Hillsborough County, FL
Tampa Pioneers, 1914
Transcribed by Mary Triplett


BROWN

W. Charles Brown came to Tampa from Athens, Ohio, in November, 1855. He was a civil engineer, and the clerk of court of the city at one time. He served in the Seminole Indian war, being one of Captain Sparkman's company. He married Mary E. Hager, June 23, 1859, who came here December 8, 1855 from St. Augustine, Fla., with her mother, Mrs. Florencia Hager, the latter afterward marrying Louis Bell. Mr. Brown surveyed some of the outlying land around Tampa. He died December 31, 1904. His widow and their four children are still living. The children are: Mrs. Mary Sidney (Tom) Gibbons, Mrs. Minnie (Louis) Carney, of Port Tampa; Flossie and Karl, the last two named being unmarried. The widow and the descendants, except Mrs. Carney, live on Washington street, this city.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett



COLLER-JACKSON

Levi Coller was, as far as can be ascertained, about the first American white pioneer of the city of Tampa, who was a permanent settler. He was of English and German descent, and came from Massachusetts to St. Augustine in 1812, married Nancy Dixon, of English and French ancestry two years later. During the war of 1812 Florida was the bone of contention of Spain, England and American governments. After the restoration of peace, the Coller family moved to Alachua County. About the year 1823 Mr. Coller came to Tampa prospecting, with a view of settling here. He made the perilous journey on horseback and alone. He selected a beautiful piece of land to homestead, but, unfortunately, did not file his preemption papers before returning to his family in Alachua. When he came again to Tampa in 1824 with his family, the Government agents had selected the same tract of land for a military post—Fort Brooke, this being known today as The Garrison.

Coming to Tampa with the Collers were two families named Dixon and Ellis, their descendants having finally drifted away from the city. The Coller family built a home on the eastern shore where two streams joined and empty into the bay. One of the streams of water is still called Coller's Creek. The Indians were friendly to the family and Levi Coller became prosperous. Most of the war vessels which guarded Tampa and Fort Brooke anchored off Coller's Creek, and purchased supplies from the Coller farm. After the outbreak of the Seminoles and the massacre of Major Dade and his men, which is well known history, the Coller family and others moved into two tents at the fort, where they were better protected against the Indians. After a few weeks General Gaines and his company come to the relief of Major Beldon and his company, at Fort Brooke. Captain Crowell came later and, by invitation, the Collers lived on his well equipped ship for many months.

During an epidemic of measles and fever, four of the younger Coller children died. Nancy, the eldest, was also ill, and her life was saved by Dr. Robert Jackson, a West Point student, stationed at the fort as surgeon's chief steward. Nancy Coller married the handsome young physician in September, 1836. The children of Levi and Nancy Coller became some of Tampa's leading citizens, as follows: Mrs. Nancy (Robert) Jackson. Cordelia, Harry, who first married Cooper Cason, and after his death married Charles Hoey. She died in 1900 at the age of 92 leaving no children. Mrs. Eliza (Louis) Bell, whose only living child is Anna Bell, corner Morgan and Bell streets, the Garrison. Mrs. Mercedes (Louis G.) Covacevich, (died I860). Their offspring are enumerated in the account of the Covacevich family. John Collier, who married Lavina Shannon. Mrs. Lucinda (Henry) Oowart, who is living on Harrison street. (See Cowart family on separate page.) Mrs. Jeanette (W. T.) Haskins. Mrs. Haskins, who is the youngest of the Coller family, survives her husband and lives on Hillsboro street. She gave birth to the following children: Levi, W. T., Jr. (dead), Eugene, of Bellair, Fla. ; Jennie C, now Sister Mary Camillus of the Convent of Mercy, New Orleans; Mrs. Mary Ann (S. A.) Phillips and Kate Haskins, unmarried. W. T. Haskins took a homestead of 40 acres in Hyde Park, which fronted on the Bay, part of the land being where Plant and Hyde Park avenues now are. This joined the Robert Jackson homestead. About that time, three well-to-do families of Jackson, Haskins and Hayden owned about all of the valuable section of Hyde Park.

Because of the inconvenience of getting their children across the Hillsboro River by boat, the Haskins family finally gave to General Washington their homestead claim and purchased property on the east side of the river, which has since become very valuable. After the close of the Seminole Indian war Dr. Robert Jackson, who married Nancy Coller, resigned from military service, and became a civilian. He built his home near the west bank of the Hillsboro River, and Tampa Bay. Mr. Jackson was judge of the Probate Court of Hillsborough County for a number of years, and was frequently called by physicians in consultation. Robert Jackson died March 2, 1865, and his wife survived him many years, dying in 1907 at the good old age of ninety-seven. The names of both these pioneers are beloved in Tampa. Their sons and daughters who have survived them are: Captain W. P. Jackson, who married Lunna Collins, whose offspring are Mrs. Mary (Henry Grady) Lester, Bartow, who married Addie Howell; Robert, Jr., who married Orie Hochstein; W. Preston, who married Bertha Chason, of Bainbridge, Ga., and Lucile, unmarried. Mrs. Mary Cardy (died recently) a daughter, Theresa Bryan, survives her. John B., unmarried, Robert A., ex-sheriff of the county. Mrs. Cordelia (E. A.) Barclay, of Elgin, 111. Mrs. Theresa (M. T.) Cheeseborough, of Galveston, Tex.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett



COVACEVICH
Louis G. Covacevich was among the well known settlers of Tampa. He was born in Austria, and came to Tampa in 1837. He was a merchant, and after the Civil War entered into partnership with Captain Miller. He married Mercedes Coller, one of the daughters of the earliest pioneers, Levi Coller. Their name has not been continued for the reason that all of their offspring were daughters except one, Louis Jr., who was killed in the Civil War. The daughters were four: Mrs. Mary (James) Williams, of Crystal River, Florida, the children being Eunice and Agnes (both married). Mrs. Nancy Phillips of Harwichport, Mass, who children were Mrs. Agnes (Henry) Chase; Louis who married Sue Kelly, and Earl, who married Alice Walker. Mrs. Laura (Doc) Rawles, of Manatee County. Mrs. Johanna (James) Brandon. Both Mr. and Mrs. Brandon died several years ago. Their children are John of Riverview, who married Annie Hendry; Camillus B, of Tampa, who married Nellie Blount; Covacevich Louis, of Tampa, who married Emily Whitney; Lettice, unmarried; Mrs. Doc Estelle (W.A.) Varnadoe of Tampa; James of Gardner, Fla., who married Minnie Waldron.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



COWART

Benjamin Cowart and his wife Margaret Chesser, of Georgia, came to Tampa with their children in 1849. Mr. Cowart opened a butcher shop here which became a thriving business. The eldest son of Benjamin and Margaret Cowart, is Benjamin Thomas, D.D.S, an eminent citizen who married Maggie Packer, of Key West. At the age of sixteen this boy went to sea, subsequently enlisting in the United States revenue service. He was a private in Company B, Seventh Regiment of Florida Volunteers in the Civil War, and fought in the battles of Chickamauga and others. He was transferred to the navy, serving as paymaster’s clerk and yeoman, afterward being placed in charge of the flagship Savannah. He was captured and placed in Libby Prison. At the close of the war he returned to Tampa and became deputy collector and inspector of customs here. Later he was assistant special agent of the United States Treasury department. While holding such appointments he studied medicine and dentistry, afterward completing his studies at Maryland Dental College, Baltimore. He began practicing dentistry in Washington in 1877. Alter again holding appointments in the Treasury Department, stationed at St. Augustine, he removed to Tampa in 1885, still practicing dentistry here. He is ex-president of the Florida Dental Association. The other children of Benjamin Cowart the First, are Henry, who married Lucinda Coller; Richard (died unmarried), Jane, married Louis Covasovich, and after his death married John Robles; Julia, the present wife of John Robles, having married him after the death of her sister, Jane.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett



