Winston County, Alabama

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 BIOGRAPHIES OF WINSTON COUNTY

 

Baker, Sam

Barton, Wm. M.

Burns, Jeremiah

Cowart, Lee

Curtis, J. J.

Edmonds, James

Haley, Charlie

Head, James B.

Ingle, Andrew J.

Letson, William P.

Lovett, James

McLain, David

Newman, Patrick 

Persinger, Jesse

Rivers, Richard

Sheats, Charles

Tubb, Chester

BAKER SAM
HE IS one of the oldest white settlers of McIntosh County [OK], has lived a life of venture and daring, his career on the extreme border of civilization having been full of action and thrilling experiences. For the past few years he has devoted his time and attention to the peaceful vocations of life, being employed principally in agricultural pursuits on his well-kept farm in Checotah. He was born, January 24, 1859, in northern Alabama, a son of Thomas Baker. A native of North Carolina, Thomas Baker moved when young to Georgia, and about 1831 married, in Atlanta, Polly Long, a native of Georgia, and immediately located in the northern part of Alabama, settling there just before the removal of the Creek and Cherokee Indians to the Indian Territory. He enlisted during the Civil war in an Alabama regiment, and served in the Union army in many engagements of importance, including the siege of Vicksburg, the battle of Shiloh, the battle at Cumberland, where his brother was killed, and in various other engagements in different parts of the country. At the close of the war he was appointed guardian of the widows and orphans of Winston County, Alabama, for the families of the United States soldiers. His wife died in 1892, and in 1898 he came to Oklahoma, and spent the remainder of his life with his son Sam, dying in 1898, aged eighty years. He reared a family of eleven children, as follows: William, who died in Alabama, where his family now lives; Ruth C., deceased; John W.. who died in Alabama; Sam, the subject of this sketch: Alonzo, deceased; Mary J., wife of W. Bordon of Oklahoma; Clementine, wife of John Turner; Calvin, deceased; Benjamin F. of Oklahoma; David, deceased; and Rosalie, wife of Henry Shuts, of Oklahoma.
          Sam Baker received a limited education in the schools of Alabama, which, just after the war were in a rather demoralized condition, and he remained in his native state until 1879. Coming then to the Indian Territory, he remained there a year or more, and then located in what is now McIntosh County. Oklahoma, but was then the Creek Nation. The population at that time was almost entirely negroes, there being very few white people here. Roughs and desperadoes of all kinds were frequently seen, especially the James and Younger Brothers, who made this part of the country a resting place, although they never seriously interfered with the people hereabout. The Dalton gang likewise came here occasionally for seclusion, and Mr. Baker had a personal acquaintance with some of the most desperate characters of the country. He was at South West City when, in 1894, the Dalton gang robbed the bank. He saw Dynamite Dick's horse shot from under him, and saw the said Dick mount behind one of the Dalton boys, and after he was mounted saw him shoot the exsheriff of the county, afterwards riding out of town with the gang. On one occasion Mr. Baker was lined up at the town of Checotah by Bill Cook and Cherokee Bill while they robbed Lafayette Brothers general store, and, as he says, he walked the line without even once thinking of leaving or trying to break away.
         For many years Mr. Baker served as United States marshal, and was with other marshals when the Buck gang, consisting of five men, were captured, all of whom were afterwards hanged at Fort Smith, Arkansas. He has captured many desperadoes, and arrested the first two Snake Indians found breaking the United States laws, to which they very unwillingly submitted. Crazy Snake, chief of the tribe at that time, is the same Snake who caused the uprising in 1907. Mr. Baker has, without doubt, captured and placed in jail more men than any other marshal in the country. He has been shot at various times, twice through the body, first with an old Colt's cap and ball, and later with a forty-five, the ball passing through his body one and one-fourth inches from his heart, the other thirteen times being wounded with smaller guns. The last time that he was shot he and his wife were riding in the evening. While passing the spot at which the Indians were having a stamp dance a man came out from the bushes and fired, shooting him in the shoulder, while Mrs. Baker received a shot in the muscle of her right arm. After getting his wife out of the buggy, Mr. Baker attended to his man. In 1898 the gang of Mose Miller, a Cherokee, had planned to rob the First National Bank of Checotah, and a posse of marshals and citizens, under command of Mr. Baker, overtook them about daylight and surrounded the house in which it was thought the gang had found refuge. Soon the pursued men opened fire on those surrounding the house, but, although in an exposed position, Mr. Baker and his posse captured all of the robbers with the exception of one that was killed and one that was wounded, capturing five men. The one that escaped was Henry Starr. Of the posse with Mr. Baker, one man, Mr. Turk, of Checotah, received a bullet in his suspenders. For the past seven years Mr. Baker has been essentially a home man, devoting his time and attention to his extensive farming interest his home in Checotah being attractive and pleasant.
          Mr. Baker married first, in 1879, in Alabama, Fannie Brooks, a daughter of Willis and Jane (Bates) Brooks, and to them ten children were born, namely: Emma J., wife of Linn Grady; Columbus; Charles H.; Bill M.; Ella, wife of Emory Hughes; Dora, wife of Roy Freeman; Ruth, deceased; Agnes, living at home; Hattie, deceased; and Homer, deceased. Mr. Baker married for his second wife Ella Blanche Freeman, who was born in Louisiana, a daughter of Floyd C. and Josephine (Howell) Freeman, who reared eight of their family of thirteen children, as follows: Roy; Floy and Emma, twins; Ella B., wife of Mr. Baker; Theodore; Carlyle; and Lyn and Bessie, twins. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have three children, Eula B., Teddie and Beulah. Politically Mr. Baker is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and in both national and local issues does his duty at the polls as a loyal and trustworthy citizen.
("A History of the State of Oklahoma by Luther B. Hill - Vol. II - Published 1910. Transcribed by D. Donlon")

