Georgia Genealogy Trails

"Where your Journey Begins" 

Bartow County, GA

PIONEER SETTLERS, 1830-1860


ADAIR, John R.: b. Oct 16, 1824, in Henry county, Ga., came with his wife, Sarah F. Paul of Abbeville, S. C, who died in Feb. 1906, about 1849 to Cass county and settled in the Pine Log district where he lived until his death on Jan, 4, 1896. Both are buried in the Pine Log cemetery. Mr. Adair was active in the political and educa-tional affairs of this community. Their children were : (1) S. Cornelia, m. in 1874 T. R Arnold by whom there were Sallie, Joe and Agnes. (2) Elizabeth, m. in 1875 Elbert M. Upshaw. (3) William J., graduate of Atlanta Medical College, practiced medicine in this county until his removal to Rockmart where he practiced until his death on Feb, 3, 1930, m. Emma McBride. (4) Agnes E.t m. in 1885 Ausley E. Vincent by whom there was one child, Lillian m. Virgil Bradford. (5) John P., b. Aug. 18, 1864, m. Stella Vincent by whom there were Ernest, Myrtice (Boyd), and Ethel (Evans) and after her decease he married Annie Hall; N.P.&J.P., in Cartersville district (6) Robert Edgar, b. May 6, 1866; in 1890 graduated from Southern Medical College; has practiced medicine in this county, and when a young man taught school; m. Lula Mahan by whom there is one daughter, Frances. (7) T. Marcellus, a twin, (dec); m. Tommie Maxwell by whom there were Candler and John, who live in the old Adair home.

AKIN. Warren: b. Oct. 9, 1811, in Elbert county, of Virginian parents. Youngest of 10 children, farmed with his father in early youth. A visit to an Elberton court scene decided his profession and at the age of 10 made his vow "to be a lawyer." At his father's death when he was 18, he took his share of the small estate to acquire seven months of schooling in Walton county. While clerking in a store in Monroe, the excitement over the Dahlonega gold mines reached War-ren, and with a knap-sack on his shoulder, he walked to the new Eldorado. While working there he studied law and was admitted to the bar in Cherokee superior court, March 15, 1836 and immediately moved to Cassville. Without friends, poor, this boy began his career amid the foremost lawyers of north Georgia. He soon earned enough money to buy lot No. 44 in the town of Cassville in 1838 for $20, upon which he erected an office made of logs cut by himself and hauled by a team loaned by a neighbor. His first law partner was the Hon. A. R. Wright. By 1845 he had made $7,000 and In this same year married Eliza Hooper, daughter of Judge John W. Hooper. (One daughter Eliza Akin Baxter from this marriage.) He was appointed colonel of a militia company by Gov. Crawford.  Col. Akin argued the first four cases decided by the first supreme court of Georgia In 1846. His first wife having died in 1848 he married Mary F. de Verdery, b. July 6, 1830, daughter of A. N. de Verdery of Floyd county- He became a licensed Methodist preacher in 1853. In 1859 he was nominated, against bis wishes, by the opposition party to run against Gov. Brown. His cam-paign was noted for its professional and political purity. In 1861 he was chosen, without candidacy, to the Georgia House of Representa-tives and on the first ballot elected speaker of the house. In 1863 he was elected to the Confederate congress and was a warm friend of President Davis. While at the Confederate capitol. Col. Akin helped the soldiers with his influence and ministerial services. His family found refuge in Oxford and Elberton, during the war, and all returned to war-swept Cassville in October 1865. In 1870 they moved to Car-tersville where he devoted his time to his profession. In 1874 he re-fused nomination for Congress from the 7th district and in 1877 his name became associated with Robert Toombs on the important ques-tion of calling a Constitutional convention. Twelve days before he died his ideas were incorporated into the Constitution and adopted. He was on the hoard of trustees of Emory College; an old time Whig, after the Clay school; considered by the Cartersville bar "as the first man in his profession in north Georgia." He died Dec. 17, 1877, and is buried on the family lot in Cassville cemetery. Of the 10 children of Warren (Bishop Warren A. Candler is a namesake) and Mary Akin, the following are identified with this county: (1) T. Warren, b. August 10, 1851; admitted to the bar in 1874 and practiced with his father and brother until he became identified in Governmental service in Washington, D. C; married Libbie Shelman, (dec.) daughter of T. P. Shelman. He died in Macon on Jan. 10, 1930. (2) John W., b. June 10, 1859; graduate of Emory; admitted to the bar in 1878; Judge of city* ccurt; member of house of representatives; president of Georgia Senate; served as secretary and president of the Georgia Bar Association and his speech, while president, on "The Aggressions of the Federal Court" was conmented upon editorially by every leading newspaper in the State and a legislature of Kansas passed a resolution endorsing it; Methodist; author of "Akin's Lodge, Manual and Masonic Law Digest"; president of local city school board; married Frances Trippe Johnson by whom t:-*ere were Verdery, Lillian (dec.) and Frances. (See war records.) Judge Akin died October 18, 1907 and is buried in Cartersville. (3) Sallie May, librarian in the Washington Memorial Library at Macon, Ga. (4) Paul F., b. Feb. 23: 1877; graduate of University of Georgia; admitted to the Cartersville bar in 1896; filled unexpired term of his brother in State senate; Mason; Methodist; Rotarian; married Kath-erine Lovejoy by whom there are Katherine and Warren. (5) William Akin.