FERRIS


William G Ferris, came to Tampa in 1833. He was one of the first merchants of the village and owned a schooner which he operated for the shipment of his goods. His first store, which was a small building, was washed away during the storm of 1848, and he rebuilt the following year. He served in the War Between the States. Mr. Ferris married and reared a family, the best known of the children being Joshiah, whose sons are Josiah, Jr., publisher of the Orlando Sentinel, and Lee, of Tampa. Henry, a merchant of Tampa, and Limona, who had no children, but whose widow, Mrs. Julia Ferris, now resides here. William, whose widow is now Mrs. Florence Hanford, who lived here for many years is now in Birmingham, Ala. The only child of William and Florence Ferris is William H., now of Birmingham, Ala., his only descendant being Catherine Ferris of Tampa, the young daughter of Kate C. Ferris.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



GIVENS


John T. Givens was born in Abbeville District, now county, S.C, on September 15, 1815. He came to Florida first in 1835 as a member of Colonel Childs’ regiment of South Carolina Volunteers (mounted), enlisted for service in the first Seminole Indian War, and was stationed at Fort Brooke, Tampa. Upon the expiration of his term of enlistment, which was six months, he returned to South Carolina and was married in the same year, 1836, to Nancy C. Walker. The family removed to Florida in 1843 and settled in Madison County. There they remained five years, coming to Tampa, December 24, 1848, reaching here on Christmas Day. Johni T Givens was an undertaker, Martin Lovegreen becoming, in the early seventies his competitor. In 1853 Mr. Givens built his home at the southeast corner of Lafayette and Morgan streets, where “The Castle” of Bay Lodge, Knights of Pythias, now stands. A portion of the old lot is still owned by one of his daughters, Mrs. R.B. Thomas, who resides upon it at No. 303 Morgan Street. John T. Givens died November 19, 1901, aged eighty-six years; his wife died September 1, 1897, aged seventy-six years. The children born of their marriage were: Robert M., died in early manhood. Thomas W., married twice, his wives being sisters, Mary and Angie McNeill, of Quincy, Fla. The first wife had two daughters, Mrs. Angie (S.W.) Allen, Mrs. Nannie (N.J.) Watrous. John J., married Mary Maloney, of Key West. Jane F., married Dr. Richard M. Wells, a prominent phsysician of village days who died here many years ago. Fannie F., married Col. Robert W. Thomas. He died leaving no children, but his wife still remains here. Anna E. married Charles E Harrison. Mary L. married V.W. Olds. Both are dead. Warren A., married Florine Cooks, of Dawson, Ga. He died in 1912. Darwin B, married Anna Morris, a member of an old family when residing near Tampa. Clara V., died unmarried. Franklin L and Marion, two youngest sons of John T and Nancy, died in infancy.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



HAYDEN

Jesse J. Hayden married Susan Morrow, of Monroe, N.C., a descendant of David Crockett, the famous hunter and Congressman, who was killed in the battle of the Alamo, 1836, War between Texas and Mexico. Mr. Hayden, and his family came to Tampa in 1866 and brought from General Carter some improved property in Hyde Park, and entered as homestead eighty acres adjoining it. Mr. Hayden, and his daughter, Mrs. Donald S. McKay, sold in 1886 to H.B. Plant, for $40,000 nearly sixty acres of this property, including the Tampa Bay Hotel site, Plant Park and Athletic Field. In the first years of Mr. Hayden’s residence here he ran a mercantile and livery business east of the river, operating his own ferry for the convenience of himself and his customers, in crossing the river. There were born to Jesse Hayden and Susan, his wife, the following children: Peter, Allen, and Homer, all unmarried. Mrs. Drucilla (William) Stanton, of Columbia, S.C., Dr. George, of Bradentown, who married Mary Taylor. Mrs. Martha (D S.) McKay. Mrs. Tomie (Allen) McMeekin, of South Carolina. Of these children only Mrs. McKay now resides in Tampa. Her children are enumerated in the Account of the McKay family.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett



HENDERSON

Andrew Henderson and Olivia, his wife, came from North Georgia to Tampa, October 1846, with their five sons, William Benton, John A., Fletcher, Wesley P., and Augustus. The parents died, leaving these sons when William B, the eldest was only twelve years old. This boy worked and educated himself and his brothers, and the success he himself achieved makes him remarkable among the “self-made” men of Tampa and the entire South. John A. married Mary Turner, who lived only a few years. John A. became one of the foremost lawyers of Tampa, and Senators from this district. He then settled in Tallahassee, marrying Misifi Ward, a daughter of Colonel G.T. Ward, of the Confederate Service. John A. was afterward general counsel and vice-president of the F.C. & P. Railroad. He died several years ago. Augustus died in the service of the Civil War, and Fletcher also died in youth. Wesley P. married Mamie Parrish (now Mrs. Marcus Giddens). He was superintendent of public instruction, and died several years ago. William B. married Caroline Elizabeth Spencer, February 9, 1890. Previous to his marriage he was a clerk in Mr. Kennedy’s store. After his marriage he bought a farm on the Alafia River and opened a small store there. At the outbreak of the Civil War he joined Captain Gettis’ Company D, of the Seventh Florida Regiment. He served in this company until he was forced to return home on account of having contracted tuberculosis. He engaged in the cattle business for ten years, and the outdoor life cured him. He then moved to Tampa and bought an interest from Captain John Miller in the latter’s steamboat and mercantile business, shipping cattle to Cuba. After ten years the Tampa Commercial Co. was organized with Mr. Henderson as president. A few years later he retired from active business, though he still retained interest in various enterprises, among them the Beckwith, Henderson and Warren real estate agency, the Henry Giddens Clothing Co, and others. He was president of the following important concerns: Bank of West Tampa, West Tamps Improvement Co., Tampa Building and Loan Association, Tampa Publishing Co., and Tampa’s first electric railway company. He was for ten years president of the State Board of Health, and chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, and held many other offices of trust. His wife died December 14, 1906, and he died May 7, 1909. Their children are: Gettis A., who married Hattie Stallings; Mrs. Blanche (Dr. L.D.) Weedon; Mrs. Cora (G.C.) Warren; Nellie M. (died unmarried October 1907); John W. (unmarried); Mrs. Hattie Ward (Amos) Harris.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



