Genealogy Trails Presents...

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Patriot Chiefs and Loyal Braves
by S. Pony Hill

 



This book is dedicated to my ancestors, without their ability to "endeavor to persevere", I would not be here today; and to my Uncle, Chief Billie "Buck" Bryant (deceased) who gave me guidance, support, and taught me that "to be an Indian is to feel the earth beneath your feet, the spirits in the air, and the ancestors in your heart."



The author, his eldest daughter Kendra Hill, and Chief Billie "Buck" Bryant

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TABLE OF CONTENTS:


Chapter One: "A large Nation" - The Colonial Period……………………………… 1


Chapter Two: "Forced, in a measure" - The Mulatto Label…..…………………..… 12


Chapter Three: "A company of friendly Indians" - The Florida Frontier……………. 17


Chapter Four: "All of Whom Claim to be Catawba" - The Florida Catawba….....… 26


Chapter Five: "A Motley Crew of Half-breed Indians" - The Civil War…………... 30


Chapter Six: "A Settlement or Town of their Own" - Scott's Ferry…………………34


Chapter Seven: "A Large Percentage of Indian Blood" - Scott Town………………..46


Chapter Eight: "Like Other Good Indians" - Woods……………………….…..…….57


Chapter Nine: The Modern Florida Catawba Tribe…………………………….……..60


Appendix: Florida Catawba family ancestry charts……………………………….….62

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AUTHOR'S CAUTION:

The author would like to make a special note regarding the usage of the name "Apalachicola" in reference to this Indian community. The terms "Apalachicola", Apalachicola River Catawba Indians" and "Apalachicola Catawba" are used interchangeably throughout this text and should not be confused as referring to the historic Apalachicola Tribe, which was considered a part of the Creek Nation.

The historical Apalachicola Tribe emigrated out of Florida in 1838 and 1839 to Indian Territory and east Texas. No positive documented evidence has ever been presented to this author, which would prove a descendancy of any family living in northwest Florida after 1839 from this band of Muscogee and Hitchiti speaking Indians.

The title 'Apalachicola' is used in reference to a general geographic area (much like the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County, North Carolina use the Lumber River) and is not meant to refer to some historic tribe. Except where specifically mentioned, the terms "Apalachicola River Catawba Indian Tribal Organization", or any abbreviation thereof, will be in reference to the descendants of Indians living within Scott's Ferry (Calhoun County), Scott Town (Jackson County), or Woods (Liberty County), which existed after the Apalachicola reservation Indians had emigrated.

It appears that the Catawba of northwest Florida have a proud warrior culture, having served on the side of the United States in every major conflict from the Revolutionary War to the Gulf War. This is a surprise given the amount of racial prejudice, educational hindrance, and economic depression that these people have suffered from their white neighbors. Regardless of how they were treated, they remained patriot chiefs and loyal braves, a fact of which they are all proud, and they should remain to be.

Copyright ©2006 by Steven Pony Hill, all rights reserved.

>>>>Used with permission from Pony Hill.<<<<

Patriot Chiefs and Loyal Braves

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