BAKER, Jesse: b. in 1800 In Pendleton district, S. C, went from there to Habersham county in the early 20's, married Parthenia Moss of that county and in 1834 they removed to Cass county where he acquired a number of large estates and slaves. He was a "Whig and a personal friend of Gen. Scott and Franklin Pierce. In 1870 his horse threw him and killed him Instantly. He is buried near Pine Log. His wife died in 1894. Of 12 children only the following were identified with this county. (1) Thomas Hudson Baker*, b. Apr. 28, 1839, received his early education in Pine Log and at the age of 18 he entered the University at Washington and later the University of Maryland where he graduated in medicine in 1860. At the beginning of the Civil War he served as assistant surgeon In Wofford's Brigade and commanded Co. K in a Georgia regiment. At the battle of Sharpsburg he received a wound while bearing a message from Gen. Wofford to Col. Darrot. In October, 1865 he began' his life as a county physician in Bartow and he probably covered more miles on his horse or In his buggy attending Ms patients than any doctor in north Georgia at that time. Prom 1873 to 1876 he represented this county in the legislature. This was during a strenuous period and Dr. Baker helped In clearing the condition of the illegal railroad bonds. He served as senator from this county from 1889 tQ 1901 and Introduced a bill providing for the teaching of hygiene and toxicology in the public schools. He owned more than 5,000 acres in the Pine Log and Etowah river districts. He was a Royal Arch Mason; weighed 240 lbs. and never married- He died June 9, 1920 and is buried in Pine Log cemetery. He was an eccentric old rn-gTi and until his death could be seen riding in. his buggy with a, little Negro hoy at-tendant (2) W. C. Baker m. Carrie Gower formerly of S. C, was a merchant and banker in Cartersville before going to Oklahoma City. A daughter, Mrs. Ella Baker Smith, lives near Cartersville. (3) J. A. Baker, lawyer, later moved to Oklahoma. (4) Mary Jane m. T. N. Stanford; of 7 children, J. W. Stanford, lives in Cartersville, Viola (dec.) taught for many years in the city schools. A son of J .W., Dr. James W. Stanford, is a practicing physician.

