Banks
Banks of Arizona
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Gila Valley Bank



THE VALLEY BANK
The Valley Bank  was organized in 1883 with a capital of $50,000, and Colonel William Christy as cashier. In four years, however, the capital was increased to $100,000, and in 1890 Colonel Christy was chosen its president, which position he held until the time of his death. At that time included in its directorate were E. J. Bennitt, now president, and Lloyd B. Christy, now cashier. This bank occupies the only exclusive banking building in the city, which is of colonial architecture and strictly modern in all its appointments. It is constructed of reinforced concrete. During the life of The Valley Bank it has been the constant aim of its management to aid in the upbuilding of the state and city, and there one is accorded the utmost courtesy in every department. In the five years elapsing from 1907 to 1912, the deposits of The Valley Bank increased from less than $600,-000 to more than two and one-half millions, and having a capital and surplus of $250,000, The Valley Bank is unquestionably the largest bank in the state. This was the first bank in Phoenix to open a savings department, and for the five years in which this department has been in operation over seven hundred thousand dollars have been deposited in it, and the depositors number over thirty-five hundred, which is due evidence of public confidence and appreciation. Its officers at present are : E. J. Bennitt, president ; John R. Hampton and John Ormsby, vice presidents; Lloyd B. Christy, cashier, and S. H. Stewart and Lebbeus Chapman, assistant cashiers. These officers, with a strong board of directors, and the confidence which the bank now enjoys insures for it many years of continued prosperity.

THE BANK OF BISBEE,
The Bank of Bisbee, one of the largest banks in the state, and the first one established in Cochise County, was organized in January, 1900, and authorized under the Territorial Bank Act to commence business. For some years prior to its organization the Copper Queen Store acted as depository, as a matter of accommodation, and in various capacities assumed responsibilities ordinarily assumed by banking houses only, until this became too heavy a tax upon their time and force. Then, recognizing the necessity of a safe depository for funds of corporations and individuals, the following gentlemen organized The Bank of Bisbee, which commenced business on February 19, 1900: W. H. Brophy, J. S. Douglas, Ben Williams, J. B. Angius, and M. J. Cunningham. The capital stock of $50,000 was all paid in before the bank was opened for business. Its success was immediate, as each member of the board of directors was well known in the community, and the confidence then displayed in their integrity and executive ability has been more forcibly shown with each succeeding year. The. Bank of Bisbee is safe, conservatively managed, meets the wants of its patrons as liberally as good banking customs will permit, and stands for all that is reliable and trustworthy. It has its own building designed expressly for banking purposes, in which are incorporated safety deposit vaults, and which is amply protected by all the safeguards necessary in banking houses. The officials and directors stand foremost among the eminent and substantial men of Cochise County. Mr. Cunningham, who has been cashier since the opening of the bank, is one of the ablest men in banking circles in Arizona, and a man whose executive ability has manifested itself in many ways in his present position. Mr. W. H. Brophy is president and also general manager of the Phelps Dodge Mercantile Company. Mr. J. S. Douglas is vice president, and a son of Doctor James Douglas, president of Phelps Dodge & Co., and one of the big mining men of the state. The directors are: Ben Williams, J. S. Douglas, L. D. Ricketts, W. H. Brophy and M. J. Cunningham.

THE PRESCOTT NATIONAL BANK
The Prescott National Bank was organized and obtained its charter from the national government on January 25th, 1893, having a paid in capital of $100,000.00. F. M. Murphy was elected president, Morris Goldwater, vice president, and R. C. Woodruff, cashier. On January 25th, 1913, an extension of its charter for another period of twenty years was granted by the Comptroller of the Currency. The present board of directors is composed of F. M. Murphy, M. Goldwater, F. G. Brecht, James A. Home, H. A. Cheverton and R. N. Fredericks. The officers of the bank are composed of the following: R. N. Fredericks, president; M. Goldwater, first vice president; F. G. Brecht, second vice president; H. A. Cheverton, cashier; L. C. Derrick and P. H. Deming, assistant cashiers. Of the original organizers and members of the first board of directors, three gentlemen are now on the present board, namely, F. M. Murphy, Morris Goldwater and R. N. Fredericks.
The Prescott National Bank, by its progressive, yet prudent and conservative methods, has been a large factor in the upbuilding of Prescott and surrounding country. The individual members of the board of directors are men known for their activity in the development of the resources of this section, particularly in railroading, mining and commercial pursuits, and it is due to their efforts that the Prescott National Bank is now one of the strongest national banks in this state. To the original capital of $100,000.00 it has added a surplus fund of $100,000.00 and undivided profits of $110,000.00, which assures its directors that all funds entrusted to its care are in absolutely safe and reliable hands and has won for the bank the confidence of its customers. The Prescott National Bank owns its solid and substantial banking house, one of the finest in Arizona, which is thoroughly equipped with fire and burglar proof vaults, safe deposit department and all modern conveniences, so necessary to the careful handling of its large and constantly growing business.

