Hillsborough County Florida Shooting
of Captain Samuel J. Carter




CAPT. SAM CARTER SHOT


Popular Police Officer Lies Critically Wounded At His Home.

P. W. Knapp Did The Shooting

CONFLICTING STORIES BY CAPTAIN CARTER AND KNAPP---TROUBLE HAD PREVAILED IN KNAPP FAMILY FOR SOME TIME AND POLICE HAD BEEN ASKED TO INTERFERE---PRETTY STEP-DAUGHTER OF KNAPP ONLY WITNESS TO SHOOTING.


Police Captain Sam J. Carter, temporarily the head of the Tampa Police Department, was shot and possible fatally wounded about 9 o'clock last night in the rear of the Hillsborough High School grounds, by Phillander W. Knapp, a sewing machine salesman for L. Merriwether. How the deplorable affair started is a matter of decided contradiction. Knapp was seen in his cell at the police station last night by a Tribune reporter, just before being removed to the county jail, and said;

KNAPP'S STATEMENT

"All I know is that a man shot at me, and as I did not want to stand up and be shot at all night, I returned the fire. I do not know who he was. They say he was Captain Carter. Do you know if he is badly hurt?" "Where did this occur?" Asked the reporter. "In the backyard of the High School," was the reply. "I struck a match on the seat of my pants and held it before my face, when a man rose from the back steps of the school house, and called to me to "stand back" firing a pistol at me. The bullet wizzed by my ear and I shot back." "Who did you expect to find in the backyard?" he was asked. "I was looking for my wife's daughter. She was sitting on the steps beside the man who shot at me."

THE CAPTAIN'S STORY

Captain Carter's statement is to the affect that he had gone to the Knapp home on official business with Mabel Dennis, the step-daughter in the case, who had complained to the police that Knapp had mistreated her. The girl met him at the gate, Capt. Carter says, and told him that her step-father was hunting her with a pistol and threatening to kill her. Together they went to search for Knapp, Mable Dennis stating that he was concealed in the bushes back of the school building, and when about 10 feet of him, according to Captain Carter, Knapp fired. Captain Carter fell and Knapp fired again, as he lay on the ground.

THE GIRL'S STORY

Mabel Dennis states that Captain Carter had an appointment with her to see about giving her police protection from Knapp. They agree in stating that Knapp was not more than ten feet away when he fired, and in denying that Captain Carter fired at all. Knapp's pistol was retained at the police station last night after he was removed to the county jail. Only one chamber had been discharged.

TAKEN TO HIS HOME

As soon as the neighbors heard the shots, they ran to the scene, and soon a large crowd gathered. Captain Carter was carried to the home of J. A. Crumpton, next door to Knapp's, and a telephone message was sent to Steve Woodward, one of the captains closest friends, who came at once and carried Captain Carter to the latter's home, 1902 Taliaferro street. The bullet had struck its victim low down in the right part of the body, apparently ranging backward toward the left thigh. Captain Carter's shirt was saturated with blood, but he was quite cool, remarking to Mr. Woodward: "Steve, I'm shot half in two."

DOCTORS AT WORK

Drs. Helms and Lawrence were summoned at Captain Carter's request, and found the wound a very critical one. Being unable to locate the bullet, they decided to perform an operation at 1 o'clock this morning. Harry Howard was the first to reach Knapp after the shooting, and the latter said to him: "A man shot at me and I shot him."

KNAPP'S ARREST

Mr. Howard took him in charge, and carried him to the city jail, and about 11 o'clock he was removed in the patrol wagon, under charge of Lieut. Johnson, who for the time being becomes acting Chief of Police, though Chief Jones is expected to return from Washington City where he has been on business, in the very near future.

THE STEP-DAUGHTER

Mabel Dennis is a girl of about 15 years, who makes the sensational charge that her step-father had been trying to ruin her since she was 13 years old. Aside from this she would talk very little to the Tribune representative, (Continued on Page 8) and seemed remarkably cool and collected after the thrilling experiences she had just been though. Neighbors have been expecting some serious trouble in the Knapp family for some time. Knapp and his people have been having a good deal of trouble, making mutual complaints to the police about each other. It is the general belief in the neighborhood that Knapp is mentally deranged. Knapp has lived in Tampa a long time, and is well known as a sewing machine agent. He has been twice married, his first marriage being a more happy one than the second. A daughter of the first marriage lives in Georgia. He and his second wife have several children. Knapp has a twin brother in Tampa, Philetus W. Knapp. Captain Carter also has been in Tampa a long time. For the past three years he has been Captain of Police and for two years preceding was deputy sheriff under W. T. Lesley, and an unsuccessful candidate for sheriff last year in the democratic primaries. He has two brothers, George B. and John E., on the police force, and a young wife, formerly Miss Pauline Meeks, to whom he was married only a few months ago. He has hundreds of friends all over the county, who will greatly deplore the affair of last night and hope for his complete recovery.