BARNSLEY, Godfrey: b. In Black Forest, England, came to the coast of Georgia and became an Important citizen of Savannah and New Orleans. While at Savannah was appointed by Andrew Jackson on May 29, 1829, vice consul of the Netherlands for the Port of Sa-vannah and on July 28, 1829, vice consul of the Two Sicilies. He was a past president of the Savannah Chamber of Commerce and officially resigned on December 1, 1845, but became an honorary member for lifet. Francis S. Bartow for whom this county was named was Mr. Barasley's attorney in Savannah. Mr. Barnsley was a cotton buyer in Savannah and New Orleans and the first bales of cotton shipped to Europe were shipped on his own vessels to Norway and he received iron chairs as a token of respect from the Norwegian king. Rev. C. W. Howard, "Wl H. Stiles and Mr. Barnsley were friends and encouraged each other to buy in upper North Georgia. In the late 30's or early 40's, Mr. Barnsley came to Cass county and selected a site in the 16th district for his home that was to become famous in North Georgia. Buying hundreds of acres of land near a spring and branch, hiring slaves by the year from other owners, he began building a brick home from native material that was to have the appearance of an English castle. The house plan was for a central section of 2 stories, topped with a tower, and with a right and left wing. Imported shrubs and trees from all over the world were planted and the formal gardens of boxwood from England laid out by Mr. Burkman, of Augusta, gave the place its name, "Barnsley's Garden." Modern plumbing was another feature of the plans. When the Federals under McPherson came to Barnsley's> ih May 1864, led there by an enemy who told of Mr. Barn-sley's wealth, as a British subject he requested protection. He had remained at home while his family refugeed. Being a connoisseur, the home contained many objets d'art and handsome furniture. These and the house were damaged when the Federals occupied the home, using it as a fortress. War, cyclones, time, and financial changes wrecked a dream mansion and a great estate. Only the left wing is now livable. The house was nearly completed except for the hand-carved stairway that was captured by Union soldiers In Nashville at the time of the Civil War. Mr. Barnsley married Julia Scarborough of Wilmington, N. C, by whom there were Anna G. Gilmore of London, England; Dr. George S. Barnsley who served in the Confederate army and later went with his brother, Lucian Barnsley, to Sao Paulo, Brazil, where they lived and died; Adelaide married a Mr. Reed of Glasgow, Scotland and died at Barnsley* s; Julia Bernard married Capt. James P. Baltzelle who was a provost marshall in the Confederate army, and was killed after the war at Halls Station at a lumber mill; ft daughter of their's, Mrs. Addie B. Saylor and her sons, Preston and Harry, live at the old home.   Mr. Barnsley died in New Orleans on June 6, 1872 and is buried at Barnsley's.

BARRON, Thomas Green: b. July 28, 1807 in Hancock county, died May 24, 1872. Admitted to the bar in 1830 in the county of Bibb, Flint Circuit, after graduating from the State University. He first practiced in Jones county and married Nancy B. Jones of this county In 1836. Deed records show that he bought lots in the 5th district in 1836. He was a law partner of David Irwin in Cassville during the removal of the Indians. HI health forced him to give up his practice and he gave all his time to his farm on the present Rome road, where Major Barron was considered a rich landowner. No descendants in the county.

