BIOGRAPHIES

LAWRENCE COUNTY/ARKANSAS GENEALOGY TRAILS



If you have Bio's of your family members and would like to add them please email me.

tinaeasley67@hotmail.com





BALL, Samuel H.

BALL, William J.

BARLOW, Joseph M.

BEACH, Clark S.

BORAH, George B.

DOYLE, J. D.

MCKINNEY, John C.

MERIWETHER, Clinton P.  (M.D.)

MILLIGAN, John II

John Edgar Wilson

Charles C. Childers

Horace Sloan

E. C. Stuart

ELMA WILLIAMS EALY

J.N. Smithee

George Thornburgh


SAMUEL H. BALL

Source: Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, c.1891 Goodspeed Publishing Co., p. 773.

Transcribed by Anna Newell-November 2006

Samuel H. Ball, a prominent merchant of Ravenden, Lawrence County, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., in November 1850, and is a son of William J. Ball, whose adventurous career has been portrayed in the sketch on this page. Mr. Ball remained with his father in his store until he reached his twenty-eighth year. He then established a store for himself in 1879 at Opposition, Ark., and carried on a profitable business up to the year 1882. In 1883 he moved to Ravenden, built a magnificent residence and a large, commodious store, and put in a large stock of merchandise, where he has been holding forth ever since. His store is two stories in height, the upper story being devoted to furniture, undertakers' goods, clothing, etc.; the lower, dry goods, boots and shoes, groceries and general plantation supplies. He handles both cotton and stock to a great extent, and altogether does a business of $35,000 to $40,000 annually. He is also interested in a large cotton gin, and besides owns two large farms, situated on Spring River, one in Lawrence and the other in Randolph County, being a farmer as well as a successful merchant. The third business house opened in Ravenden, after the location of the Kansas City, Springfield & Memphis Railroad, was by Mr. Ball, and he is the leading man of the place. In November 1878 he was married to Mrs. Margaret Williford, of Randolph County, a charming widow. Since then five children have been added to the family: Cleo, Luther, Marvin, Ernest and Lillian. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ball are consistent members of the Christian Church. The former is a Democrat politically, a Mason and a member of Ravenden Lodge No. 451, of which he is Junior Warden.


WILLIAM J. BALL

Source: Biographical & Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, c1889.

Contributed by Anna Newell-July 2006

William J. Ball, retired merchant and farmer, was born near Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., September 13, 1825. He is a son of W. T. Ball, an Englishman, and a native of Worcestershire, whose histories and adventures would fill a volume. The elder Ball was a soldier in the English army, and fought under the famous Wellington. He took part in seven battles against the great Napoleon, and fought under Blucher on the memorable field of Waterloo. He was a member of the British army at the battle of New Orleans, but the principles of liberty were so strongly instilled in his mind that he found it impossible to fight against them, and deserted the ranks to join the younger nation in its struggle against the mother country. After the war had ended, he came to the State of Tennessee and settled in Rutherford County, where he was married to Miss Jane Jordan, a native of that State, whose father was one of its pioneers. He resided in Rutherford County, one mile from Murfreesboro, up to the year 1835, when he moved to Bradley's Creek, of the same county, and lived there till 1851, then selling out and moving to Gibson County, where he lived until 1867. He then moved back to Rutherford County, where he died in 1873.
W. J. Ball remained with his father in Rutherford County until his eighteenth year, and then received the contract for carrying the mails by stage coach through that section until the fall of 1858. He then moved to Lawrence County, Ark., and bought a farm in Spring River Township for farming purposes, but shortly afterward entered into business at Powhatan, and was a dealer in general merchandise up to the time of war, and during that period had change of a distillery, on Martin's Creek, for the government. In January 1866 he moved to Gibson County, Tenn., more for the purpose of giving his children the advantages of a good schooling than anything else, but while there, engaged in the general merchandise business. At the expiration of a year he returned to Lawrence County, and settled upon the place he now occupies, and began selling goods. He had been an active businessman up to the year 1886, when he turned the business over to his son, who continues at it with the same enterprise that characterized his father. In 1868 Mr. Ball was appointed postmaster at Opposition, and still has charge of the office. He owns 320 acres of land on his home place, with about 180 acres cleared, and has eighty acres in clover and meadow, and about 100 acres under cultivation.
Mr. Ball was married on September 13, 1846 to Miss Mary Crouse, of Rutherford County, Tenn., a daughter of Harmon G. Crouse. There are five children living by this marriage: George W., Samuel H., Joseph, now carrying on the business here; Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Hallowell; Hattie, wife of F. M. Graves, and William T. and John, who are deceased, the former in 1882 and the latter in 1889. Mr. Ball and his family are all members of the Christian Church, of which he is clerk, and he is also a Royal Arch Mason.


JOSEPH M. BARLOW

Source: Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, c. 1891 Goodspeed Publishing Co.,
p. 774.

Transcribed by Anna Newell-November 2006

Joseph M. Barlow, farmer and stock raiser, came from Illinois to the State of Arkansas in the fall of 1879. His occupation on his arrival was simply farming until the year 1888, when he moved to his present place, known as the Cross Roads farm, which consists of 342 acres of land, with about 140 acres under cultivation, and now has a good frame residence, a cotton-gin, gristmill and blacksmith shop, besides his interests in stock raising. Mr. Barlow also owns a farm nearby which he rents out. This place consists of 120 acres, of which forty acres are under cultivation, and contains a fine orchard of about 100 peach and apple trees, besides a great number of small fruits. There are also a good frame and a log house on the land, which is situated one mile south east of Portia. Mr. Barlow is a son of John and Sinah (Finley) Barlow of Illinois, and was born in Montgomery County, Illinois July 14, 1841. His father died while still a young man, in 1854, and he remained with his mother until his nineteenth year, when he married and commenced farming on his own account. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in the army and served until expiration of enlistments, and in July 1862 he once more enlisted in the Third Illinois Cavalry, and was discharged shortly afterward on account of general disability contracted in service. In June 1864 he entered the army again for the third time, and served until he was mustered out, October 19, 1865. Mr. Barlow first entered the ranks as a private, but soon afterward was promoted to be a sergeant, and his record through the war is one that can be placed among the best of that period. He took part in the battles at Haines' Bluff, Arkansas Post, and a hot scrimmage at Memphis in 1865. He was also in the campaign against Hood at Nashville and in the fight at that place. Mr. Barlow was married, November 17, 1859 to Miss Catherine Chapman of Montgomery County, IL, who died in that locality in 1868. The children by this wife are: Dora A., wife of John Davenport, and a son, who lived until his seventeenth year. He was again married on February 18, 1869 to Mrs. Nancy L. Klutts, a widow lady, of Montgomery County, and this union has given them two children: Sinah J. and Clara E. Mr. and Mrs. Barlow are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which the former is district steward, and Mr. Barlow is a member of G. A. R., Lawrence Post No. 8, and is adjutant of that post. He is also a Master Mason and senior deacon of his lodge, and belongs to the Knights of Honor. In politics he is a Republican, and was elected justice of the peace for his township, and at the expiration of his term was elected county coroner. At the end of that term he was nominated for county and probate judge by the Wheel, and endorsed by the Republicans, as the latter made no nominations. Mr. Barlow has adopted Arkansas as his future residence and expects to live and die in Lawrence County.



CLARK S. BEACH


Source:  Biographical & Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, c1889, p774-775; transcribed by A. Newell-2010.

Clark S. Beach, an extensive stock raiser, farmer and fruit grower, of Lawrence County, was born in Wayne County, Mich., on March 27, 1843.  His parents were Arctus and Esther (Gibbs) Beach, of New York State, who moved to Michigan about the year 1840, and settled at Detroit, where the elder Beach's occupation was farming and dealing in stock.  He remained at that place for twelve years, and then moved to St. Clair County, where he continued his previous occupation and also kept a hotel.  His death occurred at the latter place in 1886, leaving a name that was widely known and highly respected.  C. S. Beach grew to manhood in Wayne and St. Clair Counties, and remained with his father until he had reached his twenty-first year.  April 8, 1865 he enlisted in the Eighth Michigan Cavalry, and served until the close of the war, taking a brave part in many engagements and small skirmishes.  He was mustered out September 22, 1865, after the South had been conquered and returned home and rented his father's farm for eight years in St. Clair County.  He then bought a farm in that county, and went  to work upon it, and after several years' labor, with fair success, he sold out and moved to Arkansas, locating in Lawrence County.  He bought the land upon which he now resides, in 1880, which consisted of 200 acres, unimproved, and at the present time has seventy-five acres cleared and under cultivation.  The land has a comfortable home upon it, with out-buildings and all conveniences, and a fine orchard of about 600 trees of different varieties.  Mr. Beach was married at St. Clair County, Mich., April 4, 1871, to Miss Hannah M. Shears, a Canadian lady, and they now have six children:  Sarah Esther, Mark A., Henry H., Emma L., Mary A. and Eva E.  Mrs. Beach is a member of the Seven-Day Adventist Church, and Mr. Beach belongs to Aurora Lodge No. 423, A. F. & A. M. at Walnut Ridge, being a Master Mason.



