Genealogy Trails   Arizona Trails

Navajo County, Arizona
Obits


Tucson Daily Citizen1911-12-05
FALLS UNDER TRAIN DIES FROM INJURY
Winslow Dec 4 Juan Reyes an Old Mexico resident, while stealing a ride, lost his hold and fell under the wheels of a moving freight train near Maqui, that was coming into Winslow, cutting of both of his legs near the knee. he was brought to Winslow and taken charge of by the physicians, but owing to the loss of blood he did not survive the operation. Undertaker Parr took charge of the remains and buried them in the local cemetery. Reyes was a man of about 30 years old.

Prescott Morning Courier  Winslow Mail 1901-08-03
An American laborer, in the employ of the railroad at Sunset, was caught beneath the cars of a work train switching at that place Saturday and sustained injuries from which he died,

Arizona Weekly Journal Miner 1893-02-22
The man who was picked up last Wednesday near Billings, on the A & P. Railroad, with one leg badly mashed, mention of which was made in these columns, died shortly after reaching Winslow, his name was gun Anderson.

Prescott Morning Courier 1907-10-08
James H. Castleman, an old timer in that section, died at Winslow last Sunday.

Prescott Morning Courier 1905-06-20
D.E. Scott, a machinist who went on strike at Seligman and who was quite well known here, died of Typhoid Fever at Tucson Monday Winslow Mail

Tuscon Daily citizen 1912-12-23
Holbrook Dec 22, Mrs. Heck Marley, wife of the Winslow stock man, was accidentally shot though the head with a 22 rifle, as she was getting on an engine at Sunshine to go back to Winslow, and died on the engine before reaching home.
Mrs. Marley with her sister in law Mrs. Ben Brooks had been hunting rabbits near Sunshine during the day, Brooks who is an engineer on the road, stopped to pick them up and as near as he could be ascertained, the rifle she was carrying was accidentally discharged while  she was getting into the engine, the ball striking her under the jaw, ranging upward to the brain.

Prescott Morning Courier 1903-11-07
E.A. Eastabrook, a well known printer, who resided in this city for some years and was an active member of the Prescott fire department, died Nov. 6, 1903, at Winslow Arizona of pneumonia. He was about 35 years of age, and a native of Portland Oregon. He was a first class printer, and a very intelligent man of unbounded generosity . He had no enemies. Everyone who knew him had a kind word for "Esty" as he was familiarly called, and his untimely death is a matter of regret. The news of his death was telegraphed to Hon. L.R. Barrow by W.A. Parr. Deceased was formerly a member of Prescott Typographical union.

Prescott Morning Courier  1903-09-28
About 6 o'clock Sunday morning the report of a pistol in the Monarch saloon brought Officer King Henley and others to the scene, where stretched out on top of the bar and suffering intense agony, they found Wm. J. Eagan with a bullet hole is his back. he died soon after. the coroner's jury found that he came to his death from a gunshot wound, the gun having been fired by some party at present unknown to the jury. Winslow Mail September 26

Prescott Morning Courier  1903-12-08
John Spires, who murdered a 15 year old girl at Winslow Dec 2 and then stabbed himself died a few hours therefore. both Spires and his victim was buried Wednesday afternoon.

Prescott Morning Courier  1903-11-16
A.J. Poe, a brakeman on the west end, who was thrown from a moving train near McClellan last Monday Morning. died at the Albuquerque Hospital Thursday. Winslow Mail

Weekly Phoenix Herald 1899-
Thos. K. McSweeney Dies in Albuquerque from Injuries Received
Thos. K. McSweeney died at railroad hospital in Albuquerque at 3:10 o'clock Wednesday morning,  from the effects, of a gun shot wound which he received at Winslow the morning before.
McSweeney was a section foreman on the Santa Fe Pacific road near Winslow. A few days ago he discharged a section hand by the name of Smiley which caused hard feelings between the two men. Tuesday morning McSweeney, his wife and three small children came to Winslow with the intention of going to El Paso for the purpose of having Mrs. McSweeney, who is blind treated by an expert oculist.
Smiley who had been nursing his hatred of McSweeney on strong drink, since  his discharge, met the latter and shot him. on sight the bullet passing through the kidneys.
Smiley was at once arrested and McSweeney put on the train and taken to Albuquerque.
The condition in which the family is left is most pitiable. Mrs. McSweeney is blind and her three children so small as to be helpless, the oldest being only about four years old and tho youngest still a babe in the mother's arms.