BARTON, WILLLAM MARION, member of the legislature, was born August 17, 1856, at Gainesville, Hall County, Ga., son of Jonathan and Hannah (Blackstock) Barton, the former lived in Georgia until 1858 when he removed to Winston County, served one year in 1st Alabama regiment, Federal Army; grandson of Willis and Peggie (Martin) Barton and of Daniel and Patsy Blackstock. He was educated in the common schools of Winston County. He was a member of the 1907 legislature from Winston County. He is a Republican; a member of the Christian church; an Odd Fellow; and a Mason. Married: at Haley, Marion County, to Martha J., daughter of William and Martha (Ramsey) Lambert. Residence: Lynn.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

BURNS, JEREMIAH, farmer, teacher and legislator, was born September 23, 1887, at Delmar; son of William Riley and Rebecca (Lovett) Burns; grandson of Jerry and Frances Burns, and of Arch and Betsey Jane Lovett, the former a Union soldier during the War of Secession, who died from disease and is buried in Corinth cemetery. The Burns family came to Winston County from Wayne County, Tenn. He was educated in the rural schools of Winston County; attended the G. R. C. college, Henderson, Tenn., 1904; and the West Alabama agricultural school at Hamilton. He is a farmer and teacher, having taught in the rural schools for about ten years, beginning in 1905; served as superintendent of education for Winston County, 1913-1917; and was elected in 1918 to the house of representatives from Winston County. He is a Republican; Baptist; and a Mason. Married: July 8, 1909, near Double Springs, to Nelsie Victoria, daughter of Miles La Fayette and Cordelia (Curtis) Thomas, of Double Springs, granddaughter of Frank Thomas who saw service in the C. S. Army, and of James Curtis, a Union soldier. Children: 1. Will; 2. Elle May; 3. Odie. Residence: Double Springs.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

