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1887 

The new associate editor of the Hartselle Index is Mr. J. A. Rountree. He is a ready writer and a most intelligent young man. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL - January 21, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

The Decatur News says: The citizenship of Decatur today is quite different from what it was a short time back. Here where we have lived for thirteen years, we are a stranger among strangers. A clerk in the post office who has theretofore known every person who called for mail does not now know one half of those applying. Canadians are here, men from the east and the west and from the extreme south are here, all mingling and mixing in the stir and whirl that is daily going on. Old citizens are astonished, the thoughtful are amazed and even the unconcerned and listless are surprised. Day after day property is advancing. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL - February 4, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

Somerville Ala has a big goldmine boom. Source: Marion Herald, Marion County, AL - April 26, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

We have received No. 1 of “The Free Lance” a newspaper just started at Decatur, by Mr. T. L. CANNON. It is a credit to Alabama journalism; we gladly place it on our X list.   Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL - May 12, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

The first electric light in Decatur was flashed into the ball on the night of May 28th, where the Alabama press excursionists were entertained. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL - June 16, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

Decatur turned on her first current of electric lights at an entertainment of one hundred and ten members of the Press Association on the 4th ult. Source: Marion County Herald, Marion County, AL - June 16, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

60 persons were poisoned by eating ice cream at Hartselle last week, but all recovered. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL - July 7, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

Mr. J. A. Roundtree, a young man of energy and ability who has considerable experience with the press, has purchased the Morgan County News, moved it to Hartselle, and changed the name to Alabama Enquirer and News.  Success to you As – s. Source: Marion County Herald, Marion County, AL - July 14, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

The real estate booms in Alabama towns have pretty well been succeeded by wide awake building boom. The Magic City of Birmingham, as also Anniston, Decatur, and several others are rapidly improving. Less than a year ago the little town of Decatur was looked upon by most people as being "finished" and such a thing as a boom to equal the one she now has was unthought of. This proves clearly what a little capital in the hands of live energetic men can do, as this same town now has capital pouring into her from every quarter, and scores of dwellings and various manufacturing enterprises are going up every day. There are hundreds of thousands of dollars being invested in industries of one kind and other.   While millions of dollars of Northern capital are now being invested in the South, Southern men and Southern capital are the chief instruments in building them up. The reports has been circulated abroad that the men of the South have but little share in the industrial enterprises of Alabama. This is a grand mistake. The energy and talent of Southern men are entitled to the credit for most of them.  Source: Marion Herald, (Marion County, AL) - July 14, 1887 - transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

Mr. John R. Fowler has taken editorial control of the Morgan County News. We are glad to learn that News has fallen into hands so competent and well qualified as Mr. Folwer's, and we feel quite sure that no effort on his part will be left unmade to advance the cause of old Morgan and her people. The Herald extends a hearty welcome and says long may you soar friend Johnnie. Marion Herald, (Marion County, AL), May 19, 1887, pg 1, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

People are living in tents at Decatur. Source: Lamar News, Lamar County, AL, July 7, 1887  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney  

 

More carpenters wanted at Decatur. Source: Lamar News, Lamar County, AL, July 7, 1887  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

The Morgan County Agricultural Wheel will meet at Hartselle 16th of July. Source: Lamar News, Lamar County, AL, July 7, 1887  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

Car works from Ohio going to Decatur with $1,000,000 and orders for 3,000 cars at once. Source: Lamar News, Lamar County, AL, July 7, 1887  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney


1888

A laborer on the farm of Col. C. C. Sheats, near Decatur plowed up a skeleton a few days ago, which was in a good state of preservation, the head and teeth being perfect. Source: Lamar News, Lamar County, AL, June 15, 1888  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

New Decatur has organized a fire company. Source: Marion County Herald, Marion County, AL, August 23, 1888  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 


1889

J. J. Woodall has been appointed postmaster at Hartselle, vice J. T. Simpson removed. Source: Marion County Herald, Marion County, AL, June 20, 1889  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney


