BIOGRAPHIES

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Greene County Arkansas Genealogy Trails

If you have information to add on your family . Please Email me.

Tina Easley

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http://genealogytrails.com/ark/greene/

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ar/county/greene

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PIONEER FAMILIES

BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL MEMOIRS OF NORTHEAST ARK

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Allison, W. T. -Archer, T. J. -Ayers, H. L.

James Ball - B.A. Ball - Bleier, Joseph - Bobo, E. M. -Boyd, M. W. -Bray, E. S.

EDWARD EVERETT BURR

 Benjamin H. Crowley -Daniel, R. T. -

Hume Family-

E. D. Mclauchlin - Jackson John

Johnson, Colonel Benjamin A. - William Smith Luna

David Owens  - Stevens Family of Greene County

Tredaway, John C.


W. T. ALLISON

Transcribed by A. Newell, July 2006

Source: The Goodspeed Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, 1889, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, p. 122.

W. T. Allison was born on the 25th of December 1850 in Gibson County, Tenn., being the eldest of six children, two now living, born to John W. and Elizabeth (Harrington) Allison, who were born in the "Old North State" and emigrated to Gibson County, Tenn., in 1828, where the father engaged in cabinet making and farming, and made his home until 1867, when he moved to Weakley County, Tenn., where he now resides. In 1862 he enlisted in the army and served under Gen. Forrest until nearly the close of the war. He is a Democrat. His wife died in 1861.
W. T. Allison attended the schools of Gibson County, and in his youth also followed the plow, which occupation has been his chief calling ever since. In January 1876 he removed to Stoddard County, MO, and for a number of years was engaged in teaching school in Dexter and other places. While there he was married on the 8th of May, 1879 to Miss Minnie A. Walker, a native of Carroll County, Tenn., and a daughter of John and Sarah (Gibbons) Walker, also Tennesseeans and farmers by occupation. After residing in Stoddard County, Mo., for five years, the father died in 1877. The mother is still a resident of that county. Remaining in Stoddard County until the 5th of September 1882, Mr. Allison and wife then moved to Craighead County of this State, and after working as salesman in that county until March 1883, he came to Greene County, Ark., and purchased two years later eighty acres of improved land, to which he has since added 122 acres, making 202 acres in all, of which forty are under cultivation. He has taken an active part in politics, and votes the Democratic ticket, being the present justice of the peace and is filling his second term. Socially he is a member of the Agricultural Wheel at Haliday, and he and wife belong to the Baptist Church. Three of the four children born to their union are living: Clyde Eugenia, Dero Dean, and Vernie Pearl. Adolphus Burdette died in 1881 at the age of six months and three weeks. Mr. Allison is still engaged in teaching, having followed that occupation a part of four years in Greene County, and is considered one of the successful educators of his district.


T. J. ARCHER

Transcribed by A. Newell, July 2006

Source: The Goodspeed Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, 1889, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, p. 122.

Among the many sturdy "sons of the soil" of Greene County, Ark., who have attained wealth and prominence in their calling by the sweat of their brow, and who command an enviable social position, is Mr. Archer, the subject of this biography. He was born in Alabama in 1847 and is the youngest in a family of nine children born to the marriage of Rev. Phillip Archer and Artemisa Maxwell. The father in connection with his ministerial duties, was engaged in farming, and followed these two occupations until his death which occurred on the 10th of August 1868, his death being preceded by that of his wife by twenty-one years. The paternal grandfather left Alabama and settled in Arkansas during the early history of that State, being an extensive farmer for many years. His death occurred very suddenly.
T. J. Archer was reared to farm labor, and at the age of twenty-one years married Miss Lenora Amorine, of Alabama, and two years later came to Arkansas, settling first in Polk County, remaining one year, and then went to Monroe County, where he stopped five years. Since 1875 he has resided in Greene County, and the first few years was engaged in tilling rented land, and since 1885 has been the owner of 160 acres of land near the Cache bottoms, which was at first wild land but is now well improved, with seventy-five acres under fence and cultivation. His land is among the best in this section and is devoted principally to raising corn and cotton.
To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Archer have been born the following children: Philip William Thomas, who is married and resides on his father's place; Benjamin O., Adolphus, Osceola, Thome and Moses Ray, living; and John, Ida, Eldora, and Daniel, deceased.



H. L. AYERS

Transcribed by A. Newell, July 2007

Source: The Goodspeed Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, 1889, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, p. 122-123.

H. L. Ayers, a wealthy farmer of Greene County, Ark., was born in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1858, and is the second in a family of four children born to the marriage of Frank and Loddie (Williams) Ayers, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Tennessee.  At the early age of eight years H. L. Ayers left home and began depending on his own resources for obtaining a livelihood, and up to the age of seventeen years worked on farms and did teaming.  In 1879 he was married in Gibson County, Tenn., to Miss Addie Rosson, who was born, reared and educated in that State, being a daughter of John Rosson, who was known as one of the best farmers in West Tennessee, his farm of 300 acres being valued at $9,000.  After his marriage, Mr. Ayers worked with his father-in-law until 1883, when he made a trip to Arkansas and traveled over the greater portion of that State, as well as Missouri, the Indian Territory, Texas, New Mexico, Louisiana and Mississippi.  After one year he returned to West Tennessee and at the end of one year went to Fulton County, KY, where he resided two years.  In August, 1886 he moved his family to Greene County, Ark., where he engaged in the teaming business, which he followed for two years, and then acted as stave inspector for J. F. Hasty & Son for one year.  He next began farming on a tract of 160 acres of land in Greene County in December, 1888, and on this be immediately began to make improvements, and has introduced many new methods of farming.  He has thirty-five acres in corn, fifteen in oats, thirty-five in rye and oats for pasture, and two in potatoes.  On this farm is a fine orchard of 540 trees, mostly peach, beside a fine assortment of other fruit.  He is doing well in his calling and promises to become in time a wealthy man.  He and wife are the parents of one daughter, Lizzie May.


 James Ball

Source :  A History of Northwest Missouri , Volume 2 - Page 1281 - 1915

Brought up in the South, James Ball subsequently migrated with his family to Arkansas, settling in Greene County, where he took up land, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits till his death, at the age of fifty years. He served as a soldier in the Confederate army during the Civil war, his health becoming impaired to some extent through frequent exposure and hardships. He was a democrat in politics, and a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He married a Miss Moseley, the descendant of a prominent family of Virginia, and a relative of Mary Washington. Her parents were slave owners, and large landholders in Virginia. She died in December, 1865, loved and mourned by all who knew her. The children born of their union are as follows: Elizabeth C., deceased; Benjamin A., the special subject of this brief sketch; William C., deceased; James Marian, who served in the Confederate army as a member of the Fifth Arkansas Infantry, which became a part of General Hood's army, was killed at the bloody battle of Franklin; John Everett, who died in Howell County,'Missouri; Mrs. Francis Ludlow Ball, of Hughes County, Oklahoma; and Mary Ball, Greene County, Arkansas.

Spending his boyhood days in South Carolina and Arkansas, Benjamin A. Ball was educated in the public schools. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war he enlisted in the Confederate service under Col. C. D. Cross, his regiment being assigned to Gen. Sydney E. Johnston's brigade, and after the death of that brave commander being placed under charge of General Bragg. With his comrades Mr. Ball took part in the engagement at Franklin, Tennessee; was wounded at the battle of Murphysboro; and in Georgia saw much service. Returning to his home in Greene County, Arkansas, at the close of the war, he began work as a tiller of the soil. Coming to Missouri in 1867, Mr. Ball located in DeKalb County, which has since been his home. In 1884 he bought .his present farm on section five, Lafayette township, and now has a finely improved and highly productive farm of two hundred and ninety acres, which he is carrying on with both pleasure and profit, being engaged in general farming and stock raising.

