Arizona Trails
Cochise County, Arizona
Newspaper Articles
Murders


June 22, 1881
A dispatch from Tombstone, Arizona says: Particulars have been received of the killing, last week, by cowboys, of the Hazlett brothers, and a German, at Eureka, New Mexico, who killed Leonard and Harry Head, the Contention stage robbers. Last week the brothers were surprised by a party of twenty cowboys, while playing cards in a saloon, in Eureka, and they had no chance to defend themselves. Bull Hazlett was shot six times through the bowels, Ike twice through the stomach, and the German six times through the body. The firing soon ceased and the murderers mounted their bones and rode away. There is no clue as to their Identity. 

MURDERS IN ARIZONA 06/24/1881
A dispatch from Tombstone Arizona says: Particulars have been received of the killing last week, by cowboys of the Hazlett brothers, and a German. At Eureka New Mexico, who killed Leonard and Harry Head, the Contention stage robbers. Last week the brothers were surprised by a party of twenty cow boys, while playing cards in a saloon in Eureka and they had no chance to defend themselves. Bull Hazlett was shot six times through the bowels, Ike twice through the stomach, and the German six times through the body. The firing soon ceased and the murderers mounted their horses and rode away. There is no clue as to their identity. 


The Funeral Oct. 10, 1881
The funeral for the McLowry brothers and Clanton yesterday was numerically one of the largest ever witnessed in Tombstone. It took place at 8.30 from the undertaking rooms at Messrs. Ritter and Ream. The procession, headed by the Tombstone Brass band, moved down Allen Street, and thence to the cemetery. The sidewalks were densely packed for three or four blocks. The body of Clanton was in the first hearse, and those of the two brothers in the second side by side, and were interned in the same grave. It was a most impressive and saddening sight, and such a one as it is to be hoped may never occur again in this community. 


Nov. 05 1881
A Tombstone dispatch of the 27th ult. says: Four cowboys, Ike and Billy Clanton and Frank and Tom McLowery, had been parading the town for several days, drinking heavily and making themselves obnoxious. The city marshall arrested Ike Clanton. Soon after his release the four met the marshall, his brothers Morgan and Wyatt Earp, and J.H. Holliday.
The marshall ordered them to give up their weapons, when a fight commenced. About thirty shots were fired rapidly. Both the McLowery boys were killed. Bill Clanton was mortally wounded, dying soon after Ike was slightly wounded and arrested. Morgan Earp was severely wounded in the shoulder, and Wyatt slightly. The others were unhurt
June 22, 1881
A dispatch from Tombstone, Arizona says: Particulars have been received of the killing, last week, by cowboys, of the Hazlett brothers, and a German, at Eureka, New Mexico, who killed Leonard and Harry Head, the Contention stage robbers. Last week the brothers were surprised by a party of twenty cowboys, while playing cards in a saloon, in Eureka, and they had no chance to defend themselves. Bull Hazlett was shot six times through the bowels, Ike twice through the stomach, and the German six times through the body. The firing soon ceased and the murderers mounted their bones and rode away. There is no clue as to their Identity. 

MURDERS IN ARIZONA 06/24/1881
A dispatch from Tombstone Arizona says: Particulars have been received of the killing last week, by cowboys of the Hazlett brothers, and a German. At Eureka New Mexico, who killed Leonard and Harry Head, the Contention stage robbers. Last week the brothers were surprised by a party of twenty cow boys, while playing cards in a saloon in Eureka and they had no chance to defend themselves. Bull Hazlett was shot six times through the bowels, Ike twice through the stomach, and the German six times through the body. The firing soon ceased and the murderers mounted their horses and rode away. There is no clue as to their identity.


Dec. 27 1881
Murders by Indians

The Tombstone Epitaph has just received news from Campas Sonora, of the murder of two Mexicans by a roving band of Indians. After committing the murder the Indians started for the mountains, and at  last accounts had not been captured. Later news is to the effect that the same band had murdered seven more men between Tapache and San Laripa. It is thought the latter were employees of the Chicago Mining Company.


January 7, 1882

Border Life Murders by Indians in Arizona - Cowboy Raids
A dispatch from Tombstone, Arizona, Says: Advice's from Campas Sonora state that the renegade Apaches attacked Gavillan Mine, sixty miles from here, on December 33, killing an American, supposed to be Newton Noble, a farmer; the sheriff of San Bernardino county, Cal.; Charles Woeberling, a German; the superintendent of the mine, and two Mexicans. They also carried a little girl Into captivity. There are many Americans prospecting In that part of the county, and more murders are feared, Cowboys are raiding the cattle ranches in the vicinity of Tombstone.


