Genealogy Trails

Pinal County, Arizona
Fatal Accidents

FATAL ACCIDENT
Rock Falls from High Bluff, Striking Two Men One Dies
On Sunday last a gang of men were working at the re-construction of a portion of the road leading from Feaglo's camp to the Gibson mine, when a deplorable accident occurred. A large boulder which had been left partially embedded at th top of a deep cut became loosened and rolled down the steep declivity, catching and crushing two men. Foreman Elliott received such injury of the spine that he died on Tuesday last. One of the workmen named Buck escaped with a broken leg. Elliott was highly esteemed by his employers, having worked at the Gibson mine for some years. He was considered a very competent and careful man. Buck will recover within a short time. Elliott was in charge of the road work and no blame attaches to anyone, the accident being classed among the unavoidable tradedies of life.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), February 1, 1906

MAN WAS SUFFOCATED IN CONCENTRATES BIN
M. Ledesma a Mexican employe of the Old Dominion company, lost his life in a bin in which concentrates are stored at the smelter, about 12.30 o'clock, a. m., on Monday last. He was inside the bin shoveling the concentrates, which, it is supposed, started to run and buried him. He was missed by a man working on top of the bins, who started an investigation, resulting in Ledesma's body being found in the chute from which the concentrates are discharged. The coronor 's jury summoned on the case returned a verdict of accidental death.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), February 15, 1906

ACCIDENTALLY SHOT
A most deplorable accident occurred last Sunday afternoon by which Earl Jones, the ten year old step-son of G.W. Jones, a carpenter in the employ of the A. C. Co., lost his life. A party of boys were out in the hills near Morenci shooting with target rifles, when a gun in the hands of a young son of Isaac Cochran was accidently discharged, the bullet striking Earl Jones in the back and causing almost instant death.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), March 1, 1906

INJURY FATAL 
Ira L. Wheat, who had a leg crushed in the Old Dominion shaft a week ago last Wednesday, died on Thursday night, following the amputation of the injured member —the double shock proving too great to be withstood. The body was prepared by undertaker F. L. Jones and shipped Monday morning to Del Rio. Texas, and from there will be forwarded by wagon to Rock Springs, in Edwards county. Mrs. Wheat accompanied the remains of her husband. Every attention possible was shown to the bereaved lady by her Globe friends. It is truly a sad affair. Deceased was an industrious  and capable young man and well liked by his associates.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), March 1, 1906


RUN OVER BY ORE WAGONS
Accident to an Ore Hauler Which May Prove Fatal
Harry Brown, a teamster hauling ore from the Gibson mine, met with a distressing accident ot a point on the road a short distance beyond Miami valley, at about the noon hour last Tuescay.
The horses had stopped and Brown got down off the front wagon the better to urge them to pull. Startled by his sharp command the leaders of the team jumped forward suddenly and Mr. Brown, who had hold of one line, was jerked from his feet and fell in front of the wheels, and before he could extricate himself the wheels of both wagons, heavily loaded with ore, passed over his right hip crushing the bone and causing serious injury also to the right side in the region of the kidney.
He was brought into town about 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, and taken to the home of his brother-in-law H. Q. Robertson, where he is receiving every attention from his wifo and other relatives. His condition is but little changed today and the attending physicians are not very hopeful of his recovery
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), March 22, 1906

RUN OVER BY ORE WAGONS
Accident to an Ore Hauler Which May Prove Fatal
Harry Brown, a teamster hauling ore from the Gibson mine, met with a distressing accident ot a point on the road a short distance beyond Miami valley, at about the noon hour last Tuescay.
The horses had stopped and Brown got down off the front wagon the better to urge them to pull. Startled by his sharp command the leaders of the team jumped forward suddenly and Mr. Brown, who had hold of one line, was jerked from his feet and fell in front of the wheels, and before he could extricate himself the wheels of both wagons, heavily loaded with ore, passed over his right hip crushing the bone and causing serious injury also to the right side in the region of the kidney.
He was brought into town about 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, and taken to the home of his brother-in-law H. Q. Robertson, where he is receiving every attention from his wifo and other relatives. His condition is but little changed today and the attending physicians are not very hopeful of his recovery
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), March 22, 1906

DAY OF ACCIDENTS
In addition to the caving of rock which caused the death of Thomas Hicks, there were two other serious accident at the Old Dominion last Friday. F. White, an employee in the framing shed, got his right hand caught in a planer and had his thumb and two nearest fingers cut off and also the tip of the little finger. Jesus Ramos, working at the smelter, was struck by a car and sustained a bad fracture of the right ankle. He had recovered only a few weeks before from serious injuries received by being run over by a car.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), March 29, 1906

