Newspaper articles about Colorado Military Service

 

The Gazette-Telegraph  19 Jan 1919 

Transcribed by Cathy Schultz

 

Colorado College Has Given 19 Men to Altar of War; 19 Were Killed in Action or Succumbed to Wounds

Nine Officers from Springs Institution Paid Penalty for Service With Colors; Scourge of War Fell Heavily on Former Students; Monument May Be Erected; One Woman Alumnae Died in Service

Eighteen gold stars  blaze amid the galaxy of blue ones on the Colorado college service flag.  Upon no other institution in the city, counting both undergraduates and alumni, has the scourge of war fallen so heavily.

    For many months, and until a few weeks ago, the college has been the place of military training, and there has been a steady exodus of young men from its campus to the training camps and officers' quarters.  The war game, which had supplanted athletics and many of the studies, was pursued day by day, till it had become a familiar sight in the city.

    However, tho out of range of visual observation, Colorado college men who had enlisted here and elsewhere were at the front in France when the war was still very young.  Others followed in endless chain.  Scores fought in the front-line trenches and endured hardships, and many of them were wounded.  One by one they gradually began to make the supreme sacrifice.  Many tributes already have been paid to these heroes, now present only in memory, and the names of some of them, who were of this city, or were particularly well known here, will be familiar words to be reverently uttered for years to come.

    Others gave their all no less gloriously when they were lost at sea on their way to France, or died of accident or sickness in training camps.  The, too, were in khaki and on their way to save the country from the ravages of a merciless foe and help redress the wrongs that other nations had suffered.

    Plans now are being considered by the student body of the college for a suitable memorial to the memory of the fallen students.  President Duniway has asked the present students for suggestions, but it is possible that final actions will not be taken until more of the collegians who now are in France return.

    Ten of the list were either killed in action or died of wounds.  Ten, also, were commissioned officers.  Only one, Miss Mabel Harlan, was a woman.  The honor roll follows:

CARL C. DITMAR:  Carl C. Ditmar, while he called Fruita his home, was practically a resident of Colorado Springs.  He attended the High school and later Colorado college, which he left to go to the University of Chicago.  After entering the service, he was sent to Camp Grant for training and arrived in France in October of last year.  He died in a camp there.  Both of his parents died when he was very young.  He left a sister, Miss Frieda Ditmar, who was in Dresden, Germany, when the war broke out, and an aunt, Mrs. V. P. Groves, of Fruita, and a grandmother, Mrs. Amanda J. Richardson, of Long Beach, Cal.

LIEUT. CARL A. SHADOWEN:  Lieut. Carl A. Shadowen, whose home was at Fort Morgan, Colo., was graduated from Colorado college in the class of 1917.  He attended the first officers training camp at Fort Riley and was attached to a company in the Three Hundred Fifty-fifth Infantry.  He was killed in action November 5, 1918.  He was a member of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity.

LIEUT. VICTOR WALLIN:  Lieut. Victor Wallin was attached to Company D, Three Hundred Fifty-sixth infantry and was killed in action.  He was a resident of Colorado Springs and was commissioned a second lieutenant at the first officers training camp at Fort Riley.  He was a member of the class of 1920 at Colorado college and belonged to Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.

SERGT. RALPH LYMAN HALL:  Sergt. Ralph Lyman Hall, who was a member of Company E, fourth battalion; Twentieth engineers, died in Mimizan, France, August 15, 1918, of influenza.  The regiment in which he served was a forestry regiment and he was first sergeant.  He was a member of the class of 1915  at Colorado college and belonged to Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.  His sister is Miss Edith Hall of the local High school faculty.

FRANK CAMPBELL SMITH Of Denver, but a member of the class of 1919 at Colorado college, died of pneumonia while in training at a military camp in Wyoming in August, 1916.  He was buried with military honors.

CLARENCE POTTER Was a Denver man, but well known here.  He was a member of the class of 1918 at Colorado college and enlisted in the Three Hundred Thirty-second tank corps and died while in the service, October 12, 1918, at Camp Tobyhanna.  He was a member of the University of Colorado chapter of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity.

CLINTON V. G. MILLER Of this city, while at a training school for engineers in France, contracted pneumonia and died October 27, 1918.  He was a Colorado Springs man and was graduated from Colorado college in 1916.  He became a member of the engineering corps and trained at Camp Kearny; Cal.  Later, he was sent to France with the headquarters company of the One Hundred Fifteenth engineers.  He was s member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity.  He was connected with the El Paso Ice and Coal company here.