THE CONSOLIDATED NATIONAL BANK
The Consolidated National Bank , Tucson, is the oldest and largest bank in the city, and in its history is interwoven a portion of the history of many of the ablest financiers in the Southwest. The first bank in Tucson was The Pima County Bank, organized in the early seventies, which subsequently became known as The First National Bank of Tucson. The Bank of D. Henderson was later organized, and in 1887, The First National Bank of Tucson, having surrendered its charter some years previous and become The Bank of Tucson, was merged with the bank of D. Henderson, and thus was formed the Consolidated Bank of Tucson. M. P. Freeman, who had been cashier of The Bank of D. Henderson, was instrumental in this consolidation and became cashier of the newly formed bank, while Mr. B. M. Jacobs, organizer of The Pima County Bank, and until recently president of The Arizona National Bank, was the first president, and Mr. D. Henderson, first vice president. Shortly afterwards a national charter was obtained and the name changed to The Consolidated National Bank, by which it is now known. In 1898, owing to ill health, Mr. Freeman retired from The Consolidated National Bank, and the following year, having fully recuperated, was one of the prime movers in the establishment of the Santa Cruz Valley Bank. In 1895 he again became associated with The Consolidated National Bank as its vice president. At that time H. E. Lacy was president, and H. B. Tenney, cashier. On Mr. Lacy's retirement from the presidency, Mr. Freeman was elected to this position, which he continued until late in the year 1910. During the latter year, Mr. Charles E. Walker, now cashier, was first employed with this institution as assistant to President Freeman, and at the close of the year on the latter's retirement, a reorganization of the officials followed, when Albert Steinfeld became president, Epes Randolph vice president, and Charles E. Walker, cashier. During Mr. Freeman's later association with The Consolidated National Bank his influence on its development was material both in a personal way and as regards the benefits derived from his superior knowledge of financial affairs, sound judgment, and general executive ability. The Board of Directors of this institution includes the above named officials, Mr. Freeman, F. H. Hereford, Charles H. Bayless and Leo Goldschmidt. The Consolidated National Bank is a U. S. Depositary and continues to grow with most gratifying results. Its last statement, dated Feb. 4, 1913, shows total resources amounting to considerably more than two millions, and deposits of almost one and three-fourths millions. The capital stock of the bank is $100,000, with a surplus of the same amount and undivided profits of $50,000

While sound banking principles and reliability are the keynote of the success attained by The Consolidated National Bank, its continuous policy of employing thoroughly capable assistants in each department, and of according to the public the utmost courtesy, has been a valuable aid toward this end.

THE PHOENIX NATIONAL BANK
The Phoenix National Bank , one of the safest and most intelligently conducted in the State of Arizona, was organized in 1892. Its capital stock paid in is $150,000, and its surplus and undivided profits amount to close to $200,000, while its total resources aggregate almost two and three-quarters millions. The list of assets of this bank contains a notable item in the total of its loans and discounts, amounting to about half of its funds, which indicates how well the institution serves the commercial and agricultural interests of the community. For years this bank has had a leading place on the roll of honor among National Banks in the United States.

Physically the bank is equipped in a manner both modern and convenient in offices in the center of the business district of Phoenix, and is easy of access to tourists and residents alike. The Phoenix National Bank is one of the specially designated depositories for funds of the United States Government, has the patronage of many leading business and professional men, firms and corporations, and by means of its system of direct communication maintains close relations with Arizona, New Mexico, and adjacent districts in Old Mexico. Its facilities for making collections are especially good and the prompt attention rendered affairs of its correspondents causes its services to be exceptionally satisfactions. In 1905 this bank was designated a depositary for funds of the United States Government and its disbursing officers.

The stockholders of The Phoenix National Bank are owners of The Phoenix Savings Bank and Trust Company, which commenced business in 1911.

The Phoenix Savings Bank and Trust Company, whose capital and surplus amount to $150,000, has practically the same stockholders and is under the same management as The Phoenix National Bank. It is, however, an entirely separate organization from The Phoenix National Bank, and occupies entirely different offices. This institution receives savings accounts upon which 4%, interest is paid, acts as trustee and is empowered to perform all the duties of executors, administrators, guardians, trustees, committees and the like. It also acts as escrow agent, registrar, fiscal agent and trustee for corporations and their bondholders. The officers of the savings bank are: H. J. McClung, president; T. E. Pollock and M. C. McDougall, vice presidents; and W. C. Foster, secretary and treasurer.

The officers of The Phoenix National Bank are: H. J. McClung, president; T. E. Pollock and M. C. McDougall, vice presidents; H. D. Marshall, Jr., cashier; H. M. Galliver, G. G. Fuller, asst. cashiers. The directors are E. B. Gage, H. T- McClung, T. E. Pollock, M. C. McDougall, H. D. Marshall, L. H. Chalmers, J. S. Douglas, W. A. Drake and W. F. Staunton. In this list are included some of the most important financial, commercial and professional interests of the state. Mr. Pollock is president of the Arizona Central Bank of Flagstaff, and Mr. Douglas president of The Bank of Douglas, while Mr. Chalmers is one of the state's most prominent attorneys, and Mr. Marshall, cashier, is a former national bank examiner.