Arizona Daily Star, The (Tucson, AZ) - July 10, 1992
Deceased Name: The ins and outs of Keet Seel
    Keet Seel is located at Navajo National Monument in Northern Arizona, 20 miles west of Kayenta, on U.S. Highway 160. Access to the ruin is strictly controlled - no more than 20 people a day are allowed in, and a back-country permit from the National Park Service is required for hikers or riders.
    Reservations for a back-country permit can be made by calling the monument at (602) 672-2366. The visitor center is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Navajo National Monument is on daylight-saving time, as is the rest of the Navajo Reservation. There is no charge for the permit. Reservations may be made up to two months in advance. Keet Seel is open Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, seven days a week.
    Horses for the ride must be rented from Virginia Austin; arrangements are made through the Park Service. The cost for each rider is $50, and each group of riders is accompanied by several wranglers. A ranger conducts tours at the ruin site.
    Riders and hikers must take their own food and water, as there are no facilities in the canyon or at Keet Seel. Surface water in the canyon is contaminated by livestock and should not be used for drinking. Space for packing food and water is limited to small saddlebags; unbreakable canteens with straps are advised. Each person on the daylong ride should carry a minimum of 2 quarts of water; 4 quarts are advised.
    Comfortable clothes, sturdy boots or shoes and hats are advised. Temperatures in the canyon during the summer can reach 100 degrees.
    Overnight camping is available at Navajo National Monument headquarters on a first-come, first-served basis (limited to vehicles no more than 25 feet long). The campground is open from mid-April through mid-October. The 30 spaces are usually filled early during the summer.
    Also located at Navajo National Monument is Betatakin ruin, another large and well-preserved Anasazi ruin. Two guided hiking tours per day of Betatakin are offered during summer months, beginning at 9 a.m. and noon. The hike takes five to six hours; it is five miles round trip and includes steep grades at high altitudes. Spaces are limited; sign up the day of the tour on a first-come, first-served basis. Sturdy shoes and 2 quarts of water are recommended. Visitors to Betatakin must be accompanied by a ranger. This ruin is usually open mid-April through mid-October.
    The nearest town with food, gas, services and lodging is Kayenta. There are several motels and restaurants there, but make lodging reservations early; Kayenta is also the nearest town to Monument Valley and does a booming tourist business, especially during the summer.


Arizona Daily Star, The (Tucson, AZ) - July 10, 1992
Deceased Name: The ins and outs of Keet Seel
    Keet Seel is located at Navajo National Monument in Northern Arizona, 20 miles west of Kayenta, on U.S. Highway 160. Access to the ruin is strictly controlled - no more than 20 people a day are allowed in, and a back-country permit from the National Park Service is required for hikers or riders.
    Reservations for a back-country permit can be made by calling the monument at (602) 672-2366. The visitor center is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Navajo National Monument is on daylight-saving time, as is the rest of the Navajo Reservation. There is no charge for the permit. Reservations may be made up to two months in advance. Keet Seel is open Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, seven days a week.
    Horses for the ride must be rented from Virginia Austin; arrangements are made through the Park Service. The cost for each rider is $50, and each group of riders is accompanied by several wranglers. A ranger conducts tours at the ruin site.
    Riders and hikers must take their own food and water, as there are no facilities in the canyon or at Keet Seel. Surface water in the canyon is contaminated by livestock and should not be used for drinking. Space for packing food and water is limited to small saddlebags; unbreakable canteens with straps are advised. Each person on the daylong ride should carry a minimum of 2 quarts of water; 4 quarts are advised.
    Comfortable clothes, sturdy boots or shoes and hats are advised. Temperatures in the canyon during the summer can reach 100 degrees.
    Overnight camping is available at Navajo National Monument headquarters on a first-come, first-served basis (limited to vehicles no more than 25 feet long). The campground is open from mid-April through mid-October. The 30 spaces are usually filled early during the summer.
    Also located at Navajo National Monument is Betatakin ruin, another large and well-preserved Anasazi ruin. Two guided hiking tours per day of Betatakin are offered during summer months, beginning at 9 a.m. and noon. The hike takes five to six hours; it is five miles round trip and includes steep grades at high altitudes. Spaces are limited; sign up the day of the tour on a first-come, first-served basis. Sturdy shoes and 2 quarts of water are recommended. Visitors to Betatakin must be accompanied by a ranger. This ruin is usually open mid-April through mid-October.
    The nearest town with food, gas, services and lodging is Kayenta. There are several motels and restaurants there, but make lodging reservations early; Kayenta is also the nearest town to Monument Valley and does a booming tourist business, especially during the summer.

HIS FRIEND FOUND DEAD—W. T. Gann, who came here not long ago from Texas, was on his way to Winslow to see an old friend, Newt Paschall, whom he had known from boyhood in Texas. After his arrival in Phoenix he heard in a roundabout way from home that Paschall had been killed. He called at The Republican office and learned from the issue of last Monday that Paschall had been found dead on the range. The manner of his death was not learned here.
Date: 1899-07-20; Paper: Weekly Republican

A  BABY'S  DEATH —Ruby Pearl, the baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Steele of 336 East Adams street, died yesterday afternoon of cholera enfantum. The funeral will take place at 4 o'clock this afternoon from the First Baptist church.
Date: 1899-07-20; Paper: Weekly Republican