Mr. Ball married, in 1867, in Greene County, Arkansas, Mary F. Elrod, the descendant of an old Virginia family, and a daughter of Hiram Elrod, her parents being pioneer settlers of Arkansas, where they located in 1857. Both Mr. and Mrs. Elrod have passed to the life beyond. Six children have been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Ball, namely: Mary C., of St. Joseph, Missouri; Dora, a student at Columbia; Mrs. Lulu Virginia Dooley, of Dearborn, Platte County, Missouri; Laura E., wife of a Mr. Steel, of Buchanan County, Missouri; James Edward, of St. Joseph; and Benjamin A., Jr. The four daughters are at present in the teaching profession in Northwestern Missouri.

In his political affiliations Mr. Ball is a straight forward democrat. Religiously he is an active and valued member of the Christian Church, and an interested worker in its affairs.

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B. A. BALL

A farmer and stock raiser,  post office Stewartsville, is a native of Abbeyville District, South Carolina, and was born on the 6th day of September, 1842. He received a common school education, and at the age of fifteen years, with his parents, he moved to Greene County, Arkansas, and assisted his father on a farm until the spring of 1861. He then enlisted in Company E., Fifth Regiment, Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, and did guard duty until the following fall, when he was mustered into the Confederate service. He participated in the battles of Nashville, Tennessee, and Shiloh, and was wounded at the last named place. He was also at the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, and Kenesaw Mountain, and afterward returned to his home, in 1865. Mr. B. remained at home with his parents until he was married, on the 26th day of December 1866, to Miss Nancy F. Elwood, a native of Grayson County, Virginia. She was born on the 16th day of December, 1855, and, with her parents, moved to Arkansas. Mr. and Mrs. Ball came to this county in the fall of 1868, and for one year resided near Stewartsville. They then moved to DeKalb County, in 1869, and lived there until 1875, at that time returning to Clinton County. The subject of this sketch rented land, and, in 1877, made his first purchase of land, and is now the owner of 200 acres of well improved land, surrounded and subdivided by fine osage hedges. They have been blessed with a family of six children, all of whom are living: Mary C, Dora I., Lulu V., James E., Laura E., and Bennie.

Source - History of Clinton Co. , Missouri - 1881



JOSEPH BLEIER

Transcribed by A. Newell, July 2007

Source: The Goodspeed Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, 1889, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, p. 123.

Joseph Bleier, proprietor of the Vienna Bakery, at Paragould, was born in Bohemia, Austria, December 17, 1846, and is the son of Ignatz and Anna (Freitle) Bleier, also natives of Austria.  The parents are still living  in their native country, and the father follows the occupation of a farmer.  In their family were eight children:  Joseph, Frank, Robert, Ignatz, John and Otto (twins), Barbara and Anna.  Joseph Bleier received his education in Austria, and remained on the farm with his father until fourteen years of age, when he began learning the baker's trade.  In 1867 when in his twentieth year, he took passage from Bremen to America on the steamer, "Ocean," which was stranded one year later, and landed at New York City.  He came on to Cincinnati, where he worked for about eight years in and around the city.  He then went to Chicago, remained there about three years and then engaged in business for himself at Joliet, Ill.  In 1886 he came to Paragould and immediately engaged in his present business, at which he has been very successful.  He is an excellent baker and keeps a good stock of everything carried in his line.  He was married in October, 1873 to Miss Mary Gaker, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, and a daughter of John and Rosa (Schleer) Gaker, who were natives of Germany and early settlers of Ohio.  To Mr. and Mrs. Bleier have been born five children, three now living:  John K., Frank and Joseph E.  The two deceased were Robert and Mathew.  Mr. and Mrs. Bleiser are members of the Catholic Church.



E. M. BOBO

Transcribed by A. Newell, July 2007

Source: The Goodspeed Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, 1889, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, p. 123-124.

E. M. Bobo.  Among Greene County's self-made, enterprising and successful citizens, none deserve more favorable mention than the subject of this sketch, E. M. Bobo, who was born in South Carolina in 1840.  His father, A. P. Bobo, came from the Palmetto State to Arkansas in 1857, and entered 160 acres of land, upon which he lived engaged in farming and stock raising until his dath in 1886.  He was held in favor by his fellow farmers, and was for two years coroner of Greene County.  Of his family of seven childen, two sons and five daughters, four are still living, one in North Carolina, two in Texas, and one in Arkansas.  They are Mary (Bobo) Prince, E. M. Bobo, Virginia (Bobo) Swindle, and Spotana (Bobo) Love.   E. M. Bobo was seventeen years of age when he came with his father to this State, where he has since made his home.  He has about 154 acres of land, with eighty under cultivation, forty of which he has cleared himself, and his farm is well stocked with horses, cattle, hogs and fine sheep.  October 2, 1861 Mr. Bobo enlisted in the Fifth Arkansas Infantry, and though twice wounded, continued in service during the entire war.  He and wife have reared a family of nine children:  M. A., born in 1862; Matilda, born in 1866; G. M., born in 1867; Olive, born in 1869, Victoria, born in 1871; Arthur E., born in 1872; J. E., born in 1874; Alice, born in 1875, and Ada, in 1878.  Mr. Bobo belongs to the Agricultural Wheel, and he and wife and family are active members of the Methodist Church.



M. W. BOYD

Transcribed by A. Newell, July 2007

Source: The Goodspeed Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, 1889, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, p. 124.

M. W. Boyd, (deceased) was an enterprising and industrous farmer of Greene County, Ark.  He was born in Tennessee on the 12th of October, 1846, and came to Arkansas with his father when a child, where the latter died shortly after.  In 1868 M. W. Boyd was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss M. J. McMillin, who was born in the "Palmetto State" and came to Arkansas with her parents, W. P. and Adaline (Cooley) McMillin in 1853, settling on what is known as the old Willcockson estate, consisting of 500 acres.  Here Mr. McMillin greatly improved his farm, became a well-known citizen of the county, and died on the 19th of May, 1862.  After his marriage Mr. Boyd began improving his farm on an extensive scale by erecting good buildings, setting out orchards, etc., and did considerable in the way of stock raising.  He was interested in all things that promised to promote the welfare of his section, and was a liberal contributor to churches and schools.  He died on the 27th of May 1885, leaving his wife and children one of the best farms in the county, on which is a roomy and substantial dwelling-house, surrounded by ornamental trees and shrubbery.  Mrs. Boyd is ably managing the farm, and besides the usual crops is engaged in raising cotton.  She and Mr. Boyd became the parents of the following children:  Onie, Alice, Clara and Selma.



E. S. BRAY

Transcribed by A. Newell, July 2007

Source: The Goodspeed Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, 1889, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, Chicago, p. 124.