HOOKER


William Brinton Hooker was born in Ware County, in 1807. He moved to Florida and settled in Hamilton County, White Springs, Suwannee River, in 1832. He was married to Mary Amanda Hare, near Raleigh, N.C. He was a member of the First Constitutional Convention of Florida from Hamilton County. Mr. Hooker served as Captain in the Seminole Indian War from 1833 to 1842, and then also as Captain in the volunteer service from 1855 to 1858 in the Indian War. He removed from Hamilton County to Hillsborough County in 1842, and settled on Simmons Hammock. He was largely engaged in stock raising and soon became the largest stock owner then in Florida. He sold his stock of cattle to Captain James McKay for $60,000. He was also interested in the cultivation of oranges and planted the first seed from what was then called “China” oranges, in the state of Florida. He was a man of strong mind and nerve, and cut the first straight road from Simmons Hammock to Manatee County and lived there for about two years. He was the owner of twenty negro slaves. The place he settled in Manatee County is now known as Parrish. He moved from Manatee to Tampa in 1860, and built a spacious home, which was afterward leased out as the Orange Grove Hotel. This building is now occupied by the offices of the Tampa Northern Railroad. During all the pioneer life Mr. Hooker kept a private teacher for his children. Hooker’s Point, on the Bay, was named after this early settler. During the Civil War he moved to Brooksville where he lived until his death. There were born to William and Mary nine children, some of whom are Tampa residents. They are: Mrs. Ann Elizabeth (John A.) Hollingsworth, Mrs. Jane E (William) Stallings, Mrs. Martha H (Benjamin H) Hagler, Mrs. Mary Henrietta (Samuel) Hope, Mrs. Meroba Hare (Judge Simon) Turman, who married Henry Crane after the death of Judge Turman. Mrs. Sallie (Joe) Vaughn, Mrs. Ella (George) Fuchs, Jasper who married Fredonia Meredith. James who married Rosa Carpenter.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



JACKSON

John Jackson was born in Ireland in 1809 and came to this country in 1841, settling at New Orleans, La., where he became assistant City Engineer. He went to St. Augustine in 1843. There he met Colonel Butler, U.S. surveyor, for whom Lake Butler was named, and through him received the appointment general surveyor for Florida. At St. Augustine he met and married Miss Ellen Maker, who had also come from Ireland. John Jackson and his wife came to Tampa in 1847. It was that year that Tampa was established as the county seat of Hillsborough County, which that time meant the territory included in several of the surrounding counties of today. Mr. Jackson being a surveyor was engaged lay off the city, which then comprised an area of 160 acres. He laid off another part of the city in 1850, and made a general map of the city in 1853, this map still being on record as authentic. His survey of the city was from Whiting Street to Harrison, and from East Street to Ashley, the west side of the city being bounded by the Hillsborough River. Mr. Jackson named the streets after the United States Presidents, and the officers in charge of Fort Brook. Colonel Whiting was in charge of the fort at the times, and the first street from the Garrison was named after that officer. Mr. Jackson received large contracts from the government to survey portions of Florida, sometimes a contract covering a radius of five hundred miles. He surveyed the country around Miami, and that portion of the State bordering the Everglades. Once when surveying below the Caloochehatchee River he unintentionally caused an Indian uprising. There was a white settlement divided by what they called a “mutual ground” but beyond that neither the whites or Indians were to trespass. Mr. Jackson had authority from the Government to survey a portion of the Indian land, through a mistake, and in doing this the hostility of the Indian was aroused and several whites killed. Captain Casey finally pacified the Indians, and Osceola and Billy Bowlegs as well as others of that time were among his admirers. In 1848 a gale washed Mr. Jackson’s home away. He had two boxes containing $3000 in silver which were carried away by the waves, but he recovered the boxes of money after the flood subsided. John Jackson entered into the mercantile business in 1849 and was, until his death in 1887, a worthy and prominent citizen. He married Ellen Marr and their offspring are Thomas E., formerly a merchant, now a real estate dealer, who married Katherine Warner, and whose offspring are: Mrs. Mary Ellen (T. Van Ryan) Carty; Bernier A, who died in 1912, Mrs. Lula (J.T.) Joughin, and John Edward who married Hildegarde Bell. Kate V., unmarried, president of the Tampa Real Estate Association, and a woman of much prominence and brilliancy in mind. Dr. John, of New York, a specialist who is an instructor at clinics at the Columbia University, and also has a private practice, married Mary Gardan, of Hartford, Conn.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



KENDRICK

The Kendrick brothers of pioneer history of English parentage. James Kendrick, the father, was a major in the War of 1812. He married Elizabeth Mickler, at St. Mary’s Ga., settled at Suwannee Springs, Fla., soon after the war. He served in the First Indian disturbance called the Seven Years War, which began in 1835, dying during that period. His widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Kendrick and their daughter and four sons, Emily, Edward Tatnell, William H., Hardy D., and Robert James, came to Tampa soon after his death, about the year 1840. Both Edward and William H., were captains in the Seminole War, and also served in the War Between the States, Edward T dying during that war. He was sheriff of Hillsborough County in 1853. He married ?rbia Ann Moore and their children now living are Ernest Tatnell, who married his cousin, Emma Moore, and whose children are Luis, who married Mattie Hardawny; Mamie, unmarried; Mrs. Eunice (W.G.) Lewallen, of Burnington, N.C., and Vivienne, untried. Harney, who married Russell Renneu, and their only child, Mrs. Edna (Cecil) McCord. William H, known as Captain Bill Kendrick, of the first family already named, settled at Fort Dade, Dade City, Fla., after his service in the two wars mentioned. His political career is familiar history to the oldest citizens of Florida. He was a member of the Senate for two terms, retiring from his political work in 1876 to devote his time to real estate business. He was active in inducing immigration, traveling, and lecturing in the North on the advantages of Florida. It is said it was he who gave Orlando its name, and there is a town near Ocala, Fla., named after him. He is credited with having been the pioneer discoverer of phosphate in Florida, finding it in Bone Valley, near Fort Meade in 1880. Captain Bill was twice married. His first wife was Mrs. Mary Gibbons, whose only daughter now lives in Tampa is E. Panchita, unmarried. His second wife was Mattie Johnson, daughter of Abner Johnston of South Carolina. He died in 1901 at the age of seventy-eight. Hardy D, the third brother of the original family in Tampa married Mrs. Alexanil Martin, widow of one of the pioneers who was a captain, also a MJ of the Gospel. Hardy died here many years ago. Only one of his three children lived to grow up. Charlie, who died at the age of twenty-one. Robert James, the fourth brother, was a physician and he settled at Anthony, Fla., where he died many years ago, leaving his wife, formerly Mrs. Isabella Henderson, of North Carolina. Emily, the sister of the four Kendrick brothers, married William Spend. Their children being here recorded with the Spencer family.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