REVEREND GEORGE B. BORAH

Source:  Biographical & Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, c1889, p. 775; transcribed by A. Newell, 2010.

George H. Borah is a minister of the Gospel, who has followed in the footsteps of his father Chesterfield G. Borah, a physician of note and a minister.  Mr. Borah's father was born in Caldwell County, Ky., in 1814, and by his earnest endeavors in that direction was made a professor of religion when quite a young man.  He found a faithful partner in the person of Miss Samarimus Perkins, also a native of his State, a young lady well fitted to assist him in his chosen field of labor.  In 1845 Mr. Borah and his wife, seeking new pastures for their work, came to Arkansas and settled on Reed's Creek, in Lawrence County.  He preached the Gospel and practiced medicine until death ended his labors in March, 1863.  He was a prominent man in his time and one who took an active part in the affairs of his county.  His wife still survives him and makes her home with her son, George B. Borah, the eldest of six children, of whom two only lived to the age of maturity, the other being Samarimus A., now the wife of N. E. Judkins.  When George B. Borah arrived at the age of manhood he enrolled himself in the ranks of the Confederate army under Gen. Price, and took part in the raids through Missouri and Kansas.  During a lull in the war he was given a sixty days' furlough to go home, and afterward went to Jacksonport, where he surrendered June 5, 1865.  He adopted the profession of religion in 1874, and was ordained to preach in 1876.  Since then he has had charge of four churches, besides assisting at others whenever his services were called upon, and has been an indefatigable worker.  His efforts have been appreciated, and he is now recognized as one of the ablest ministers in that county, and is beloved by all with whom he comes in contact.  He was married in 1866 to Miss Melissa Wayland, a daughter of Sisco Wayland, one of the pioneers of Arkansas, and nine children have blessed their union.  Six of them are living:  Willie L., John N., Joseph H., Richard P., Florence and Mary Ethel.  Those deceased are Samarimus M., Josaphine and Milton A.  Mrs. Borah is a valuable assistant to her husband in church work, and a lady whose Christian influence is manifested in many ways.  Mr. Borah is a member of the A. F. & A. M.  He is the owner of eighty-five acres of land under cultivation, besides considerable unimproved lands in other sections.


J. D. DOYLE

Doyle, J. D., Portia, Ark.—Was born and raised in Lawrence County, Arkansas; obtained a common school education; entered the profession of teaching; was an active member of the Agricultural Wheel in its day. Also joined the Union in June, 1905; was elected local Lecturer. In 1905 was elected County Lecturer of Lawrence County. At the State Union, in 1906, he was elected a member of the Legislative Committee. In August, 1907, was elected by the State Union as a member of the Executive Committee; attended all the State Unions and many important meetings, also the National Conference at Atlanta, Georgia; made a strong fight before the Legislature for the four agricultural schools; is now a member of the Executive Board of his county, also Lecturer of his county and a member of the Commercial Committee of the Union.  (Source:  History and Times of the Farmers Union, 1909; transcribed by Tina Easley.)


JOHN C. MCKINNEY

Source: Biographical & Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas, c1889.

Contributed by Anna Newell-June 2006
(
This was my great-great grandfather.)

John C. McKinney, a leading farmer of Lawrence County, Smithville post office, was born in Alabama, February 20, 1839, a son of James and Patsey M. (Holder) McKinney. James was born in North Carolina, April 3, 1819, was reared and married in Alabama, came to Polk County, MO about 1844 and in 1857 moved to Sharp County, where he resided until his death in 1863. His father, Francis McKinney, of Scotch and Welsh descent, was born in South Carolina. He served throughout the Revolutionary War and died in Polk County, MO. Our subject's mother was born in Alabama in 1826; she died about 1867, being the mother of ten children, five of whom are now living: Thomas M., Elizabeth A., William B., Samuel B. and John C., our subject, who came to Polk County, MO at the age of eight years where he received his education. On March 4, 1860, he married Lucinda Daily, who was born in Polk County, MO in 1839 and died in September 1882. She was the mother of six children, all living: Sarah J., wife of William Hollen; Melvina J., wife of Jeff D. Estes; Mary A., Davis L., William G., Dora J. In November 1884 he married Hannah Williams, who was born in Louisiana in 1855. Mr. McKinney has 285 acres of land, about 100 cultivated, located on Strawberry River. He enlisted in Company F, Shaffer's regiment, Seventh Arkansas Infantry Volunteers and served until May 1865. He was a private the first year, corporal the second and afterward captain of a company till the close, when he returned home and resumed farming. He has been a resident of this county since 1875 and has held the office of Justice of the Peace two years. He is a Democrat, having cast his first presidential vote for Breckenridge. He is a member of Masonic Lodge No. 29, at Smithville. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church.


DR. CLINTON P. MERIWETHER

Clinton P. Meriwether, M. D., of Walnut Ridge, was born in Independence county, Ark., December 23, 1871, son of William D. and Eleanor (Bradley) Meriwether, his father being a prominent merchant and cotton buyer of Arkansas. Doctor Meriwether was educated in the Arkansas college at Batesville, St. Vincent's college, of Cape Girardeau. Mo., and was graduated from the Missouri Medical college of St. Louis in 1893. Subsequently he has taken several post graduate courses, attending the Post Graduate college of Chicago in 1897, and again in 1900, and also attending the New York Polyclinic the same year. He came to Walnut Ridge in 1893, has taken a prominent stand in the medical profession, and is one of the leading citizens of that city. He is a member of the Lawrence County Medical society, of which he has been president and also secretary; member of the Arkansas Medical association; member of the Tri-State Medical association; and a member of the county board of health. In 1898 he was appointed assistant surgeon of the First regiment of Arkansas volunteers for duty in the Spanish-American war and served in that capacity until mustered out at Fort Logan H. Root, October 28, 1898. Doctor Meriwether is prominently identified with some of the leading business enterprises of Walnut Ridge, being secretary of the T. J. Sharum Mercantile Company, director in the Bank & Trust Company of Walnut Ridge, and secretary of the Walnut Ridge & Hoxie Railroad Company. He is interested in matters of an educational nature and is a member of the local school board. Doctor Meriwether was married in October, 1894, to Myrtle, daughter of Thomas J. Sharum, a prominent merchant and capitalist of Walnut Ridge, and they have two children, Francis C. and Mona L. He is a member of the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Methodist church.  
--Source:  Weston Arthur Goodspeed, 1904; contributed by Tina Easley.


John Edgar Wilson

Source - Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association - 1899

John Edgar Wilson, of Walnut Ridge, Arkansas, was born July 7th, 1873, in Marshall County,Miss. His mother died when he was but a mere babe, leaving him and a two-year-old sister to the care of his father, George W. Wilson, and a beloved aunt, Amanda Coleman, now Mrs. English of Blossom, Texas. His father was poor (too generous to be otherwise), but made up in love and devotion to his children what he lacked in material means. Their home was in Byhalia, Miss., where John received a fair education, and began to study pharmacy. When he was but seventeen years of age, his father's health failed, and John was obliged to travel with him for a whole year, after which time his father died. He then went to Memphis, Tenn., at which place he continued the study of pharmacy, and, after some experience and close attention to business, he took charge of a drug-store for Mr. Crego, which he conducted with very satisfactory resulls to his employer until December, 1895. After his health began to fail, he changed his place of residence by going to Walnut Ridge, Ark , and engaged with his uncle, T. J. Wilson, and his brother-in-law, J. H. Sloan, in the drug business of the firm of Wilson, Sloan & Co., the deceased there taking charge. On November 11th, 1896, he married Miss Claude Phelps, daughter of Col. A. C. Phelps, of Walnut Ridge, a handsome and accomplished yonng lady. She died October 2d, 1897, and after this his health began failing rapidly. He went to Blossom, Texas, where he died on the 7th of February, 1898. His remains were brought to Walnut Ridge and deposited beside his young wife. He was a young man of good address, affable, friendly and made many friends w herever he went. The deceased became a member of our A. sociation in 1896, at the meeting held in the city of Montreal, Canada.


Charles C. Childers

Source - Standard History of Oklahoma 1916

Charles C. Childers. As a public official Hon. Charles C. Childers has given most loyal and effective service both in Arkansas and Oklahoma, in which latter state ho represented Garfield County in both the Fourth and Fifth General Assemblies of the Legislature. He is one of the broad-minded, appreciative and progressive citizens of Oklahoma, is here the owner of valuable farm property and has identified himself most worthily with the industrial and civic affairs of the state. In addition to giving a general supervision to his own farm properties he has for several years past had charge of the farm connected with the Oklahoma State Home for the Feeble Minded, at Enid, in which thriving little city, the judicial center of Garfield County, he maintains his residence.