BENHAM. Maj. Willis: b. Dec. 12, 1795 near Bristol. Conn. of well-to-do parents; in 1818 located in Laurens district, S. C, and in 1820 married Elizabeth Irby, a sister of Dr. William Irby, of Laurens, S. C. Following the Howards to Georgia, the Benhams, Youngs, and Milams came to Cass county from Laurens. In 1850 Maj. Benham purchased a plantation from Col. Irwin, an erratic old bache-lor who raced horses, which was 3% miles north of Cartersville. CoL Irwin had erected a brick home with an unusual flat roof; after this home was destroyed by the Federals in 1864, Maj. Benham rebuilt it as it stands today. Being a northern man he had to swear anmesty to President Johnson in 1865 as he had acquired a large estate of land and slaves. He was a Methodist and a beloved character to friends and family; died Sept. 25, 1875, a year after his wife and both are buried In the Benham family cemetery near the old home. Their chil-dren were: (1) Dr. William Irby Benham, b. Aug. 6, 1822, d. Jan, 21, 1904, was a graduate of a medical school in Charleston, S. C, served as 2nd Lt in the 16th Ga. Battalion during the Civil War, was a physician and farmer near Euharlee at what is now known as the Nick Adams place and at the old Benham home, m. Louisa Schulte of Charleston, S. C, by whom there were: (a) Louise, m. William Henry Lumpkin (b. Feb. 22, 1852, d. Mar. 10, 1913) who served the county as senator in 1894-95, and their son, W .EL, Jr., served as representative in 1925, and as 2nd Lt., 326th Inf. 82nd Div., in World War, and m. Margaretta Womelsdorf of Cartersville. Their daughter, Bessie (d. June, 1932) m. W. H. Howard, Jr., of Cartersville and Wilmington, N. C. (b) Elizabeth, m. Thomas Lumpkin who died in 1930 and who with his brother, W. H., established the Lumpkin Hardware Company which is now the Gilreath Hardware Co. Their children were: Henry, lives in Fla.: Christine, who served in World War, m. Felix Jackson; Benham, who served as 1st Lt and Capt. of Infantry in World War; Loulie m. Ed Strickland of Cartersville; Stuart, lives in Va; Boslyn of Cartersville. (c) Kate, m. Albert Strickland (died 1926). She and her son, Sidney, live at the old Benham home. Willis and Herman Benham died when young m^eru (2) Lois, in 1845 m. J. J. Howard in S. C, and soon came to this county. (3) Frances, m. Capt. John D. Weight of Laurens, S. C. Their daughter, Frances E. Wright, was reared by her grandfather, Maj. Benham, and she married in 1866, Rev. J. Joe Jones, a brother of Rev. Sam P. Jones. He was a private in Co. G, 22nd Ga. Inf., 1861 and a 2nd Lt., Co. H, 4th Ga. Res. C. S. A. in 1864, later 1st Lt.There were 8 children who were reared and married in this county: Lois m. Lee Simpson of Laurens, S. C, (both dec); Annie Laurie m. A B. Cunyus of this county; Lucy m. J. G. Simpson of Pendleton, S. C; Evelyn m. B. L. Sims (dec.) of Shelbyville, Tenn.; W. Benham Jones, b. 1879, d. July 22, 1907; Hattie m. Dr. H. C. Henderson of Charlotte, N. C; Mrs. Frances W. Jones died in 1887 and in 1888 Rev. Jones m. Bossie Farrow of Spartanburg, S. C, by whom there was one child, Helen (Winslow). Rev. Jones and his first wife and children are buried in the Benham cemetery.

BEST, Rev. Hezekiah: b. April 15, 1801, Hagerstown, Md.; d. Jan. 12, 1878, buried at Cassville; in 1826 joined Baltimore conference in which he served 30 years; biographical sketch in "The Old Baltimore Conference"; served Rockingham and Greenbrier circuits in Virginia; instrumental in founding Seamen's Bethel in Baltimore where he also served as pastor of M. E. Church on Broadway and Old Foundry church in Washington; m. on Jan. 29, 1833, Adeline Ball of Prince William county, Va.; in Nov. 1857 moved to Cass, settled on a large estate, paying $30,000 in gold, on Two Run creek, called "Forest Home" a home   noted   for  its  hospitality;   a Whig;   never   joined the southern conference, but built churches and preached without pay; Best's Chapel was named for him; erected grist mill, gin and saw miU on Two Run creek. Children of H. and Adeline Best, d. May 8, 1880 were: (1) Louisa A., b. Dec. 1833, m. S. K. Phillips; buried at Cassville. (2) Alfred Ball, b. Mar. 23, 1835 in Va., m. Isabella Saxon; major in Con-federate army; removed to Md. (3) John W. F., b. 1837, m. Sarah V. H. Harris. (4) Hezekiah S., b. Oct. 10, 1838 in Hereford, Md., sergeant in Cobb's Ijegion, later in 23rd Regt; m. Julia Clayton Trippe, daughter of Turner H. Trippe.* (5) Emory F., m. Mrs. Mary Hill. (6) Robert Newton, b. Oct. 28, 1841 in Heathsvillei, Va.; a scout during war; m. Oriana L. Saxon; children born in the county: Waring and Hugh, identified with Rome history; Robert of Camden, N. J.; Aileen m. Dr. Will Battle, a physician in Cassville who died on Nov. 12, 1925; Orie m. Dr. Clark Griffin, a dentist in Cartersville.