KENNEDY

Thomas Pugh Kennedy descended from the English houses of Penrose, Tresse, and Pugh; was born in Philadelphia in 1812. He came to St. Augustine in 1828, and to Tampa in 1840. He established the first and only trading post here with Indians and with the garrison at Fort Brooke, and later one at Charlotte Harbor. Mr. Kennedy was on the friendliest terms with the Indians. He was just and liberal with them and they held him in high esteem. Billy Bowlegs, the old Seminole Chief, particularly admired him and was entertained by Mr. Kennedy and his wife as a honored quest. Before the old chief was sent to the Indian reservation he presented to Mr. Kennedy a handsome silver medal which had been given to him by President Van Buren at the signing of the peace treaty with the Seminoles. The Kennedy family still possesses this medal. Mr. Kennedy’s business called him frequently to Central and South America and Mexico. On one of these trips during the Mexican war, while running the blockade with supplies for the American soldiers he as captured by the Mexicans and held prisoner for many months. His escape, by the aid of a Mexican officer’s wife, is a romantic and interesting story. Mr. Kennedy’s wife, now Mrs. J.P. Crichton, Atlanta, came to Tampa as a child, in 1837, with her uncle, Major Fraser, the officer who commanded Fort Brooke, the U.S. Garrison. She was formerly Adelaide Cristy, a cousin of Howard Chandler Cristy, artist. Mr. Kennedy became one of the wealthiest and most honored men in South Florida. He gave assistance in business life to several young men who later acquired fortunes and became prominent citizens of Tampa, among them being the lat M.B. Henderson, who often spoke with pride of his friendship. At the time of his death in 1858 Mr. Kennedy was an extensive property holder throughout the State. More than $75,000 of his fortune went to the support of the Confederate Government in the War of Succession. The first entry on the tax books of Hillsborough County was a deed to Thomas P. Kennedy from E.T. Kendrick and wife recorded March 3, 1846. He was a charter member of the first Masonic Lodge here and his son, Thomas Pugh Kennedy and his grandsons have also been prominent in the organization. The old Kennedy home and store at the foot of Washington, Tampa, and Water streets were landmarks for many years. The children of Thomas Pugh Kennedy, who lived to maturity, were three: Jane, afterward Mrs. J.W. Crichton, then a leader in the musical life of Tampa, a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music and who was soprano of Dudley Buck’s Trinity Choir. She reestablished and was in charge of the music department of Wesleyan Female College. It was to her that Mr. Butterfield dedicated his song, “When You and I were Young, Maggie.” She died in 1890 leaving descendants. Thomas Pugh, 2d, who graduated in 1870 from Washington College, now Washington and Lee University, while Gen. Robert E Lee was president of the institution; married Ida Catherine of Ocala, and their first home in Tampa was the site now occupied by the First National Bank. He took prominent part in affairs of the community and was chairman of the Board of Education at the time of his death. He was admitted to the bar with prospects for a brilliant career but was cut down by death in his prime, at the age of 36 years, leaving a widow and seven children. Tampa Heights was the name given by Mr. Kennedy to his home and [?] on the brow of the hill and the name has since been used to designate that section of the city. Henry P, the youngest child, died in 1882, aged twenty-five years, unmarried. He was at one time editor of The Gulf Coast Progress, one of Tampa’s earliest newspapers. The present members of the Kennedy family are Mrs. Ida J. Kennedy, widow of Thomas P. Second, and six children. Mrs. Josephine (S.S.) Moore; Mrs. Ida (C.F. Gay; Henry P., married May Jordan; Thomas P, third, who married Alma Shac? of Savannah; W. Theodore, of Colorado (unmarried), and Mi[?] Maude (W.T.) Myers, of Virginia. The eldest son, John D. died in Mexico in 1906.

[Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.


KRAUSE

John Henry Krause, who was notable among Tampa’s pioneers, was born in Saxony, Germany. He came to Tampa in 1855. He was a wagon manufacturer, and had in connection with a blacksmith shop, located on the corner where the old Citizen Bank now stands. He also has a store of general merchandise, located on the opposite corner, Franklin and Zack Streets, where Maas Bros’, store is now. Mr. Krause was a conspicuous figure in the early development of Tampa and served in the Confederate army in the War Between the States. He married Mary E. Dagenhart who was born at Palatka, Fla., in 1845, and who dies in this city at the age of thirty-six. Mary Dagaenhardt was the daughter of John Henry and Mary Dagenhardt, of Dresden, Germany, well known pioneers who came to Tampa about 1848. The Dagenhardt name has not been continued in this city. There were born to John Henry Krause and Mary, his wife, eight children, four of whom still live here: John Henry, Jr., Fred W., both unmarried, Mrs. Henrietta (John T.) Gunn, and Mrs. Mary (J.A.M.) Grable. The brothers were formerly in the livery business, but now are partners in the Hava-Tampa Cigar Factory, on Nebraska Avenue, this city. Mr. and Mrs. Grable have no offspring. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Gunn are John Krause, unmarried; Mrs. Helen (Paul) Lindley of Pomona N.C., and Jack Arbid, unmarried.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



LESLEY

Rev. Leroy G. Lesley from South Carolina to Madison, Fla., and in 1848 he came to Tampa as pastor of the First Methodist church, which was then a small chapel. He was accompanied by his wife, formerly Indiana C. Livingston and three children. John T; Emory L., who was killed in early manhood by the accidental discharge of a rifle, and Mary, who first married William H. Brown, and after his death, U.S. Bird, father of Dr. U.S. Bird. Mrs. Bird survives both husbands, and has one son, W. Lesley Bird. Leroy G Lesley’s wife died in 1859. His second wife, Jane Sandwich, bore him one child, Mrs. Emma (W.J.) Frierson, of Tampa, who died some years ago. Lesley and his son, John T., served in the Indian and Civil Wars. The former was a captain in the Indian War, his boy serving under him as private and as a lieutenant, for when duty called, the minister and his son were not found wanting. Both were among the most prominent of the pioneer citizens. John T. Lesley moved with his parents to Fort Brooke in 1849, and lived there for fifty-two years. During the Civil War he was captain of Company K, Fourth Florida Infantry. He was promoted to the rank of major but resigned in 1863, returned home and raised a company of calvary which he commanded until the close of the war. Captain John T. held many public offices. He was sheriff, tax collector, and assessor of Hillsborough County, 1867-68. Soon after the war he engaged in the cattle business. In1876 he was elected to the State Legislature, serving two terms, and in 1885 was vice-president of the Constitutional Convention, which framed the present constitution. A handsome gold-headed cane presented to him by the members of the convention is still treasured by his family, together with about seventy other canes, which have been presented to him and which hail from many parts of the world. He became clerk of the County Circuit Court in 1893; later was collector of customs for the port of the city, and was elected mayor of Fort Brooke in 1886, holding the office until Fort Brooke became a part of Tampa. Captain Lesley married Mrs. Margaret Brown Tucker, a daughter of Major William T. Brown, in 1858, who died in 1893. Captain Lesley died July 13, 1913. They had six children: Indiana, Emory Leroy, of Kissimmee; John J., W.T., sheriff, died 1904; Theodore L, and L.G. Emory L, married Jennie Morgan; W.T. married Sarah Yancey; Theodore L. married May Yancey; L.G. married Florence Yancey, the wives of the three last named being sisters, and they are granddaughters of Hon. William L. Yancey.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