ROY MUNCASTER of Denver and of the class of 1915 at Colorado college, was a member of Company C, Sixth batallion, Twentieth engineers.  He was aboard the Tuscania, and was lost in February 1918.  He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.

MISS MABEL HARLAN Was bacteriologist in the base hospital at Camp Logan, Camp Houston, Tex. when she succumbed to an attack of influenza-pneumonia.  She was a graduate of Colorado college and later taught in the school of music.  Her death occurred last November.

LIEUT. JOHN SCRANTON SHAW Of New York, but a graduate of Colorado college in the class of 1913, was killed in action.  He was in the infantry and lost his life in the battle on the heights of the Meuse shortly before the armistice was signed.  He was a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity.  His mother, Mrs. Marie Shaw, now lives in Michigan.

WILLIAM CHENAULT ARGO Son of Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Argo, superintendent of the Colorado school for the Deaf and Blind, fell a victim of the influenza epidemic last fall.  He was a member of the medical reserve corps at Harvard university.  He was graduated from Colorado college in the class of 1915 and was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity.

JOHN GABBERT Came from Caldwell, Kan., to attend Colorado college, and while a member of the class of 1920 was known by many in Colorado Springs when he went into the service.  He trained in the S. A. T. C. and died of influenza last fall.  He was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity.

LIEUT. HARRY C. RAY died of wounds received in action.  He attended the first officers training camp at Fort Riley and was there commissioned a second lieutenant.  A short while afterward he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant.  Later he was attached to Company G, Three Hundred Fifty-third infantry.  Lieutenant Wray was graduated in Colorado college in 1914 and was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.

LIEUT. ROLAND JACKSON, son of W. S. Jackson of Colorado Springs, was one of the best-known young men of the city.  He was killed in action June 6, 1918.  He was commissioned in 1917 at Fort Sheridan and was an officer of Company C, Thirtieth Infantry.  He was a member of the class of 1914 at Colorado college and belonged to Phi Beta Kappa fraternity.

FRED ALBERT WAISS, son of Mrs. W. P. Johnson, formerly of Colorado Springs, now of Kiowa, Colo., was killed in action September 11.  He was one of the first and one of the youngest Colorado Springs men to enter the service, enlisting in the marines, April 14, 1917.  He was a member of the famous Fifth regiment, and at different times served as a dispatch rider and as a member of the American military police in Paris.  He was a member of the class of 1920 at Colorado college.

LIEUT. GLEN SPENCER, whose home was Pueblo, was a member of the class of 1912 at Colorado college.  He was commissioned a second lieutenant at the first officers training camp at Fort Riley, January 1, 1918, and later made a first lieutenant at Camp Funston.  He sailed for service overseas, June 1, 1918, an officer of Company, E, Three Hundred Fifty-fifth infantry, and was killed in action October 20, 1918.

HOWARD DODSON who came to Colorado Springs from Sanger, Tex., to attend Colorado college, and was a member of the class of 1922, joined the S. A. T. C. here last fall.  He was transferred to the coast artillery officers training school at Fort Monroe last November.  He died of pneumonia while there, November 30, 1918.

LIEUT. EUGENE WUBBEN was killed in an airplane accident in France May 17, 1918.  He was a resident of Colorado Springs and entered the first officers training camp at Fort Riley in May 1917.  He was transferred to the aviation ground school at Champaign, Ill., in June, 1917, and began flying at Rantoul, Ill., in September of that year.  In December, 1917, he was commissioned a reserve military aviator.  It was March 10, 1918, that he reached Europe.  He was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity and of the class of 1919 at Colorado college.  His parents are Mr. and Mrs. John Wubben of the city.

LIEUT. LESTER HARTER Pilot in the aviation service, was killed in action September 18, 1918.  His home was in Aurora, Neb., but he was a member of the class of 1916 at Colorado college and had many friends here.  He was prominent in Colorado college athletics in 1912 and 1913, and was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.

CAPT. MARCELLUS HOLMES CHILES was a Denver man, but a member of the class of 1919 at Colorado college and of the local chapter of Phil Gamma Delta fraternity.  He died November 5, 1918, of wounds received in action at the battle of the Argonne forest.  Captain Chiles was commissioned a second lieutenant at the first officers training camp at Fort Riley.  Soon afterward he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant, and in January 1918, was made captain.  He received the wounds from which he died while leading his company in a charge on German machine-gun nests.  He was buried in the American cemetery at Cheppy-sur-Meuse, France.  Captain Chiles was an expert bayonet instructor.
 

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