March 29, 1884
    The Gallows Eight men legally put to death, Five Murderers Suspended from One Beam at Tombstone Arizona A Riot as a side show.
O.W. Sample, Dan Dowd, James Delany, James Howard and Dan Kelly were hanged here at quarter past one this afternoon, for the Bisbee Murders.
The five bandits marched up the steps of the scaffold without flinching, and all declared their innocence. Heith, who was lynched here on February 22, was, they stated also innocent. They bade their friends goodbye. They expressed faith in the Christian religion, and requested that their bodies be delivered to Father Gallagher. Nothing occurred to mar the sheriff's plans. The murderers were all dropped off together, and, with the exception of Dowd, died without a struggle.
A SIDE SHOW
    Over one thousand persons witnessed the execution. A large balcony had been erected outside of and overlooking the jail yard, the builder intending to charge a dollar and a half admission. The mob became indignant and tore the balcony down. In the row which followed seven persons were injured. One man had his leg broken and another his arm. The balcony would have seated five hundred persons. With this exception, everything passed off quietly.
THE RAID ON BISBEE
    The residents of Tombstone were startled on the morning of the 9th of last December by the news that reached the city regarding the desperate work of a number of bandits, who had on the previous day entered Bisbee, a neighboring mining settlement, and robbed a number of citizens. The messengers who brought the news stated that on the afternoon of December 8 six men rode into the settlement. They dismounted in a quiet part of the place, and , leaving the horses in charge of one of their number, five visited the business portion of the settlement and commenced a series of robberies. Three of them entered the store of A.A, Castenado while two stood guard without. As they entered the door one of them immediately covered the book-keeper of the establishment with a revolver and commanded him to open the safe, which he did. They took from the safe about $800.00 and then robbed the attaches taking a gold watch and other valuables. Whole these scenes were being acted within, the  watchmen on the outside when any one approached, cried out "Keep back, or we will kill you." and pointed a revolver at the head of the person so addressed. When they left the plundered store, they returned to their horses, stopping and robbing several citizens on the way.
    A number of people were soon in pursuit of the desperadoes, who, as they rode from the place, fatally shot Mrs. Roberts, D.T. Smith, J.A. Tappenier, and John A. Nolly. The highwaymen made their escape, carrying with them about $1200.00. A reward of $2000.00 was offered for the arrest and conviction of the persons implicated in the crimes. As the desperadoes, with one exception, all wore masks, it was at first difficult to trace them. Clues soon developed that led to the arrest of six men. These were Daniel Dowd, James "alias "Tex" Delaney, Oscar W. Sample alias "Red" Daniel Kelly, James Howard  and John Heith. The first five named men were tried at Tombstone and convicted of murder in the first degree. The trial of Heith was separate, and he was found guilty of murder in the second degree, and sentenced to life imprisonment.
    As Heith was believed to be the instigator of the crime, this so enraged the citizens of Tombstone that they determined  to lynch him. On the  morning of Washington's birthday about one hundred men, mostly miners armed themselves and a committee of seven appointed to enter the jail and secure the murderer.
They knocked at the door, and as it was about the time that the Chinese servant brought in the breakfast for the prisoners, the jailer, thinking it was he, threw open the door, and the lynches marched in, and,  under the muzzle of a revolver, they compelled the turnkey to open Heith's cell. This was done, and after putting the rope around Heith's neck, they started to leave jail with him. As they descended the stairs of the jail it was suggested that they hang him from the balustrade, but as Sheriff Ward and several others came on the scene, it was prevented. The sheriff was knocked down by some of the mob, who then dragged Heith through the streets for several blocks, until a telegraph pole was reached. He was then informed that his time had come. He made one request of the mob before he was lynched saying "Don't riddle my body with bullets, boys" A pocket handkerchief was put over his eyes and the rope thrown over one of the cross pieces of the telegraph pole. The mob, seizing the rope, drew him up, and he was left hanging for half an hour, when he was cut down.