E. S. Bray, postmaster at Paragould and cashier of the Bank of Paragould, is classed among the prominent and successful business men of that town.  He was born in Chatham County, N. C. and is the son of Solomon and Sarah (Brooks) Bray, natives of North Carolina, where they passed their entire lives.  They were the parents of nine children, seven now living, three in N. C., two in TN, and two in AR.  E. S. Bray was but a lad when his parents died, and he went to live with an elder brother in TN, where he remained until grown.  He received his education in that State and remained engaged in assisting on the farm until 1878, when he came to AR.  Previous to this, in 1869, he married Miss Margaret E. Cox, a native of TN, and after coming to AR he located three miles from Paragould and followed agricultural pursuits until July 14, 1885, when he was appointed postmaster.  He is the owner of 440 acres of good land with about fifty acres under cultivation, and has made many improvements since purchasing the farm.  He has been magistrate for a number of years, and was one of the enumerators of the census of Greene County in 1880.  He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and represented his lodge at the Grand Lodge.  He is also a member of the K. of P.  He and wife belong to the Baptist Church.


R. T. DANIEL

Transcribed and contributed by Frances Cooley

R. T. Daniel, a merchant and farmer of Clark Township, Greene County, was born in 1837 in Tennessee, and is the fifth of a family of nine children born to Ephraim and Pennie (Mundson) Daniel, who were Tennesseeans. The father was a sturdy son of the soil, and when our subject was a child removed to Mississippi, where he was engaged in farming until 1855.  At that date he came to Greene County, Ark.,  and settled on the farm on which R. T. Daniel is now residing, which consisted of 200 acres. He improved this farm very much and soon had quite an extensive tract under cultivation and furnished with good buildings.
R. T. Daniel remained with his parents until twenty-five years of age, then marrying Miss Elizabeth Pilmore, who was born in Mississippi and came with her parents to Arkansas at an early day. Soon after he erected a cottage on his father's farm. and began tilling the soil for himself on forty acres of  land purchased from his father. Later he bought eighty acres more. At his father's death, in 1870, he inherited the remainder.
When the war broke out he enlisted in Capt. Anderson's Company, and was with Gen. Shelby on his raid through Missouri, and was in the battle of Cape Girardeau, where he was wounded. He was also at Helena, Devall's Bluff. Little Rock, Camden and Saline River. While with Price on his raid through Missouri he was in the engagements at Iron Mountain, Independence, Blue Lick, Boonville and Kansas City.  He then retreated to Texas and surrendered at Pine Bluff. After his return home he resumed farming successfully, continuing until 1887, when he received a stroke of paralysis, and has not been able to do hard labor since.
He is now conducting a general mercantile store on his farm, which is netting him a fair income. Sixty acres of his place are under cultivation, and he devotes it to raising corn, cotton, etc. He and wife are the parents of the following children: James, who is married to
Miss Nancy Fielder;  Eliza Jane, wife of Jeff Adams;  Henry, Thomas, Pollie, and Sarah Elizabeth. The family worship in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Daniel has served as school director and has always taken a deep interest in educational matters, as well as all other worthy enterprises.  
Source:  Northeast Arkansas Biographies and Historical Memoirs.
 
 


COLONEL BENJAMIN A. JOHNSON

Transcribed and Contributed by:  Frances Cooley

Benjamin A. Johnson, who lives at Crowley in this county, was a native of the state of Tennessee and his first wife was Sarah E. Fielder, of Hickman County of that state.
The writer married a younger sister of Mrs. Johnson, she being Miss R.L. Fielder.

Another sister was married to John C. Treadway, and was the mother of Thomas, William, and Ed Treadway, of Paragould, and of Mrs. McFall, of near Camp Ground
Another of the sisters of the Tennessee Fielders was married to Rev. E. H. Bratton, and she was the mother of Mrs. Sallie Mangrum, William, Thomas and Manda Bratton.
These ladies were sisters of Thomas and Polk Fielder.
Colonel Johnson enlisted in the Confederate Army in Missouri and was made Lieut. Col. in Reeve's regiment of Missouri cavalry, a most daring and indomitable body of soldiers. They made their mark where they went and victory perched upon their arms on many a bloody field. At the close of the war Col. Johnson came to Polland, now in Clay County, but which was then in Greene County.
In 1869 he came down to the Dr. Croft farm and soon afterward bought and moved onto the old Ed Bratton homestead, where he lived for several years and then purchased the Mart Gramling place and moved to it, and resides there at the present time.
Col. Johnson is strong and active for one of his age and is now living with his third wife.
He is a consistant member of the Baptist church, a great student of current news and takes a lively interest in political affairs, being an old line Jeffersonian Democrat.
He appears satisfied to spend the rest of his days on Sugar Creek, surrounded by his children, grand-children and great grand-children, drinking the finest water in the world, eating big red apples and smoking home-made tobacco.

B. A. Johnson, a wealthy farmer and stockman, of Greene County, Ark., was born in Hickman County, Tenn., in 1834, and is the fifth in a family of ten children born to Granville M. and Nereusa (Gardner) Johnson, who were Tennesseeans, the father being a farmer by occupation, and a wealthy citizen. He was justice of the peace in Tennessee for many years, and died in that State in 1884, followed by his wife some two years later. The paternal and maternal grandfathers were Virginians, who removed to Tennessee at an early day, the former reaching this State in 1812. Here they both died.
B. A. Johnson was reared to farm labor, and had very poor educational advantages in his youth. He remained at home until attaining his majority, and then for several years was engaged in brick-laying.  At the age of twenty-one he was wedded to Miss Sarah E. Fielder, a native of Tennessee. In 1855 he located in Wayne County, Mo., where, in 1860, he bought a farm, and embarked in agriculture, continuing until the war broke out, when he raised a company of Missouri State Guards, of which he was elected first lieutenant. He soon resigned this position, and enlisted as a private in the Confederate army, being elected first lieutenant of Reeves' Cavalry Company of independent scouts. He was soon sent east of the Mississippi, and was in the battles of Memphis, Corinth, Iuka, Jacinto, Richmond, Ky., Perryville, after which he was transferred to the western department of Arkansas, where he was detailed to raise a regiment, of which he was made lieutenant-colonel.  In this capacity he participated in the battles of Little Rock, Pine Bluff and Saline River, and was then with Price on his Missouri raid, taking part in every battle fought on this trip. During the war his family removed from Missouri south to Clay County, Ark., and here Mr. Johnson went after the cessation of hostilities, where he remained three years, and then came to Cache Township, Greene County, Ark, where they are still residing.
He purchased a partially improved farm of 160 acres, opened about sixty acres, and in 1871 purchased 160 acres three miles south of his first place, to which he has added 170 acres, and has cleared 100 acres, having about 200 under cultivation. In addition to these tracts he has about 500 acres in another locality. He does general farming, but gives the most of his attention to the raising of corn and cotton. He is an active politician, a substantial supporter of churches and schools, and he and family attend the Baptist Church, of which he and his wife are members.
His family consists of the following children: John W., born February 17, 1856, who is married and resides on his father's land;  William G., born February 9, 1858, also married and living in the township;  Barbara Etta Bell, born October 5, 1860, wife of E. R. C. Biggs, a resident of Woodruff County;  Robert E. Lee, born October 21, 1863, died in 1864;  Adelaide, born September 24, 1865, wife of P. Eubanks, of Greene County;  Samantha C., born August 4, 1867;  Victoria R., wife of James Light, born July 19, 1869;  Sarah N., born October 10,
1871; Benjamin O, born June 10, 1874; and Lizzie B., born August 11, 1877.  
Source:  Northeast Arkansas Biographies and Historical Memoirs.