LATEST REPORT

At 2:20 a.m., Dr. Lawrence was asked by the Tribune about Captain Carter's condition and stated that preparations were then being made for an operation and nothing definite could be stated until that was performed.

[Source: The Tampa Tribune; Pages 1 & 8; May 30, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





CONDITION OF CAPTAIN

REPORT FROM HIS BEDSIDE LAST NIGHT WERE NOT SO HOPEFUL--BULLET PENETRATED LIVER--LEFT LEG PARTIALLY PARALYZED--MRS. CARTER BEARING UP WELL UNDER SHOCK AND STRAIN--KNAPP STILL HELD IN COUNTY JAIL.

Captain Sam Carter was reported from his residence last night as doing as well as could be expected, though not resting easily. The bullet has not been located, but has been found that it penetrated liver, and caused a partial paralysis of the left leg, which however, he was able to use some last night. Mrs. Carter is bearing up well under the shock and nervous strain. Chief of police Jones has not been notified in regard to the serious wounding of his chief officer, as his exact whereabouts are not known. He had been attending a Chief's convention in Washington City, which adjourned several days ago, and stated before leaving Tampa that he would make the trip to New York and other points, returning the early part of next week.

JOHNSON IN CHARGE

Lieut. Johnson is in command of the police force and is keeping it up to its high standard of efficiency in spite of the trying surroundings. Phillander W. Knapp, whose shot laid Capt. Carter low Monday night, is still confined at the county jail, awaiting the result of the officers wound.

ABOUT THE PISTOL

The Times yesterday stated that the pistol used by Knapp was one which Harry Howard had given W. H. Frecker. Mr. Frecker requests the Tribune to say that, several weeks ago, Knapp called at his store and asked the loan of a pistol, stating that his wife's brother was coming to Tampa with the avowed intention of killing him. Mr. Frecker had only one pistol, the one given him by Mr. Howard, and Knapp secured this one. Mr. Frecker says he never carried or used a pistol.

[Source: The Tampa Tribune; Pages 1; May 31, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





CRITICAL

Condition of Captain Carter Exoited Grave Apprehensions Last Night--No Change Reported at 1 a.m. State Attorney Took His Statement.

Captain Sam J. Carter was in a decidedly critical condition last night, and the chances for his recovery were very discouraging. State's Attorney H. S. Phillips went to the house last night and took a statement from Captain Carter in regard to the shooting, but gave out nothing to the public. The Captain's condition was so serious last night that no one was allowed in the sick room except his wife and the physicians attending him. Other members of his immediate family were at the home, however, fearing that the end might come at any time, and that he could not last beyond daylight.

TO TELL PARENTS.

Patrolman John E. Carter, one of Captain Carter's four brothers, left last night for Naylor, Ga., 12 miles northeast of Valdosta on the Atlantic Coast Line Railway to bring his aged parents to the bedside of thier son. The mother's health is so feeble that the family did not dare telegraph her, and it will be John Carter's painful duty to break to his parents the news of the deplorable tragedy.

DANGEROUS BULLET.

It was stated yesterday that the pistol with which Captain Carter was shot had not been fired in two years and that the bullets which it contained were green with mold. The condition of the bullet, it is natural to suppose, complicates the case and makes the wound much more dangerous than it would ordinarily be. Drs Helms and Lawrence were in almost constant attendance upon the wounded man yesterday and last night, watching every development of the case.

UNCHANGED.

At 1 a.m. Capt. Carter's nurse stated to the Tribune that his condition was unchanged during the night. At that hour he was asleep. A constant stream of inquiries in regard to the wounded Captain's condition were received at the Tribune office during the day and night, showing the marked interest that is felt in his case and the solicitude for his recovery.

SOME HOPE.