 1891

OIL IN MORGAN - Two Wells With a Capacity of Fifty Barrels and Two More Being Bored
Capt. E. J. Oden, says the Birmingham Age-Herald of Hartselle who is staying at the Florence says that work is being push on two or three additional oil wells near that town.
      There are two companies engaged in the business, and they are working on local capital.  Captain Oden believes that the boring of the wells will be commercially successful.
       Two wells are already finished and they have a capacity of twenty-five barrels each a day. They are 1500 feet deep, and the oil rises within 50 feet of the surface.  It is not being pumped out at present, for the reason that the company is not ready to utilize it.
 Captain Oden says that there is no doubt about the oil being a valuable quality of petroleum.  The counties of Morgan and Lawrence, in both of which oil has been found, expect to profit very largely by the new industry, which it is thought, will spring up and flourish.  Source: Hamilton Times, Marion County, AL, March 26, 1891  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney  

Morgan county has decided to change her county seat.  We regret that such is the case as we have a very kindly feeling toward the dear old town of Somerville and had hoped that the court house would remain there.  But such is progress. The two booming Decaturs have grown too strong for the people of "High Morgan' and have beaten them at the polls. (Hamilton Times, Marion County AL, April 9, 1891 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney)

Supt. Vandell, of the Rolling Stock Works at Decatur, has invented and will patent an automatic car coupler. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, May 28, 1891  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney  

The dwelling house and contents of Wm. Woodall, living a few miles from Decatur on the Courtland road, were destroyed by fire last Sunday. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, May 28, 1891  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney  

Miss Jessie Herring, of Flint, has been elected one of the teachers of the Gordon public School of New Decatur. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, June 25, 1891  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney  

Last night, Mr. E. P. McClanahan’s store at McClanahan’s Springs, three and a half miles southwest from Hartselle, was destroyed by fire. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, July 2, 1891  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney  

S. E. Humphrey, the well known oil contractor, commenced to sink an oil well three miles from Hartselle on the farm of William Young last Tuesday.  The work  will go on speepily until the well is completed. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, September 24, 1891  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney  


1893

The Decatur City authorities have passed an ordinance forbidding the firing of guns, pistols, fire-crackers, torpedoes, etc. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, January 5, 1893, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

Peter Broadfoot and L. S. Robinson have recently secured a patent for what is termed the "king brace for a railroad scraper, for which they have been offered and refused $20,000 They are citizens of Decatur, Ala.  Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, January 5, 1893, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

V. O Hawkins, of Decatur has been granted a patent on a cast metal monument.   Source: Hamilton Times, Marion, Lamar County, AL, June 8, 1893, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

F. S. Hood, living near Hartselle, wants all the old members of Company H, Twelfth Regiment to eat dinner with him on the Fourth and spend the day in social festivities. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County, AL, June 29, 1893, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney


1895

ABANDONED THEIR BABE

Some time ago a man calling himself C. P. Jones, accompanied by a young woman who posed as his wife, arrived in Decatur.  The couple took rooms and board with the Barnes Bros. restaurant men, for some time.  They the rented a small cottage in the most fashionable part of the city, where they lived until Wednesday night, and left during the night for parts unknown, leaving an infant locked up in the house, apparently about 1 month old, which had been born since their residence in Decatur.  They left $25 with the child, and a note telling their neighbors that any once caring for the child would be well paid for it.  The note was thrown, with the house key, upon the porch floor of a neighbor, and the baby was found Thursday morning alone in the house. Source: Hamilton News Press, Marion County, AL, March 7, 1895 -  transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 


1897

STEEL BRIDGE PROPOSED

Frank Conger, president and general manger of the Grotton bridge company, New York, has a proposition to submit for the erection of a steel bridge across the Tennessee River at Decatur.  Mr. Cogner proposes at this own expense to make the survey for the bridge and approaches on both sides of the river, at a cost of about $1,000, provided he meets with the proper encouragement from the citizens of Decatur.   Source: Marion County News, Marion County, AL, November 25, 1897 , transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