                                                                                             DAVID OWENS
 

Mr. Owen affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Mutual Protective League of Hornersville. In politics lie is a Democrat, and is a member of the Methodist church, South. He and his wife are the parents of the following family: Suda, born December 30, 1890, now the wife of Thomas Hitt; Viola, born in 1891, died at the age of fifteen; Charles, born in 1893; Mary, born in 1897; Mattie, born in 1899; and Thomas, born in 1901.

Mr. Owen's parents were Rev. John Sylvester and South Carolina Owen, the former a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, during all of his active life. lie was born in Tennessee and died at Caruthersville, Missouri, in 1899, aged fifty-five years. He was a Mason and active in lodge affairs. His wife had died at the age of forty-two years, in 1887, in Arkansas. David W. Owen was the second of ten children, of whom six are living: Daniel, of Mississippi county, Arkansas; Lucinda (Lomax), of Dunklin county, Missouri; Willie, also of Dunklin county; Catherine (Busby), of Noble, Clay county, Arkansas; Walter, of Dunklin county, Missouri; and Caretha (Pitts), also of Dunklin county, Missouri. Mrs. David W. Owen was born in Greene county, Arkansas, in 1872, a daughter of John and Sarah Rowe, both now deceased, but early residents and farmers of Greene county, Arkansas.

Source - History of southeast Missouri - 1912

JOHN C. TREDAWAY

Transcribed and contributed by Francis Cooley

John C. Tredaway is one of the successful farmers of Union Township, and one of its oldest settlers. He was born in Pendleton District, S. C., in 1812, and is a son of Richard and Nancy (Smith) Tredaway, who were born in Georgia and South Carolina, the former's birth occurring in 1787. He grew to manhood in his native State, was married in South Carolina, and after residing in Tennessee for about ten years, returned to Georgia, where he was engaged in farming until his death in 1851. His wife was born in 1794 and died in 1871, and both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Of their ten children, eight lived to be grown, and seven are living at the present time.
The maternal grandfather came from Europe with two brothers and settled in Georgia, but it is not known where the others settled. He was a farmer, and lived and died in the state of his adoption, his death occurring when between sixty and seventy years of age. His wife lived to be nearly 100 years old, and also died in Georgia. She was an earnest member of the Baptist Church. To them were born five children, the father of our subject being the eldest.
John C. Tredaway, who was the second of his parents' children, grew to manhood in East Tennessee. At the age of twenty-one years he commenced for himself, engaging in the shoemaker's trade, and followed this occupation in connection with farming until he went to Georgia, when he opened a wagon shop, which he managed with farming eight years.
In 1856 he came to Arkansas and located on a farm on Crowley's Ridge in Clay County, where he remained for about sixteen years, subsequently spending three years in Boone County, Ark. Here his wife died on the 12th of November, 1872, her birth occurring in South Carolina November 6, 1808, her maiden name being Rebecca Chapman. They were married August 21, 1884, and became the parents of ten children, four of whom are alive. The names of the children are: John W., who died in Tennessee; Asbury F., who first joined the Confederate Army, and later, on account of his wife, joined the Union forces, went South, and as he was never afterward heard from, was supposed to have been killed; Francis M., who served in the Confederate Army and died in Mississippi, being buried there with 10,000 other soldiers; William B., also a Confederate soldier, was taken sick and died somewhere in the South; James R., who sickened and died in
Greene County, and was buried at Oak Bluff; Nancy E., wife of William Wagner, residing in Clay County, Ark.; Sidney S., a resident of Clay County; Sarah A., wife of Benjamin Copeland, of Clay County; Mary A., wife of Buck Fain, of Boone County, Ark., and an infant not named.
Mr. Tredaway was married a second time to Amanda Fielder, who was born in Hickman County, Tenn., in 1840. To them six children have been born: Thomas F., John W. W., Edward S., Mary and Martha (twins), and an infant that died in childhood, not named.
Mr. Tredaway and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, the latter having been a professed Christian for fifty-eight years, and an active worker in the church. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., and in his political views is a Democrat.
Source:  Northeast Arkansas Biographies and Historical Memoirs.
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Source - Public Documents 1903

James Wyse Kuykendall , principal of the preparatory department, was born in Gainesville, Arkansas, September 12, 1873. His school work has been almost wholly in the public schools of this state and Texas. For four years prior to coming to the University he served a's deputy State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and in 1898 was appointed to fill the inexpired term of State Superintendent Jordan. He has held his present position since June, 1901.

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Source - Sheild and Diamond Pi Kappa Alpha 1908

Our Grand Chancellor

WALTER GARRETT RIDDICK was born on September 13th, 1883, at Gainesville, Arkansas, the second child and eldest son of James Edward Riddick and Emma Wayde Mack Riddick, and spent the early part of his childhood at Gainesville, his father being judge of the Circuit Court of that district. Later, however, his father was elected a Judge of the Supreme Court of Arkansas which necessitated his moving to Little Rock, and it was in Little Rock that Brother Riddick spent the last years of his childhood and received his preparatory education, he having graduated with high honors from the Peabody High School of that city.

In September, 1901, he entered Washington and Lee University at Lexington, Virginia, and in the early fall of that year he was initiated into Pi Kappa Alpha by Pi Chapter, the first initiate of that chapter since its revival which occurred early in the same year. After spending two or three years at Washington and Lee in the academic department, during which time he led many of his classes and was considered one of the most brilliant students at that institution, he had a dispute with some members of the faculty and left the institution returning to his home in Little Rock, Arkansas, and never returned to the University, though he still maintains a great love for his Alma Mater and is an enthusiastic alumnus and one of which the faculty of that famous institution is justly proud.

Upon his return to Arkansas he taught for a year or more and after that time entered the employ of the Sandefur & Waters Real Estate Company as cashier, holding at the same time a similar position with the Little Rock office

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William Worth Hume, born in Indiana, December 1, 1849, married Elvira Stallings, had two sons and one daughter as follows: Bertha B., born September 16, 1871, married Charles Spangenberg in 1897, died July, 20 1899, leaving one daughter, Geraldine. Dr. H. C. Hume, born January 1, 1873, married Lily Land of Carmi, Ills., lives now at Paragould, Arkansas, is president of North Arkansas Oil & Feed Co. Had one son, Harry Hume, who died in 1897.

A. G. Hume, is a merchant at Paragould, Arkansas, he was born November 12, 1874, is unmarried.

Ben Procter Hume, son by second marriage, born April 8, 1861, married Anna Stallings, had one daughter who lives at New Harmony, Ind.

Elizabeth Hume, born in Kentucky, March 13,1825, married

Stephens; had four children, one son Ezra, a Real Estate

Agent who has assisted the author in this work.

Mrs. Anna C. Wilson contributed the following:

Elizabeth Stephens, daughterol Wm. and Betsy Hume, born March 13, 1825, died August 20, 1882; had five children all living but one. Almira Inez Stephens, dead, Orien W. Stephens, Ezra A. Stephens, Annie P. Wilson, Flora B. Stallings.