At 2 a.m., Capt. Carter awoke from a long sleep and asked for water. He seemed better and said that he felt improved. He very shortly fell asleep again. His respiration, however, is down to 50, and it was said his only chance of pulling through the night would be continue his restful sleep. [Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 1, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





CAPTAIN SAM CARTER RALLIES IN HIS BRAVE FIGHT WITH DEATH

Much to the surprise of those who had given up all hope and who expected that, by yesterday's dawn, his body would lie cold in death, Capt. Sam J. Carter rallied yesterday and seemed to grow stronger and better as the day wore on. Last night, the same slight improvement was noticeable and it was with the buoyancy of hope that his faithful nurse, Mrs. Stevenson, responded a few minutes after midnight this morning to the Tribune's telephone inquiry, with the statement: "There is a very slight change for the better, but still a change. The Captain is now resting nicely." The sad tidings flashed from the Captain's bedsided Thursday night there was little hope that he would survive until the morning caused many to prepare for the last montage, but the friends of the wounded man yesterday felt renewed in their optimism and there was a general expression: "He will get well."

[Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 2, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





CAPT. SAM CARTER DEAD

HONORS PAID TO HIS MEMORY

SPECIAL MEETING OF COUNSIL, FLAGS AT HALF MAST--JUDGE WALL ORDERS REASSEMBLING OF GRAND JURY TO INVESTIGATE THE CASE--AGED PARENTS ARRIVED FROM GEORGIA AND MOTHER ASKED IF THERE WAS CHANCE OF HIS RECOVERY.

After three days desperate battle with death, Captain Sam J. Carter passed away at 6:20 o'clock yesterday morning. All hopes for his recovery had been abandoned the day before, but toward midnight he rallied and grew seemingly better until 2:30 a.m. Then he relapsed, and for four hours fought the fight that ended with death the conqueror. Those around his bedside his last night upon eart were Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Woodward, at whose house he boarded, Mrs. Carter and her brother R. L. Meeks, George, Albert and E. J. Carter, brothers of the Captain, with their families Judge and Mrs. Horace C. Gordon, R. I. Gordon, J. P. Hardee, W. A. Cook, Gordon Keller and Dr. W. P. Lawrence.

SURROUNDED BY FAMILY

As the shadows gathered, the dying man requested that all should leave him except his wife and immediate relatives. The friends who were closest to him in life and among the last with him on earth withdrew from the chamber of death and he passed into the valley of the shadow surrounded only by his nearest relatives, speaking his last affectionate words to his wife. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Carter, had not left Georgia where they had been on a visit, and his brother John was there to bring them to their dying son when the end came. Expressions of universal sorrow were heard when the news went abroad that the popular officer, whose hundreds of friends had just begun to hope for his restoration, was no more. The brief change for the better, which before it was generally known, had given way to death, only served to raise the foul hopes of friends and kindred, and then dash them to the ground.

SIGNS OF MOURNING

At the police station the regret was the keenest, as for eight years the members of the force had known Sam Carter as comrade and as officer. By order of Mayor Salomonson, the flag above the City Hall was put at half mast. Across the north side of the building festooms of white and black were hung, and also over the arched entrance to the department's headquarters. The dead captains desk in the office of the chief of police was draped in mourning, and the silence of death reigned, broken only by the low tones of the officers and men as they talked of the many things that endeared them to the deceased.

COUNCIL MEETING

At 11:30 o'clock a special meeting of the City Council assembled on call of the Mayor, and received from him an official notification of the officer's death, "resulting from a wound received while in the discharge of his duty." The executive suggested that the body should take suitable action to show the respect due Captain Carter by the city. Upon motion of Councilman Hardee President Webb appointed a committee, consisting of Mr. Hardee, Mr. Parker and Mr. Dekle, the chairman of the council committee on police, to draft a resolution expressive of sorrow and regret. The committee will meet in conjunction with the City Attorney Whitaker at the latter's office this morning to prepare the resolutions. Upon further suggestion of Mr. Hardee, seconded by Mr. Parker, Lieut. Johnson, who was temporarily at the head of the police department, was asked to request Sheriff Jackson to put the courthouse flag at half mast, in view of the fact that Captain Carter was formerly connected with the Sheriff's office. Also that the Counsil as a body meet with the pall bearers at the undertakers establishment the morning of the funeral, and escort the remains to the cemetery. Mr. Parker's suggestion prevailed that the committee should send a suitable wreath of flowers to gon on the casket. It was also ordered that the offices in the City Hall be closed during the hours of the funeral, though this will be a nullity, as the funeral will occur Sunday when the offices are closed anyway.