BRANDON, Thomas Wiley: b. May 16, 1803, in Halifax county, Va., a 4th son of William and Mary Langley Brandon; was reared and received what little schooling he had in Gwinnett county where the family moved in 1806 or 1807. On Jan. 7, 1830, he married Ijouisa Avery Green, daughter of Joseph and Bellariah Green of North Carolina. In 1835 Thomas W„ Brandon came to Cass county with his brothers, Moses A., who died in Floyd county; Frances Lawson whose grandsons, John L. Burnett served 20 years as congressman from Alabama until his death in 1919, and W. W. Brandon served as governor of Alabama 1923 to 1926; and Leroy J. Brandon. Thomas W. settled on the Etowah river in the 17th district which at the time was a wilderness, and where there were only 10 voters in the district, and but two of those could read and write. At the age of 17 he joined the Methodist church and as soon as his home of logs was erected, he started a Sunday school class that was the beginning of Brandon's chapel He was one of the early justices of the peace in his district and held the office for many years.Acquiring a large plantation he became one of the leading farmers, and this property was divided among his sons at his death. Inflexible in his principles, he was called "uncle Tommy" by those who knew him. An "old-time" Whig, he later became a Democrat. He died at his home, near Euharlee, June 11, 1874, and was buried in the family cemetery on the place. The children of T. W. and Louisa Brandon were: (1) Mary Anne m. W. J. Byers (both dec). (2) Elizabeth B., m. John S. Leake.* (3) William X, b. Jan. 4, 1835, served in Co. "F", 18th Ga. Inf., C. M. S., was taken prisoner until close of war, m. Martha S. Tnrkharn by whom there were: Annie m. Lee Jolly of Taylorsville and their sons, Oscar served in Co. B. 102nd Begt., 26th Div., and Walter served in 136th Co. 30th Div. in World War. Blanch m. Clarence A. Dodd of this county and Menlo, Ga-, and 4 of their sons, Harold, Glover, Paul and Jerry served in the World War. Walter lives in Norman Park, Fla. Jeff m. Jack Beazley, son of Dr. J. S. Beazley (b. Aug. 12, 1832, d. May 25, 1907) and Sarah EL Asbury. Dr. Beazley was born in Fredericksburg, Va., served as surgeon in the 7th Ga. Cav. and camfe to Georgia, settled at Stilesboro where he practiced medicine after the Civil War. There were 2 other sons, Reuben, and Ned m. Hessie Baker. Jeff and Jack Beazley have one son, Frank. Maudet m. Jim White of Kingston. Frankt lives at the William Brandon home. W. J. Brandon was one of the founders of the Oak Grove Methodist church. (4) Parthenia A., m. W. A. Templeton who died in Confederate service and by whom there were: Clio m. Frank Colbert (dec), lives at Stilesboro; Mary L. m. Pendleton Gaines (both dec.); Willie m. N. M. Adams (dec). (5) Jefferson R., b. May 9, 1839, served in Co. F, 18th Ga. Regt, until rank of lieutenant in 1863, later captured prisoner and held until close of war, served as county commissioner in 1877-8-9, m. Kate Sumner by whom there were: Paul HM Will D., Moses T., Claude S. who live in the county, Hugh R. lives in Rome. (6) David P., b. Oct. 13, 1842, served in Co. F, 18th Ga. Regt. C. M. S.; m. Bettie Ida Hay (both dec.), a daughter of W. Pinckney Hay who refugeed to this county during the Civil War and settled at Taylorsville, and by whom there were: Tom W., Mary m. Abel Skannal, John R, David TJ., and Charles who live in Louisiana where they reared families. Joseph G., m. Martha Cole and lives on the David Brandon place. Virginia m. Marcellus Conyers. Betty m. Lawson Jackson of Cartersville. Two grandsons, D. F. Brandon and R. B. Skannal served in World War. (7) Virginia, (dec). (8) Florence, m W. E Puckett (both dec.) of this county, formerly of S. C-, lived at Tay-lorsville. Served in Co. 'TV 1st Ga. Cav., C. M. S. Their children were: Thomas B. Puckett of Valdosta, Ga., and Lois m. T. I. Charles of Conestee, S. C. (9) Avarilla, m. Henry H Milam (both dec.) by whom there were Louisa and Henry H. Milam, Jr. Always lived near Euharlee. (10) Susan, m. John Henry Walker (both dec.) who served in Co. F, 1st Ga. Regt., Confederate service and whose father and mother werg pioneer settlers, coming to this county from S. C, in 1835. Of 8 children Ethel is the only living one in the county. Thomas B. served in the 11th Bakery Co. in the World War and is now at Kelly Field, Texas. A Negro, Noah Brandon, saw Civil War service with the Brandon boys.