THE NATIONAL BANK OF ARIZONA
The National Bank of Arizona, the oldest bank in Phoenix, was established in 1878, and in 1887 was chartered as a national bank under the name of the National Bank of Arizona, with a capital stock of $100,000. The capital stock has been increased, however, until it now amounts to $200,000. The history of this bank has been one of steady progress, because of the ability and wisdom of its management which have won the entire confidence of the public, individual, firm and corporation.
The National Bank of Arizona conducts its business on the ground floor of their own building, which is built of brick and concrete, four stories high, and situated on the corner of Central Avenue and Washington Street. Their counting rooms have been especially designed that the business may be carried on with the greatest degree of ease and safety to customers and the bank itself. Every precaution known in banking circles has been taken, and their massive steel vaults are time locked, fire and burglar proof. In addition to that essential in banking, The National Bank of Arizona has the advantage of a large capital, sufficient to meet all requirements, and an able and efficient management under honest and conservative officials.
The active officers of this bank are all substantial men and well known in Phoenix and vicinity, men of the highest standing as regards integrity and real worth. Emil Ganz, president, has been a resident of the Valley for more than thirty years, and at the head of the bank's affairs for about seventeen years. S. Oberfelder, cashier, came to Phoenix from Omaha sixteen years ago to accept a position as assistant cashier, and in 1897 he was elected to his present position. His conduct of affairs during these years is, of itself, sufficient evidence of his knowledge of banking and general ability. These men, together with Charles Goldman, vice president; W. H. Kay, Ed Eisele, J. Thalmeimer and Jacob Miller, form the board of directors. These are all among the representative business men of the vicinity whose sterling worth adds a note of assurance to the bank's reliability.

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NOGALES
First National Bank of Nogales , one of the most reliable financial institutions in Arizona, was organized about ten years ago and numbers among its directors and shareholders some of the most enterprising men of the town. Its cash capital is $50.000, surplus and undivided profits $65,000, and deposits but little less than $500,000. While its business is conducted along safe and conservative lines, its policy has always been broad and liberal. The First National Bank is depository for public funds of Nogales, the County of Santa Cruz and for the United States. The funds of the Post office, the Immigration Office, and the Custom House are also deposited with this institution. The record made by this bank is one of which the directors and officers may well be proud, and during the panic of 1907 it was one of the few banks in the state which met all of its obligations without hesitation or reservation. The reputation of The First National Bank of Nogales for permanence and stability is thoroughly well known over all Arizona, and no one circumstance has ever done more to establish a high standard for any financial institution than the able manner in which this bank coped with the wants of its customers during the trying period referred to by its announcement that it knew no limit short of the total amount of a customer's deposit. Checks were readily taken everywhere, and when presented at the bank itself, were cashed with alacrity. Its record in this particular has given it a place among the sound and solid financial institutions of the country and in the estimation of the entire business and commercial world that is treasured among its most valuable assets. The First National Bank conducts the usual Exchange and Collection business in addition to the regular banking lines, and in every way is especially accommodating to customers. It also conducts a safety box department for deposit of valuable documents, bonds, money, jewels, etc., and a Mexican department for the buying and selling of Mexican money. This bank has a large and extensive business down the West Coast of Mexico. The Directors are Theo. Gebler, E. Titcomb, Phil Herold, Bracey Curtis, L. Lindsey and H. M. Clagett. Bracey Curtis is president; Phil Herold, vice president; Otto H. Herold, cashier.. Beside a strong and liberal policy in the conduct of the business of the sterling banking institution confided to their care, the officials of the First National Bank give attention to the best interests of the town of Nogales. Mr. Curtis, the president, and Mr. Otto H. Herold, the cashier, have served as members of the Nogales Council, and Mr. Grover Marsteller, one of the clerks, is Town Clerk. Mr. Curtis is also chairman of the Fire and Water Committee, and has been for years Chief of the Fire Department.

THE NAVAJO-APACHE BANK & TRUST Co.
Navajo-Apache Bank & Trust Co. , whose head office is at Winslow, and branches at Holbrook and St. John, is the outgrowth of a small bank which was organized in 1900 by W. H. Burbage and Fred Nelson. This was known as the Navajo County Bank, and was established at Winslow with a capital of but $10,000. Mr. Burbage was president, and Mr. Nelson, vice president. In 1905 these same gentlemen organized the Apache County Bank & Trust Co., at St. Johns, of which Mr. Nelson was vice president and cashier. Four years later the two were consolidated under the name "The Navajo-Apache Bank & Trust Co.", which began business with a paid-in capital of $100,000. This is the largest bank in the northern part of the state, and from its beginning has met with general favor because of its sound and liberal policy.

THE SOUTHERN ARIZONA BANK & TRUST COMPANY,
The Southern Arizona Bank & Trust Company one of Tucson's solid financial institutions doing business according to the most modern methods, has a paid in capital of $75,000 and resources amounting to more than one million dollars, while its aggregate deposits are close to the million mark. This company was organized in May, 1903, and its original capitalization was but $50,000. Its surplus and undivided profits now amount to more than $50,000. This institution is one of the largest in this section of the country from the point of view of deposits and resources, and its policy of carrying 50% of deposits in quick cash assets and cash reserves makes it second to none in the state in the matter of strength, and causes the institution to stand exceedingly high in the confidence of the public. A general banking business is conducted, both check and savings accounts being received and on the latter four per cent interest per annum is allowed. They also issue letters of credit and travelers' checks, payable practically everywhere in the world.
The trust department of the Southern Arizona Bank & Trust Company is one of the most complete known in Arizona, and they are competent to act as trustee or administrator, and to take charge of estates. They also conduct a real estate and insurance department under thoroughly qualified men, and they loan money on city property. This bank also extends accommodations to its clients in Tucson and vicinity whenever consistent with sound banking principles, as the entire business of the institution is conducted along the lines of wise and conservative, though liberal, methods. The officers of the Southern Arizona Bank & Trust Company are as follows: N. E. Plumer, president; Fred J. Steward, vice president; G. H. Sawyer, secretary. These three officers together with J. Ivancovich and R. Power, compose the board of directors.


THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CLIFTON
The First National Bank of Clifton was organized in 1901. Its capital is $30,000, which is fully paid, and while this bank does not rank among the large institutions of Arizona, it does rank foremost among the soundest. Its management is able and experienced, and its directorate and stockholders are found among some of the leading business and professional men of that section. E. M. Williams, president, is also one of the founders and a charter director. As general manager of the Arizona Copper Company store, he is known throughout the state as a responsible business man. Henry Hill, vice president, is a well known business man of Clifton. W. J. Riley, cashier, is also director of the State Bank of Morenci and the Bank of Duncan, and since he has grown to manhood, has been almost continuously employed in banking, while J. J. Kelly, assistant cashier, is a native of the state, and has grown up in the banking business, and although a young man has attained to prominence in banking circles. The board of directors consists of the foregoing officials, together with John R. Hampton, vice president of the Valley Bank, Phoenix, George Frazer, John Webster, J. T. McClay, C. O. Billingsley, and Sam Abraham, proprietor of the Clifton Hotel.

THE GILA VALLEY BANK & TRUST COMPANY
The Gila Valley Bank & Trust Company, which, in addition to its principal house at Globe, has branches at Ray, Winkleman, Morenci, Clifton, Hayden, Safford and Miami, has proven a most important factor in the business growth of that section of Arizona, and done much in aiding to success hundreds of people engaged in mining, agriculture, and cattle raising in the vicinity of its houses. The advantages possible in this particular have been considerably increased by the fact that eight banks in different towns, but all under one strong and capable management cover a greater area with much more expedience than would be possible by the same number of individual banking companies, even though the aggregate of their resources were greater than those of the Gila Valley Bank Si Trust Company. Under this arrangement the people of the smallest of these towns have the benefit of dealing with a large institution, in reality, for they appreciate the fact that each branch is as strong and as high in its financial responsibility as the entire system behind it. They realize also that should any of the ordinary financial difficulties be met with in their immediate locality, the local bank need not necessarily be put to any exceptional test as would otherwise doubtless be the case, to meet the demands of depositors needlessly alarmed, but having the strength of the entire Gila Valley Bank & Trust Company to rely upon, the situation would never assume serious proportions.
1The Gila Bank & Trust Company was organized in 1900 with a capitalization of $100,000, all of which is paid in. They have a surplus of $60,000, and deposits amounting to almost $2,000,000. In all their branches they transact a general banking business, loan money, buy and sell exchange, make collections and receive deposits, both for commercial and savings accounts, and utilize every modern system which in any way tends to benefit financial transactions.
The Gila Valley Bank & Trust Company has in its employ in each of its houses men who are well trained in banking, and familiar with every detail of the requirements of their position. This is notably true of the manager?, many of whom have received their bank training in the very best possible way, in large eastern houses, either national banks or private banking firms, where emergencies must be met and questions coped with that broaden a man's horizon in this calling and develop in him the power to quickly respond to the unusual demands of the day and to rise to the occasion and satisfactorily dispose of matters of a special nature requiring his attention.
The officers of the company are as follows: President C. E. Mills; Vice Presidents, L. D. Ricketts and T. A. Pascoe; Cashier, Harry S. Van Gorder ; General Manager, R. E. Moore, all of whom are prominently known in the business enterprises of the state.

THE VALLEY BANK
The Valley Bank  was organized in 1883 with a capital of $50,000, and Colonel William Christy as cashier. In four years, however, the capital was increased to $100,000, and in 1890 Colonel Christy was chosen its president, which position he held until the time of his death. At that time included in its directorate were E. J. Bennitt, now president, and Lloyd B. Christy, now cashier. This bank occupies the only exclusive banking building in the city, which is of colonial architecture and strictly modern in all its appointments. It is constructed of reinforced concrete. During the life of The Valley Bank it has been the constant aim of its management to aid in the upbuilding of the state and city, and there one is accorded the utmost courtesy in every department. In the five years elapsing from 1907 to 1912, the deposits of The Valley Bank increased from less than $600,-000 to more than two and one-half millions, and having a capital and surplus of $250,000, The Valley Bank is unquestionably the largest bank in the state. This was the first bank in Phoenix to open a savings department, and for the five years in which this department has been in operation over seven hundred thousand dollars have been deposited in it, and the depositors number over thirty-five hundred, which is due evidence of public confidence and appreciation. Its officers at present are : E. J. Bennitt, president ; John R. Hampton and John Ormsby, vice presidents; Lloyd B. Christy, cashier, and S. H. Stewart and Lebbeus Chapman, assistant cashiers. These officers, with a strong board of directors, and the confidence which the bank now enjoys insures for it many years of continued prosperity