GRAND JURY CALLED

Judge Joseph B. Wall issued an order yesterday morning recalling the (Continued on Eight Page) CAPT. SAM CARTER

(Continued from First Page.)

Grand Jury recently discharged, to meet next Tuesday at noon and investigate the death of Captain Carter. The circumstances of his shooting last Monday night by Phillander W. Knapp are to fresh in the public mind to need repetition. State's Attorney H. S. Phillips was seen by a Tribune reporter yesterday in regard to Captain Carter's dying statement, which with the testimony of Knapp's step-daughter, Mabel Dennis, will be laid before the grand jury. Mr. Phillips said that he would prefer not to give out the statement as it would be difficult to secure an impartial jury if it were made public before the trial. Knapp, of course, is still in jail.

CHIEF JONES RETURNS

Chief of police J. S. Jones returned last night from the two weeks' vacation, and relieved Lieut. Johnson of the command of the department. Chief Jones first learned of the shooting of Captain Carter last Wednesday, while he was spending the day with a friend in Georgia when one of the ladies of the family called his attention to a dispatch in the Augusta Chronicle relating to the shooting. He left on the next train, stopping over a few hours to see a brother, and then coming to Jacksonville. He there met R. A. Crowell, of this city, who informed him that the Captain's condition was hopeless. While on the way to Tampa yesterday afternoon, he learned on the train of his chief lieutenant's death some hours previous.

DEPARTMENT TO ATTEND.

The Chief announced last night that the entire police department would attend the funeral tomorrow, with perhaps a few special officers to patrol the city during the funeral.

FUNERAL SUNDAY.

The funeral services will be held at 9:00 a.m. tomorrow at the home of the Captain's father, Mr. E. E.Carter, Lamar street, being conducted by Rev. B. K. Thrower, pastor of the First Methodist church. Interment will be made in Woodlawn cemetery, by undertaker J. L. Reed. Tampa Lodge of Odd Fellows, the three lodges of Knights of Pythias, Bay, Pythagoras and Red Cross, with the entire police force, the City Council and a detachment from the fire department, will attend. The following gentleman will be pall bearers and are requested to meet at Reed's parlors at 8:00 a.m. tomorrow: S. T. Woodward, H. C. Gordon, W. A. Cook, Gordon Keller, Douglas Cononley, T. N. Henderson, Theodore Leslie and V. H. Knight.

AUTOPSY HELD

An autopsy was helf at the undertaking establishment yesterday morning by Doctors Helms, Lawrence and Ives. It was found the bullet had penetrated the liver, and also gone through a portion of the backbone, lodging in among the muscles of the back. Blood poisoning had set in, causing death.

STORY OF HIS LIFE

Samuel James Carter was 36 years of age, and was born in Milltown, Berrien County, Ga. He had long been a resident of Tampa, and in 1895 was appointed a patrolman under the first Salomonson administration, serving as such for three years. He was First Lieutenant under the Bowyer administration, then left the force and for two years was a deputy under sheriff Lesley. Three years ago he was appointed police captain, next in rank to Chief, by Mayor McKay, and reappointed last year by Mayor Salomonson, meeting his death while acting Chief of Police. Captain Carter was a candidate for Sheriff before the democratic primaries last year, and while defeated for that office received a vote that was regarded by his friends as a high personal compliment. He had many years experience as an officer, and was faithful, popular and efficient. In person he was a splendid specimen of manhood, being about six feet tall, solidly built, of a commanding appearance, and in the full vigor of life. He was married a little less than one year ago to Miss Pauline Meeks. To her and the other members of his family the heartfelt sympathies of hundreds of friends go out in the hour of their great bereavement. Aside from the relatives previously mentioned Captain Carter leaves two half sisters, one in Wildwood, Fla. and one in Georgia. John E. Carter and his parents arrived at 10:50 last night over the Atlantic Coast Line. The latter were not made aware of their son's death until after they had arrived in the city and been taken to their home, friends fearing the result of the shock to the frail mother who is afflicted with heart trouble.

PARENTS ARRIVE

When the train arrived at Lakeland, John Carter telephoned to his brother Albert and learned of Sam Carter's death, but did not break the news to the old folks. Arriving in Tampa, they were met by Dr. L. S. Oppenheimer and driven home in a carriage, the mother asking several time, "O Dr., do you think Sam will get well?" to which the physician made no reply. When told of his death, Mrs. Carter came near collapsing. Captain Carter's body will lie at the undertaking establishment at the corner of Florida avenue and Zack street, where it may be viewed by friends until 10 o'clock this morning when it will be removed to the home of his parents and brothers, 1808 Lamar street.