BOSTON, Frederick Anton: b. Feb. 5, 1809, in Rowan county, N. C; married Fanny Houser who was born in 1815 on the 6th of January, 1S33 in York district, S. C. He died March 7, 1902; was buried at Stamp Creek. Of 14 children the first one born after their removal to Cass county was Nancy Jane Boston in 1843. Other children identified with the county were: (1) Katherine Elizabeth Boston, b. in 1845 and died May 17, 1932, married J. P. Alexander and lived in the county all- her life. (2) Henry F. Boston, b. 1839 in Lincoln county, m. Cora Dyar, lived in the county until their decease. (3) Jefferson Johnson Boston, b. Jan 21, 1862, lived and reared a family in the house where he was born near the Cherokee line in the Stamp Creek district. He married Zonie Matthews, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Matthews, by whom there are 8 living children. He died April 20, 1932.

BOWDOIN, Joshua: b. Nov. 2, 1803. in Edgefield district, S. C; came to Cass in 1835 and was one of the early Baptist preachers in the county. He was ordained at Oothcalooga church in 1837. In 1820 he married Bethsheba Fails. Justice of the inferior court in 1845-49. Their children were: (1) Frances M., b. June 2, 1822. (2) John W., b. Sept. 29, 1825 in Putnam county, graduated from University of Ga,, Medical Dept. in 1852 and registered as a Bartow county physician as late as 1881. (3) Eiisha F., b. Jan. 17, 1828. (4) Josephus Daniel, b. April 17, 1829 in Putnam county, member 66th Ga. Inf. in Confederate service; and later pharmacist in Kingston Hospital; J. P. for many years, m. Elizabeth Patman; died Dec. 20, 1882 at his home in Adairsville. Their son Joe P. Bowdoin, M. D„ b. May 7, 1866, graduated from Atlanta Medical College in 1889, and began his practice in Adairsville, is at present Deputy Commissioner of Health for the State of Ga.; m. Mary E. Bibb in 1889 by whom there were: Hypatia m. T. N. Ray, Joe Bibb, Max M., Mary Bess, Charles Daniel, Esther m. W. J. Crouch. Dr. Bowdoin's residence is in Adairsville, where he has been active in all the affairs of his city. (5) Joshua W., b. Nov. 2, 1834.