Charles Clarence Childers was born in Lawrence County, Arkansas, on the 1st of September, 1872, and is a son of William and Clara (Wells) Childers, the latter of whom died at the age of forty-two years. William Childers likewise was born and reared in Lawrence County, Arkansas, a representative of a sterling pioneer family of that state, and he was long one of the honored and influential citizens of Lawrence County, where he served as county treasurer and for two years in the dual office of sheriff and tax collector. In the Civil war he was a valiant soldier of the Confederacy, and in the command of Gen. Sterling Price he took part in numerous engagements, including the battle of Vicksburg, Mississippi. He continued to reside in Lawrence County until his death, at the age of sixty-one years, and he passed away in 1907. His first wife, mother of the subject of this review, passed her entire life in Lawrence County, her parents having removed from their native State of Louisiana and become pioneer settlers in Arkansas. William Childers contracted a second marriage and of the children of the first union five are now living, five children of the second marriage likewise surviving the honored father. Of the first marriage the surviving children other than he whose name initiates this article are: William S., who was foreman of concrete construction in the erection of the fine Oklahoma State Capitol; John C. is clerk of Lawrence County, Arkansas; Grover C. is a farmer at Plant City, Florida, and there also resides the one sister, Mrs. Mollie Coffman. Of the children of the second marriage it may be recorded that Thurman M., Carlisle and App T. reside in Grant County, Oklahoma; Nelson remains in Lawrence County, Arkansas; and Clara Lee maintains her home in Oklahoma City.

In the public schools of his native county Charles C. Childers gained his early education, which was supplemented by a course of study in the high school in the City of Memphis, Tennessee. Thereafter he was a student in the University of Arkansas until the close of his junior year, in 1893, when he returned to his native county and assumed a clerical position in the office of his father, who was then sheriff and tax collector of the county. He was elected as his father's successor in this dual office, of which he continued the incumbent for two terms of two years each, and had the distinction of being the youngest sheriff in Arkansas. He was then elected district clerk and ex-officil register of deeds of Lawrence County, and he held this position likewise for four consecutive years, his long and effective service in public office in his native county showing the estimate placed upon him and that in his case there could be no application of the scriptural aphorism that "a prophet is not without honor save in his own country.''

In 1908 Mr. Childers came to the new State of Oklahoma and settled on a farm near Hillings, Noble County. Two years later he removed to a farm near Covingtou, Garfield County, and after there remaining one year he established his residence in Enid, where he has since given much of his time and attention to the active supervision of the farm of the State Home for the Feeble Minded. He is the owner of a well improved farm in Grant County and also of a valuable farm property in Roger Mills County, and city property in Enid.

In 1912 Mr. Childers was made democratic nominee for representative of Garfield County in the State Legislature to which he was elected without opposition. During the session of the Fourth Legislature he was chairman of the Coinmitteo on Levees, Ditches, Drains and Irrigation; was the author of the law that substituted electrocution for hanging in this state, and of the bill that was enacted and provides for and authorizes the organization of farmers' mutual insurance companies. It was primarily due to his earnest efforts, also, that an appropriation was secured for the erection of au additional building at the Home for Feeble Minded, an institution in which he has taken the deepest interest. In the Fifth Legislature Mr. Childers was chairman of the Committee on Insurance, and was associated with Senator William A. Chase, of Nowata, in the authorship of a bill providing for free textbooks in the public schools, besides which he was especially active in the promotion of measures designed to establish a minimum wage scale for women employed, to place the school land income in the direct jurisdiction of the state treasurer, to enable county attorneys to adjust probate matters, to establish hospitals for railroad workers, and to pension the widows of men who were killed in a fight between officers and prisoners in the State Penitentiary at McAlester, in 1814. Loyalty and progressivencss dominated the course of Mr. Childers as one of the efficient legislators of the state, and his record in the Legislature is one that will reflect enduring honor on his name.

At Enid Mr. Childers is affiliated with the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic Fraternity, and with Camp No. 35 of the Woodmen of the World. At Covington, another of the flourishing towns of tJarfield County, he holds membership in the lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

In Lawrence County, Arkansas, November 3d, 189.1, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Childers to Miss Elizabeth Wells, a native of Kentucky, born December 17, 1876, daughter of Ira and Emily (Morgan) Wells, both natives of Kentucky. The father died in 1903 at Powhatan, Arkansas; the mother is still living aged seventy-two years (1916). They were parents of six sons and four daughters, all living but the youngest child, Bell, who died at the age of six years; the eldest of the family, Fred, of Oklahoma; William of Kansas; E. Jesse, of Nebraska; Nancy, of Kansas; Joseph, of Kansas; (Elizabeth) Leah, of Arkansas; John of Kansas; Madison of Arkansas, and Bell, deceased.

Their only child, Ruth, born October 20, 1897, is now a student in Phillips University, at Enid, from which she graduates in June, 1917, besides being one of the popular young women in the social circles of her home city, she is a fine musician.


Horace Sloan
 
Horace Sloan, Attorney-at-Law, Home Address: Jonesboro,

Arkansas. A. B.; A. B., Arkansas College; J. D., University of Chicago Law School 1912 Born, February 24, 1890, in Powhatan, Arkansas. Married, Geraldini Smith,  DePauw University, on October 13th, 1912, in Winchester, Ind.; now member of law firm of Baker & Sloan, in Jonesboro, Ark.

Source - Alumnal Record De Pauw Univ. 1915


E. C. Stuart

Source - Texas Bankers 1915

STUART BECOMES VICE-PRESIDENT.

St. Louis.—E. C. Stuart, on January 9, was elected a vice-president of the Third National Bank. Mr. Stuart has served the Third National for seven years as assistant cashier, going there from Washington, Missouri, where he organized the First National Bank, of which he was cashier.

Mr. Stuart was born in Powhatan, Arkansas, but moved with his family to Missouri while still a boy and spent his boyhood in Cape Girardeau. He has traveled extensively over the South and Southwest as representative of the Third National Bank and has a large acquaintance among the bankers and business men of Texas, as well as all the Southern States. As vice-president, Mr. Stuart will now be in charge of a number of Southern and Southwestern States. He has many friends in Texas, who will be interested to learn of his promotion.


MRS. ELMA WILLIAMS EALY

Born in Powhatan, Arkansas.

Wife of Elmer H. Ealy.

Descendant of Capt. Israel Spencer and of Israel Selden Spencer, of Connecticut.

Daughter of Thomas J. Williams and Maria E. Mount, his wife.

Granddaughter of Elijah Mount and Emiline E. Spencer, his wife.

Gr.-granddaughter of Israel Selden Spencer and Temperance Brockway, his wife.

Gr.-gr.-granddaughter of Israel Spencer and Elizabeth Marsh, his wife.

Israel Spencer, (1732-1813), commanded a company under Col. Charles Burrall 1776. He was deputy 1778-80 to the General Court.

Israel Selden Spencer, (1762-1837), served several short enlistments. In 1832 he was placed on the pension roll of New London County for ten months actual service as private, Conn, line. He was born in East Haddon, Conn.; died in Port Gibson, Miss.

Source - Lineage Book Daughters of the American Revolution - 1917

 


J.N. Smithee

 James N. Smithee was born in Jan. 11, 1842 near Smithville  in Lawrence County . Worked as Type-setter on Newspapers in Pine Bluff , Des Arc and Powhatan before he was 15 . Bough interest in Brownsville Echo. Smithee enlisted in the Confederate Army Woodruff's Light Artillery , 1861 . Wounded in battle of Helena 1863 . was adjutant of Blocher's Battalion at close of the war.

In 1874 Smithee was appointed Commissioner of Immigration and State Lands . He joined the Staff of the Arkansas Gazette . Later became Editor of Little Rock Star and stayed and stayed with it after its consolidation with the Democrat . In 1896 Smithee bought control of the Gazette and was its Editor until 1899 . Was unsuccessful candidate for Democratic Nomination for Govenor 1880. Lived in Colorado and New Mexico several years but returned to Arkansas . When he purchased the Gazette. He died July 4, 1902 , in Little Rock.


George Thornburgh

George Thornburgh - Editor and Masonic Authority - Source Arkansas Archives

Born 1847 at Havana , Illinois . Family settled in Lawrence County , Ark. 1855 . Attended Law School of Cumberland University , Tenn. Began practice at Powhatan . Served four terms in Legislature and was speaker of the house in 1881 . Became editor of the Walnut Ridge telephone. In 1889 assumed management of the Arkansas Methodist at Little Rock of which he was manager for 14 years.

Established and edited the Masonic Trowell . Author of Masonic Monitor Grand Master of Masons 1878-1879 . Grand High Priest 1880. He helped organize State Anti-saloon League. President Arkansas Press Assn. One of founders of Ark. Methodist Orphanage . Superintendent of Arkansas Blind School . Appointed Colnel of Militia in the Brooks Baxter War by Governor Garland.