FUNERAL NOTICES

Pyhagoras lodge, K. of P., is summoned to appear at the Castle Hall Sunday at 8 a.m., To attend the funeral of the late Sam J. Carter. Pythians of Tampa are invited to join in the mark of respect. George H. Atwood, K. of R. and S. It was suggested yesterday that the Georgians of the city, particularly those who are members of the Georgia Society of which Mr. Carter was a prominent member and worker, attend the funeral in a body and all Georgians who desire to attend the funeral are requested to meet at the residenct at 8:30 a.m. Sunday.

[Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 8; June 3, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





SAD RITES

Of The Funeral Of Sam J. Carter Will Occur This Morning

AN IMPRESSIVE PROCESSION

Will Accompany the Remains to Their Last Resting Place--City Council, City Departments, Knights of Pythias and Odd Fellows to Turn Out.

Arrangements have been completed for the funeral of the late Captain Sam J. Carter from the residence of his father, E. E. Carter, 1808 Lamar street, at 9 o'clock this morning. Rev. B. K. Thrower, pastor of the First Methodist church, will conduct the services at the house, after which the remains will be borne to Woodlawn cemetery, and laid to rest.

The police department, headed by Chief Jones and Lieut. Johnson, will attend the funeral in a body, with a detachment of ten men from the fire department, headed by Chief Harris, the City Council in a body, and other city officials. Members of the six Lodges of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias will also attend, Captain Carter having been a member of both orders.

HONORARY ESCORT

At 8 o'clock the members of the City Council and the honorary pall bearers will meet at undertaker Reeds establishment, and proceed thence to the residence. The honorary pall bearers, S. T. Woodward, H. C. Gordon, W. A. Cook, T. N. Henderson, Theo Lesley, Douglas Conoley, Victor H. Knight, Frank Bruen, M. B. MacFarlane, H. L. Knight, L. L. Buchanan, J. A. Griffin, John Trice, P. O. Knight, Herman Glogowski, Enrique Pendas, Dr. N. B. Rhoades, P. Rey and Charles Wright are chosen from among the civilian friends of the dead officer, and the active pall bearers from the private members of the police department. The latter are H. M. Middleton, A. S. Thompson, W. T. Miller, B. K. Greene, C. M. Story, L. R. Rhodes, L. A. Brantley and G. L. Middaugh. Until 10 o'clock yesterday morning the remains lay at Reeds parlors at that hour being conveyed to the residence, Chief Jones and detectives F. A. Bell and J. T. Durst accompanying them. During the morning hundreds of people, of all ages, colors and conditions, passed in an almost unceasing stream and gazed upon the dead. The body lay in a handsome black casket with silver handles and a silver plate, bearing the simple inscription, "Samuel J. Carter, 1869-1905."

SEEMED NATURAL

The body was dressed in a suit of civilians clothes, and the face and features appeared as natural as possible under the circumstances, though the flesh was considerably discolored as a result of the blood poisoning that caused death. A magnificent wreathe was sent down as a mark of esteem and respect from the City Council. The services at the grave this morning will be conducted by Pythagoras Lodge, Knights of Pythias, in accordance with the wishes of Mr. Carter.

ATTENTION, PYTHAGORAS LODGE.

The members of Pythagoras Lodge, Knights of Pythias, are requested to assemble at Castle Hall, this morning at 8 o'clock to attend the funeral of our late brother, Samuel J. Carter. All Knights are invited to be present and attend. A. M. Godwin, Chancellor Commander, G. H. Atwood, Keeper of Records and Seal.

ATTENTION, ODD FELLOWS.

The members of Tampa lodge, No. 7, and all odd Fellows, are requested to meet promptly at 8 o'clock this morning, to attend the funeral of the late Capt. Samuel J. Carter, a member of this order. Earnest Smith, Noble Grand. [Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 4, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





PROCESSION A MILE LONG

NEXT TO THAT OF MARTINEZ YBOR AND H. L. MITCHELL, SAM CARTER'S FUNERAL WAS THE LARGEST TAMPA EVER SAW--DEAD OFFICER'S HORSE LED, RIDERLESS, IN THE CORTEGE.