************

William Smith Luna, of Paragould , Ark., a well known attorney, read law in the office of Faulkner & Frederick, of Ripley, Miss., and there was admitted to the bar on November 9, 1880. He removed to Arkansas  on January 3, 1882. began his practice I; at Gainesville and there prospered until jj 1884, when he located in Texas. Not being satisfied with his location there, he returned to Arkansas in 1888, and since his leturn has practiced with fair success at Paragould. He served as city attorney of Paragould for two terms and has been a school director for the past five years. He was married in 1885 to Rettie J. Kuykendall of Gainesville, Ark., and they have two children, Mary and Wellborn Swinburne. Mr. Lima has enjoyed a fair share of the practice at Paragould for many years and his service as city attorney was marked by proficiency and fidelity. He has labored unceasingly for the advancement of the public school system of the town, and during his terms as member of the school directorate, has contributed materially to its present high state of efficiency.

********

E. D. Mclauchlin. A young attorney, already well established in practice at Blanchard, E. D. McLauchlin was for nearly ten years before entering the law engaged in the mercantile business at Denver, Oklahoma.

He was born December 27, 1885, at Love Station, De Soto County, Mississippi. His father was R. B. McLauchlin, who was born in Mississippi, in 1847, and was left an orphan by the death of his mother when he was seven years of age. His father, who died five years earlier, had emigrated from Scotland to North Carolina. R. B. McLauchlin was reared in Mississippi, and became dependent upon his own resources at an early age. He was married in Do Soto County, Mississippi, to Miss S. E. Perry, who is now living with her son, Dr. J. R. McLauchlin, ten miles east of Norman, Oklahoma. In 1889 R. B. McLauchlin moved with his family to Clarendon, Arkansas, and ho died there in 1896. For many years he was an active school man, later a farmer, and at the time of his death was serving as county surveyor of Monroe County, Arkansas. He was a democrat, and very active in the Baptist Church, and fraternally was associated with the Knights of Honor. His wife was born in De Soto County, Mississippi, in 1843. Their children were: Emma, deceased, whose husband, Robert Haines, is a music teacher at Clarendon, Arkansas; D. D., who was actively associated with his brother, E. D. McLauchlin, in merchandising until his death; Mattic married Henry Harris and both are now deceased; R. J. lives as- a farmer near Paragould, Arkansas; Fannie is the wife of John Hatcher, a farmer near Chickasha, Oklahoma; Sallie, who died at the age of eighteen; Alice, wife of Sam Cooper, a farmer at Paragould, Arkansas; Essie, who died at the age of twenty-four, was the wife of Tom Vaughn, a teacher in the public schools at Cordell, Oklahoma; J. R., a physician and surgeon at Denver, Oklahoma, ten miles east of Norman, who is a graduate M. D. from the Oklahoma State University; and E. D. McLauchlin, the youngest of the ten children.

The last named attended the public schools in Clarendon, Arkansas, and continued his education in Paragould in Greene County, when his mother removed to that town in 1898. When twenty-eight years old he left school and at once engaged in the mercantile business at Denver, Oklahoma, with his brother, D. D., under the firm name of McLauchlin Brothers. His older brother, D. D. McLauchlin, died February 7, 1914. At that time the junior member of the firm sold the business and during 1914-15 was a student of law in the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, where he graduated LL. B. in 1915. After four months at Norman, Oklahoma, he took the bar examination and was admitted to practice in June, and on the first day of July opened his office at Blanchard. He has his offices in the court house and his ability has already attracted a profitable practice, especially in civil cases. He has been called upon to act as special county judge and is now city attorney for Blanchard.

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Benjamin H. Crowley, of Paragould. Ark., a distinguished lawyer, citizen, soldier, and statesman, was born in Greene county. Ark., October 28, 1836: son of Samuel Crowley, who died during the infancy of our subject, and a grandson of Benjamin Crowley, who came to Arkansas from Kentucky in 1821. and from whom Crowley Ridge derived its name. Mr. Crowley attended the public schools and the Wallace institute, of Van Buren, Ark., and farmed in Scott county until the opening of the war. ln 1861 be enlisted in Capt. John Dillard's company, organized at Fort Smith, and this command hecame the body guard of Gen. Ben McCulloch, Dillard having served with McCulloch in the .Mexican war. When McCulloch was killed, Dillard's company was disbanded and General Crowlex joined Company H, Nineteenth Arkansas infantry and served under Gen. Albert I'ike in the Indian country. Later he was transferred to Gen. Thomas C Hindman's command and became first lieutenant of his company. He was stationed at Arkansas Post, promoted to a captaincy and when that fort fell, made his escape and served until captured near Fort Smith. General Crowley was a prisoner of war two months at the old penitentiary at Little Rock, four months at St. Louis, and at Johnson's Island until January 9, 1865, when he was exchanged. During the rest of the war he served as captain of the body guard of General Fagan. After the war he returned to Greene county, farmed, taught school, studied law and was admitted to the bar. General Crowley has had a most successful career as a lawyer, and has practiced in all the courts with great distinction. He has been prominently identified with the state militia and has held many important positions. He was appointed by Governor Conway a lieutenant in Companv D, Seventeenth Arkansas infantry; by Governor Garland, in 1875, colonel of the state militia, and by Governor Jones, in 1897, brigadier-general of the Second brigade of Arkansas state troops. In 1893 he was appointed by President Cleveland, receiver of public money at Little Rock : in 1895 by Secretary of the Interior Hoke Smith, appraiser of unsold government lands and of the public lands of Hot Springs, Ark. He was elected to the legislature in 1872; served as a member of the constitutional convention of 1874; member of the state senate in 1877 and 1879 and again in 1889 and 1891. He is a leading Mason and has taken the Thirty-second degree of the Scottish Kite. General Crowley has been married twice, first to Elizabeth J. Crowley, of Missouri, who died in 1880, and the second time to Rosa L. Fielder, of Hickman county. Tenn., who died January 8. 1901. He is the father-of the following seven children: Victoria V. , wife of J. D. Sibert. a well known minister of the Methodist church: Cynthia H., wife of Prof. L. W. Zook, of Greene county: Nannie P., wife of H. R. Wood, of Paragould, Ark.: Lucien G., a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Greene county: Belle: Renona H.: and Sallie A., a graduate of Thompson's classical institute of Paragould. General Crowley is one of the leading citizens of Arkansas and has occupied a prominent place in many walks of life. As a lawyer, a citizen, a soldier and a statesman, he has commanded the respect and esteem of all classes.

Source - The Provience and the States 1904

___________

EDWARD EVERETT BURR

Burr was born in Ohio January 18, 1895.  His family later moved to Paragould (Greene County), Arkansas, probably shortly before the turn of the century.  He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, where some of his work (probably sculpture) was exhibited in the 1920s and 1930s.  He remained in Chicago the rest of his life, working as a successful commercial artist.  He was also noted for sculpture, serious painting, and architectural rendering, and is perhaps best remembered for designing the Arkansas centennial half-dollar in 1936.

His father, George Alfred Burr was a prominent lawyer in Paragould for twenty-five years before becoming a Methodist minister. 


Source - History of Oklahoma 1916

E. D. Mclauchlin. A young attorney, already well established in practice at Blanchard, E. D. McLauchlin was for nearly ten years before entering the law engaged in the mercantile business at Denver, Oklahoma.