LEONARDI

In the year 1855 there came to Tampa from St. Augustine, Fla., the Leonardi brothers, Vincent and Bartholomew accompanied by their sisters, all of whom were married and had families. The descendants of this family have been born and reared here and have figured more or less prominently in the city’s development. The Leonardi brothers were architects. Bartholomew has a daughter, Mrs. Annie (W.S.) Soloman, living here. Barthlomew’s son, S.B. Leonardi and his family, are the only ones now living here who are from that branch of the family bearing the name of Leonardi. S.B. married Alia Buff, of Indiana. He is a chemist, and now is a manufacturer of well known medicines. He was formerly the leading druggist of the city. The children of his marriage are Mrs. Marguerite (Clinton B.) Amorous; Bernandetta and Sydney B., the two younger children being in their teens. The Leonardi ancestors were from Italy. The sisters of Vincent and Bartholomew, who came with them to this city, were Mrs. Theodosia (John P) Andreu; Mrs. Jane Canning, and Mrs. Florencia (Tom E) Hagar. Captain J.P. Andreu carried the mail from Tampa to Point Pinellas, now St. Petersburg, and was proprietor of an oyster house, supplying the village and Garrison with this product of Tampa Bay. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Andreu are Mrs W.J. Holden, Mrs. Nora Jeter, Mrs. C.C. Lebey, Mrs. J.S. Smith, and Katie, the latter being unmarried. Mrs. Canning and Mrs. Andreu are still living at a good old age. Mrs. Canning’s children are Mrs. Lillie (Cal) Floyd, a widow; Mrs. Irene (P.B.) Stuart, Mrs. Emma Patten, a widow, and B. Burns. Mrs. Hager, who died some years ago came here a widow and married Louis Bell, the only child of this marriage being George, who married Linnie Post. The children of the first marriage of Mrs. Hager are Mrs. Mary E. (W.C.) Brown, a widow; Mrs. Ellen (George) Lyons, Mrs. Melvina (L.A.) Masters, and William who married Miss Bradley.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



MC CARTY

Mitchell McCarty, one of Tampa’s early settlers, was born in Rochester, N.Y., in September 1818. Leaving home in his early youth because of trouble with his father over property rights, he wandered south and arrived at Mobile, Ala. There he met Elizabeth Aylisse Simmons, who, on April 21, 1844, became his wife. She was born in Savanna, Ga., January 10, 1819, and passed much of her girlhood in this section of Florida. Her father, Rev. Daniel Simmons, a Baptist minister, purchased 640 acres of land from the Spanish Government, upon which he located with his family. He was a man of means and improved his property, but during one of the Indian insurrections the family fled for their lives to Alabama. Rev. Simmons never attempted to regain possession of his property around “Simmons Hammock,” near Seffner, Fla., where some valuable orange groves are now located. About 1846 the families of Simmons, McKay, and McCarty left Mobile by the same boat, landing at Chashowiska, Fla. The McKays soon afterward came to Tampa, but the other two families remained in Hernando County until 1849, when Mr. McCarty moved to Tampa. He purchased from Captain Lesley, property on Washingto Street, between Morgan and Marion, and engaged in a general merchandise business. He was a charter member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He died November, 1858, being survived by his wife and three daughters. The widow of Mitchell McCarty was an influential member of the First Baptist Church and did much for its upkeep until her death on February 21, 1859. The McCarty offspring were Mrs. Mary Jane (John A) McKay, who died in 1911, and whose children are here recorded with the McKay family; Mrs. Margaret (H.W.) Sherritt, whose two children are Mrs. Mollie (J.I.) Carruthers and Mack unmarried; and Ada McCarty, unmarried.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



MC KAY

Captain James McKay, The First, formerly of Scotland, founder of this prominent family in Tampa, came here October 13, 1846 from Mobile, Ala. He was accompanied by his wife, formerly Matilda Kail, and her mother, Mrs. Sarah Kail. Captain McKay was a man of considerable means, and had various interests in Tampa. He owned a number of sailing and steam vessels. He originated the cattle trade between Tampa and Cuba, and also the mail route between Tampa and Cedar Keys, and his own steamers carried the mail to and from these points; also freight and passengers. He also ran a four-horse coach from Tampa to Gainesville, Fla., before the Civil War. The cattle business in that period was as important as the fruit business is now in this section. Captain McKay dealt in cattle to the extent of about $60,000 per month. He also owned a saw mill and one of the few stores of pioneer days. The site of his store was corner of Franklin and Washington streets, where his grandson, Mayor Donald Brenham McKay now has his office. It was a small wooden building, which was years afterward replaced by the present brick structure, this being the first brick edifice ever erected in Tampa. The first home of the McKay’s was the entire square where the Almeria Hotel was afterward located. When the Civil War broke out, Captain McKay and his son, Donald S., had just reached Cuba with a ship load of cattle. In running a blockade from that island to Tampa, they were captured. The father was kept a prisoner in Key West for several months, and the son was transported to Fort LaFayette, New York harbor. After thirteen months in prison there, Donald S. was released on parole and returned by transport to Key West. On his way down he witnessed the sinking of the Cumberland and Congress by the Merrimac. Donald S. came home and joined a battalion and remained in the Confederate service until the end of the war. His father was appointed Commissary General to furnish cattle for the Tennessee army. Captain McKay sold some of his steamers to Miller and Henderson, who became associated with him in carrying on the cattle trade and mail route. Captain McKay built the first jail and court house of Tampa, and furnished all the nails and lumber for the early life of Tampa. This building stands opposite the Tribune building, on Tampa street, and is now Bomford’s Plumbing Shop. It stood in a grove of oak trees in pioneer days. Captain McKay was the first mayor of Tampa. He was a member of the first lodge established here (Masonic), in which he owned fifty-six shares. James McKay, The First, and Matilda, his wife, were blessed with a large family. George, who died in youth; Sarah A; James, Second; Marian, Tillie, Allie, Donald S, John Angus, and Charles, who died several years ago leaving no children. James, Second followed his father’s footsteps, being also a sea captain and cattle dealer. He married Mary Crichton, the daughter of Dr. John T. Chichton, one of Tampa’s first and most prominent physicians. Dr. Chrichton lived here many years and moved to Atlanta, Ga., where he died, leaving several children. James, Second, lived here until a few years ago, and was prominent in public affairs. He was once mayor of the city, and state senator from his district. He is now Marine Superintendent of United States Transsports, and in this capacity inspects all transports that are chartered by the U.S. Government along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. He also has supervision over quartermasters’ boats stationed along the Atlantic coast. His headquarters are in New York City, but he has been stationed at Galveston, Tex. during Mexican disturbances. The offspring of this branch of the McKay family are: Tillie, of this city, widow of J.D. Clarke, of Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, N.Y.; Mrs. Blanche (T.L.) Morton, of Virginia; James C, who married Lillian McDonald, of Fernandina; Julia, who died several years ago; Mrs. Madge (C.) Lastra; Mrs. Mary (John O) Kirkpatrick, of Nashville; Harold, who married Bess Fisher, of Lima, O. Fred, unmarried, Marian, daughter of James, First, married William Randolph and their only offspring is Sarah, wife of Judge W.A. Carter. Tillie, also of the first family, married Dr. John Wall, and there was born to them a son, Charles, who now lives in Tampa. Allie married Howell T. Lykes, Sr., and there were born to them the following sons and one daughter; Mrs. Tillie (S.B.) Turman; Fred, unmarried, a cattle dealer in Cuba; Howell T., Jr. married Stella Long; Thomas, unmarried, who was the Gasparilla King, 1913; Lipscomb, unmarried; James, of Galveston, Tex., and who married Viva Parkhill, daughter of Judge and Mrs. C.B. Parkhill, John Wall, who married Ruth Freeman; Joseph, unmarried. The Lykes Brothers, like their grandfather McKay, are cattle dealers. Donald S. McKay, formerly a sea captain, now a pure food inspector, married Mattie Hayden, member of another of the pioneer families. Their offspring include Marion, Mrs. Martha Porter, May, who died in1900; George, who married Anne McDermott, and Donald, Jr. John Annus, the youngest surviving son of James, First, married Mary Jane McCarty, and their offspring are Donald Brenham, now mayor of the city and editor of the Tampa Times, who married Aurelia Gutierrez, daughter of G. Guiterrez, a prominent Spanish citizen who did much toward bringing the cigar industry to Tampa. Mrs. Margaret (C.C.) Woodward; Charles A., a member of the firm of Maas Bros., and president of the Retail Merchants Association of the city, who married Irene McKeague, of Pennsylvania; Mitchell S. McKay, who married Janie Givens; Mrs. Ada (Lawson) Magruder, of Deland, and Kenneth I., unmarried.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