THE BANK OF BISBEE
The Bank of Bisbee , one of the largest banks in the state, and the first one established in Cochise County, was organized in January, 1900, and authorized under the Territorial Bank Act to commence business. For some years prior to its organization the Copper Queen Store acted as depository, as a matter of accommodation, and in various capacities assumed responsibilities ordinarily assumed by banking houses only, until this became too heavy a tax upon their time and force. Then, recognizing the necessity of a safe depository for funds of corporations and individuals, the following gentlemen organized The Bank of Bisbee, which commenced business on February 19, 1900: W. H. Brophy, J. S. Douglas, Ben Williams, J. B. Angius, and M. J. Cunningham. The capital stock of $50,000 was all paid in before the bank was opened for business. Its success was immediate, as each member of the board of directors was well known in the community, and the confidence then displayed in their integrity and executive ability has been more forcibly shown with each succeeding year. The. Bank of Bisbee is safe, conservatively managed, meets the wants of its patrons as liberally as good banking customs will permit, and stands for all that is reliable and trustworthy. It has its own building designed expressly for banking purposes, in which are incorporated safety deposit vaults, and which is amply protected by all the safeguards necessary in banking houses. The officials and directors stand foremost among the eminent and substantial men of Cochise County. Mr. Cunningham, who has been cashier since the opening of the bank, is one of the ablest men in banking circles in Arizona, and a man whose executive ability has manifested itself in many ways in his present position. Mr. W. H. Brophy is president and also general manager of the Phelps Dodge Mercantile Company. Mr. J. S. Douglas is vice president, and a son of Doctor James Douglas, president of Phelps Dodge & Co., and one of the big mining men of the state. The directors are: Ben Williams, J. S. Douglas, L. D. Ricketts, W. H. Brophy and M. J. Cunningham.


THE PRESCOTT NATIONAL BANK
The Prescott National Bank  was organized and obtained its charter from the national government on January 25th, 1893, having a paid in capital of $100,000.00. F. M. Murphy was elected president, Morris Goldwater, vice president, and R. C. Woodruff, cashier. On January 25th, 1913, an extension of its charter for another period of twenty years was granted by the Comptroller of the Currency. The present board of directors is composed of F. M. Murphy, M. Goldwater, F. G. Brecht, James A. Home, H. A. Cheverton and R. N. Fredericks. The officers of the bank are composed of the following: R. N. Fredericks, president; M. Goldwater, first vice president; F. G. Brecht, second vice president; H. A. Cheverton, cashier; L. C. Derrick and P. H. Deming, assistant cashiers. Of the original organizers and members of the first board of directors, three gentlemen are now on the present board, namely, F. M. Murphy, Morris Goldwater and R. N. Fredericks.
    The Prescott National Bank, by its progressive, yet prudent and conservative methods, has been a large factor in the upbuilding of Prescott and surrounding country. The individual members of the board of directors are men known for their activity in the development of the resources of this section, particularly in railroading, mining and commercial pursuits, and it is due to their efforts that the Prescott National Bank is now one of the strongest national banks in this state. To the original capital of $100,000.00 it has added a surplus fund of $100,000.00 and undivided profits of $110,000.00, which assures its directors that all funds entrusted to its care are in absolutely safe and reliable hands and has won for the bank the confidence of its customers. The Prescott National Bank owns its solid and substantial banking house, one of the finest in Arizona, which is thoroughly equipped with fire and burglar proof vaults, safe deposit department and all modern conveniences, so necessary to the careful handling of its large and constantly growing business.

THE CONSOLIDATED NATIONAL BANK
    The Consolidated National Bank, Tucson, is the oldest and largest bank in the city, and in its history is interwoven a portion of the history of many of the ablest financiers in the Southwest. The first bank in Tucson was The Pima County Bank, organized in the early seventies, which subsequently became known as The First National Bank of Tucson. The Bank of D. Henderson was later organized, and in 1887, The First National Bank of Tucson, having surrendered its charter some years previous and become The Bank of Tucson, was merged with the bank of D. Henderson, and thus was formed the Consolidated Bank of Tucson. M. P. Freeman, who had been cashier of The Bank of D. Henderson, was instrumental in this consolidation and became cashier of the newly formed bank, while Mr. B. M. Jacobs, organizer of The Pima County Bank, and until recently president of The Arizona National Bank, was the first president, and Mr. D. Henderson, first vice president. Shortly afterwards a national charter was obtained and the name changed to The Consolidated National Bank, by which it is now known. In 1898, owing to ill health, Mr. Freeman retired from The Consolidated National Bank, and the following year, having fully recuperated, was one of the prime movers in the establishment of the Santa Cruz Valley Bank. In 1895 he again became associated with The Consolidated National Bank as its vice president. At that time H. E. Lacy was president, and H. B. Tenney, cashier. On Mr. Lacy's retirement from the presidency, Mr. Freeman was elected to this position, which he continued until late in the year 1910. During the latter year, Mr. Charles E. Walker, now cashier, was first employed with this institution as assistant to President Freeman, and at the close of the year on the latter's retirement, a reorganization of the officials followed, when Albert Steinfeld became president, Epes Randolph vice president, and Charles E. Walker, cashier. During Mr. Freeman's later association with The Consolidated National Bank his influence on its development was material both in a personal way and as regards the benefits derived from his superior knowledge of financial affairs, sound judgment, and general executive ability. The Board of Directors of this institution includes the above named officials, Mr. Freeman, F. H. Hereford, Charles H. Bayless and Leo Goldschmidt.
    The Consolidated National Bank is a U. S. Depositary and continues to grow with most gratifying results. Its last statement, dated Feb. 4, 1913, shows total resources amounting to considerably more than two millions, and deposits of almost one and three-fourths millions. The capital stock of the bank is $100,000, with a surplus of the same amount and undivided profits of $50,000.
    While sound banking principles and reliability are the keynote of the success attained by The Consolidated National Bank, its continuous policy of employing thoroughly capable assistants in each department, and of according to the public the utmost courtesy, has been a valuable aid toward this end.