He was born December 27, 1885, at Love Station, De Soto County, Mississippi. His father was R. B. McLauchlin, who was born in Mississippi, in 1847, and was left an orphan by the death of his mother when he was seven years of age. His father, who died five years earlier, had emigrated from Scotland to North Carolina. R. B. McLauchlin was reared in Mississippi, and became dependent upon his own resources at an early age. He was married in Do Soto County, Mississippi, to Miss S. E. Perry, who is now living with her son, Dr. J. R. McLauchlin, ten miles east of Norman, Oklahoma. In 1889 R. B. McLauchlin moved with his family to Clarendon, Arkansas, and ho died there in 1896. For many years he was an active school man, later a farmer, and at the time of his death was serving as county surveyor of Monroe County, Arkansas. He was a democrat, and very active in the Baptist Church, and fraternally was associated with the Knights of Honor. His wife was born in De Soto County, Mississippi, in 1843. Their children were: Emma, deceased, whose husband, Robert Haines, is a music teacher at Clarendon, Arkansas; D. D., who was actively associated with his brother, E. D. McLauchlin, in merchandising until his death; Mattic married Henry Harris and both are now deceased; R. J. lives as- a farmer near Paragould, Arkansas; Fannie is the wife of John Hatcher, a farmer near Chickasha, Oklahoma; Sallie, who died at the age of eighteen; Alice, wife of Sam Cooper, a farmer at Paragould, Arkansas; Essie, who died at the age of twenty-four, was the wife of Tom Vaughn, a teacher in the public schools at Cordell, Oklahoma; J. R., a physician and surgeon at Denver, Oklahoma, ten miles east of Norman, who is a graduate M. D. from the Oklahoma State University; and E. D. McLauchlin, the youngest of the ten children.

The last named attended the public schools in Clarendon, Arkansas, and continued his education in Paragould in Greene County, when his mother removed to that town in 1898. When twenty-eight years old he left school and at once engaged in the mercantile business at Denver, Oklahoma, with his brother, D. D., under the firm name of McLauchlin Brothers. His older brother, D. D. McLauchlin, died February 7, 1914. At that time the junior member of the firm sold the business and during 1914-15 was a student of law in the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, where he graduated LL. B. in 1915. After four months at Norman, Oklahoma, he took the bar examination and was admitted to practice in June, and on the first day of July opened his office at Blanchard. He has his offices in the court house and his ability has already attracted a profitable practice, especially in civil cases. He has been called upon to act as special county judge and is now city attorney for Blanchard.

In politics he is a democrat and is affiliated with Camp No. 10835 of the Modern Woodmen of America at Franklin, Oklahoma. On January 24, 1910, at Norman, he married Miss Ethel Cohee, whose father, J. K. Cohee, is a retired farmer at Capitol Hill, Oklahoma.


Source - History and Times of the Farmers Union 1909

Dickinson, M. S., Conway, State Secretary-Treasurer of Arkansas.—Born on a farm in Greene County, Arkansas, May u, 1879; attended the public schools of the county until fourteen years of age, then attended the Thompson Classical Institute at Paragould; later took a course in the University of the South at' Sewanee, Tennessee, and the Hospital Medical College at Memphis. Since reaching maturity, has been engaged in various occupations—as farming, teaching in rural, city and private schools, salesman, politics (Democrat), having served as County Examiner of Schools in Greene County four years; President of the Northeast Teachers' Association, also President of County Teachers' Association; joined the Union during the summer of 1905, at Lorado, Greene County; served as President of Marmaduke Local Union, Marmaduke District Union, and the Greene County Union; elected Secretary of the Arkansas State Union to succeed Ben L. Griffin, August 5, 1908. He is a good speaker and a splendid writer, and his varied experience makes him ready at all times to defend the Union cause. He belongs to a number of secret orders, in which he takes an active interest. He is, at the present time, ably editing the Arkansas Union Tribune.


Source - Pioneers and Makers of Arkansas 1908

We have been told by Arkansas historians that Benjamin Johnson was the youngest member of a family of distinguished men.  We have also been told that Richard Mentor Johnson served fifteen years in the lower house of Congress, while the records show a service of twenty years. The order of a man's birth and the number of years he may serve in a given position may not be important; but where they are stated as historic truths they should at least be accurate. Another narrative makes a brother of Judge Benjamin Johnson kill the great Indian Chief, Tecumseh, and another brother serve as Vice President of the United States, when the truth is that these brothers were identical.

Judge Benjamin Johnson was born in Scott County, Kentucky, on the 22d day of July, 1784, and was married to Matilda Williams in the same county on September 8, 1811. The Judge died at Lexington, Kentucky, on October 2, 1849, and was buried in Mt. Holly Cemetery at Little Rock. Eight children were born to Judge Johnson and his good wife, Matilda.

Daughter of Judge Bengamin Jonhnson and Matilda , Juliette E. Johnson, born October 12, 1812, married to Ambrose Hundley Sevier at Little Rock on September 26, 1827, and died on March 16, 1845, being buried at Little Rock. Four children were the fruits of this marriage, Annie M. Sevier, Mattie J. Sevier, Elizabeth Sevier and Ambrose H. Sevier. Of these, Annie M. Sevier married General and Governor Thomas J. Churchill on July 31, 1849, and became the mother of six children : Abbie, Samuel J., Ambrose S., Juliet J., Emily and Matilda.

Ambrose Hundley Sevier owed much to heredity. His family on the paternal side had for more than a thousand years occupied places of honor and trust in both church and State in the great kingdom of France. His great uncle, John Sevier, had carved for himself an immortal name in the creation of the State of Franklin and the making of the great commonwealth of Tennessee. The father of John Sevier, who spelled his name Xavier, its French form, was born in France, but on account of religious differences emigrated to Rockingham County, Virginia, where in 1745 John Sevier was born. In this same rugged county of Virginia, the bee hive of restless and ambitious spirits, was born Valentine Sevier, another immortal Tennessee name, and also several other brothers' among whom was the grandfather of A. H. Sevier.

John Sevier's fame rests upon the confidence of his friends and neighbors, engendered by his unselfish and patriotic devotion to duty. Wherever John Sevier went twere went all his neighbors and friends, and out of his pocket, which was never reimbursed, went the money which these friends and neighbors needed in the execution of their enterprises. John Sevier was the idol of his neighbors and friends and knew men as few other men of his age knew them. Valentine Sevier sacrificed boy after boy in the East Tennessee conflicts with the Indians; with but two left, he sent these into the Cumberland district to help his friends there, where they were both butchered by the savages. In the agony of his heart the old man wrote back to a brother in Rockingham County: "Send me one or two of your boys. My boys are all gone, except some little ones they left, and the old man is so lonely." The wail of Ossian is no whit grander than this wail of old Valentine Sevier in the mountains of East Tennessee. In answer to this request, one nephew, with his wife, moved to Greene County, Tennessee, to comfort the declining years of this majestic old uncle, who was, with the exception of his brother, John, the proudest figure of that day.

CLASSICAL EDUCATION IN THE MOUNTAINS.

This boy, the father of Ambrose Hundley Sevier, married in Greene County, Susan Conway, whose nephews afterwards, became famous in Arkansas. In Greene County, in the year 1801, at the very time when his great uncle, John, was governor of the commonwealth, A. H. Sevier was born. For nineteen years he lived in Greene County and was there educated. He was classically educated in the mountains of East Tennessee. And he who conceives that a classical education may only be had inside great collegiate walls needs to undeceive himself. He who believes, like Alfred Bushnel Hart, professor of history in Harvard College, that the puritans of New England furnished the leaven which leavened the whole lump of American civilization, needs to undeceive himself. The civilization of the great West and South owes less to puritanism, to New England, than to any other cause. In fact, the very purest puritanism existed in other colonies, and while the narrow puritanism of New England made more noise, the broader puritanism of the other colonies produced a greater effect.