Fully a thousand people, friends, acquaintances and citizens, attended the funeral of Police Capt. Sam J. Carter which occurred in this city Sunday morning. Long before the hour set for the funeral, 9 a.m., the house of his brother, George B. Carter, 1808 Lamar street, where the services were held, the sidewalks, carriages in the streets and porches of neighboring houses were filled to overflowing. It is said to have been the largest funeral ever held in Tampa since B. Martinez Ybor died, with the possible exception of the funeral of ex-governor Henry L. Mitchell two years ago. The day was calm and beautiful, as serence a Sabbath was never known.

SERVICES AT HOUSE.

Brief services were held at the residence, Rev. B. K. Thrower, of the First Methodist church, delivering a few remarks of sympathy and consolation to the bereaved family. A number of beautiful hymns appropriate to the solemn occasion were rendered by a quartet consisting of Messrs. Gaylord and Milliken, Mrs. E. V. Whitaker and Mrs. R. Jennie Weller, after which the many friends file past the body resting in its coffin in the parlor, and looked for the last time on the dead.

A MILE LONG

The funeral procession was at least a mile long, the front reaching Woodlawn cemetery before the rear was well under way. Chief Jones and Lieut. Johnson, both on horseback, headed the cortege, followed by Lieut. Sellers and the other members of the police department on foot.

Behind them, and led by Patrolman Warren, was the dead Captain's handsome bay horse, riderless and with crepe upon its harnesses, a silent and touching reminder that the late officer, who was generally seen on horseback, was "off duty" forever. Chief Harris, in his trap, followed by a detachment of ten from the fire department, came next. After them, in carriages, came the members of the City Council, other city and county officials, and the honorary pallbearers, of whom there were twenty. The Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythians followed on foot, preceding the hearse. Next to the hearse came the carriage carrying the bereaved widow, her mother and brother, and after them, in carriages, the other members of the family, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Carter and four sons, with the families of the latter. A large number of people living in the vicinity of the cemetery already walked were driven thither, and were awaiting the cortege when it came up.

AT THE CEMETERY

Arriving at the newly made grave, the police department were halted by the Chief, and faced each other in two lines, Chief Jones on the left and Lieut. Johnson on the right, and all stood with hats off while the hearse was drawn between the lines and halted. Eight members of the police force, the active pall bearers, removed the casket and, followed by the honorary pall bearers, lowered it into the grave, the sides of which were draped with white cloth covered with sprigs of arbor vitae, the symbol of internal life that is frequently used in the burial services of secret organizations.

PYTHIAN SERVICE

G. H. Atwood, the Keeper of Records and Seals, conducted the ritual services for Pythagoras Lodge, Knights of Pythias. The services were very brief, consisting only of a short reading and prayer, after which the mourners rapidly disbursed, leading the remains of Sam Carter one of the most popular men and officials than ever lived in Tampa, in their last restin place, freed forever from the cares and sorrows of human life.

A CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thus publicly express our heartfelt thanks for the kindness and courtesies shown during the last illness and since the death of our husband, son and brother. It will never be possible for us to repay them, or to express to the many friends our deep appreciation, but desire to take this means of assuring them one and all that their kindness will never be forgotten. Mrs. Samuel J. Carter, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Carter and family.

[Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 6, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





SENSATIONAL RUMORS ARE IN CIRCULATION

CONCERNING TESTIMONY ADDUCED BEFORE GRAND JURY IN CARTER-KNAPP CASE--ASSERTED THAT OTHER PERSONS WERE PRESENT WHEN TRAGEDY OCCURRED, WHO HAVE NOT YET BEEN MENTIONED PUBLICLY IN THE CASE--MARKED CONFLICT IN TESTIMONY, ONLY THREE POINTS BEING ESTABLISHED POSITIVELY.

Twenty witnesses have so far been subpoenaed to before the Grand Jury which is investigating the killing of Capt. Sam Carter by Phillander W. Knapp, but the body adjourned yesterday afternoon until this morning without having reported a true bill. While of course nothing has given out from the Grand Jury room, there were persistent rumors of a sensational nature about all of yesterday, to the affect the evidence had been discovered there were other parties in the immediate vicinity of the shooting, and that they would be summoned to give testimony. The Grand Jury is evidently preceding very cautiously and carefully in the investigation, and speculation is divided as to whether or not they will return an indictment.

