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Russell County Alabama
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Alabama As It Is by B. F. Riley - 1893

Northern Alabama - by Smith and DeLand - 1888


RUSSELL COUNTY.

 

Source: Alabama As It Is by Benjamin Franklin Riley, D. D., The Brown Printing Co, State Printers and Binders, 1893 , Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

 

THE county which bears the name above given was established in 1832, and named for Colonel Gilbert C. Russell, of Mobile. This is one of the border counties of the State, being separated from Georgia by the Chattahoochee River. It has many valuable tracts of land and a thrifty population. The county embraces an area of 670 square miles. Population in 1880, 24,837; population in 1890, 24,093. White, 5,814; colored, 18,279.

 

Area planted in cotton, 66,772 acres; in corn, 32,502 acres; in oats, 5,631 acres; in wheat, 47 acres; in rye, 63 acres; in tobacco, 1 acre.

 

Cotton production—20,521 bales.

 

The general surface of Russell county is undulating, and in some sections broken. It abounds in capital agricultural lands, many of which have been in cultivation for quite a number of years. Its soils differ widely in their character, but are generally quite productive.

 

Beginning our survey with the lands in the eastern part of the county, and those which lie along the western bank of the historic Chattahoochee, we find them to be excellent for farming purposes, the loamy soil having the color of chocolate. These embrace a belt five or six miles in width, when the more elevated table-lands begin. These are covered with a red loam soil, and are considered even more valuable than those which lie in close proximity to the river. Beyond this, still westward, are the hill regions, which have long sustained a reputation for productiveness. Next this comes a range of gravelly hills, which penetrate the county near the center. From this point to the extreme western boundary there is quite a diversity of soil, produced largely by the numerous streams which ramify this portion of Russell. In this western half may be found rich alluvial bottoms, as well as thin, sandy, ridge lands. These lands are peculiarly adapted to the production of corn, cotton, oats, potatoes and sugar-cane. The bottom lands are usually preferred for cotton. The lands are generally tilled with ease. Every variety of soil may be found in the county, from that of sand to that of the most fertile black prairie and blue marl. The county is highly favored in its dense forests of excellent timber. Both the short-leaf and yellow or long-leaf pine, the white, red, water and blackjack oaks, hickory, gum, beech, dogwood, willow, maple, timbers, prevail in different sections of Russell. The county has ample supplies of water throughout the entire year. The Chattahoochee River forms the entire eastern boundary of the county, giving a river front of more than fifty miles, while its territory is watered by such streams as Hatchechubbee, Big and Little Uchee, North and Middle Forks of Cowikee and Wetumpka Creeks. These bold streams are fed by numerous tributaries that drain every section of the county. The springs and wells afford abundant supplies of superior water for domestic uses. These water supplies, taken in connection with the readiness with which grass and clover are produced, suggest the ease with which stock may be raised. This will no doubt become, in the years of the future, one of the leading industries of Russell.

 

The chief towns are Seale, the county-seat, with a population of 300, Girard 300, Hurtsboro 600, Jernigan 250, and Hatchechubbee. Pittsboro and Paradise, new and growing towns on the Savannah, Americus & Montgomery Railroad, and Crawford are inviting points. Flourishing schools exist in these, as well as in every hamlet and village in the county. Hurtsboro has long been noted for its educational spirit.

 

The Mobile & Girard and Savannah, Americus & Montgomery Railroads and the packets upon the Chattahoochee furnish transportation facilities to the people of the county. Columbus, Georgia, a large and nourishing city, on the opposite bank of the river to Russell, affords a fine market to the inhabitants of the county.

 

The people of Russell are alive to the importance of developing the wealth of their highly-favored county, and they look for that development to come mainly from the industry and energy of those who will come in and occupy their valuable lands. These can be purchased at prices ranging from $1.50 to $10.00 per acre.

 

The government lands have been exhausted in the county.

 


 

RUSSELL COUNTY.

 

Source: Northern Alabama - Historical and Biographical by Smith & De Land, Birmingham, Ala 1888 - Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

 

Population: White, 6,182: colored, 18,655. Area, 670 square miles. Woodland, all. Gravelly hills, with pine and oak uplands, and blue marl.

 

Acres - In cotton (approximately), 81,600; in corn, 34,300; in oats, 9,700; in wheat, 1,000; in rice, 65; in sugar-cane, 196: in sweet potatoes, 1,000.

 

Approximate number of bales of cotton, 20,000.

 

County Seat - Seale; population, 600; on Mobile & Girard Railroad.

 

Newspaper published at County Seat - Russell Register (Democratic).

 

Postoffices in the County: Arahburgh, Crawford, Dexter, Fort Mitchell, Glenville, Hatchechubbee, Hurtsboro, Jernigan, Loflin, Marvyn, Oswichee, Seale, Uchee.

 

The county was established in 1832, and named for Col. Gilbert C. Russell, of Mobile. This is one of the border counties of the State, being separated from Georgia by the Chattahoochee River. It has many valuable tracts of land and a thrifty population.

The general surface of Russell County is undulating, and in some sections broken. It abounds in capital agricultural lands, many of which have been in cultivation for quite a number of years. Its soils differ widely in their character, but are generally quite productive.

 

Beginning the survey with lands in the eastern part of the county, and those which lie along the western bank of the historic Chattahoochee, we find them to be excellent for farming purposes, the loamy soil having the color of chocolate. These embrace a belt five or six miles in width, when the more elevated table-lands begin. These are covered with a red loam soil, and are considered even more valuable than those which lie in close proximity to the river. Beyond this, still westward, are the hill regions, which have long sustained a reputation for productiveness.

 

In the hills which adjoin the two Uchee Creeks, limestone is found in inexhaustible quantities and of the finest quality.

Next this comes a range of gravelly hills, which penetrate the county near the center. From this point to the extreme western boundary there is quite a diversity of soil, produced largely by the numerous streams which ramify this portion of Russell. In this western half may be found rich alluvial bottoms, as well as thin, sandy ridge lands. These lands are peculiarly adapted to the production of corn, cotton, oats, potatoes and sugar-cane, and to all kinds of fruit, including the Lecompte pear which grows in great luxuriance. The uplands arc especially adapted to all kinds of grapes and berries.

 

The bottom lands are usually preferred for cotton. The lands are generally tilled with ease. Every variety of soil may be found in the county, from that of sand to that of the most fertile black prairie and blue marl. The county is highly favored in its dense forests of excellent timber. Both the short-leaf, and yellow or long-leaf, pine, the white, red, water and blackjack oaks, hickory, gum, beech, dogwood, willow, maple, walnut, cypress and cedar timbers prevail in different sections of Russell. The county has ample supplies of water throughout the entire year. The Chattahoochee River forms the entire eastern boundary of the county, giving a river front of more than fifty miles, while its territory is watered by such streams as Cowikee and Watauia Creeks. These bold streams are fed by numerous tributaries that drain every section of the county. The springs and wells afford abundant supplies, taken in connection with the readiness with which stock may be raised.

 



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