Holbrook Man Brutally Slain
HOLBROOK, Feb. 7— (AP)— John Nunn, sheriff, and Earl Piatt, county attorney, of Apache county expressed belief today robbery was the motive for the brutal slaying of Labe Hitson, cowboy and former Holbrook cafe operator, whose body was found in a bunk house on the Jamieson ranch, 35 miles east of here, last night.
His neck had been stabbed twice and the back of his head was crushed.
Nunn and Plait said they found one of the death weapons a knife honed to razor edge and bearing several bloody fingerprints, Hitson, they believe, was first slain and then placed on a bed In the bunkhouse. A blanket was thrown over him and there was a pool of blood on the floor.
The slain man, friends told investigators, usually carried between $150 and $250 in cash on his person. When he was found by Bunk Jamieson, rancher, there was only $2. in his clothing, Hitson recently sold the Grill Cafe here for $1.500. The slain man was. last seen alive at 9 a. m. yesterday. The Jamieson ranch is in Apache county, and the investigators came here from St. Johns on the case.
Arizona Republic Phoenix Wednesday Morning February 8, 1939

Winslow Resident Passes Away Tuesday Evening
Mrs. Susan J. Ryan, mother of Mrs. Georgia B. Futrelle and W. J. Ryan, of this city, passed away at her home at the Woods Hotel, on Tuesday evening.
Mrs. Ryan, who had been ill for the past seven years, and bed-fast for a long period during that time, has been a resident of Winslow for five years. Death came while she was in a peaceful sleep, relieving long years of suffering.
Mrs. Ryan is survived by her son and daughter, of this city and five sisters and two brothers living in other states, who are Mrs. William Six, of Santa Ana, Calif., Mrs. Hiram Land, of Higbee, Missouri, Mrs. Evan Hamm, of Slater, Missouri, Mrs. Bradford Evans, of Higbee, Missouri, and another sister whose address is unknown, and two brothers, Frank and Joe Lessley.
Funeral services will be held from the Winslow Undertaking parlors Friday afternoon at 2:30.
Winslow Mail 1926-08-13 Page 1

Services Are Held For Winslow Woman
WINSLOW, Jan. 7 —Funeral services were held here Friday for Mrs. Mary McFarlane, 70-year-old resident, who died at a local hospital January 3 after an attack of pneumonia. Interment was in Desert View cemetery.
Surviving Mrs. McFarlane are two daughters, Mrs. W. T. Willey of Winslow, with whom she had been residing for the last 10 years, and Mrs. Rose Sorensen of Los Angeles
Arizona Republic, Phoenix Monday January 8 1940

Hugh McGann Dead After Long Illness
Hugh McGann, 52, resident of Winslow and employe or the Santa Fe railroad for the past 12 years died here yesterday following several months illness.
Born in Pittsburg, Penn., October 1, 1879, McGann entered the service of the railroad company at Winslow on July 24, 1920, serving as a brakeman until March 22, 1932.
Six years previous to coming to Winslow, Mr. McGann worked with the lumbering companies railroads at Flagstaff.
Funeral arrangements had not been made yesterday pending advices from relatives.
Winslow Mail 1932-08-05 Page 1

Mrs. Mary Dye Goes To Her Final Rest
Mrs. Mary Dye, widow of Thos. F. Dye. and resident of Winslow for the past nine years, passed away at her home. 414 West First street, at 6:05. p. m., Wednesday, December 23. 1925. of Brights disease.
Mrs. Mary Dye was born in San Antonio, Texas. March 7. 1858. She came to Ft. Wingate 1872, where she met Thos. F. Dye, with whom she was united in the holy bonds of matrimony. From there they moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, where they resided for forty years. Nine children were born to bless their union, three deceased and six living, all of whom were at her bedside when the end came. Jas. S. Dye of San Francisco. California, Mrs. Earl Weidinger of Clovis. New Mexico, Mrs. C. W. Mehan, Miss H. B. Dye. Anna Dye. and Julia R Dye. all of this city.
Winslow Mail 1926-01-01 Page 1

MEXICAN SHOT AND KILLED BY MEMBER OF HIS OWN FAMILY
Porfirio Montano, 30 years of age, was shot during a celebration at the home of Ramon Gonzalez, by Gonzalez, a brother-in-law. Montano died the following day at the hospital in Gallup where he had been rushed following the shooting. The body was brought back to Winslow for burial Monday.
The Gonzales home is in Taylor addition to Winslow. A Christmas celebration was in progress at the time, during which a row started. Little is known of the causes leading up to the killing. Gonsales is still in jail pending preliminary hearing.
Winslow Mail 1926-01-01 Page 1

YOUNG RANCHER SHOT TO DEATH AT HOLBROOK
Lynn Baldwin, 23 years of age, a rancher, was shot and instantly killed at Holbrook Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the lobby of the Old Trails hotel.
James Donohoe, a stock raiser of Adamana, who is alleged to have shot Baldwin, was removed to the hospital a short time later suffering from a wound in the hip. Witnesses told officers that after the shooting Donohoe attempted to return his pistol to his hip pocket and wounded himself.
Baldwin had recently returned to Holbrook from Adamana in company with the former wife of Donohoe and another woman, it is said, Donohoe and his wife were divorced about two months ago.
No charge have been filed in connection with the affair pending the outcome of Donohoe's accidental shooting.
Winslow Mail 1926-01-01 Page 1





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