COWART, LEE, lawyer, was born March 26, 1866, in Towns County, Ga.; son of Thomas J. and Lydia (Chastain) Cowart, the former a native of Spartanburg District, S. C, who lived at Houston, served in the C. S. Army for four years, and was county superintendent of education of Winston County from 1880 to 1888; grandson of Elijah and Sarah Chastain, who moved from North Carolina to Alabama in 1860. Mr. Cowart received his early education in the common schools of Winston County, and was graduated from the law department of the University of Alabama, LL. B., June, 1886. He was admitted to the bar at Double Springs, in 1886, and practiced there for four years, serving from 1887 to 1890, as county solicitor. He was examiner of accounts in the department of justice, 1893-1895; assistant U. S. attorney, northern district of Alabama; 1895-1898; presidential elector, ninth congressional district, 1908; private secretary to Gov. Emmet O'Neal, from January 16, 1911, until his appointment as commissioner of immigration, February 8, 1911, and held the latter position until January 18, 1915. He is a Democrat; was chairman of the Winston County executive committee, 1886-1890; a delegate to all state con- ventions, 1886-1894; and a member of Jefferson County Democratic committee, 1900-1910. He is a Methodist, an Odd Fellow, Knight of Pythias, and a Red Man. Married: February 22, 1892. at Spruce Pine, Franklin County, to Emilie Spann, daughter of Felix G. and Martha (Howell) Spann, of Double Springs. Children: 1. Lee, jr.; 2. Emmet O'Neal; 8. Virgil; 4. Edward; 5. Willadene. Residence: Birmingham.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

CURTIS, JAMES JACKSON, lawyer and judge, was born August 18, 1871, at Double Springs, Winston County; son of Benjamin F. and Eliza (Taylor) Curtis, the former came from Denmark, Buncombe County, N. C, lived near Double Springs, Ala., was once sheriff of Winston County, also once tax collector, and a member of the legislature of 1878-79; grandson of Solomon and Charlotte Curtis, of Denmark, N. C, and of John and Eliza Taylor, of Haleyville. The Curtis and Taylor families are descendants of early English settlers in North Carolina. He was educated in the schools of Winston County; graduated in 1891, from the State normal college, at Florence; later took a course in the Birmingham business college. Studying law he was admitted to the bar in February, 1895. His practice has been in Cullman, Birmingham and Haleyville. He was assistant district attorney, 1895-96; U. S. commissioner, 1897-1903; mayor of Haleyville, 1907-09; supervisor of the census, 1910; elected Judge of the fourteenth judicial circuit in 1910, which position he still occupies. He is a Republican; Presbyterian; Mason; Odd Fellow; Knight of Pythias; a member of the Fraternal union, and of the Royal order of moose. Married: June 22, 1904, at Cullman, to Lorena, daughter of Judge Asa B. Hays, of that place. Children: 1. Lorena. Residence: Haleyville.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

EDMONDS, JAMES ANTHONY, merchant and legislator, was born August 1, 1877 at Berry Station, Fayette County; son of John and Manervia (Stoddard) Edmonds, the former of Natural Bridge, served as a private in the U. S. Army, the latter of Stoddard Cross Roads; grandson of Nathaniel and Sarah Edmonds of Tuscaloosa, and of Samuel and Mary (Cooper) Stoddard, of Fayette County. He is a merchant, a miner, and a shipper of stone coal. He was formerly a justice of the peace. He represented Winston county in the legislature of 1911. He is a Republican; Methodist; and an Odd Fellow. Married: December 25, 1899, at Jasper, to Maud, daughter of Joel A. and May (West) King, of Natural Bridge. Children: 1. Amzia; 2. Blanche; 3. Mamie; 4. Laura; 5. James; 6. Ruth. Residence: Natural Bridge.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

