carolina, daughter of Henry and Louisa (Houser) Whetstone, of Autauga County; (3) to Beatrice Wall of Coosa County. Children: by the first wife: 1. Mary, m. John Harris; 2. Sarah, m. Robert Motley of Texas; 3. Warren, m. Helen Benton; 4. Callie, m. Joe Harris; 5. George, killed at the battle of Seven Pines; 6. Eliza, m. James M. Lewis; by second wife; 7. Henry Lewis, physician, m. Willie Eliza Frazier; 8. Barton William. No children were born of the third marriage. Last residence: Montgomery County.
[Source: History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Submitted by AFOFG]


STONE, GEORGE WASHINGTON, lawyer, was born October 24, 1811, in Bedford County, Va., and died March 11, 1894, in Montgomery; son of Micajah and Sarah (Leftwich) Stone, of Bedford County, Va., who removed to Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1818; grandson of Micajah Stone, a native of England who emigrated to America and settled in Bedford County, Va.; grand nephew of Jabez Leftwich (q. v.). Judge Stone was educated in the common schools of Lincoln County, Tenn., later attending the village academy. He studied law in the office of James Fulton, of Fayetteville, Tenn.; removed to Alabama; was admitted to practice his profession in that State, May, 1834, and opened an office in Talladega; entered into partnership with William P. Chilton, later chief justice of the supreme court of Alabama; appointed judge of the circuit court, August, 1843; elected to the same position for a term of six years by the legislature, in December, 1843; resigned in January, 1849, and removed to Hayneville, Lowndes County, practicing in succession with Nathan Cook, T. J. Judge, and S. Perry Nesraith. He was elected associate justice of the Alabama supreme court bench, January, 1856, re-elected in 1862, and upon the reconstruction of the State government after the War of Secession retired from the bench and again took up the practice of his profession in Montgomery. He formed a partnership in 1866 with David Clopton and Gen. James H. Clanton. Upon the death of General Clanton the firm was continued under the name of Stone and Clopton. Judge Stone was again appointed in March, 1876, as associate justice of the supreme court by Governor Houston to fill an unexpired term; elected by the people in 1880 for a term of six years; appointed chief justice by Governor O'Neal in 1884; and elected to the same office for a term of six years in 1886; after which he returned to his practice. He served on the supreme court bench for nearly a quarter of a century and delivered over two thousand and one hundred decisions. These decisions are to be found in the twenty-eight to the thirty-ninth, and fifty-third to the eighty-ninth volumes of the Alabama State reports, inclusive. Married: (1) December 16, 1834, to Mary, daughter of George and Martha (Morgan) Gillespie, of Franklin, Tenn.; (2) September 4, 1849, to Emily, daughter of William and Dolly (Rutherford) Moore, of Lowndes County; (3) February 8, 1866, to Mrs. Mary E. (Harrison) Wright, daughter of Paschal and Elizabeth (Phillips) Harrison, of Georgia, later of Lowndes County. He left numerous descendants. Last residence: Montgomery.
Source: History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Submitted by AFOFG


STOUGH, THOMAS JEFFERSON, physician, city commissioner of Montgomery, 1915-1919, and legislator, was born June 7, 1865, at Highland Home, Crenshaw County; son of Daniel Jackson and Mary Allen (Cox) Stough, the former was a native of Upson County, Ga.; grandson of Jacob and Sophy Stough, and of William and Clementine Cox, all residents of Dadeville. He was educated in the common schools; at Highland Home college; and graduated M. D., March 24, 1893, from the University of Tennessee. He entered upon the practice of his profession in April, 1894, at Petry, Crenshaw County, but later removed to Montgomery. He represented Montgomery County in the legislature of 1915. He was one of the city commissioners of Montgomery from 1915 to 1919. He is now engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: at Moss Point, Miss., to Carrie Bell, daughter of Jerold and Hortense Reed, of Evergreen. Children: 1. Vivian, m. Stuart May; 2. Bernard Hill. Residence: Montgomery.
[Source: History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Submitted by AFOFG]