THE PHOENIX NATIONAL BANK,
The Phoenix National Bank one of the safest and most intelligently conducted in the State of Arizona, was organized in 1892. Its capital stock paid in is $150,000, and its surplus and undivided profits amount to close to $200,000, while its total resources aggregate almost two and three-quarters millions. The list of assets of this bank contains a notable item in the total of its loans and discounts, amounting to about half of its funds, which indicates how well the institution serves the commercial and agricultural interests of the community. For years this bank has had a leading place on the roll of honor among National Banks in the United States. Physically the bank is equipped in a manner both modern and convenient in offices in the center of the business district of Phoenix, and is easy of access to tourists and residents alike. The Phoenix National Bank is one of the specially designated depositories for funds of the United States Government, has the patronage of many leading business and professional men, firms and corporations, and by means of its system of direct communication maintains close relations with Arizona, New Mexico, and adjacent districts in Old Mexico. Its facilities for making collections are especially good and the prompt attention rendered affairs of its correspondents causes its services to be exceptionally satisfactory
    In 1905 this bank was designated a depositary for funds of the United States Government and its disbursing officers. The stockholders of The Phoenix National Bank are owners of The Phoenix Savings Bank and Trust Company, which commenced business in 1911.
    The Phoenix Savings Bank and Trust Company, whose capital and surplus amount to $150,000, has practically the same stockholders and is under the same management as The Phoenix National Bank. It is, however, an entirely separate organization from The Phoenix National Bank, and occupies entirely different offices. This institution receives savings accounts upon which 4%, interest is paid, acts as trustee and is empowered to perform all the duties of executors, administrators, guardians, trustees, committees and the like. It also acts as escrow agent, registrar, fiscal agent and trustee for corporations and their bondholders. The officers of the savings bank are: H. J. McClung, president; T. E. Pollock and M. C. McDougall, vice presidents; and W. C. Foster, secretary and treasurer.
    The officers of The Phoenix National Bank are: H. J. McClung, president; T. E. Pollock and M. C. McDougall, vice presidents; H. D. Marshall, Jr., cashier; H. M. Galliver, G. G. Fuller, asst. cashiers. The directors are E. B. Gage, H. T- McClung, T. E. Pollock, M. C. McDougall, H. D. Marshall, L. H. Chalmers, J. S. Douglas, W. A. Drake and W. F. Staunton. In this list are included some of the most important financial, commercial and professional interests of the state. Mr. Pollock is president of the Arizona Central Bank of Flagstaff, and Mr. Douglas president of The Bank of Douglas, while Mr. Chalmers is one of the state's most prominent attorneys, and Mr. Marshall, cashier, is a former national bank examiner.

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CLIFTON
The First National Bank of Clifton was organized in 1901. Its capital is $30,000, which is fully paid, and while this bank does not rank among the large institutions of Arizona, it does rank foremost among the soundest. Its management is able and experienced, and its directorate and stockholders are found among some of the leading business and professional men of that section. E. M. Williams, president, is also one of the founders and a charter director. As general manager of the Arizona Copper Company store, he is known throughout the state as a responsible business man. Henry Hill, vice president, is a well known business man of Clifton. W. J. Riley, cashier, is also director of the State Bank of Morenci and the Bank of Duncan, and since he has grown to manhood, has been almost continuously employed in banking, while J. J. Kelly, assistant cashier, is a native of the state, and has grown up in the banking business, and although a young man has attained to prominence in banburg circles. The board of directors consists of the foregoing officials, together with John R. Hampton, vice president of the Valley Bank, Phoenix, George Frazer, John Webster, J. T. McClay, C. O. Billingsley, and Sam Abraham, proprietor of the Clifton Hotel.

THE GILA VALLEY BANK & TRUST COMPANY
The Gila Valley Bank & Trust Company, which, in addition to its principal house at Globe, has branches at Ray, Winkleman, Morenci, Clifton, Hayden, Safford and Miami, has proven a most important factor in the business growth of that section of Arizona, and done much in aiding to success hundreds of people engaged in mining, agriculture, and cattle raising in the vicinity of its houses. The advantages possible in this particular have been considerably increased by the fact that eight banks in different towns, but all under one strong and capable management cover a greater area with much more expedience than would be possible by the same number of individual banking companies, even though the aggregate of their resources were greater than those of the Gila Valley Bank Si Trust Company. Under this arrangement the people of the smallest of these towns have the benefit of dealing with a large institution, in reality, for they appreciate the fact that each branch is as strong and as high in its financial responsibility as the entire system behind it. They realize also that should any of the ordinary financial difficulties be met with in their immediate locality, the local bank need not necessarily be put to any exceptional test as would otherwise doubtless be the case, to meet the demands of depositors needlessly alarmed, but having the strength of the entire Gila Valley Bank & Trust Company to rely upon, the situation would never assume serious proportions.