BURGE, Nathaniel: b. January 8, 1790 in Virginia, a son of Green, daughter of Joseph and Bellariah Green and they settled in 1824 on Sweet Water creek in Gwinnett county until in 1837 they removed to Cass county where he purchased 800 acres on the Etowah river in one of the "horseshoe bends." He and his wife were among the found-ers of the Raccoon Creek Baptist Church where he served as deacon and gave the land for the present church and cemetery. A prosperous farmer, public-spirited. Democrat; he died Dec. 18, 1839 at his home near Euharlee and is buried in the Burge family cemetery. Children of "Natty" and Nancy Burge were: (1) Joseph G., b. Dec. 1, 3815, (dec). (2) William Twitty, b. Jan. 20, 1820 in North Carolina, After coming to Cass, was engaged in sawmill business, in 1845 pur-chased a farm in the Stilesboro community, during Civil War was a quartermaster of the State troops; was in 1862-65 justice of the in-ferior court, a Whig, then Democrat, was active in organization of Populist party, represented the county in the general assembly, 1890-91, on Feb. 3, 1845, married Melissa Smith, daughter of Samuel Smith by whom there were 10 children: Nancy, lives in Atlanta, m. John Mun-ford of Polk county; Texanna, m. John T. Wofford, has children in Fla.; Susan, living near Rockmart, m. J. S. Davitt of Polk county; Dora, m. A. S. McGregor of Cedartown (both dec.); Ida, m. Samuel E. Smith, who served in Confederacy, his wife and children live in Rockmart; James W„ b. Dec. 3, 1857, d. Dec 28, 1928, m. Etta Hines, lived at home place, a daughter, Idora, is only survival in the county. (3) Adolphus Green, b. Oct. 5, 1823, d. May 22, 1854, is buried at Euharlee. (4) Mary Elizabeth, b. June 2, 1826, m. Daniel Branson Cunyus of Houston county who came to this county in 1843 and be-came a large and prosperous land owner near Stilesboro. He died May 12, 1889, and he and his wife are buried in the Burge cemetery on the Etowah river. The old home is yet standing. Of 10 children these reached maturity: (a) Dr. Henry D., b. April 1, 1848, m. twice, lives in Rome, (b) Nannie J., m. Ellas Skannal and has descendents in La., d. Dec. 1887. (c) M. Frances m. J. T. Conyers, d. Dec. 16, 1928. (d) Robert N., b. Oct. 23, 1851, d. Sept. 14, 1929, unmarried,   (e) John William,   b. Dec. 1, 1853,  m.   Cora  Whaley   by  whom   there are Susie,   May   Belle,   and  John   who   served   in   the   World War, lives in Decatur,   (f)  M. E,  (Ella), m. Charles Jones  (both dec.) by whom there were 3 children, burled in Cartersville. (g) Adolphus Burge, b. July 17, 1863, m. Annie Laurie Jones by whom there were Dorothy m. the Rev. B. P. Pirn, and Lucy, the historian of Bartow county. The half brother of D. B. Cunyus, Rev. William Cunyus, was a teacher and preacher in Stilesboro and Taylorsville and reared a large family. Of his children, Sallie, m. J. K. Rowan; Creed, m. Villa Leake of this county (both dec), Charlie, Fort, and Homer removed to Texas, Daniel, m. Alice Hawkins of this county (both dec.), Mittie, m. E. H Janes (dec.), Ida and Maude never married. (5.) Eliza Anne, m. Russel EL Cannon, b. Feb. 24, 1815, d. May 5, 1890, represented Woody and Judy Burge who moved from Virginia to Rutherford county, N. C, where he was reared. On November 18, 1815 married Nancy Green, daughter of Joseph and Bellariah Green and they settled in 1824 on Sweet Water creek in Gwinnett county until in 1837 they removed to Cass county where he purchased 800 acres on the Etowah river in one of the "horseshoe bends/' He and his wife were among the found-ers of the Raccoon Creek Baptist