MITCHELL

The name Mitchell is one of the most prominent in the history of Tampa, and the entire State. The Mitchell family came from Alabama in 1846 and first settled at Simmons’ Hammock, coming to Tampa in 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mitchell were parents of seven distinguished sons, Henry Laurens, Samuel, Robert, George, Charles Lucian, Frank and Thomas. The two last named boys were both officers in the Civil War service, and both were killed therein. Henry Laurens was among the most prominent citizensn in the entire history of Tampa. He was born in September 3, 1831. He studied law in the office of Judge James Gettis, a beloved pioneer, who died a bachelor, and his name therefore is known among only the oldest citizens today. Judge Gettis aided many young men of those days. The late W.B. Henderson named his eldest son in honor of this man. When he was admitted to the bar,, Henry L Mitchell was elected State Attorney for the Sixth Judicial Circuit, holding this office until 1861, when he entered the Confederate service, attaining the rank of Captain in the Fourth Florida Infantry. After the Vicksburg campaign he resigned to perform his duties as a member of the State Legislature from Hillsborough County. He was twice reelected. He was Judge of the Circuit Court from 1877 to 1888. After this he was one of the Justices of the Supreme Court for two and a half years. In 1892 he was elected to the highest office of the State, that of Governor. After his term as Governor closed he returned to Tampa and was chosen as Clerk of the Circuit Court and County Treasurer, holding these offices until his death, October 14, 1903. His widow, formerly Mary E. Spencer, whom he married in 1866, survives him. Although having no children Governor Mitchell has many namesakes, one being prominent citizen of today, H.L. Knight. Samuel Mitchell married Jane Urquhart, of Welbourne, Fla. Their only surviving offspring, who lives in Tampa, is Edward Mitchell, who married Alice Hamphill. Robert Mitchell married Leonora Crum. They have reared a large family and live at Homeland. Rev. George Mitchell married Nanny Alderman. Their children are Thomas, now of Missouri, and Mrs. May (Bert) McMullen, of Clearwater. Charles Lucian married Julien Martin Spencer. Their offspring all settled in Tampa. They are Mrs. Eugenia (S.W.) Graham, Mrs. Nellie (B.A.) Ferguson, Mrs. Minnie (O.P.) Stallings, Dr. Lucien Bayard Mitchell, who married Marie Gutierrez; Mrs. Viva (A.J.) Angle, who died February 1913, and Spencer Mitchell. The widow of Charles Lucian also lives here.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett



MILLER

Captain John Miller is highly deserving of mention among the men of affairs in Tampa during that period immediately following the Civil War, having first come to Tampa in 1865. He was born in Norway, August 4, 1834. When he was eleven years old he sailed to Quebec as a cabin boy. He learned navigation on an American vessel, serving on this vessel for four years. He thus visited many parts of the world, but received no pay for services. He even became a sailor on a packet boat between New York and Liverpool. He gradually advanced until he became owner of a brig, much was used as a transport by the Federal Government during the Civil War of 1861-65. He purchased a schooner when war trouble was over and came to Tampa. He later not only conducted trading vessels, but became, in 1867, the leading merchant and banker here. After a few years he admitted William B. Henderson as a partner, the firm continuing as Miller and Henderson for twenty years. In present years Captain Miller operated the Tampa Steam Ways of which he was the owner. He was a Royal Arch Mason. He married Mihitabel Phillips in 1861, losing her by death in 1884. Captain Miller died in October, 1911. They have two children, John H, who married Addie Burts, whose only child is Mrs. Jessie (Ottis) Wallace. And Lucy P. (R.A.) Crowell whose children are Mrs. Berdina (? H.) Tarr and Mrs. Stella (O.G.) Sexton, Jr.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett



MOORE-POST

The history of the Moore family would not be complete without the statement that they are direct descendants of Lord Samuel Stanford, who was born in Staffordshire, England. He was the second son and only heir to the title, but preferring the freedom and liberty of America, he came to the United States and became a citizen of Dauphin County, N. C, sometime before the American Revolution. He was educated in theology for the Presbyterian ministry and when war was declared enlisted as a chaplin and soldier, fighting for Christ and liberty and carrying both sword and Bible. His daughter, Euphemia Stanford, married Joseph Moore, who was of Scotch-Irish descent and second cousin to Thomas Moore, the poet. Joseph and Euphemia Moore, with their children, came to Tampa in 1842 and located, with other settlers, in what is now known as Hyde Park, which was named after the Hyde Park in London, England. This name was given by Dr. Griffith, Presbyterian minister and pioneer, who came here from England. Prior to the naming of this district Hyde Park was known as Spanish Town. Beneath the ground near Spanish Town Creek some of the earlier pioneers of Tampa were placed at rest, it being used as a burial ground. Mrs. Maria Moore (Madison) Post, who is the only surviving member of the Joseph Moore family, and who still resides in this city, attended the first election in this county, and which his mother, Euphemia Moore, had the honor to name as Hillsborough County. There is an interesting story in connection with the name of this county as told by Mrs. Post, who says that it was named for: Mr. Hills, a hunter and trapper, because he killed the largest alligator, these pests being numerous at that time. It was Joseph Moore who installed the Masonic order in Tampa on January 16, 1850, the charter for the local lodge being obtained on January 20, 1851. His portrait adorns the walls of the Masonic Hall of Tampa today. The children of Joseph and Euphemia Moore were Samuel Louis, Farina Ann, Margaret, Jackson, who died unmarried; Emily, who died in her youth; Walter Raleigh, who died unmarried; William J., Maria Janet, Joseph, Jr., Henrietta and Martha Washington. Walter Raleigh Moore, according to the "Soldier Book of the South," held a distinguished record. He entered the great struggle between the States as Captain of the Twentieth Florida Regiment, and during the former years ears of service was promoted by Governor Perry to the rank of Major and later Colonel. Samuel Louis, the eldest son, married Charlotte Wheedon, whose fourteen children were as follows: Spencer, who was mortally wounded in the Civil War; Samuel, who married Julia Bradley, and whose children are Mrs. Winifred (John) Winter, State Recorder of Crosses in the Florida Daughters of the Confederacy; Charles and Samuel, of Monticello, Fla. ; Joseph, unmarried; William, who married Alice Stewart and whose children are Julia, Josephine, Alice and William; Douglas, who married Annie Howell and whose children are Jack and Benjamin; Hansel, who married Mattie Haze and whose children are Samuel and Charlotte; Jackson, who married Linnie Cox and whose children are Douglass, Dell, Harry, Edith and Florence; Mrs. Estelle (Will) Cook, whose children are Thomas, Naomi, Estelle and Willie Louise; Mrs. Minnie (Harry) Levick, whose only child is Kathryn Estelle; Mrs. Lou Ella(Thomas) Mitchell, whose only offspring, James Goodwin, received the thirty-first degree in Masonry at Dallas, Tex., at the age of twenty-six years; Mrs. Bessie (M. E.) Gerow, whose children are Edmonde, Lawrence, Daniel, Getas and Charles; James, who married Effie Bush, of Atlanta, Ga., and whose children are James and Marian. When James Moore was but seventeen years of age he won the scholarship at Thomas County, Ga., which admitted him to the Georgia Technological College from which he later graduated with high honors. Mrs. Blanche (H.) Wagner, of St. Petersburg, whose children are Leslie and Francis. Mrs. Mary (L. T.) Smith, the fourteenth child, lives in Macon, Ga. A trait peculiar to the children of Samuel Louis Moore and his wife, Charlotte, was that every member of the family were natural musicians, being able to play on any stringed instrument. This musical talent has been handed down to the present generation and stringed instruments of all kinds are treasured heirlooms of a forgotten past. Maria Jane Moon married Madison Post, whose children are as follows: Dr. Duff, who married Inez McGregor, and who practiced dentistry in tins city for many years; was marshal in L881 and L882 and mayor 1883-1884 and 1885-1886; president of the Board of Health in 1893 and postmaster from and including 189l to 1895, during which time he established the free mail delivery in this city. He also established the emergency hospital of Tampa. Mrs. Holly Fine, whose children are Charles Post and Castell; Mrs. Liney (George) Bell, whose children are Hilda, Edna, Duff and Adrian.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