When Doak, the great Presbyterian puritan of North Carolina, established a college in East Tennessee before 1800, he was planting the leaven which should contribute most to Tennessee civilization. This college had the same Virgil, the same Caesar, the same Xenophon, the same Cicero, the same Legendre and the same Bible that any college in the world had, and its teachers were masters of the books, a thing that may not be said of all the professors who hold place in the greater institutions of today. A. H. Sevier in East Tennessee received a classical education, and upon the death of his father and mother received a very small estate. Not satisfied to live surrounded by an aristocratic kin, unable to move in the same circle with them, and looked upon by them as poor relations, Ambrose H. Sevier, in his nineteenth year, moved to Little Rock, Arkansas. We are not left to conjecture as to his condition upon arriving there. On April 25, 1825, in a speech to his friends in Little Rock, he used these words: "In my orphanage and boyhood I emigrated to this country, where I had neither friends or fortune or family connections." He was not making a speech for political buncombe, for the election was over and he had won. It was a speech characteristic of old John Sevier and of young Ambrose Sevier, or, as he was called in Little Rock, "Don Ambrosia." It was a speech to the people in which he rehearsed his life for five years in their midst, and in which he acknowledged his obligations to them for taking him into their confidence and honoring him with their support. It was not the speech of a demagogue, tickling the people for future gain, but a speech from the heart, a Sevier speech of the type of old John, in which truth and honesty predominated. There are those who think that Sevier's rapid promotion was due to his gifted father-inlaw, Benjamin Johnson, and to his great kin, the Conways and Rectors. As a matter of fact, instead of these making Sevier, he, in all truth, may be said to have made them. It was Representative Sevier who saved Benjamin Johnson in the Congress of the United States, and it was the same Sevier who had a name and power before the Conway-Johnson family became the political rulers of the State.

Sevier's Rapid Rise

He studied law in Little Rock, which is not to his discredit. He had the same Blackstone, the same Chitty, the same Ste-. phens, that he would have had in a great law school, and as good teachers as any law school of that day afforded. He was a student and that explains the whole question. While others were enjoying themselves Sevier was studying his tasks, or visiting among the common people, whose heartthrobs found an answering echo in his own. He was a full-fledged lawyer in 1823 and had for his first case the defense of Russell in the great slander suit of Hogan v. Russell. He lost, but made for himself a character and a name. His friends were Chester Ashley and Robert Crittenden. He was clerk of the House of Representatives in the second legislature in October, 1821, and earned in that way the means necessary for his support. His manly common sense won for him the esteem of the people and in 1823 he was sent to the House of Representatives from Pulaski County, and returned again in 1825 and in 1827, in which session he was speaker of the house. Such a career for a poor orphan boy is absolutely remarkable, and bespeaks for him talents and virtues of the very highest order. During this time he held partnerships with Crittenden, with Ashley and with Trimble.

Political issues were of little moment, but in all the essentials of a party he was a Whig, as were the great body of the aristocratic slave holders of that period.

In fact, he is credited as being a Whig in his first term as delegate to Congress by the registers of that body. The enmity between him and Crittenden was not yet born, for in 1824 Crittenden, as acting governor, appointed him as prosecuting attorney for the Second Judicial District, and in the same year aide-de-camp to the governor, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, from which he obtained the title Colonel Sevier. In the race between Conway and Crittenden Sevier supported Conway, and upon his lamentable death entered the field as a candidate to fill the vacancy. In this race Crittenden supported him, but from that time on Crittenden's way diverged from that of Sevier. Sevier became a Democrat and Crittenden a pronounced Whig. It was not likely otherwise than that Sevier should become a Democrat. His whole life had been spent with the people. He knew their trials, their sentiments, and was one with them in their hopes. For years he had been an intimate associate of Sampson Gray and in his company had mingled with the common people everywhere.

He had the aristocratic tendencies of his Whig friends and relatives, but had the sense to know that these tendencies were antagonistic to a republican form of government.

SEVIER'S DEFEAT OF CRITTENDEN.

His greatest race for office was against Crittenden. Crittenden was more eloquent Sevier the more forceful; Crittenden made preparation for literary effect; Sevier for a natural effect; Crittenden sacrificed matter for a period; Sevier sacrificed his periods for his matter. Both were learned men, both honest, and both good looking. Sevier's knowledge of men gave him the advantage and he won by an overwhelming majority. From 1827 to 1836 he was constantly in Congress as a delegate from the territory, and while there made friends in both parties. In fact no man had a greater influence than did he. In 1836 he was sent to the Senate of the United States and remained there for twelve years. In the Senate he took the very highest rank, and maintained it. As chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations he was recognized as a power with few equals. His speeches in Congress are models. When the pre-emption law was before the Senate of the United States in 1841 he made a speech, which should be in all the school readers of the State. In that he described the common people as he knew them and to their credit. He argued for the emancipation of men from the grade of operatives to that of managers. - He argued for a freer life upon the farm. He argued for Arkansas and for the great influx of population which this bill would surely bring. He described as no other man on the floor did, or could, the kind of people that were going West in covered wagons. He drew a parallel between the covered wagons of the Yankees seeking a new home and that of the North Carolinians on the same quest. It. was humorous and far more creditable to the Yankee than to the North Carolinian.

His apostrophe, however, to the North Carolinians was eloquent to the extreme. He pictured his early boyhood home, where for nineteen years he could look from his door over Buncombe County, North Carolina, and told his North Carolina friends who opposed the bill that while they might be ashamed of their own sons and daughters, that he was not. He said they were a good sort of people and that he wanted more of them, both Yankees and North Carolinians, in Arkansas. He- then told of his association with North Carolinians as a man, from Wilmington to the mountains, and while honoring them and loving them, he assured the senator from North Carolina that he would not blush, nor dread to make a comparison of his constitutents upon the public lands with the best his State afforded, gauged by any standard of virtue, intelligence or worth, which he or others might choose to suggest. His speech upon the civil service had exactly the right ring and was head and shoulders above the twaddle which modern civil service reform has given the world. He believed in the spoils system, the very system that obtains, despite all civil service law. He said: "But as for Democrats, they expect to be turned out from one end of the country to the other. And for one, I should disown them as party associates if they whimpered over their removal." He was answering Henry Clay, and that great man, after the answer, hurried to his side to express his congratulations. There was a manliness about Sevier which no one could doubt. He was a man of the people without being a buffoon or a demagogue, and in the matter of the division of the offices, conscientiously believed that the party in power should have their exclusive control. In 1848 he was sent as minister to Mexico, and in the same year died at his plantation in Arkansas. On September 27, 1827, he married Juliette Johnson, daughter of Honorable Ben Johnson of the superior court, and his children may be found in the chapter on Judge Benjamin Johnson.

In whatever capacity Sevier was placed to serve he rounded it out with dignity and honor. His private life was above reproach and in all the attributes of greatness was sound to the core. He inherited much and in a new environment hammered himself up to the fullest stature of a great man.

PRE-EMPTION SPEECH.

Senator A. H. Sevier in his great speech on pre-emption in 1841 before the Senate of the United States said:

"Public sentiment in the new States demands a change in the disposition of the public lands, and, sooner or later, public sentiment will control. On this subject there is a collected moral force, which can not and will not be resisted. And is it not our duty to respect this public opinion? Is it not our duty to promote the peace and happiness of every member of our Union ? And in accomplishing so high and so noble a purpose, does it become us to stand out upon mere trifles? What are a few dollars, more or less, to the national treasury, in comparison with such absorbing questions?