HALEY, CHARLIE LITTLE, live stock dealer, was born July 22, 1859. at Haleys, Marion County; son of Green M. and Juliet Ann (Wright) Haley, the former born near Bowling Green, Ky., who lived at Haleys, Marion County, was a minister of the Christian church, and represented Marion County in the State legislature at one time; grandson of Allen Haley, and of Charlie Wright, who lived in St Clair County. He was educated in the common schools of Marion County, and attended college at Bradyville. Tenn. He was a merchant at Thorn Hill, 1883-1888; moved to Winston County in 1888, and opened a mercantile business on the new railroad at the site of the town of Haleyville, which was named for him; sold his mercantile business in January, 1906, and established the Traders and Farmers Bank, of which he was president for three years; resigned the bank presidency, and located in Florence as a live stock dealer. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1901 from the Seventh congressional district; was a delegate to the national Democratic convention which met at Kansas City, Mo., July 4, 1900; and was chairman of the Democratic executive committee of Winston County in 1901. He is a member of the Christian church and a Mason. Married: December 18. 1879 at Thorn Hill, Marion County, to Martha Phillips, daughter of John R. and Mahalle Phillips, who lived at that place. Children: 1. Cora L., m. Pinkney Curtis; 2. Allen B.; 3. Arthur C; 4. Ida A., m. Clarence Gravlee; 6. Charlie L., jr.. m. Ninion Wallace; 6. James H.; 7. Emmett L.; 8. Joseph Wheeler; 9. Ruby L. Residence: Florence.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

HEAD, JAMES BUTLER, lawyer, was born December 16, 1846, at Clinton, Greene County, and died June 26, 1902; son of William and Cynthia (Butler) Head, who lived at Clinton, Greene County. He was educated in the com- mon schools at Clinton and at the age of seventeen years, entered the C. S. Army, joining Co. A, Sixteenth regiment of cavalry, under Col. William Armistead. He served as a private from that time, 1864, until the dose of the war. He engaged in agriculture for two years, and in 1867, entered, as deputy, the office of clerk of the circuit court of Greene County. He filled various clerical positions in the several court offices of the county, and in 1871 was appointed clerk of the circuit court, which position he filled until 1874. In the meantime, he had taken up the study of law, and in 1874 was admitted to the bar of Eutaw. He practiced his profession in Eutaw until 1888, when he moved to Birmingham. He was associated in law practice with W. C. Ward for one year, then, in 1889, was appointed judge of the tenth Judicial circuit, consisting of Jefferson, Walker, and Winston Counties, by Gov. Thomas Seay. In June 1892, he was nominated by the Democratic state convention as one of the Judges of the supreme court of the state, and was elected to the office the following August. After his election to the supreme bench, he moved with his family to Montgomery. He was a Democrat; an Episcopalian; a Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: July 9, 1874, in Eutaw, Virginia Louise Pierce, daughter of Judge William Flemming and Mary Edwards (Ratcliffe) Pierce, who lived at Eutaw, the former of whom was at one time probate Judge of Greene County, and at the time of his death in 1873, was register in chancery. Children: 1. Rinnie Leigh, m. James Jack Christian, Greensboro; 2. Beverly Pierce, electrician, b. October 6, 1876, solicitor and inspector Electric Light Company, Birming-ham, m. Charlotte Bidgelow Barton, Tuscaloosa; 3. Virginia Roy, m. John Lanzel Kaul, Birmingham; 4. Jamie Beverly, m. Edward Bressle Vaughan, Birmingham. Last residence: Montgomery.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

INGLE, ANDREW J., member of the constitutional convention of 1875, from Winston County.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