DREW, Thomas Stevenson, third governor of Arkansas (1844-46) was born in Wilson county, Tenn., Aug. 25, 1782, son of Newton Drew, a native of Virginia, who about 1797 or 1798 removed to Tennessee, where he remained, engaiged in farming. Thomas S. Drew was reared upon the farm, and received a fair education in the country schools. He removed to Arkansas in 1818. After several years' traveling in the territory selling such articles of merchandise as he could carry with him to the pioneer settlers, he mode his home in what is now Ouachita county, some eighteen miles from Camden; it was then part of Clark county. He finally abandoned his itineray in the mercantile business, and taught school for several years. He finally wedded the daughter of a well-to-do pioneer, who brought him a dower of a dozen or more slaves and a good plantation. He then became a proserous and enterprising farmer, and delighted in the tillage of the soil and raising of flocks. He had no political ambitions, but was induced to accept the position of clerk of Clark county for a term of two years (1823-25). He afterwards removed to the northern portion of the state, and settled in Lawrence county, which he represented in the constitutional convention of 1836 (Jan. 4th to 13th), in preparation for the state's admission. This ten days' experience in a parliamentary body seems to be all he ever had before he accepted the gubernatorial chair. In 1844 the Democratic state convention met at the capital to select a candidate for governor. All except three votes were cast for Elias N. Conway, their state auditor. Mr. Conway positively declined the honor on account of personal obligations. The party leaders then requested him to name a substitute, and he suggested Thomas S. Drew, an honest, upright farmer, who had neither made enemies or political record. Drew received the nomination with an almost unanimous vote and was elected. He was economical aud honest, but was too unsuspicious to divine the schemes of the politicians who were working ruin for his administration. The managers of the Real Estate Bank, noted in Arkansas history, had secured control of the finances and credit of the state, aud he was incompetent or powerless to wrest it from them. He was elected for a second term of four years, but after serving a little more than a year resigned, ostensibly for the reason that $1,800 salary was insufficient to support his family, and the legislature had failed to make an increase. His integrity and honesty were never questioned, but bis administration left the state in financial trouble which continued for years. He resigned April 10, 1849, broken in spirit and fortune, and returned to his home, then in Independence county, and again tried farming, with poor success. He then went to California to retrieve his fortune by gold mining, but failed. He died near Lipau, Hood co., Tex., in 1879.
Source - American Bio's 1900


James G. Marcum.—Trained to habits of industry and thrift, and possessing in unstinted measure the intelligence and sound judgment necessary for success in this busy world, James G. Marcum has acquired an assured position among the substantial business men of Joplin, being one of its leading contractors and builders. A son of G. P. Marcum, he was born September 11, 1871. in Smithville, Arkansas.

Born in middle Tennessee, October 20, 1846, G. P. Marcum moved to Arkansas when young, becoming a pioneer settler of Lawrence county. By trade he was a millwright and a mill builder, and he also followed contracting for many years. Removing to Washburn, Missouri, he continued work there until he located in Joplin, Jasper county, Missouri, where he has since been actively engaged in business, having acquired a competency and distinction in his profession. During his earlier days as a contractor he built numerous flour, lumber and cotton mills, which were operated by water power, the use of steam at that time being exceedingly limited. A millwright in those days had to be thoroughly conversant with every detail of his trade, in the construction of mills being forced to begin at the very foundation. Going to the forest, he selected the trees most suitable for the purpose, and after felling them hewed the timber for the mill, and also constructed the huge water wheels used. During the progress of the Civil war, G. P. Marcum, with five brothers, enlisted in the Forty-fifth Arkansas Cavalrj, and served in the Confederate army until the close of the conflict, coming out without a scratch, although he had numerous hair-breadth escapes.

The maiden name of the wife  of G. P. Marcum was Mary E. Parks. She was born in Lawrence county, Arkansas, February 4, 1851, being a member of a well known and highly respected family of that state. Ten children blessed their union, as follows: James G., the special subject of this sketch; Mrs. Pearl Hayes, of Joplin, Missouri; Mrs. Naomi Thorpe, also of Joplin; John, deceased; Lucas, deceased; Lonah, deceased; Byron, deceased; Mrs. Cody Thomas, of Jasper county; Mrs. Myrtle A. Haswell, of Joplin; and Joseph L., a graduate of the Joplin high school and now associated with his brother James G. He is to finish his education in a higher academic institution, to fit himself for the business they have adopted for their life work.

James G. Marcum married, at Fort Scott, Kansas, June 16, 1895, Demie C. Park, a daughter of James and Maggie Park, well known members of the farming community of Washburn, Missouri. Donovan Jere Marcum, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Marcum, was born in Washburn, Missouri, July 7, 1897, and is now attending the Jackson school in Joplin. Two other children were born into their home, namely: Murl, born March 5, 1896, died July 20, 1896; and Mona, born July 21, 1899, died in September, 1899.

Mr. Marcum uniformly supports the principles of the Democratic party, but is not an active politician. Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a skilful hunter and fisherman, and enjoys automobiling, having a handsome car and being a daring, but an expert driver. Mr. and Mrs. Marcum are free and happy entertainers, ever welcoming to their hospitable home their many friends and acquaintances.
Source - A History of Jasper Co. Missouri - 1912


Source -  Memphis Medical 1900

Dr. T. J. Wilson, formerly of Walnut Ridge, Ark., has moved to Pomona, Cal. Dr. Wilson is a well-known member of the Tri-State Medical Association of Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee, having held the offices of vice-president and of president in that organization ; he has also been president of his county medical society and board of examiners for medical licenses.


Pi, '94— Homer F. Sloan is now in the mercantile business at Imboden, Arkansas; he is prospering nicely, and is still a loyal Sig.
Source -  Sigma Alpha Epsilon - 1895

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DAVIS FAMILY IN LAWRENCE COUNTY.

Source- Pioneers and Makers of Arkansas

At that time, 1817, there was a man, Benjamin Davis, fortyseven years of age, living at Strawberry. Near him lived Eliphas Davis, about the same age with a family of ten children, and also the widow Elizabeth Davis with a family of eight. Samuel Davis, about fifty-seven years old, also lived in the county, as did Charles and David, each about thirty years old. It will thus be seen that there were quite a number of the Davis family in Lawrence County in 1817, and at this late day it is impossible to untangle the degrees of relationship. Where the Davis family came from I cannot say, but it is reputed to have 

come from Kentucky to Arkansas, and from North Carolina to Kentucky. It is certain that North Carolina could have furnished two regiments of the name Davis in 1790 without calling on the other States. The first census of North Carolina gives four hundred and four families of the name, with an average of five persons in a family, or two thousand and twenty Davises. Some of these may have formed the Lawrence County settlement.

UNION OF THE BRILHARTS AND DAVISES.

Young Brilhart was smitten with the charms of one of the young Davis girls and married her. The father and mother lived on their little farm near Strawberry, where in 1822 a daughter was born. Jacob Brilhart and wife both sickened and died in 1826, and the infant daughter was taken by her grandmother Davis to her home and reared.

The attractions of Pulaski County on the Saline were at that time beginning to depopulate Lawrence County, and in 1831 Grandmother Davis moved to that neighborhood. Rebecca Brilhart grew to womanhood on the Saline, a gem of the forest and a picture of life. She knew every dale and glen of the neighborhood and made toys out of the soapstones before modern industry gave them a value. Under the guidance of a noble dame Rebecca Brilhart was trained to think, to act and to grow symmetrically. 

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Charles C. Childers. As a public official Hon. Charles C. Childers has given most loyal and effective service both in Arkansas and Oklahoma, in which latter state ho represented Garfield County in both the Fourth and Fifth General Assemblies of the Legislature. He is one of the broad-minded, appreciative and progressive citizens of Oklahoma, is here the owner of valuable farm property and has identified himself most worthily with the industrial and civic affairs of the state. In addition to giving a general supervision to his own farm properties he has for several years past had charge of the farm connected with the Oklahoma State Home for the Feeble Minded, at Enid, in which thriving little city, the judicial center of Garfield County, he maintains his residence.

Charles Clarence Childers was born in Lawrence County, Arkansas, on the 1st of September, 1872, and is a son of William and Clara (Wells) Childers, the latter of whom died at the age of forty-two years. William Childers likewise was born and reared in Lawrence County, Arkansas, a representative of a sterling pioneer family of that state, and he was long one of the honored and influential citizens of Lawrence County, where he served as county treasurer and for two years in the dual office of sheriff and tax collector. In the Civil war he was a valiant soldier of the Confederacy, and in the command of Gen. Sterling Price he took part in numerous engagements, including the battle of Vicksburg, Mississippi. He continued to reside in Lawrence County until his death, at the age of sixty-one years, and he passed away in 1907. His first wife, mother of the subject of this review, passed her entire life in Lawrence County, her parents having removed from their native State of Louisiana and become pioneer settlers in Arkansas. William Childers contracted a second marriage and of the children of the first union five are now living, five children of the second marriage likewise surviving the honored father. Of the first marriage the surviving children other than he whose name initiates this article are: William S., who was foreman of concrete construction in the erection of the fine Oklahoma State Capitol; John C. is clerk of Lawrence County, Arkansas; Grover C. is a farmer at Plant City, Florida, and there also resides the one sister, Mrs. Mollie Coffman. Of the children of the second marriage it may be recorded that Thurman M., Carlisle and App T. reside in Grant County, Oklahoma; Nelson remains in Lawrence County, Arkansas; and Clara Lee maintains her home in Oklahoma City.