Church where he served as deacon and gave the land for the present church and cemetery. A prosperous farmer, public-spirited, Democrat; he died Dec. 18, 1839 at his home near Euharlee and is buried in the Burge family cemetery. Children of "Natty" and Nancy Burge were: (1) Joseph G., b. Dec. 1, 1815, (dec). (2) William Twitty, b. Jan. 20, 1820 in North Carolina. After coming to Cass, was engaged in sawmill business, in 1845 pur-chased a farm in the Stilesboro community, during Civil War was a quartermaster of the State troops; was in 1862-65 justice of the in-ferior court, a Whig, then Democrat, was active in organization of Populist party, represented the county in the general assembly, 1890-91, on Feb. 3, 1845, married Melissa Smith, daughter of Samuel Smith by whom there were 10 children: Nancy, lives in Atlanta, m. John Mun-ford of Polk county; Texanna, m. John T. Wofford, has children in Fla.; Susan, living near Rockmart, m. J. S. Davltt of Polk county; Dora, m. A. S. McGregor of Cedartown (both dec.); Ida, m. Samuel R Smith, who served in Confederacy, his wife and children live in Rockmart; James W., b. Dec 3, 1857, d. Dec 28, 1928, m. Etta Hines, lived at home place, a daughter, Idora, is only (survival in the county. (3) Adolphus Green, b. Oct. 5, 1823, d. May 22, 1854, is buried at Euharlee. (4) Mary Elizabeth, b. June 2, 1826, m. Daniel Branson Cunyus of Houston county who came to this county in 1843 and be-came a large and prosperous land owner near Stilesboro. He died May 12, 1889, and he and his wife are buried in the Burge cemetery on the Etowah river. The old home is yet standing. Of 10 children these reached maturity: (a) Dr. Henry D., b. April 1, 1848, m. twice, lives in Rom§. (b) Nannie J., m. Ellas Skannal and has descendents in La., d. Dec. 1887.  (c) M. Frances m. J. T. Conyers, d. Dec. 16, 1928. (d) Robert N., b. Oct. 23, 1851, d. Sept. 14, 1929, unmarried,   (e) John "William,   b. Dec. 1, 1853,   m.   Cora   "Whaley   by  whom   there are Susie,   May    Belle,   and  John   who   served   in   the   World War, lives in Decatur,   (f)  M. E.  (Ella), m. Charles Jones  (both dec.) by whom there were 8 children, buried in Cartersville. (g) Adolphus Burge, b. July 17, 1863, m. Annie Laurie Jones by whom there were Dorothy m. the Rev. B. F. Pim, and Lucy, the historian of Bartow county. The half brother of D. B. Cunyus, Rev. William Cunyus, was a teacher and preacher in Stilesboro and Taylorsville and reared a large family. Of his children, Sallie, m. J. K. Rowan; Creed, m. Villa Leake of this county (both dec), Charlie, Fort, and Homer removed to Texas, Daniel, m. Alice Hawkins of this county (both dec), Mittie, m. E. H. Janes (dec), Ida and Maude never married. (5.) Eliza Anne, m. Russel BL Cannon, b. Feb. 24, 1815, d. May 5, 1890, represented the county two terms in the senate, active in the political and educa-tional affairs of the Stilesboro community and Cartersville. Their chil-dren were: (a) Henry (dec), (b) Fanny, m. Jim Colbert (both dec), children live in Fla. (c) Nathaniel B., died in 1931, has a son, Roy, who lives at Stilesboro. (d) John, (dec), (e) Joseph B., m. Mattie Sproull by whom there were Willie Belle, m. C. B. Hawkins, Charlie, m. Allie Tlnsley, Flossie m. Dr. M. F. Haygood, Fanny (dec) m. Roy Harris. (6) Jane m. John F. Sproull. (7) Joseph P., died in 1861, 1st Lt. Co. K, 14th Ga. Regt.  (8) Robert M. (dec).

Source: The history of Bartow County : formerly Cass. Cartersville, Ga.: Cunyus, Lucy Josephine Printed by Tribune Pub. Co., c1933.


 

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