MET DEATH IN A MINE
Deplorable Accident at the Old Dominion Ends Life of a Miner
Thomas Hicks, a miner, met instant death last Friday afternoon on the intermediate level between the eighth and ninth. As he was walking through the drift a quantity of rock fell from the roof, striking Hicks on the head and back and crushing the life out of him. Acting Coroner Hinson Thomas held an inquest over the body and a verdict of accidental death was returned.
Deceased was working his seventh shift in the mine when killed. He had been a resident of Globe only since last November, but notwithstanding he had many friends attracted to him by his genial nature and generosity. He is survived by two sons, living at Eureka, Nevada, and by a daughter, Mrs. Eli Banfield, of Globe.
A funeral service was held at the family residence on Monday afternoon at which Rev. A. K. Stabler, of the Methodist church, offictated and the church male quartette rendered appropriate music.
There was a large attendance of sorrowing friends. The remains were shipped on Tuesday to Eureka, Nevada, for interment, the deceased having resided there 30 years.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), March 29, 1906


BURIED IN ORE CHUTE
Shelby W. Jordan and John Trevethen Lose Their Lives In a Mine
A most deplorable and fatal accident happened in the Old Dominion mine last Monday, shortly alter the noon is hour, the victims being John Trevethen be and Shelby W. Jordan.
The young men were engaged in an attempt to clear a chute connecting the 10th and 11th levels, which had become choked with waste from the new pump station being cut on the 10th level. Powder had been exploded near the bottom of the chute to loosen the contents and after shooting, Trevethen and Jordan, who were alone in the intermediate slope between the two levels, entered the chute at that point for the purpose of dislodging the waste if possible. The on chute is only two feet square from the tenth level down to the stone mentioned and three feet square from there down to the eleventh, the men must have both been standing in the chute when the waste suddenly gave way under their feet and other broken rock, from fine to course sizes, fell into the chute on top of the unfortunate men, burying them between many tons of material.
The accident was quickly discovered by men working in the vicinity of the chute and the groans coming from the chute told of the fate of Jordon and Trevethen. Efforts were immediately started to rescue them, but without avail. It was found a slow and difficult undertaking to start the waste running again and no being could survive more than a few minutes under the great pressure to which Jordan and Trevethen were subjected.
It was two hours after the accident when the bodies of the men were recovered.
When taken from the chute they were in a close embrace, one of Trevethen's arms being around Jordan; the latter had a piece or steel in his hand. Both bodies were bruised and lacerated. The cuticle was almost entirely stripped from Trevethen's face, and his right arm was broken above the elbow and the left leg broken between the knee and hip. An inquest was held by Acting Coroner Hinson Thomas and a verdict returned by the jury of accidental death for which no one is to blame. Shelby W. Jordan was 23 years of age and his home was at Tulia, Texas, where his widowed mother resides and to which place the remains were snipped this morning.
John Trevethen was a native of Scorrier, Cornwall, England, and 22 years old. He had been in the United States two years and in Globe only two months. The funeral of Trevethen took place this afternoon from the undertaking parlors of F. L. Jones, under the auspices of Globe Miners' Union.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), April 12, 1906

TRAGEDY AT ROOSEVELT
Mrs Pearl Hunter Killed by the Accidental Discharge of a Pistol
At Roosevelt last Friday evening Mrs. Pearl Hunter, of Glaisure, Texas, was almost instantly killed by the accident discharged of a pistol. Mrs. Hunter, her husband and their little daughter, four years of age, had just arrived on the stage from Globe and were assigned a room on the second floor of J. D. Houston's lodging house. Mrs. Hunter, carrying her husband's coat in the pocket of which was a revolver, to go up the stairs when the pistol fell from the coat and was discharged, the ball entering the left nostril of the unfortunate woman and penetrating the brain, causing death within two or three An inquest was held by Acting Coroner J. C. Evans and jury returned a verdict of accidental death. The funeral took place at Roosevelt following day.
The family. were enroute from Texas to Rye to visit Mrs. Sam Haught, aunt of the deceased woman.Mrs. Hunter was twenty-one years of age and of prepossessing appearance. Her tragic death is deeply deplored at Roosevelt.
Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe City, Pinal County, Ariz.), April 19, 1906





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