OPENING NEW COLONIES

A new colony has sprung up practically of its own accord at McDonalds, Morgan County, but bids fair to excite some interest before long.  Here a number of sturdy Germans have settled and will plant vineyards.  Bismarck, another proposed German colony near Decatur, has been lagging on account of quarantines, but bids fair to reawaken.  The town has been laid out and it is ready for settlers. Source: Marion County News, Marion County, AL, December 2, 1897 , transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

IOWA FARMERS LOCATING IN THIS STATE

J. E. McMichael has just arrived in Morgan County as an advance guard for a large party of emigrant Iowa farmers, consisting of eleven families, who, he says, are traveling overland with all their stock, wagons and personal property, headed for Decatur.  The distance they will cover is more than 800 miles.  McMichael came on first in order to make certain essential arrangements.  the large party will arrive here in a few days.  McMichael says they are only a small number compared to the exodus that will come here a little later on, as soon as they can complete their arrangements to get away.  This first party has obtained three large fertile farms about six miles west of Decatur, where they will locate. Source: Gazette Appeal, Marion County, AL, December 3, 1897 , transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

COTTON GIN AND LUMBER YARD BURNED – Fire at Hartselle recently destroyed the cotton gin and lumber yard belonging to Robert Sobatka.  The loss was total.  Forty bales of cotton and 30,000 feet of lumber comprised the principal loss outside of buildings. Source: Gazette Appeal, Marion County, AL, December 3, 1897 , transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 


 

1903

 

AUSTINVILLE HAS TELEPHONES
A telephone exchange, with about twenty pones, ahs been put in at Austinville, a suburb of New Decatur by the Morgan County telephone Company of that city. This company has extended its system at New Decatur recently.  Source: Marion County Democrat, Marion County, AL, November 26, 1903, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney


 1908

 

LIGHTNING TAKES A PHOTGRAPH OF DECATUR

August 7 of the present year S. W. Goree was instantly killed by lightning while standing in the front door of his home in West New Decatur, and his wife, who was standing close by his side, was seriously shocked.  It has just been discovered that on the glass in the door where Mr. GOREE stood when he was killed there is a picture which was photographed by the lightning flash that killed Mr. Goree.  In the picture on the glass the faces of Mr. and Mrs. Goree appear quite plainly. She has her mouth slightly open as if in the act of speaking, while his head is raised as if in the act of watching the storm.  There also appears in the picture e a portion of the yard fence, a large gif bush in the front yard, two telephone poles some distance ay and a house an a strip of wooded scenery fully a quarter of a mile away. The picture is on exhibition in the Decatur News office and is attracting considerable attention. The house wherein Mr. Goree was killed in now vacant, and a number of responsible persons claim that the place is haunted.  Some say they have seen and heard the front door open and shut without any cause and some claim that they have seen Mr. Goree’s ghost walking around in the yard at night. Source: Marion County Republican,, Marion County, AL, October 6, 1908, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

DECATUR TAG DAY

The ladies of the Benevolent Society of the Decaturs will observe Saturday October 24 as “Tag Day” in both Decatur and New Decatur. Good-looking girls will be stationed at all the hotels, depots and on all the principal street corners during the day and no man will be allowed to escape from them until he has given up his 10 cents and had a tag tied on his coat by a good looking young lady.  The money received from the sale of tags will go to the relief of the poor of the two Decaturs.  Source: Marion County Republican,, Marion County, AL, October 21, 1908, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 

GIRLS WILL PLAY FOOTBALL

A school football team has just been organized by the high school girls of New Decatur. The team is divided into two divisions, and the captain of the divisions are Miss Annie Watson and Miss Elizabeth Glover. The girls will have some interesting games this winter.  They will have the regulation uniforms.  Source: Marion County Republican,, Marion County, AL, November 4, 1908, transcribed and submitted by Veneta McKinney

 


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