In the public schools of his native county Charles 0. Childers gained his early education, which was supplemented by a course of study in the high school in the City of Memphis, Tennessee. Thereafter he was a student in the University of Arkansas until the close of his junior year, in 1893, when he returned to his native county and assumed a clerical position in the office of his father, who was then sheriff and tax collector of the county. He was elected as his father's successor in this dual office, of which he continued the incumbent for two terms of two years each, and had the distinction of being the youngest sheriff in Arkansas. He was then elected district clerk and ex-officio register of deeds of Lawrence County, and he held this position likewise for four consecutive years, his long and effective service in public office in his native county showing the estimate placed upon him and that in his case there could be no application of the scriptural aphorism that "a prophet is not without honor save in his own country.''

In 1908 Mr. Childers came to the new State of Oklahoma and settled on a farm near Hillings, Noble County. Two years later he removed to a farm near Covingtou, Garfield County, and after there remaining one year he established his residence in Enid, where he has since given much of his time and attention to the active supervision of the farm of the State Home for the Feeble Minded. He is the owner of a well improved farm in Grant County and also of a valuable farm property in Roger Mills County, and city property in Enid.

In 1912 Mr. Childers was made democratic nominee for representative of Garfield County in the State Legislature to which he was elected without opposition. During the session of the Fourth Legislature he was chairman of the Coinmitteo on Levees, Ditches, Drains and Irrigation; was the author of the law that substituted electrocution for hanging in this state, and of the bill that was enacted and provides for and authorizes the organization of farmers' mutual insurance companies. It was primarily due to his earnest efforts, also, that an appropriation was secured for the erection of au additional building at the Home for Feeble Minded, an institution in which he has taken the deepest interest. In the Fifth Legislature Mr. Childers was chairman of the Committee on Insurance, and was associated with Senator William A. Chase, of Nowata, in the authorship of a bill providing for free textbooks in the public schools, besides which he was especially active in the promotion of measures designed to establish a minimum wage scale for women employed, to place the school land income in the direct jurisdiction of the state treasurer, to enable county attorneys to adjust probate matters, to establish hospitals for railroad workers, and to pension the widows of men who were killed in a fight between officers and prisoners in the State Penitentiary at McAlester, in 1814. Loyalty and progressivencss dominated the course of Mr. Childers as one of the efficient legislators of the state, and his record in the Legislature is one that will reflect enduring honor on his name.

At Enid Mr. Childers is affiliated with the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic Fraternity, and with Camp No. 35 of the Woodmen of the World. At Covington, another of the flourishing towns of tJarfield County, he holds membership in the lodge of the Independent Order  of Odd Fellows. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

In Lawrence County, Arkansas, November 3d, 1891, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Childers to Miss Elizabeth Wells, a native of Kentucky, born December 17, 1876, daughter of Ira and Emily (Morgan) Wells, both natives of Kentucky. The father died in 1903 at Powhatan, Arkansas; the mother is still living aged seventy-two years (1916). They were parents of six sons and four daughters, all living but the youngest child, Bell, who died at the age of six years; the eldest of the family, Fred, of Oklahoma; William of Kansas; E. Jesse, of Nebraska; Nancy, of Kansas; Joseph, of Kansas; (Elizabeth) Leah, of Arkansas; John of Kansas; Madison of Arkansas, and Bell, deceased.

Their only child, Ruth, born October 20, 1897, is now a student in Phillips University, at Enid, from which she graduates in June, 1917, besides being one of the popular young women in the social circles of her home city, she is a fine musician.

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The Tutt and Evert War.

My memory is that it was in the year 1846 that an incident occurred in Marion county that I will now relate. It was known as the Tutt and Evert war. They were once fast friends. They met in Yellville, the county seat, and while there one of the Everts purchased a set of silver spoons at the store of one of the Tutts. Afterwards a misunderstanding grew up between them as to the payment for the spoons, which led them into a fight. Afterwards, which was often, when they would meet in Yellville, they would hardly ever get away without some fighting taking place between the parties. There was a large gathering and a public demonstration to take place within a few weeks. The Tutts declared, backed by the Kings, that if the Everts came into town that day they would kill them outright. Both parties came in early in the day, heavily armed. After coming under the influence of intoxicants to some extent, Evert went into the public square and stated what he had heard from the Tutts, and said that if they, the Tutts and Kings, were ready for the conflict, there never was a belter time than then, and that they, the Everts, were fully ready. Both parties, in short range, opened fire. One of the Kings shot Simm Evert during the fight, supposed to be through the heart. One of the Kings, just previous to the shooting of Evert, had been shot through the hips and so disabled that he could not stand upon his feet. After Simm Evert had received the wound, he turned around, and, within a few steps of the wounded King, picked up a large stone, raised it in both hands, and, stepping up to King, came down on King's head with the stone with all the force possible, completely crushing King's head. Then, turning around and walking about three steps, he remarked, "I am a dead man," and fell to the ground and expired within a few minutes. When the smoke cleared away and the fighting ceased, an examination showed that there were eight or ten left dead on the ground. The stoutest men afterwards went to the stone, but there wasn't one of them that could raise it from the ground. The surviving Kings made arrangements and attempted to leave the country. At that time the sheriff of the county was a man by the name of Mooney. A writ was placed in his hands and he arrested them. Shortly after the arrest, the Everts and their friends came upon the sheriff and his posse and demanded the prisoners. The sheriff gave them up, and they were all shot. The sheriff then appealed to the governor for aid; he sent the militia, who aided the sheriff in the arrest of the Everts, a man by the name of Stratton, and some others of their friends. The governor ordered them to be taken to Lawrence county and placed in the Lawrence county jail at Smithville, the county seat of that county. I saw the militia in charge of the prisoners pass my father's house on their way to Smithville.

In about ten days after they were put in prison, late one evening, strange men commenced dropping into the town, who were unknown to the citizens, until they reached to about the number of sixty-five. Somewhere near midnight they paraded the streets, and the jail being a log jail, they prepared levers and pried it up and let the prisoners all out, and they all left together, Evert, Stratton, and their friends proceeding directly to Texas. After their families had reached them and everything had quieted down, they sent in and notified Hamp Tutt, whom they charged with being the inciter and leader in bringing on the original trouble, that if he would "hull out" and leave the state they would not kill him. Tutt was a man of considerable wealth and declared he would not leave the state. He at once hired a young doctor, who claimed to be a very brave man, to act as his body guard, and kept himself very close to the town for about the space of two years. One day, however, he declared that he was going to take a ride out on the main public road for his health. He, in company with the young doctor, then rode out about one mile. On returning, not more than a quarter of a mile from the town, after they had passed the place where they were concealed, they, (the Everts) discharged a volley. Two balls entered the back of Tu't, and his horse made but a few leaps when he fell to the ground. The young doctor ran for dear life, reached the town, and gave the alarm. Parties immediately went out to the place, but found that Tutt was dead. On examining the place where the parties had lain in ambush, they found that they had lain therefor months watching for the opportunity. So ended the Tutt and Evert war.

Source- History of Southern Missouri and Northeast Arkansas

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Hon. George Thornburgh was born in Mason county, Illinois, January 25, l8l7, and is of English-German extraction. When eight years of age his father moved to Smithville, Lawrence county, Arkansas, where he grew to man’s estate. His educational facilities and opportunities were extremely meager, but he had the taste, the desire, and the noble resolution to overcome and surmount these obstacles by self-culture and selfdenial. These elementary principles, in their nature, lie at the foundation, and are the best structural basis, on which to build a good name and a useful life, and fortunate is the youth who makes the discovery, and embraces it as a rule of action.

Mr. Thornburgh educated and polished himself, and advanced far enough in the field of literature and science to become a practical teacher at Hillhouse Institute and New Hope Acadcmy, both institutions in Lawrence county. In 1867 he began the study of law at Smithville under the supervision of Colonel Baker. and in 1868 entered the law department of Cumberland University, Tennessee, and remained there but one session, but by extraordinary application accomplished as much as the average student does in two sessions. He was admitted to the bar in the winterof 1865, but did not enter on the regular practice of his profession until 1873, when he opened an oflice in Powhattan, Lawrence county. He is a hard working steward in the Methodist church; is quite distinguished in his masonic relations; was grand master of the State in 1878 and 1879, and grand high priest in 1880, and deputy grand master; has been active and eflicient as alderman, school director, Sunday school superintendent and president of a large manufacturing enterprise at Walnut Ridge, where he now resides.

All the duties imposed by these numerous and varied relations have always been well and faithfully discharged.