November 16 1900
TWO BROTHERS HANGED FOR MURDER IN ARIZONA
Phoenix, Ariz., Nov. 16. William and Thomas Halderman were hanged this afternoon in Tombstone jail for the murder of Ted Moore. Both died without the slightest exhibition of fear. Thomas, the younger brother, was the cooler of the two. He lifted the noose and placed it around his neck. "What do you shake that paper that way for, you look scared." he said to the sheriff. Just before the trap was sprung he said: "Boys, I forgive all my enemies and hope they forgive me. "William, the elder of the two, did no show so much bravery. As his brother repeated the farewell words, he muttered as the noose was placed about his neck: "This rope is choking me. My brother is Innocent." Thomas was pronounced dead in 13 minutes and William in 15 minutes. On April 15, 1899, the Haldeman brothers shot and killed Constable Frank Ainsworth and Ted Moore, when the latter came to arrest them for shooting cattle. Acting Governor Akers refused a respite and the friends of the Haldemans laid the case before President McKinley. securing a reprieve until October 5. Governor Murphy then gave an extension until November 16.


September 9, 1900
RECKONING TIME CAME.
Virgil Earp, the Noted Rustler, Dies With Boots On.
    Wllcox, A. T., July 9. - Warren Earp, tie youngest of the four Earp brothers whose names twenty years ago were synonymous with gun fighting on the Arizona frontier, "died with his boots on" here.
    He was shot through, the heart in a saloon by Cowboy Johnny Boyett, and died almost Instantly.
    The shooting occurred early in the morning and grew out of a feud that had existed between the two men ever since the bloody fights between the Earp's and Arizona cattle rustler about Tombstone In the early eighties.
Earp had habitually bullied Boyett for months past, and the latter always tried to avoid a quarrel.
    A few days ago Earp cornered Boyett in a saloon, and, pressing a revolver against Boyett's stomach, made him promise that if they ever quarreled again the one should kill the other.
    The two men met in a restaurant and Earp began his abuse.
    Boyett went Into an adjoining saloon, followed by Earp. The latter said: "Boyett, go get your gun and we'll settle the matter right here. I've got my gun;go get yours."
    Boyett was willing and agreed to return in a few moments and fight it out. Earp also left the saloon.
    Boyett returned very soon and finding Earp gone warned all loungers in the saloon to clear out, emphasizing his warning by shooting into the ceiling.
    Earp shortly appeared through a back door. He started toward Boyett, throwing open his coat and saying: "Boyett, I am unarmed; you have the best of this," advancing as spoke.
    Boyett warned him not to come nearer, but Earp did not heed the words, and when within eight feet Boyett fired, shooting Earp through the heart and killing him instantly.
    Warren Earp was the youngest brother of the Earp family. He was well known by Uncle-Sheriff Paul of Tucson, who was Sheriff of Pima county in the  
eighties when trouble occurred  between the Earps and the Clanton gang.
    Earp came to this country about the time of the beginning of the feud from Colton, Cal. He was one of the original brothers and took an active part in their fights after he arrived. Morgan Earp was killed In 1883 In Bob Hatch's saloon in Tombstone, being shot from the back as he was playing billiards. Virgil Earp later was shot in the arm and seriously wounded and the  killing of Frank Stilwell occurred In Tucson not long after, when he attempted to shoot Virgil through
a car window. Stilwell was shot by Wyatt Earp.
    Warren came here when his brothers got into trouble at Tombstone with the Clanton gang and he has remained here since. He was driving stage from Willcox to Fort Grant and had done freighting.
Tombstone Epitaph Sept. 09, 1900


Desperate Efforts Made to Save Youthful Sheriff Slayers' Lives
Phoenix, Ariz, July 23, 1900
S. H. Hopkins, a prominent attorney of Texas has made a plea before Acting Governor Akers here for the life of William and Thomas Halderman, two boys sentenced to be hanged in Tombstone, Aug. 10th, for the murder of Deputy Sheriff Charles Ainsworth, brother of Attorney General of Arizona, and Ted Moore, who started out in the Chirlcaihua mountains, to arrest the Halderman brothers for cattle stealing.
    The case has resolved itself into a plea by the State of Texas to the Territory of Arizona,praying that executive clemency might prevent a stain on the name of one of  the best pioneer families of Texas Hopkins and other prominent attorneys connected with the trial argued that two innocent boys had been hurried through a trial when the misinformed public was inflamed and that intense prejudice entered the jury box. Two young girls who were the most important witnesses against the Haldermanas make affidavit that they have been intimidated by their father, who said they would be put in jail if they testified to what they saw as eye witnesses to the killing.And now, when innocent lives are about to be sacrificed, they swear that the killing occurred in self protection.
    Acting Governor Akers is making a thorough investigation of the case and will arrive at a decision in two or three days



Return To The Main Index Page