"And, lastly, is it not our duty, as far as in us lies, to make every citizen in every State a freeholder—an independent and happy man? What spectacle is there so pleasing to a virtuous and feeling heart?"

This was a great speech of a great man on a great question, and is of lasting importance to one who tries to grade the intelligence of Arkansas in early times. The extract is but a part of the speech, but it is enough to lead us to intelligent conclusions as to the speaker, and through him, as to the men behind him, and who stood for him. Webster may have had a quality of eloquence more refined and more exhaustive, but no whit greater than that of Sevier in cogent and forceful utterance, in comprehensive knowledge of the finer play of human nature, in an understanding of the loftiest soul forces and the power of human spirituality. He was on the borders of a great, and hitherto, untried problem—the disposition of the lands of a continent. Is it not proof of his disinterestedness that he stood out boldly and fearlessly for the individuals—the men in homespun—the pioneers? Today he might be criticised as a Socialist, but in that good day such a classification was unknown. What loftier utterance has ever been made by any statesman than Sevier's words, "Is it not our duty, so far as in us lies, to make every citizen in every State a freeholder, an independent and happy man?" And with this grand old pioneer may we not all say, "What spectacle is there so pleasing to a virtuous and feeling heart?"

Grand old Sevier! Yea, verily, Grand old Arkansas! He was not a diamond dropped in a sea of dirt, nor was he alone, among his fellows in the territory, a master of correct thought and rightful action. The pioneers of Arkansas were all diamonds in the rough, great hearts and souls living in the woods. There were gamblers and thieve? among them, as a matter of course, for wherever mankind has rested there these degenerates have been found. Gamblers and thieves, however, never chose a Sevier for their leader, for he was not of their kind. The great population of the territory and State was honest, and Sevier represented that element, and in his day a man from Arkansas was in any part of the world the peer of any man from any section of the Union.

The question he discussed so ably was a most comprehensive one, and the happiness, thrift and wealth of the United States have come more from the way in which America handled this question than from any other single source, except that of American freedom.



Stevens Family of Greene County, Arkansas

     James Edward Stevens was born in Campbell County, Kentucky in April 1862.  He was the son of Union Civil War Veteran Dr. George William Stevens and wife Mary Elizabeth Lipscomb.  Dr. George W. Stevens was born in Campbell County, Kentucky June 1, 1838, son of James M. Stevens, born about 1813 in Kentucky and Mary Jane Dicken, born about 1817 in Kentucky, daughter of Joseph Dicken and Mary Sutton. 

     Dr. Stevens moved his family to Hardin County, Illinois, where he was murdered June 27, 1896.  The children of Dr. George Stevens and Mary Elizabeth Lipscomb were James Edward, Mary Theresa, William S., Harvey A., Charles W., Etta Ann and John Marion.

     James married Susa Ann “Susann” Foster May 3, 1882 in Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Illinois.  Susa Ann, born February 2, 1864 in Rock Creek, Hardin County, Illinois was the daughter of Horace Foster, a Christian Church minister, and Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” Hobbs.  Betsey was raised by Dr. Anna Catherine Pierce Hobbs, discoverer of the cause of milk fever.  Susa Ann was a charter member of the Rock Creek Christian Church when it was established in 1880 and James joined when they were married. 

     James brought his wife Susa Ann, and their children to Arkansas after the death of Dr. Stevens in 1896.  They traveled by covered wagon along with James brothers John, William and Charles.  Their mother and grandmother, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Lipscomb Stevens came with hers sons and their families.  The daughter and sister, Etta Ann Stevens Price, stayed in Hardin County with her family.  Charles, his family and his mother Mary Elizabeth settled near Poplar Bluff, Missouri while the rest the family continued into Arkansas.  James and Susa Ann lost a young son during the journey to their new home due to illness in the area that is now known as Peach Orchard in Clay County, Arkansas.

     James and his family made their home on Jones Ridge, near the township of Delaplaine and later moved to the Beach Grove area.  The children of James and Susa Stevens were Mary Ann, Lillie May, George Horace, Charles Edward, Austin Willard (known as Doss), Etta Margaret and Edna Cordelia.  James was a farmer, timber worker and Justice of the Peace.  His wife Susie died in 1902 and he married Jane Jetton.

     Mary Stevens married Clay Robinson; Lillie Stevens wed Clyde McGarraugh; George Stevens married Alice Jetton, daughter of Jane; Charles Stevens married Vicky Jetton, daughter of Jane; Etta Stevens wed Moss Watson; and Cordelia Stevens married Fred Rice.  Vicky Jetton Stevens died in 1912 leaving one son, Robert Stevens.  Charles Stevens married Victoria (Martha Miranda Victoria) Clark in 1917.  She was the daughter of Billie Franklin Clark and his wife Laura Melissa Ginger who were a farm family in the Beach Grove community.  Victoria was the granddaughter of Confederate Civil War Veteran John Jarvis Clark, born January 31, 1832, and his wife Mary Ann Smelser.  John Jarvis Clark, Mary Ann Smelser Clark, Billie Franklin Clark and Laura Melissa Ginger Clark are buried in the Greene County Cemetery that is known as Owens’ Chapel.

    Charles Stevens was a farmer in Greene County and he frequently cut wood to sell and did other trading through the winter months.  The children of Charles and Victoria Stevens were Goldie, Imogene, Lenora, Wanda, Venita, Paul, Arzella, Lillie and Woodrow.

     During the Influenza Epidemic of 1919 James Stevens, his daughter, Mary Robinson and his son Austin Willard Stevens all perished.  They are buried in the Beech Grove Cemetery.  A member of the Woodsmen of the World, Austin Stevens’ grave is prominently marked with a tall stone resembling a log.  James Stevens owned land in the Evening Star community at the time of his death.

     Charles Stevens’ wife Victoria died of pneumonia March 24, 1931.  She is also buried in Beech Grove Cemetery near the grave of Charles’ brother Austin. Charles Edward Stevens married Rosie Katherine Holloway April 16, 1932.  They had two daughters, Frances and Vivian, who live in Greene County along with siblings, Imogene and Woodrow.  Charles Edward Stevens, born February 15, 1890 in Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Illinois, died October 30, 1961 in Paragould.  Rosie Katherine Holloway Stevens, born April 14, 1900, died July 24, 1974 in Paragould.  They are buried in Jones Ridge Cemetery.

Contributed by: Charlene Johnson



JACKSON, John Clark, banker, farmer; born Gainesville, Ark., Oct. 16, 1874; English descent; son of John Franklin and Maria E. (Terrell) Jackson; father’s occupation merchant and farmer; educated Searcy (Ark.) College and State Normal School, Cape Girardeau, Mo.; began career as a merchant; at present he is vice-president and director of People’s Bank of Tiptonville, Tenn., farmer and stock raiser; married Maymie Hines July 31, 1891; member F. & A.M. (Blue Lodge), K. of P., Business Men’s Club of Tiptonville, Tenn., corresponding secretary of latter; member of M.E. Church, South, and was trustee of church property three years.
Source: Who’s Who in Tennessee, Memphis: Paul & Douglass Co., Publishers, 1911; transcribed by Kim Mohler









 

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