MONTESDOSCA-DALAUNEY

John Montesdosca, a Spanish gentleman of high family, came to Tampa from his native country about 1830. Being highly educated and a master of languages, he acted as interpreter for the Government. He was beloved alike by the Americans and the Indians. He wooed and wed a beautiful Indian maiden, lovely of soul as in person. This girl wife died early in life, leaving a little daughter, Victoria. Victoria was reared by Robert and Nancy (Coller) Jackson. She grew to womanhood and married Alfonzo Dalauney, of French birth, a lawyer by profession, who came here to be restored to health. Mr. Dalauney was, from 1861 to '65, postmaster of Tampa and custom's house officer. His wife, Victoria, was a woman of noble character and lofty mind, and their children were very intelligent. Two of them, Pauline and Emma,were among the most prominent teachers in the public schools of the early days. The offspring of Alphonso and Victoria were: Pauline, who married Captain John B. Walton whose only child, Marie, survives them both; Emma, who died unmarried in February, 1913;Harry, who died in youth unmarried, and Florida, who died in 1907 unmarried. Captain Walton was a civil engineer and it was he who surveyed and laid out the town of Tarpon Springs, Fla. Marie Walton is now in Asheville, N. C, and is the only surviving descendant of Victoria. Previous to his marriage with Victoria Alfonso Dalauney had married a Miss St. John, of Georgia, who died after giving birth to one son, St. John. The boy was brought up by his uncle, James Dalauney, in Columbus, Ga., coming to his father and step-mother, Victoria, some years later. The father died at the close of the war, in 1865, and the boy went to Lake Providence, R.I., where he continued the newspaper trade begun in Tampa, and became editor and publisher of the East Carroll Democrat of that city. He married Mrs. Barbara Streffner, of that place, returning to Tampa in 1888 with his wife and was engaged in the newspaper business until his death in 1903. The only child of his marriage is Mrs. Pauline (James W.) Holmes, of this city.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



MODLEN

John Modlen and Christina, his wife, came to Florida just after their marriage in 1844, from Hertfort, N. C, the journey being made in wagon trains. They established a camp at [?] Mile Creek, near Tampa, but soon afterward went to Ocala. [In]1846, when the family left Ocala to settle on Indian River, misfortune rose in their path, for during the storm of that time, John Modlen was drowned, the entire party being shipwrecked. The survivors who reached land in safety wandered about for three days and nights without food or dry clothing. They were rescued and carried to the home of Captain Russell. After a few months Mrs. Modlen returned to Ocala and disposed of her property, coming from Ocala to Tampa. In 1849 she was married to Captain George Perkins. Their home was made on the corner of Florida avenue and Fayette street, and the first break that was made in the happy family was when the family removed to Key West in 1862, where occurred the death of Captain Perkins in the Marine Hospital. In 1865 the widow returned to Tampa, remaining until her death in 1906, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. There were born to Captain George Perkins and Christiana, his wife, three daughters, Mrs. Isabel (George) Hanson; Mrs. Susan (Charles) Stagiers, who died in 1908, and Mrs. Margaret (Thomas) Billings.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



NUNEZ

Robert F. Nunez, of Georgia, came to Tampa in the early forties, and in early manhood was a clerk in the store of Kennedy & Darling. He afterward owned a store at the corner of Washington and Tampa streets, which he sold in 1862. He married that year A. H. Craft, daughter of Rev. S. C. Craft, a Tampa minister in charge of the First Baptist church. Mr. Nunez enlisted in the Civil War as Captain of Company B, Seventh Florida Regiment, left his young wife at home and fought in Tennessee and Kentucky. He was in General Bragg's famous march. Unused to the colder climate where duty called, he contracted pneumonia, from which he never fully recovered. He resigned from the army in 1864 and died

in 1868, at his home in Tampa. His widow is still living in this city. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Nunez are: Mr$, Ruby (I. S.) Giddens, whose offspring are Mrs. Genevieve (Dr. Sheldon) Stringer, David; and

little Mary Giddens. Robert Nunez, who married E. Hale. Their offspring are Robert, Jr., Mary, John and Paul Nunez. The sisters of the widow, Mrs. A. H. (R. F.) Nunez, are Mrs. Maggie Merken and Mrs. Mary Pierce, both of Texas. During the forties R. F. Nunez's sister, Mrs. Nancy Miller, a widow with a child, Emma, came to Tampa to live with him. Emma grew to womanhood in Tampa and was sent to the Wesleyan Female College from whence she was graduated. She married J. A. Edwards: a lawyer, of Atlanta, Ga., and still lives in that city, being a widow. Her offspring are: Kate Edwards, celebrated portrait painter, who has a studio in Chicago; Lee Edwards, of Atlanta, and Mrs. Edwards Lovett, wife of Dr. Lovett, of Atlanta.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



ROBLES

Joseph Robles was born in Madrid, Spain, September 15, 1817. He came to America and settled at Darien, Ga., in 1832. He came to Florida and lived at Newmansville and Fort White during the early part of the frontier days. He married Mary Garris in 1841. He served in the Indian trouble around Fort White, and his arm was broken by the shot of an Indian. He came to Tampa in 1849 and lived here until his death, February 1907, in his nineties year. During his residence in Tampa he served in the Indian and