The Gila Bank & Trust Company was organized in 1900 with a capitalization of $100,000, all of which is paid in. They have a surplus of $60,000, and deposits amounting to almost $2,000,000. In all their branches they transact a general banking business, loan money, buy and sell exchange, make collections and receive deposits, both for commercial and savings accounts, and utilize every modern system which in any way tends to benefit financial transactions.

The Gila Valley Bank & Trust Company has in its employ in each of its houses men who are well trained in banking, and familiar with every detail of the requirements of their position. This is notably true of the manage,r?, many of whom have received their bank training in the very best possible way, in large eastern houses, either national banks or private banking firms, where emergencies must be met and questions coped with that broaden a man's horizon in this calling and develop in him the power to quickly respond to the unusual demands of the day and to rise to the occasion and satisfactorily dispose of matters of a special nature requiring his attention.

The officers of the company are as follows: President C. E. Mills; Vice Presidents, L. D. Ricketts and T. A. Pascoe; Cashier, Harry S. Van Gorder ; General Manager, R. E. Moore, all of whom are prominently known in the business enterprises of the state.

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF DOUGLAS
First National Bank of Douglas  is incorporated under the laws of Arizona and is a United States depository. It was organized with a capitalization of $100,000, and its management comprises some of the most reliable and prominent citizens of the state. Honorable B. A. Packard, a pioneer Arizona business man whose reputation throughout the state for business ability, integrity and efficiency is absolutely unexcelled, is the president. Being a man whose personality has attracted to him positions of honor and trust, both appointive and elective, Mr. Packard's name in the list of organizers and at the head of this institution has been one of its valuable assets from the beginning. E. W. Graves, cashier, is a thoroughly trained and competent bank official. . He has been known in the financial life of Arizona for many years and spent almost two decades in the employ of the Consolidated National Bank of Tucson, and to his business capacity and uniform courtesy much of the bank's continuous growth may be attributed. Its deposits now amount to more than $850,000, and its total resources are more than a million. Its affairs are judiciously managed on a broad, but conservative, basis, and its facilities, both financial and physical, for accommodating the public wants are ample. The First National Bank is located on the most prominent corner in Douglas, Tenth and "G" Avenues, in a modern, complete three story building which is an addition to the business section of the city. The equipment is modern and includes a large safety deposit vault. The Board of Directors includes the officials previously named and T. E. Pollock, president of the Arizona Central Bank of Flagstaff ; L. W. Powell, well known mining man of Cochise County; James Wood, George Dawe and A. B. Packard, all of Douglas.

THE CITIZENS BANK & TRUST COMPANY
Citizens Bank & Trust Co. , Bisbee, was organized June 30, 1906, by more than fifty of the substantial business men of Bisbee with an authorized capitalization of $100,000. This bank opened for business October 8, 1906, having a paid in capital of $50,000, since that time its business has grown with the Warren District, and it now enjoys the confidence of its fifteen hundred patrons. The home of the Citizens Bank & Trust Company, situated on Main Street, is constructed throughout of reinforced concrete, and is the only really fireproof building in Bisbee. It is elegantly fitted out with up to date furniture and fixtures, has two reinforced burglar and fireproof vaults and is equipped with time lock safes and safety deposit boxes of the most modern design. The Citizens Bank & Trust Company handles every branch of the banking business and was the pioneer in Bisbee in the establishment of a Savings Department paying interest at the rate of four per cent per annum upon savings accounts. Since the exceptional success of this department became recognized the other banks in Bisbee have installed Savings Departments along the same lines, and now the combined savings accounts in the district aggregate more than three-quarters of a million dollars. The officers of the Citizens Bank & Trust Company are Will E. McKee, president ; B. A. Taylor, first vice president ; F. A. Watkins, second vice president; C. A. McDonald, cashier, and O. W. Wolf, assistant cashier.

THE NATIONAL BANK OF ARIZONA
The National Bank of Arizona, the oldest bank in Phoenix, was established in 1878, and in 1887 was chartered as a national bank under the name of the National Bank of Arizona, with a capital stock of $100,000. The capital stock has been increased, however, until it now amounts to $200,000. The history of this bank has been one of steady progress, because of the ability and wisdom of its management which have won the entire confidence of the public, individual, firm and corporation.


The National Bank of Arizona conducts its business on the ground floor of their own building, which is built of brick and concrete, four stories high, and situated on the corner of Central Avenue and Washington Street. Their counting rooms have been especially designed that the business may be carried on with the greatest degree of ease and safety to customers and the bank itself. Every precaution known in banking circles has been taken, and their massive steel vaults are time locked, fire and burglar proof. In addition to that essential in banking, The National Bank of Arizona has the advantage of a large capital, sufficient to meet all requirements, and an able and efficient management under honest and conservative officials.