In 1870 the electors of his county returned him to the legislature, but the dominant republican party arbitrarily excluded him. In November, 1872, he was again, by an almost unanimous vote, returned to the legislature, and in the session of 1873 became famous as an obstructionist to radical legislation. In 1876 the democracy of his senatorial district nominated him for the State senate, but he declined on the ground that his professional engagements demanded his entire attention. In 1880 he was nominated and elected to the general assembly and that body elected him speaker of the house on first ballot, a high but well-earned and deserved compliment. In 1884 his well-pleased constituency of old Lawrence again sent him to the capitol to represent them in the halls of legislation, and his abilities and efiiciency were recognized by the speaker, who made him chairman of the judiciary committee, an important position in all legislative bodies. Those who know him best pronounce him a good lawyer, citizen, adviser and Christian gentleman, but the circumstances of his life and the positions of honor and trust which he has filled and discharged without just criticism or censure pronounce his best eulogy. At this writing he-is prominently spoken of as a candidate for governor. Source Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas 

*******
Jacob S. Allison, a farmer and stock raiser whom Lawrence County can feel proud to claim as a citizen, was born in Burke County, N.C., Novem- 
ber 12, 1837. He is a son of Bird and Elizabeth (Davis) Allison, of the same State. The elder Allison was a farmer in North Carolina, until the
year 1 859, when he moved to Cocke County, Tenn. , and from there to Alabama, where he now resides with his wife, very near the age of one hundred
years. Jacob remained with his parents in North Carolina, until he grew to manhood, and then started in life on his own account. In 1861 he enlisted in
the Twenty second North Carolina Infantry, and served in that company until the close of the war. He took part in the battles around Richmond, at
Manassas, Chancellorsville, the seven days' Battle in the Wilderness, the fights and siege at Petersburg, Cedar Creek, and others, besides twenty or
more skirmishes. He was wounded twice, through the shoulder, at Shepherdstown, and had one finger shot off. His service for the cause
was brilliant, and there are few that are superior. After receiving his discharge he returned to the State of Tennessee, where he remained up to 1871,
when he moved to Arkansas and located at Clover Bend. He first bought some land near Stranger' s Home, and has since then added to it on different
occasions, until now he owns about 1,400 acres of rich bottom land, with about 200 acres under cul- tivation. He has ten houses altogether on his
land, eight of them being on the home farm. When Mr. Allison first came to Lawrence County, all he possessed was $90 cash, and two beds, and
was in debt to the extent of 51. 00, which he has since paid. He now owns a fine farm, and is considered to be one of the most substantial men in
Lawrence County. He was married, in 1809,' to Miss Sallie Store', of Tennessee, a daughter of William Storey, and has had seven children by his
marriage: William, Clara, Rose, Pearl, Lizzie, Robert Lee and Zola. Mr. Allison is a Master Mason, and he and Mrs. Allison are both members
of the Eastern Star Chapter.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas 

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Sidney W. Andrews, of Sexton & Andrews, druggists, was born in Jefferson County, Ill., January 12, 1855, and is a son of Seymour Andrews 
and Martha C. (Hendricksou) Andrews, now residing in Centralia,Ill. The parents had ten children born to them, five of whom are still living.
S. W. Andrews being the only one in Arkansa's, however. Mr. Andrews was reared in Centralia, and received a common school education. In the
year 1871 he learned telegraphy, in Centralia. Ill., and accepted a situation as telegraph operator at Georgetown, Ill. Soon thereafter
he emigrated to Arkansas, and in 1874 entered the employed by of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain &; Southern Railway Company as agent
and operator at Bradford, remaining in their service at Bradford and Walnut Ridge until January, when he formed a partnership with
Joseph K. Sexton in the drug traile, and has had fair success. He is a Mason, and a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor,
also of the Methodist Epi.scopal Church, South, and is treasurer of the town. He was united in wedlock to Mrs. Belle E. (Haney) Matthews. May
3, 1883, and has had two children: Sidney Mills, born March 7, 1884, died with whoopping cough August 16, 1884; Alonzo Bertrand, born October 
29, 1885, died with membraneous croup August '24, 1889. His wife is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas 

*********

Joseph Bagley (deceased) was born in Bedford, Penn. , February 25, 1802, and is the son of Samuel Bagley, a native of Scotland (who came to 
the State of Pennsylvania at a very early day), and Martha (Bentle) Bagley. He was reared in the neighborhood of Bedford, or Bedford Springs,
Penn., and in his younger days drove a hack, and did considerable freighting between Philadelphia and the above named places. When between the
age of twenty one and twenty-two he enlisted in the United States regular army for five years, and, on one occasion, was sent with his company
up the Missouri River, as far as the mouth of the Yellowstone. After his five years' service was up he was discharged from the army, at
Jefferson Barracks, and came to Illinois, where he resided one year. From there he traveled down the Mississippi to Jacksonport, Ark. , about
the year 1829 or 1830, and was there married to Miss Annie Gibson, of Lawrence County, daughter of Jacob Gibson. Within a short time after his
marriage he moved to this section, and commenced farming, until his death, April 1872, at the age of seventy years.
His grave is on Col. Ponder" s farm, at Old Walnut Ridge. He was among the early settlers of this section, and lived, until his death, about
live miles northwest of Walnut Ridge. He and wife were the parents of nine children, only two of whom are yet living, Lavira, the wife of
Thomas C. Hennessee, and Isam J., both residents of Campbell Township. Isam J. was reared on the homestead farm, and was born December 18, 1847.
He led a placid life on the farm, with nothing eventful occuring to disturb the serenity of his existence until March, 1864, when he
enlisted in Company F, Thirteenth Missouri Cavalry, and was a gallant soldier through the remainder of the war. He was married to Miss Elizabeth
Sailing, of Crawford County, Ark., and out of nine children has five still living: Estella, Charles, John, Alfred and
Edward. Mr. Bagley first rented his land for three or four years, near Walnut Ridge, and then bought 120 acres north of tliat town. Since then
he has added to it, and now owns 460 acres. He also operates a cotton-gin upon the farm, and deals very largely in stock. He is a member of the Ma-
sonic fraternity, and in politics a Democrat, holding the office of justice of the peace for one term.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas 
***********

William W. Baley, farmer and cotton ginner, was born in McNairy County, Tenn., in the year 1835. His parents were Benjamin and Nancy
(Holman) Baley, of North Carolina, who had settled in Tennessee with their parents when children. Later in life they married and moved to Hender-
son County, remaining there until the war commenced, when they transferred their home to Ballard County, Ky., where the father died in 1867, at
the age of seventy-four years. After his death the mother came to Arkansas with one of her sons and a daughter, and settled in Searcy County, where
she died in 1870, aged sixty-eight years. She was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, in which : she had been an earnest worker all
her life. Mr. Baley is the oldest of five children yet living. Seven were born to his parents, but two of them have died.
He was reared in Tennessee, and commenced farming for himself in Henderson County in the year 1855, where he remained until 1862, when the call
to arms was issued, and on June 17 of that year he enlisted in Company K, of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, and served three years and two months.
He was in the foremost ranks of every battle in which the Seventh Kansas was engaged, and can recount some of the narrowest escapes a soldier
ever had in time of war. Twenty-eight different times he was shot through the clothes he wore, the bullets not even scratching his skin, and
on four occasions had the horse he rode shot from under him. His service through the war was honorable and brave, and the lustre of his valor can
never be tarnished by time. He received his discharge from the army in November, 1864, at St. Louis, Mo. , and joined his family in Kentucky.
Five years later he moved to Thomasville, Mo., and from thence to Arkansas, coming here in 1870, and locating on Big Creek, in this county.
He came to his present home in 1872, which, at that time, was but veiy little improved. Since then a great change has taken place in the
condition of the land. He owns 100 acres, 125 acres of which are under cultivation. He also has a cotton-gin set up on his place and in
1888 ginned 312 bales of cotton. Mr. Baley's wife was formerly Miss Jane C. Wadey, of Tennessee, born in 1829. They have a family of four chil-
dren living: Richard M., Mary E., John G., Robert L. Mary E. is the wife of William B. Doyle, and the others are all married except the youngest.
They have lost two children — Sarah Ann and Jeanette E. Mr. Baley and wife are members of the Christian Church, and the former of Dry Creek
Masonic Lodge No. 453. In politics he is a Republican.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas 
*********