MUCH CONFLICT

It is known that there is remarkable conflict in the testimony of the various witnesses, on almost every detail of the case. The fact that Carter was killed and that he was killed by a bullet from Knapps pistol and that two shots were fired seem to be the only points upon which there is unanimity.

[Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 8, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





MANY APPEAR BEFORE JURY

EXHAUSTIVE INVESTIGATION OF KNAPP CASE IS BEING CONDUCTED.

The Grand Jury is investigating the fatal shooting of Capt. Sam Carter by Phillander W. Knapp last week, having been recalled by Judge Wall and charged by him with this duty yesterday afternoon. A large number of witnesses, including members of Knapp's family, neighbors and members of the police department, were examined during the afternoon, and the examination of witnesses will be continued this morning, or perhaps throughout the day, before the body decides whether or not to return a true bill. [Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 8, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





KNAPP A FREE MAN

Jail Doors Open For Lucky Man Eight Days After Victims Death

Twelve days after firing the shot that killed Captain Sam J. Carter and eight days after the officer's death, Phillander W. Knapp walked the streets of Tampa a free man. Promptly at noon yesterday Jailer Levister open the doors of the cell and jail and let the prisoner out, after an incarceration for nearly two weeks, Mr. Knapp went quietly downtown in the afternoon, and was accompanied all during the afternoon by his brother. While in jail Mr. Knapp was treated very considerately and was not closely confined until after Capt. Carter's death. It is not definitely known whether or not he intends to remain in Tampa. County Solicitor Raney declined yesterday afternoon to say why he did not file in the information against Knapp for manslaughter, as was in his power, under the law. It is presumed, though he did not make any statement to that effect, that he did not believe a jury would convict Knapp with the evidence before the Grand Jury, which after an exhaustive investigation, refused to return an indictment, the vote standing 10 for no true bill against 8 for manslaughter.

[Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 8, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.





NO CHARGE AGAINST HIM

GRAND JURY REPORTS "NO TRUE BILL" AGAINST CARTER'S SLAYER

HE'S STILL HELD IN JAIL

TO AWAIT ACTION OF SOLICITOR RANEY, OF CRIMINAL COURT---GRAND JURY, IT IS ALLEGED, DECIDED THAT CARTER FIRED FIRST SHOT AND THAT KNAPP WAS JUSTIFIED IN RETURNING FIRE--OTHER COUPLE AT LAST IDENTIFIED.

The Grand Jury, which has been for two days investigating the killing of Capt. Sam J. Carter, of the police department, by Phillander W. Knapp, having been recalled for that purpose by Judge Wall, yesterday morning made the following report to the court: "To the Hon. J. B. Wall, Judge Sixth Judical Circuit of Florida: We the Grand Jurors, beg leave to report that we have investigated the facts concerning the killing of Samuel J. Carter by Phillander W. Knapp, on the night of the 29th of May, 1905, and find no true bill, our ballot being eight for manslaughter and ten for no true bill, J. A. Barnes, Foreman; W. T. Miller, Clerk."

Judge Wall received the report of the Grand Jury without comment, and discharge the body from further service. Later, Judge Wall ordered that Knapp be held in jail to await the action of Solicitor Raney, of the Criminal Court, who has the right, should he so desire, to file an information against Knapp any offense less than murder. Knapp will probably be released from custody today, as it is not believed that Solicitor Raney will file an information.

ENDS THE CASE

This rather sudden termination of a homicide case probably concludes the investigation of the killing of Capt. Carter so far as the courts are concerned. It is very infrequent, and was commented upon largely yesterday, that a man who kills another is able to obtain full and free exoneration within ten days after the killing.

MANY WITNESSES.

Many witnesses were examined before the Grand Jury, State Attorney Phillips conducting the examinations and all the testimony being taken in shorthand. The Tribune, from interviews with a number of members of the jury and the State Attorney, ascertained that the jury based its action in not bringing a charge against Knapp on the belief, from all the testimony heard, that Capt. Carter fired the first shot in the difficulty and that Knapp was justified in returning the fire.

The Grand Jury was also unable, it is alleged, to obtain confirmation from other witnesses of the dying statement of Capt. Carter. Capt. Carter stated positively in his statement that the shooting occurred outside the school grounds, while all the other witnesses testified that it was inside the grounds. Mabel Dennis, the stepdaughter of Knapp, and the girl who was with Captain Carter at the time the shooting occurred, also showed great indecision in her testimony before the Grand Jury as to who fired the first shot, although her first statement about the affair was that Knapp fired the first shot.