Civil Wars. While running a blockade from Tampa to Cuba he was captured and placed in a Federal Prison for several months. There were born to Joseph and Mary seven sons and three daughters all now living except Michael F. who died in Camp Carson Prison a Federal prisoner, in February, 1865. The wife of Joseph W. was born in 1824, died in 1886. The sons and daughters are: John Godoff; Joseph Paul; Seaborn L.; Greene W.; Francis M.; Horace T.; Mrs. Mary O. Tanner; Mrs. Fanny Cuscaden; Mrs. Julia A. Harris. There are now living fifty-five grandchildren, counting the husbands and wives; thirty-three great grandchildren, and over 100 descendants all living near Tampa, including those who have married into the family. One son of Joseph and Mary, F. M. Robles, is the present Judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit. This circuit includes Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas Counties. Judge F. M. Robles was born February 26, 1858. He graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan in 1890. After practicing law for a while he became inspector of cattle for Hillsborough County. He was appointed to the office of County Judge in 1901. He married Katie S. Binkley, of Indiana.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



SPENCER

William Samuel Spencer came to Tampa in 1846 from Savannah, Ga., with his family. His wife was formerly Emily Amanda Kendrick, of Darien, Ga. Attracted by the beautiful waters of the bay, and especially by the springs now called Palma Ceia, Mr. Spencer settled with his family at this spring, on Tampa Bay. He laid in the spring and was cured of rheumatism from which he suffered for many years. After residing here for several years he moved to the east side of the Hillsborough River. Mr. Spencer was the sheriff of Hillsborough County before the Civil War, and during. This same office was held by his son, Thomas Kennedy Spencer, 1893 to 1901. It is a remarkable coincidence that the latter's son, C. Spencer, is sheriff at the present time. There were born to William Samuel Spencer and Emily, his wife, several sons and daughters, as follows: Mrs. Eliza J. (Rev. Henry) Breaker, no children survive; William James, who died in service of the Civil War; John Edward, who died from the effects of hardships in service in the war; Mrs. Caroline Elizabeth (W. B.) Henderson, whose offspring are stated in the account of the Henderson family; Mrs. Mary (H. L.) Mitchell, no children. Thomas K., first married his cousin Mary Spencer, one daughter, Mary, now widow of W. H. Cald?, being born to this marriage. After the death of his wife, Thomas S married Lizzie Parrish. Children of this marriage are L. V., who married Hattie Lee Cone; W. C, (Sheriff) who married Paulino Marj[?] Of Georgia; Mrs. Elizabeth (W. F.) Ferman, and Mrs. Pearl King. Susan A. (Ferdinand) McLeod was another daughter of William S. and Emily Spencer, she having died in 1891. Mrs. Ellen Martin (Charles Lucian) Mitchell is the youngest daughter of this first pioneer family. Her children are mentioned in the account of the Mitchell family. The two Spencer sons who died in youth, William James and John Edward, owned and edited the Tribune, then a weekly paper of Tampa. After their death Thomas K. took charge of the paper, afterward giving up his newspaper career for politics. The founder of the Tribune was Simon Turman, the pioneer of the Turman family in Tampa. This same Tribune is not in existence now, another Tampa Morning Tribune was founded by Colonel W Stovall years afterward, the paper being one of the best know the State today.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



TURMAN


Simon Turman came from Indiana to Florida in 1843, and to Tampa in 1845. He was married here to Meroba Hooker in 1847. He was at that time a clerk in John Jacks store. He was afterward editor of the Tribune, a weekly newspaper. Mr. Turman was Probate Judge at one time. He served in the

Confederate States army as lieutenant, and was killed in the service. He left one child, Solon B., who studied law at the University of Virginia and was admitted to the bar in Tampa in 1887. He engaged in the phosphate industry in 1891, retiring from the practice of law. He was special commissioner from Florida to the World Columbian Exposition at Chicago. Mr. Turman returned to the practice of law in 1897 and two years later was appointed solicitor of the criminal court of record for this county by Governor Bloxll

Solon B. married Tillie Lykes in 1897. He died in 1912, leaving a widow and two children, Almeria and Solon B. Simon Turman. A sister, who came to Tampa with him from Indiana, was Mary, she married Colonel John A. Henderson, a lawyer. Their only child is Flora, who married George Waldo, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who was a congressman from that district during President Roosevelt's administration.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.



WALL-FRIEBELE-CLARKE

These names are very pertinent in Tampa's history, and because they are so closely related they are recorded here together. The members of the Wall family are of English ancestry. Perry G. Wall, Sr., came to Hernando County, Brooksville, Fla., in the year 1845 from Georgia. He married Barbara Baisden. He became clerk of court of Hamilton City and was afterwards probate judge of Hamilton and Hillsborough Counties. He had his residence in Tampa during the time he was judge of this county. He died in 1897. To the marriage of Perry G. Sr., and Barbara were born ten children, some of them become very influential in the up building of Tampa. They are Mary Frierbele, of Fort Myers; Mrs. Julia (C. L.) Friebele; William W.; Dr. John; David H.; Mrs. Sarah (E. A.) Clarke; Mrs. Susan C. (M. E.) Hendry, Judge Joseph B.; Charles F., and Ella. Mrs. Julia (C. L.) Friebele had three children, Sam, Mary and Nannie. Mary, now Mrs. James W Dupree, is the only one who survives. William W. Wall, a merchant, married Minnie May, of Alabama. Their offspring are Perry G., who married Mattie Houstoun, of Tallahassee, and James Edgar, who married Florrie Bowman, of Texas. These sons are members of the hardware firm of Knight & Wall. Dr. John P. Wall, prominent physician of the early days of Tampa, who married Miss Pressie E Eubanks. Their two sons are John P. Jr., and Charles M. John P., is one of the best known lawyers of the city. He married Lillian [?]lite, of Brooksville. David H., a merchant of Brooksville, died married in 1864. Mrs. Sarah (E. A.) Clarke still survives her husband and only child, Mrs. Flossie (A. J.) Knight. Mrs. Susan C.[ E.) Hendry, of Ft. Myers, mother of Edwin M. Hendiy, (unmarried); Mrs. (Joe) Frazier, Mrs. (Henry) Linebaugh, the late Wall Hendry, who married Bessie Knight, all of Tampa, and Mrs. Lady Sarah (I. O. R.) Travers, of Ft. Myers. Judge Joseph D. Wall married J Precious Errington. They were the parents of Mrs. Helen (C. B.) Parkhill, wife of Judge Parkhill, of Tampa. After the death of his wife, Judge Wall married Frederica Lykes, who survives him. She is a sister of the late Howell T. Lykes, Sr. Charles F. Wall, merchant of Brooksville, married Susan Mayo. He died 1913. The only survivor is Mrs. Moss Rose (C. H.) Freeze. Ella Wall, died in childhood. S. Friebele, now eighty-two years old, is a remarkable woman and large property holder. She was the first of the Wall family to move to Tampa, coming here as a bride, January, 1852, from Brooksville. Mr. Friebele was a conspicious figure in pioneer days, and led one of Tampa's first stores. There he had a tailoring department and dealt in general merchandise. It was while Mrs. Friebele's sister, Sarah Wall, was on a visit to her here that she met A. Clarke, whom she married in May, 1860. Mr. Clarke was one of the [?]able and prosperous merchants Of the early period before and after the Civil War. The two sisters influenced the brothers to move to Tampa, and thus the city gained some of its most enterprising prominent citizens.

[ Source: The Blue Book and History of Pioneers Tampa, Florida 1914, by Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen]
Transcribed by Mary Triplett.

Visit our National Site

All data on this site is protected by copyright law with full rights reserved for original submitters.
Genealogy Trails ©




Hillsborough County Home Page | Florida Home Page | Genealogy Trails Home Page