TAYLOR, GEORGE WASHINGTON
George Washington Taylor, Democrat, of Demopolis, Marengo county, Ala., was born January 16, 1849, in Montgomery county, Ala,; is the son of Edward F. Taylor and wife Anne S. Trezevant, both natives of Columbia, S. C.; was educated at the South Carolina University, Columbia S C - is a lawyer, and was admitted to practice at Mobile, Ala., November 1871; entered the army as Confederate soldier at the age of fifteen years in November, 1864, being then a student at an academy in Columbia S.C.; served a few weeks with the South Carolina. State troops on the coast near Savannah, and then enlisted as a private in Company D , First Regiment ,South Carolina Cavalry, and served as a courier till the end of the war; left the South Carolina University at eighteen, having graduated in Latin, Greek, history, and chemistry; taught school for several years, and studied law at the same time; was elected to the House ot Representatives of the State of Alabama in 1878, and served one term as a member from Choctaw county; in 1880 was elected solicitor for the first -judicial circuit of Alabama, and was re-elected in .1886; declined a third term; was elected to the Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh, Fiftyeighth Fifty-ninth Congresses, and re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress without opposition receiving 3,592 votes. In January, 1881, he was married to Margaretta/V. T., daugher of E. H. and Mary J. Metcalf, of Montgomery.
[Alabama Official and Statistical Register by Thomas M. Owen, 1907 - Transcribed by AFOFG]

TAYLOR, GEORGE WASHINGTON, Attorney-at-law and Solicitor of the First Judicial Circuit, was born January 16, 1849, at Montgomery and is a son of Edward F. and Anne S. (Trezevant) Taylor, both natives of Columbia, S. C. After his father came to Alabama he was engaged in planting and at the time of his death he was a Confederate soldier, and died at Montgomery, November 4, 1862. Our subject was educated at the University of South Carolina, situated at Columbia, which has been a seat of culture and refinement for many years. He was graduated from this institution in June 1867. Going back somewhat, we find that in November, 1864, he entered the army as a private in Company D, of the First Regiment of South Carolina Cavalry, and served in the capacity of courier till April, 1865, when the war closed. Immediately after his graduation, as already noted, we find our subject engaged in teaching in Mobile, Ala., which he continued four years, and, having read law in the meantime, he was admitted to the bar in 1871, In the following year he located in Choctaw County, for the practice of his profession, he was a member of the Alabama Legislature from Choctaw during the session of 1878-79, and served on a special committee and was a member of the Judiciary Committee of the House. In November, 1880, he was elected Solicitor of the First Judicial Circuit, and having come to Demopolis in January, 1883, to live, he was reelected from there to the same position in 1886. It needs no assurance on our part to satisfy our readers that Mr. Taylor has been eminently successful as a lawyer. If the tree is known by its fruit then, indeed, can we know by the results of his life's work thus far; and should we base the outcome of the future on the past and present, we can say that his life will present a well-rounded and well-won series of events achieved in a useful and noble calling. Mr. Taylor was married January, 1881, to Miss Margaretta V. T., daughter of E. H. and Mary J. Metcalf, of Montgomery. Their family consists of four children: Mary, Maggie M., Edward and Lucy C. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Masonic fraternity of the Knights of Pythias and of the Episcopal Church. Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney


THOMPSON, THOMAS P., Life Underwriter, Banker and Literature of 1812 Calhoun Street, New Orleans, La. was born Nov. 11, 1860, in Montgomery, Ala. He is director of the oldest bank in New Orleans; and chairman of the real estate committee that erected its six-hundred-thousand-dollar office building. He is president of the Greater New Orleans Homestead Association, and president of the Bienville Realty Company and other corporations. In 1910 he was president of the Century Club, and in 1913 was president of the Louisiana Historical Society. He has the largest private library of Americana of Louisiana, comprising six thousand volumes. He is the author of Louisiana Writers; and Guide to the French Quarter of New Orleans.
Source: Herringshaw's American blue-book of biography: By Thomas William Herringshaw, American Publishers' Assoc.; Publ. 1919; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack.


Home
 

Copyright © Genealogy Trails 2013
All Rights Reserved with Full Rights Reserved for Original Contributor