LETSON, WILLIAM PALESTINE, teacher, was born December 4, 1870, at Falls City, Winston County; son of William Henry and Susan Emiline (Steward) Letson, the former who was born in Fredonia, Chambers County, lived at Mountain Home, Sparta, South Lowell, and Glen Allen; grandson of George John and Nancy (Martin) Letson, of Fredonia, the former a Georgian, who came to Alabama about 1840, and lived in Chambers and Lawrence Counties, who served in the C. S. Army with Gen. Lee in all of his campaigns from the first of the War of Secession until the surrender at Appomattox, and of Manly Palestine and Susan Steward, of Jasper. The Letson family came from Holland to South Carolina, and the great-grandfather Let son served in the Revolution. Mr. Letson grandfather Let son served in the Revolution. Mr. Letson was educated in the common schools and the Glen Allen school. He began to teach at Poplar Springs, in 1888, and since that time has been teaching in Marion and Fayette Counties. He served as county superintendent of education, 1898-1900; and represented Marion County in the State legislature, 1911. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason; and an Odd Fellow. Married: March 29, 1903, at Stricklin, Marion County, to Martha Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Andrew Jackson and Nancy Jane McWhirter, of that place, the former of Irish descent; great-granddaughter of Archibald Whitehead, who was with Gen. Jackson in the Creek War, 1813. Children: 1. Lorenz Hearsh; 2. Lothair Everett; 3. Burwell Braxton; 4. Kermit. Residence: Glen Allen.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer

 


LOVETT, JAMES ARCHIBALD BRADFORD, teacher, was born March 3, 1848, in Winston County, and died October 19, 1910, at Bessemer; son of Abel J. and Mary (Hardwick) Lovett, who lived near Shelby, the former a native of Georgia; grandson of Thomas Lovett, of Georgia, who was of Scotch descent, and of James and Vloletta (Elder) Hardwick, who lived in Georgia, the former a memberof the Alabama legislature for several years, whose father came from England. He was educated at Ashville, and at the age of fifteen ran away from school to enter the C. S. Army. He was made drummer boy in the Fifty-eighth Alabama regiment, Co. G, under Capt. A. B. Vandegrlft, and after two months' service, waa captured, June, 1863, and held a prisoner at Camp Chase and at Fort Delaware until the close of the war. After the war, he worked his way through the theological department of the Cumberland university, Lebanon, Tenn., and was graduated with the degree of D. D. He received the degree of A. M. from the college at Winchester, Tenn. He joined the ministry of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and was pastor of churches at Huntsville, Winchester, Tenn., and Beech Grove, Tenn. After giving up the ministry on account of throat trouble, he entered the profession of teaching. In 1882, he organized the Huntaville grade schools, and later was made superintendent of the city schools of Huntsville, and superintendent of education of Madison County. He was at one time secretary of the Southern interstate cotton convention, and was appointed as one of a committee to visit President Roosevelt in the interest of the expansion of the cotton market. He was elected to the presidency of Blount college in 1889; established Spring Lake college, at Springville, and later, the Montezuma university, since destroyed by fire, at Bessemer; and was twice elected president of the Ninth district agricultural school, which replaced Blount college after its destruction by fire. He was one of the founders of the Birmingham dental school in 1893, and of the Birmingham medical college in 1894. In the former he was professor of chemistry and metallurgy, and in the latter, of chemistry and toxicology. He was a Democrat; a Mason; and a member of Camp William Rose McAdory of Confederate Veterans. He established an educational journal, "The Teacher at Work," said to have been the first educational journal in the state, in Huntsville, about 1886. Married: September 2, 1866, to Frances Priscllla, daughter of William and Ellen Gilbert, who lived at Highland, Shelby County. Children: 1. Edward Goode, deceased; 2. Dr. James Marion, m. (1) Emma Mae Baker of Huntsville, (2) Olive Nichols of Delavan, Ill..; 3. Mary Eleanor, Bessemer; 4. Dr. William Abel, m. Fannie Kemp Dennis, Birmingham; 5. Richard Beard, deceased; 6. Susie Mae, deceased. Last residence: Bessemer.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer

McLAIN, DAVID HUBBARD, physician, was born April 28, 1861, in Winston County, and died May 81, 1897; son of Allen Boston and Mary (Hewlett) McLain, the former a North Carolinian, of Scotch-Irish descent, who came to Alabama with his parents when a child, and located on a farm in Walker County; grandson of William Hewlett, of Virginia. His ancestors, the McLains, Hewletts and Hubbards of North Carolina and Virginia achieved distinction in the War of 1812, and were prominent in the polities of the country and the cause of the Confederacy. He received his schooling at Mount Hope, and in Spring Hill academy, Tennessee, under the direction of Col. John Peebles. He worked on his father's farm until 1872, when he began the study of medicine under Dr. J. M. Clark, at Mt. Hope, and graduated from the medical college of Alabama, M. D., 1875. After practicing for one year in Allen's Factory, Marion County, he moved to Maysville, Madison County, and from there to Gurley, 1879, where he soon established himself in a practice extending over the eastern part of Madison County. He was a member of the Madison County medical society and of the State medical association, and for two terms was a member of the board of censors of the former; was a Democrat; a steward in the Methodist Episcopal church; and a Knight of Honor. Married: June 10, 1880, to Ella McBroom, a graduate of Huntsville female college, daughter of C. C. McBroom, of Gurley. Children: 1. Deceased; 2. Allen. Last residence: Gurley.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

NEWMAN, PATRICK HENRY, lawyer, was born September 20, 1846, in Elbert County, Ga., son of James Henry and Elizabeth (Beggs) Newman, the former who was a native of Ireland, emigrated to Floyd County, Ga.; grandson of Hough and Nancy Agnes Beggs. Mr. Newman received his education in the common schools of Floyd County. He enlisted in the Nineteenth Alabama regiment, C S. Army, August 13, 1862; in 1864 was transferred to the Eighth regiment, Georgia infantry; was paroled May 12, 1865, after participating in over twenty-two battles. He returned home and worked on a railroad; settled in Winston County; taught in the public schools for several years; studied law; and was admitted to the bar in April, 1885; in 1880 and 1884 was a member of the general assembly; and in 1902, was re-elected. He is a Democrat and a Primitive Baptist. Married: March 12, 1865, in Bartow County, Ga., to Octavia T. Hadder, daughter of John and Eliza Hadder of that county. Residence: Double Springs.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

PERSINGER, JESSE COLE, Methodist minister, was born April 26, 1863, at North Port, Tuscaloosa County; son of Ellas and Martelia J. (Freeman) Persinger, who lived at that place, the former a native of Virginia, who came from Indiana in 1831, to Tuscaloosa and North Port where he died, December 27, 1866; grandson of Rev. Jesse and Rebecca (Cole) Freeman, who lived at Sheffield Poet Office, Fayette County; great-grandson of Nicholas Freeman, who came to Tuscaloosa from Georgia about 1815, and of William B. Cole, who went from Virginia to Georgia, and from Georgia to Tuscaloosa in about 1816. He was educated in the country schools at Jasper and at North Port, and attended Godfrey high school, at Motes, Winston County. He became a minister in the Methodist Episcopal church. South; was licensed to preach in 1881, by Rev. L. M. Wilson, presiding elder; attended school and taught for two years; joined the North Alabama conference at Birmingham in November, 1883; has served as pastor of circuits and stations; was for four years presiding elder of Decatur district; was pastor in Birmingham for more than nine years; and is now in charge of the First Methodist church at Ensley. He was a member of the board of trustees of Athens female college for twelve years; is a Democrat; a Mason; and an Odd Fellow. Married: September 19, 1889, near Pickensville, to Mary Elener, daughter of Samuel C. and Lucinda (Mullen) Nabers, who lived at that place, the former a native of Jefferson County, the latter of Madison County. Children: 1. Martelia Oline; 2. Jessie Rowe; 3. Mary Boyd. Residence: Ensley.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