William J. Ball, retired merchant and farmer, was born near Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., September 13, 1825. He is a son of W. 
T. Ball, an Englishman, and a native of Worcestershire, whose histories and adventures would till a volume. The elder Ball was a soldier in
the English army, and fought under the famous Wellington. He took part in seven battles against the great Napoleon, and fought under Blucher on the
memorable field of Waterloo. He was a member of the British army at the battle of New Orleans, but the principles of liberty were so strongly in-
stilled in his mind that he found it impossible to fight against them, and deserted the ranks to join the younger nation in its struggle against
the mother country. After the war had ended, he came to the State of Tennessee and settled in Rutherford County, where he was married to
Miss Jane Jordan, a native of that State, whose father was one of its pioneers. He resided in Rutherford County, one mile from Murfreesboro,
up to the year 1835, when he moved to Bradley's Creek, of the same county, and lived there till 1851, then selling out and mov-
ing to (Jibson County, where he lived until 1867. He then moved back to Rutherford County, where he died in 1873. W. J. Ball remained with his
father in Rutherford County until his eighteenth year, and then received the contract for carrying the mails by stage coach through that section
until the fall of 1858. He then moved to Lawrence County, Ark., and bought a farm in Spring River Township for farming purposes, but shortly after-
ward entered into business at Powhatain. and was a dealer in general merchandise up to the time of war, and during that period had charge of a dis-
tillery, on Martin's Creek, for the government. In January. 1860, he moved to Gibson County, Tenn., more for the purpose of giving his children
the advantages of a good schooling than anything else, but while there, engaged in the general merchandise business. At the expiration of a year hi-
returned to Lawrence County, and settled upon the place he now occupies, and began selling goods. He had been an active business man up to the year
1886, when he turned the business over to his son who continues at it with the same enterprise that characterized his father. In 1868 Mr. Ball was
appointed postmaster at Opposition, and still has charge of the office. He owns 320 acres of land on his home place, with about 180 acres cleared,
and has eighty acres in clover and meadow, and about 101 acres under cultivation. .Mr. Ball was married on September 13, 1846. to Miss Mary
Crouse, of Rutherford County. Tenn., a daughter of Harmon G. Crouse. There are five children living by this marriage: George W.; Samuel H. .
Joseph, now carrying on the business here; Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Hallowell; Hattie, wife of F. M. Graves, and William T. and John, who are
deceased, the former in 1882 and the latter in 1800s. Mr. Ball and his family are all members of the Christian Church, of which he is clerk, and
he is also a Royal Arch Mason.

Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas 

*******
George W. Brady, merchant and postmaster, of Smithville, is a son of Jeremiah Brady, of North Carolina, who came to Arkansas in his childhood, 
with his father, James W. Brady, one of the pioneers of Lawrence County. Jeremiah Brady was reared and grew to manhood in this county, where
he was also married to Miss Nancy MeCarrell, a native of the same place, and where their sun. George W., was born, October 8, 1858. Mr.
Brady, the father, was a farmer and blacksmith and resided here until the war, when, tired with a desire to battle for the cause of the Confederacy,
he left the peace and quiet of his family for the turmoil and dangers of war. He died at Mulberry, Ark. . and previous to his death his faithful
wife had passed away, thus leaving George bereft of both parents in quick succession. George W. Brady received a good common school education in
his youth, and, after his school days were over, entered into commercial life at Smithville, for two years. He next made a trip to Texas, in 1876,
and remained about eighteen months in the Lone Star State. On his return to Smithville he again occupied a position in one of the business houses,
 and in 1878. after obtaining a thorough knowledge of commercial affairs, he established a business of his own, which, by his enterprise and
fair dealings, has won for him a large patronage. Previous to 1885 Mr. Brady had been appointed deputy postmaster, but in that year he received his
appointment as postmaster, and has held the office since then. He was married September 7, 1871, to Miss Lee L. Raney, a daughter of Morgan Raney, of
Lawrence County, and by this marriage has had two children: J. Clarence and Claud Carter.

Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas 

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George W. Bridges is a son of John and Jane T. Bridges, the former of whom was a native of Missouri, and his mother a Virginian. He was 
born in that portion of Lawrence County, now known as Randolph, in 1856. His parents settled in Arkansas when they were children, about the
year 1829, and were married when they reached the age of maturity. They have always made Lawrence County their home, where the father
died in 1858, at the age of thirty-eight years, with the proud consciousness of having performed his duty to his country, having been a
survivor of the Mexican War, through which he served with the relogium of his commanding officers upon his bravery. The mother contracted
a second marriage with William Ferguson (now deceased), and had one child by her second husband, who was a captain in the Confederate army.
Mr. Ferguson died in June, 1865, shortly after he returned home from the war. Mr. Bridges is the third child of his parents, and was reared in
Randolph and Sharp Counties, returning to the former in 186it, where he remained until February 28, 1888, and then moved to his present
place of abode. He has upward of 100 acres of land under cultivation, and has also turned his attention to cotton planting. He was married to
Miss Bettie A. Glenn, in 1876, a young lady of Ballard County, Ky. They have had six children, one of them deceased. Those
living are: Charlie Emma, Mamie Ana, Sallie H. , Andrew O. and George William. Mr. Bridges is a member of the A. F. & A. M., of Ravenden, and is
a popular resident of Lawrence County. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas

********

Thomas F. Buchanan, an enterprising farmer and stock raiser, of Spring River Township, was born in Lawrence County, Ark., November 14, 
1854. He is the son of Thomas, and Eliza (Weithy) Buchanan, of Missouri, who moved to Arkansas after their marriage and settled in Lawrence
County, where the older Buchanan died in 1854, in the prime and vigor of his manhood. Thomas F. remained with his mother until he had attained his
maturity, and then commenced to take his own part in the world. He has been farming the greater portion of his life, and the experience
gained during that time has made him one of the best farmers in his county. When still a young man, he visited the city of Memphis, Tenn., with
a view of making it his future home, but after a residence of fourteen months, he decided to come back to Lawrence Country, and has remained here
ever since. On August 20, 1876, he was married to Miss Sarah Huffman, daughter of John Huffman, and two years after his marriage he bought
the tract of land upon which he now resides, and commenced cultivating the soil. He now owns 120 acres, with about thirty-live acres cleared, and
has built a large double house upon it, besides giving his attention to a small but well selected orchard of two acres, with several different varie-
ties of fruit. Mr. Buchanan and his wife have four daughters: Effie. Ruby, Ella and Orlana, and all four of the girls are members of the Missionary
Baptist Church. He takes great interest in education and is a member of the school board.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas


********

 Benjamin R. Bush, farmer and stock raiser, of Lawrence County, was born in Wilson County. Tenn., February IIJ, 1838. His parents were S. 
L. and Elizabeth (Tate) Bush, of the same State, who migrated to Arkansas in 1840, and settled in Lawrence County, where the father practiced
medicine up to the time of his death. He reared a family of three sons and one daughter, all of whom lived until their maturity. Benjamin R.
remained with his mother until his twentieth year, when he married and purchased a farm of his own. His bride was Miss Mary Orr,
a young lady who was reared in this county, who proved a usefull helpmate and faithful wife. Mr. Bush farmed on his land for several years, and
then bought more and added to it from time to time, until he now owns about 400 acres of the best laud in Arkansas, with 1 50 acres cleared, and
all of it situated four miles west of Minturn. There is a good residence, two barns, two cribs, and all other necessaries upon the land, besides
a line orchard of three acres, with peach and apple trees. He had almost nothing he could call his own when he first started in life, and has
accumulated his fine property by shrewdness, good judgment and industry, and has set a worthy example for others to follow.
In 1802 he enlisted in Col. Lindsay's company (afterward C'ol. Baber's), and served one year. He then joined Col. Reeves' regiment, and re-
mained with it until the close of the war, when he surrendered, and was paroled June 5, 1865, at Jacksonport. He took part in the engagements at
Cane Hill, Ark., and Price's raids through Missouri, also the fight at Pilot Knob, besides numerous other sharp encounters, liearing himself in a
soldierly manner through the entire campaign.
Mr. Bush lost his first wife in 1880. and afterward married Miss Ellen Giuthry. Five children were born to him by his first wife: Joseph W., George
R.. Sauford, Charles, and Mary Elizabeth, wife of William McC'lure; also two children by his second wife, who.se names are Clarence and Katie. Both
parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. and Mr. Bush is a member of the K. of H. and the Agricultural Wheel.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas
********
M. V. Camp, physician and surgeon of Walnut Ridge, has been a resident of Northeast Arkansas for the past twenty-one years. He was born in 
Bibb County, Ala., June 11, 1830, and is the son of James Camp, of South Carolina, who was one of the first to manufacture the ore into wire in the
iron furnaces of Birmingham. Ala. He was married to Miss Mary Looney of South Carolina, who died in Mississippi about the year 1870, aged
eighty years. Eight girls and four boys were born to them, four of them still living. Martin Van Buren Camp was the youngest of this large family,
and was reared on a farm. He had been given a liberal education at the city of Birmingham, principally at "Old Elyton," and was the leader in
Greek and Latin in his class. After his college days were over he embarked in the newspaper business at Butler, Choctaw County, Ala., and bought
the plant of the Southern Democrat. This paper he edited from 1837 to 1800. and his ability pushed it to the first place among the newspapers
of Alabama. It was the second paper in that State to advocate secession, and the Doctor still has copies of his first literary effort in his
library at home. In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Maner's regiment, and was created a sergeant (Mississippi troops) and then
under Col. (afterwards Maj.-Gen. ) Lowrv. with whom he served three months. He afterward organized a company of volunteers, with Dr. R. B.
Stephens, of Tupelo, Miss., of which he wits captain, while Dr. Stephens was made surgeon. The company formed part of Col. W. Mluges' Twelfth
Regiment Mississippi Cavalry, in Gen. S. W. Ferguson's brigade, and did excellent service all through the war. Dr. Camp came to Jonesboro.
Ark., after they had disbanded, and was engaged in teaching school in Craighead County. He then attended a course of lectures at the University of
Louisville, and when through moved to Gainesville, where he practiced fur fourteen years. In 1855 he located in Walnut Ridge, where he has
succeeded in building up a fair practice. He has no desire to accumulate a large amount of property, but believes in giving his children a
good education under his own supervision, so that his money will be judiciously expended. The Doctor is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows
fraternities, and of the Cross Roads Baptist Church, near Portia. He is a Democrat in politics, but has never held any
public office excepting that of county examiner of public instruction, in Greene County. He was married May 2, 1860, in Sumter County, Ala., to
Miss Sarah C. Sheid, of that State, a daughter of Jesse G. Sheid. Her parents had three girls and two boys born to them, one of them deceased.
Those living are Lizzie I. , the wife of Rev. James F. Jernigan, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and residing in Walnut Ridge;
James Sheid, now studying medicine with his father; Mary Ann, who graduated in June, 1889, from the Bellevue Collegiate Institute, of Cale-
donia, Mo., and Alice E., at home. Mrs. Camp's mother died July 17, 1888, aged fifty-one years. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyte-
rian Church, and came from what is known throughout South Carolina as the " Old Horseshoe Robinson Stock."
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas
********
John N. Campbell, treasurer of Lawrence County, Ark. , is a native of Cumberland County, N. C. , where he was born April 3, 1820. His father was
Miirdock Campbell, of Scotland, born of Scotch and Irish parentage, who was raised and married in North Carolina. After his marriage the elder
Campbell moved to Lawrence County, Tenn. , and settled on a farm, where he began the cultivation of the soil and rearing his children. From there he
moved to the State of Arkansas in 1843, settling in what is now Lawrence County, where he resided up to the time of his death, about the year 1852.
John N. Cambell reached his maturity in the State of Tennessee, and came to Arkansas in 1843, where he settled, in Lawrence County, on a farm, and
tilled the soil for a number of years. In 1872 he was elected county treasurer and at the expiration of his term was re elected, serving from 1872 to
1878. In 1888 his party, seeing the fitness of the man for the position and recognizing his abilities, once more elected him to office. He previously
discharged the duties of justice of the peace for twelve years, and also served as deputy sheriff and constable. Mr. Campbell was married, in 1846,
to Miss Mary J. Childers, of Virginia, and they are now the parents of three sons and one daughter, all of them having attained maturity and mar-
ried. Their names are: William M., John D., Alex C, and Sarah A., wife of John C. Overstreet, the entire family residing in Lawi-ence County.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and stand high in the regard of those surrounding them.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas
********