ANOTHER COUPLE

It was stated in yesterday's Tribune that there were rumors that another couple, whose names had not been learned, was present in the vicinity of the fatal affray. Yesterday morning the identity of this couple was disclosed. They proved to be Rimo Ceconi, of Green & Ceconi, proprietors of the Nebraska avenue saloon, and Miss Maud Andrews, a telephone operator. They testified that they were sitting on a bench just outside the school grounds and saw a man and girl enter the grounds, followed, some five or ten minutes later, by another man. After a brief interval, they heard two shots fired with scarcely any interval, and then a man and a girl came out of the grounds, they taking their departure at once. This testimony, in view of the Grand Jury, tended to corroborate the statements of other witnesses and had much effect in bringing about the decision that there was no case against Knapp.

THE WITNESSES

The following is a list of the witnesses heard before the Grand Jury: Mabel Dennis, Mrs. P. W. Knapp, Mrs. J. A. Crumpton, B. K. Greene, Eugene Brantley, Will Lane, Steve Woodward, Mrs. Nellie Burrows, H. C. Thompson, C. F. Woolweaver, Hugh Hawkins, Miss. Smith, Mrs. Lunden, Chief Jones, W. L. Flynt, Charlie Drummond, T. V. Smith, John Ellison, Harry Howard, McRae, Mary Fowler, Mrs. Beasley, Roy Jackson, M. U. Smith, S. J. Berry, C. H. Greenidge, Mrs. Maud Andrews, Elmo Cesconi, W. H. Frecker, J. P. Hardee, W. C. Sellars, Bessie Hewill.

KNAPPS STATEMENT

Knapps full statement of the transaction has never been published but the Tribune learns that he claims he was sent by his wife to look for Miss Dennis; that he took his pistol in his hand and went in the direction of the school grounds; that he entered the grounds and heard voices; recognizing Miss Dennis as sitting on the steps, with a man, whom he did not know; that he struck a match on the seat of his trousers, and held it up in order..(Continued on Page Eight) CARTER CASE (Continued from First Page.) To see who the man was; that at that moment, the man stood up and called out "get out of here; what are you doing here?" and at that same time fired, the bullet whizzing by his ear; that he then returned the fire without giving the man time to shoot again; that he went to the place, the man having fallen, but did not recognize him, then followed the girl out of the grounds; that she told him it was Mr. Carter.

The Grand Jury evidently believed the facts to be in line with Knapp's own statement. It should be mentioned, however, that all the testimony, and the postitive statement of Miss Dennis, showed that Captain Carter went to the place in response to Miss Dennis' call for an officer. Miss Dennis swore emphatically that she had sent for an officer and did not know which one was coming and that she and Captain Carter were talking about the conduct of Knapp at the time the trouble occurred. She declared that Capt. Carter had never addressed you in any other but in a gentlemanly way. Capt. Carter, in his statement, said he had never met the girl before that night.

SHERIFF HAS JAIL GUARDED BY ARMED MEN

Sheriff Jackson spent last night at the County Jail. Around the jail, he had posted a dozen or more men, armed with Winchester pump guns. Every person who passed in the vicinity of the jail during the night was halted and made to give an account of himself. The Sheriff's precautions were due to reports that an attempt would be made last night to take P. W. Knapp, the slayer of Capt. Sam Carter, out of the jail and lynch. It is not believed that there was any real foundation for the reports, but the Sheriff thought it best to be on the safe side.

NOTHING DOING.

The Tribune kept in close touch with the Sheriff by phone. There were no signs of trouble up to the time the Tribune went to press. "How's Knapp?" a Tribune reporter asked the Sheriff. "He's asleep," was the response over the wire. "Any trouble in sight?" "only two suspicious characters seen about here," said the Sheriff, "and they were made to move on."

MAY KEEP HIM IN.

It was said last night that Knapp, although the courts have already declared him free, would be kept in jail for three or four days, as a measure of protection to himself. Efforts to ascertain if there was any foundation for the report's of trouble were fruitless. It is not believed that any attempt is contemplated seriously. But the sheriff is keeping a cordon around the jail and it is dangerous to wander in that vicinity after nightfall. [Source: The Tampa Tribune; Page 1; June 9, 1905.]
Transcribed and submitted by Tam Inman.








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