RIVERS, RICHARD MALICHI, merchant, was born February 15, 1866, at Warrior, Jefferson County; son of Frederick W. and Synthia (Knight) Rivers, the former who lived at Warrior until 1872, when he moved to Winston. He attended the country schools until he was twenty-one years of age, then spent a short time at Houston seminary. He taught in the country schools, together with merchandising, 1888-1890; was elected justice of the peace in 1888, and held that position through three terms, serving until 1900; and represented Winston County in the State legislature in 1901. He is a Republican and a Methodist .Married: January 16, 1889, at Houston, to Sarah Louisa Wilson. Residence: Double Springs.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

SHEATS, CHARLES CHRISTOPHER, U. S. commissioner, consul to Denmark, member of congress, member State legislature and the constitutional convention, 1865, was born April 10, 1839, in Walker County; son of William W. and Mary (Garner) Sheats, the former a native of Wilkes County, Ga., born October 22, 1809, and removed to Walker County, the latter a native of Tennessee, born in 1811; grandson of Archibald and Amanda (Gibson) Sheats, natives of Georgia who removed to Lawrence County in 1822, and of Jacob and Mary (Hunter) Garner, the former a soldier in the Texas revolution, and the Mexican War. Mr. Sheats was reared on a farm, received a good education at Somerville academy in Morgan County, and began teaching school at eighteen years of age. He represented Winston County in the session of 1861 and strenuously opposed the secession of the State. At the next term of the legislature, 1862, he was expelled from the house on account of alleged disloyalty to the Confederate government. He was arraigned, indicted and imprisoned for treason. The Federal general, Thomas, in December, 1863, retaliated by ordering Gen. Crook, at Huntsville to arrest William McDowell and confine him in jail as a hostage for Christopher Sheats. Nothing further was done with Mr. Sheats except to hold him in duress until the end of the war. In September, 1865, he was elected a member of the constitutional convention for Winston County. In the same year he was a candidate for congress from the sixth district. In 1868 he was a Grant elector and the next year was appointed U. S. consul to Denmark where he remained three years. In 1872 he was a delegate to the Philadelphia convention, which nominated Grant for his second term, and the same year was elected to congress from that state at large by a majority of ten thousand over Gen. Alpheus Baker. In 1874 he was an unsuccessful candidate for congress. In 1876 he was sixth auditor of the United States treasury for the post office department, which he held until 1877, when he resigned and was appointed appraiser of merchandise for the port of Mobile. He served in this capacity until 1878, when he was appointed assistant collector of internal revenue for the State of Alabama and served until the inauguration of Cleveland. Married: January 27, 1887, to Mrs. Mary Anderson, nee Dickson, a lady of English ancestry. Residence: Mobile.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney

TUBB, CHESTER, lawyer, was born May 7, 1887, at Days Gap, now Oakman, Walker County; son of James Madison and Dorothy (Hamilton) Tubb, the former who was a native of Days Gap, and physician at Bessemer; grandson of Samuel and Malinda (Cranford) Tubb, the former who was a member of Col. Patterson's regiment, Rody's brigade. Fifth Alabama cavalry, C. S. A., was captured in 1864 and sent to Rock Island, and the latter who was an aunt of Capt. Jack Cranford of Jasper, and of Elbert and Susan (Vanselt) Hamilton, the former who died just before the outbreak of the War of Secession; great-grandson of Daniel and Matilda (Sanders) Tubb, and of John and Elizabeth (Wilkes) Cranford, both of the great-grandfathers served in the War of 1812 and were in the final battle at New Orleans. Mr. Tubb received his education in the schools of Bessemer; graduated from the Bessemer high school in 1903; was graduated LL. B., from the University of Alabama in 1912. He began the practice of law at Haleyville; has been city attorney of that place for two terms, of one year each; and is the secretary of the Winston County fair association, which he inaugurated in 1914. He is a Republican, was a member of the committee from Winston County to the state convention of his party in Birmingham, 1914, and a member of the congressional delegations in the same year; and is a Presbyterian. Married: on April 2, 1915, to Ethel, daughter of Walker W. and Martilia (Taylor) Haley of Haleyville. Residence: Haleyville.

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Submitted by Veneta McKinney



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