John Casper, farmer and blacksmith, whose work at the forge and anvil has placed him as an expert in his trade, was born in Rowan County,
N. C, May 5, 1827. He is a son of George and Nancy (Leonard) Casper, both of the same county and State, who died in their native place. Mi-.
Casper is one of a family of four sons and four daughters, of whom five are still living, three brothers and two sisters, the latter residing in
North Carolina, and the former, David, Jacob Alexander and John, living in Lawrence County. John Gasper is the oldest of the three brothers
living, and was reared in Rowan County, N. C, where he remained with his father until his twenty- sixth year. He moved west in 1853 and settled
in Lawrence County, Ark., where he bought a small section of land and commenced clearing and improving it. On March 8, 1854, he was married
to Mrs. Sarah M. Blackwell, a widow lady, of North Carolina, who also possessed a small improvement on government land. Mr. Casper im-
mediately set to work clearing his land, and they now have about seventy-five acres under cultivation. The home place comprises about 380 acres
altogether, with a good log house and other buildings built upon it, and an orchard. He also owns 240 acres in other sections, and from the fact
that he commenced on almost nothing at all, has done remarkably well. He owes it all to his own thrift and business tact, and is now considered
as one of the sustantial farmers of Lawreuce County. Mr. Casper enlisted in the Confederate army in 1863, and was a member of the Seventh Missouri
Cavalry, and afterward transferred to the Seventh Arkansas Infantry. He took part in many a hard fought battle — at Little Rock, Pilot Knob and in
Gen. Price's raids through Missouri, besides several battles of lesser importance. He was paroled at Shreveport, La., at the close of the war, and
returned homo to resume his labor upon the farm. In 1877 Mr. Casper lost his faithful wife, who died October 4, leaving him one child, George W.
He again married, his second wife being Mrs. Harriet E. Harris, a widow, of North Carolina, and has one child by this marriage Etter E. Mr.
Casper is a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church, in which he is an elder, and is also a member of the Agricultural Wheel, being
vice-president of the local Wheel. He has been unfortunate in the loss of his second wife, who died February 13, 1884, leaving behind her a
record of usefulness and many virtues.
Source- Biographical and Pictorial History of Arkansas
*********



John Edgar Wilson, of Walnut Ridge, Arkansas, was born July 7th, 1873, in Marshall County, Miss. His mother died when he was but a mere babe,
leaving him and a two-year-old sister to the care of his father, George W. Wilson, and a beloved aunt, Amanda Coleman,
now Mrs. English of Blossom, Texas. His father was poor (too generous to be otherwise), but made up in love and devotion to his children what he
lacked in material means. Their home was in Byhalia, Miss., where John received a fair education, and began to study pharmacy. When he was but
seventeen years of age, his father's health failed, and John was obliged to travel with him for a whole year, after which time his father died.
He then went to Memphis, Tenn., at which place he continued the study of pharmacy, and, after some experience and close attention to business,
he took charge of a drug-store for Mr. Crego, which he conducted with very satisfactory resulls to his employer until December, 1895. After
his health began to fail, he changed his place of residence by going to Walnut Ridge, Ark, and engaged with his uncle, T. J. Wilson, and his
brother-in-law, J. H. Sloan, in the drug business of the firm of Wilson, Sloan & Co., the deceased there taking charge. On November 11 lb, 1896,
he married Miss Claude Phelps, daughter of Col. A. C. Phelps, of Walnut Ridge, a handsome and accomplished yonng lady. She died October 2d, 1897,
and after this his health began failing rapidly. He went to Blossom, Texas, where he died on the 7th of February, 1898. His remains were
brought to Walnut Ridge and deposited beside his young wife. He was a young man of good address,affable, friendly and made many friends wherever he
went. The deceased became a member of our Association in 1896, at the meeting held in the city of Montreal, Canada.


George Thornburgh was born at Havana. Ill., January 25, 1847; came to Arkansas with his parents in December 1855. He taught school a short while. Attended law school at Cumberland University; admitted to the bar in 1868; entered the newspaper business in 1886 by establishing the "Walnut Ridge Telephone.'' He founded the Masonic Trowel in 1887, and is still its editor. Moved to Little Rock 1889, to take the business management of the Arkansas Methodist, which position he held for fourteen years. He then gave himself exclusively to the editing of the Masonic Trowel, a Masonic Monitor and a History of Freemasonry.

In early manhood, he served four terms as a member of the Legislature, and speaker of the House in 1881. In the Brooks-Baxter War, he was commissioned a Colonel, first by Elisha Baxter, Governor, and a second time by Augustus H. Garland. Governor. In 1885 he retired permanently from politics, and has declined to enter the field since that, though often urged to run for Governor.

He was one of the organizers of the Anti- Saloon League in Arkansas, has been its President for fifteen years and both President and Superintendent the past four years. He has written or helped to write every law enactment on the subject of liquor by the Legislature in Arkansas for twenty years past.

The following resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote of the Little Rock Methodist Conference Dec. 2, 1916:

"Whereas, The greatest moral victory in the history of our beloved commonwealth has recently been won in the defeat of Act No. 2, which, had it passed, would have again fastened upon this fair state the infamous saloon; and

"Whereas, the one man who is due the greatest credit for this splendid achievement is Col. George Thornburgh, the intrepid leader of the temperance forces of Arkansas a man who has given the best years of his rich and unselfish life to warfare of the common enemy of our homes and the Church of the Living God; and therefore, be it

"Resolved, That this Conference hereby express its great appreciation of the great work of Brother Thornburgh in leading our people to so decisive a victory, and that we assure hi manew of our sincere love and admiration."

Colonel Thornburgh was chosen Superintendent of the Arkansas School for the Blind Jan. 1, 1919. Although not an applicant he was chosen over several prominent candidates.

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Desegregation 1955 - Hoxie 21

William Penix senior,  who was the lawyer for the Hoxie County School Board during the integration of the Hoxie School District. He supported the integration of the schools. - Source - Tenn. Electronic Lib.

Rosemary Hill, wife of Marshall Hill,  was one of the parents of Hoxie 21 students involved in the desegregation of the Hoxie, Arkansas schools in 1955.

Ethel Tompkins a Hoxie 21 student. Ethel was the first African American student to graduate from Hoxie School District 46 in 1961. 

 

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