The active officers of this bank are all substantial men and well known in Phoenix and vicinity, men of the highest standing as regards integrity and real worth. Emil Ganz, president, has been a resident of the Valley for more than thirty years, and at the head of the bank's affairs for about seventeen years. S. Oberfelder, cashier, came to Phoenix from Omaha sixteen years ago to accept a position as assistant cashier, and in 1897 he was elected to his present position. His conduct of affairs during these years is, of itself, sufficient evidence of his knowledge of banking and general ability. These men, together with Charles Goldman, vice president; W. H. Kay, Ed Eisele, J. Thalmeimer and Jacob Miller, form the board of directors. These are all among the representative business men of the vicinity whose sterling worth adds a note of assurance to the bank's reliability.

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NOGALES
First National Bank of Nogales, one of the most reliable financial institutions in Arizona, was organized about ten years ago and numbers among its directors and shareholders some of the most enterprising men of the town. Its cash capital is $50.000, surplus and undivided profits $65,000, and deposits but little less than $500,000. While its business is conducted along safe and conservative lines, its policy has always been broad and liberal. The First National Bank is depository for public funds of Nogales, the County of Santa Cruz and for the United States. The funds of the Postoffice, the Immigration Office, and the Custom House are also deposited with this institution. The record made by this bank is one of which the directors and officers may well be proud, and during the panic of 1907 it was one of the few banks in the state which met all of its obligations without hesitation or reservation.

The reputation of The First National Bank of Nogales for permanence and stability is thoroughly well known over all Arizona, and no one circumstance has ever done more to establish a high standard for any financial institution than the able manner in which this bank coped with the wants of its customers during the trying period referred to by its announcement that it knew no limit short of the total amount of a customer's deposit. Checks were readily taken everywhere, and when presented at the bank itself, were cashed with alacrity. Its record in this particular has given it a place among the sound and solid financial institutions of the country and in the estimation of the entire business and commercial world that is treasured among its most valuable assets.

The First National Bank conducts the usual Exchange and Collection business in addition to the regular banking lines, and in every way is especially accommodating to customers. It also conducts a safety box department for deposit of valuable documents, bonds, money, jewels, etc., and a Mexican department for the buying and selling of Mexican money. This bank has a large and extensive business down the West Coast of Mexico. The Directors are Theo. Gebler, E. Titcomb, Phil Herold, Bracey Curtis, L. Lindsey and H. M. Clagett. Bracey Curtis is president; Phil Herold, vice president; Otto H. Herold, cashier.. Beside a strong and liberal policy in the conduct of the business of the sterling banking institution confided to their care, the officials of the First National Bank give attention to the best interests of the town of Nogales. Mr. Curtis, the president, and Mr. Otto H. Herold, the cashier, have served as members of the Nogales Council, and Mr. Grover Marsteller, one of the clerks, is Town Clerk. Mr. Curtis is also chairman of the Fire and Water Committee, and has been for years Chief of the Fire Department.

THE NAVAJO-APACHE BANK & TRUST
Navajo-Apache Bank & Trust Co.  Co., whose head office is at Winslow, and branches at Holbrook and St. John, is the outgrowth of a small bank which was organized in 1900 by W. H. Burbage and Fred Nelson. This was known as the Navajo County Bank, and was established at Winslow with a capital of but $10,000. Mr. Burbage was president, and Mr. Nelson, vice president. In 1905 these same gentlemen organized the Apache County Bank & Trust Co., at St. Johns, of which Mr. Nelson was vice president and cashier. Four years later the two were consolidated under the name "The Navajo-Apache Bank & Trust Co.", which began business with a paid-in capital of $100,000. This is the largest bank in the northern part of the state, and from its beginning has met with general favor because of its sound and liberal policy.

THE SOUTHERN ARIZONA BANK & TRUST COMPANY,
The Southern Arizona Bank and Trust co. one of Tucson's solid financial institutions doing business according to the most modern methods, has a paid in capital of $75,000 and resources amounting to more than one million dollars, while its aggregate deposits are close to the million mark. This company was organized in May, 1903, and its original capitalization was but $50,000. Its surplus and undivided profits now amount to more than $50,000. This institution is one of the largest in this section of the country from the point of view of deposits and resources, and its policy of carrying 50% of deposits in quick cash assets and cash reserves makes it second to none in the state in the matter of strength, and causes the institution to stand exceedingly high in the confidence of the public. A general banking business is conducted, both check and savings accounts being received and on the latter four per cent interest per annum is allowed. They also issue letters of credit and travelers' checks, payable practically everywhere in the world.

The trust department of the Southern Arizona Bank & Trust Company is one of the most complete known in Arizona, and they are competent to act as trustee or administrator, and to take charge of estates. They also conduct a real estate and insurance department under thoroughly qualified men, and they loan money on city property. This bank also extends accommodations to its clients in Tucson and vicinity whenever consistent with sound banking principles, as the entire business of the institution is conducted along the lines of wise and conservative, though liberal, methods.

The officers of the Southern Arizona Bank & Trust Company are as follows: N. E. Plumer, president; Fred J. Steward, vice president; G. H. Sawyer, secretary. These three officers together with J. Ivancovich and R. Power, compose the board of directors.



Who's Who In Arizona Volume 1 1913 Complied and Published by Jo Connors




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