Georgia Genealogy Trails

"Where your Journey Begins"

Burke County, Georgia
Biographies


Alonzo Lee Franklin. One of the ablest advocates of the Georgia bar is Alonzo L. Franklin, solicitor general for the Augusta Circuit. As Mr. Franklin has reached, but not passed, his mature prime, much strong professional work attaches to both his past and future career. A native of Georgia, Mr. Franklin is a son of that ardent southern patriot, John E. Franklin, who joined the army at the age of sixteen years, who served a fouryears' term and who lost an eye at the Battle of Gettysburg. After the war, his strong personality made itself felt in various public affairs. Settling in Burke County, his native community, he engaged in school-teaching as his first vocational activity. He was moreover deeply interested in local civic affairs and among his political honors and services was his incumbency of the office of tax collector for Burke County. In 1881 he removed to Richmond County, where he became identified with Augusta's mercantile enterprises. Here he remained until his death, which occurred in 1895, at the age of fiftysix years. The companion of his manhood home was Emma Youngblood Franklin, who yet survives her husband, and who resides in Mathews, Georgia. Their children were two and both were sons. Benjamin Franklin died in Augusta in 1896. His brother is the special subject of this sketch.

Alonzo Lee Franklin was born to the above-mentioned parents on December 16, 1873, at their home in Burke County, Georgia. He was given the advantages of the Richmond County public schools and particularly those of Augusta. His academic education was further extended through courses in the Kimberlin Heights School of Tennessee, where he spent two years, and in the Milligan College of the same state, where he studied for four additional years. Having selected the law as his profession, he then proceeded to take up its practical study in the office of the Hon. Henry C. Hammond, who has since become the judge of the Superior Court of Augusta Circuit. When Mr. Franklin had completed his research under that capable tutelage, he was admitted to the bar by the Hon. E. L. Brinton, judge of {he Superior Court of the Augusta Circuit. The date of that auspicious circumstance was January 25, 1901, and immediately thereafter the young lawyer entered upon practice in Augusta. The first office tendered him by his townsmen as a political tribute was that of commissioner of police. In that office he served for five years. In 1912 Mr. Franklin was elected solicitor general of the Augusta Circuit. He entered upon the duties of the office on the first day of the succeeding year and still continues in the able and efficient performance of its duties. His term for the elected office ends on January 1,1921, he having since been elected to succeed himself.

Mr. Franklin is a true Southerner in his gracious social qualities and his firm loyalty to state and city. He has many fraternal connections. He is a Mason, a Shriner of both Savannah and Augusta, a member of the Knights of Pythias, of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Red Men and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. The variety and extent of his interests in the social fraternities in no wis« diminishes his consistent faithfulness to church responsibilities. The Disciples' or Christian Church is that of Mr. Franklin's membership. He is a deacon in the organization of the First Church of Augusta and since the departure of the Very Honorable Justice Lamar from the city, Mr. Franklin has been the teacher and lecturer of the Bible class of the same church. These labors and enthusiasms are shared by Mrs. Franklin, who is active in numerous movements of the church society and is a teacher in its Sundayschool.

Mrs. Franklin is a South Carolina lady and formerly resided in Edgefield of that state, where her parents, John A. and Lucinda McDaniel, have long been well known. It was on December 22, 1902,-that Katherine McDaniel became Mrs. Alonzo L. Franklin. The Franklin home is one of attractive atmosphere and its owners among Augusta's most popular people.

Hon. George C. Thomas. Among those who have lent honor to the legal profession in the State of Georgia a place of special distinction must be accorded to George C. Thomas, of Athens, a former circuit judge and for more than forty years identified with his profession in this state.

A native Georgian, he was born in Burke County October 20, 1850, a son of Jethro and Jane T. (Blount) Thomas, who were also natives of Georgia and were married in this state. His father was a farmer and afterwards a merchant, and died in 1885 at the age of sixty-two. During the war he enlisted in Company I of the Fifth Georgia Regiment of Cavalry as a private, and served from 1862 until the close of the struggle. He was once wounded in a battle in which his command was engaged, and in 1864 he was taken prisoner and was held in the Point Lookout prison in Maryland until the close of the war. The mother died in 1855 at the age of fifty-five, having had three children. •

The youngest of these children, Judge Thomas, spent most of his boyhood in the troubled era of the Civil war, attended school rather irregularly, gained part of his early education in Burke County, later attended Mercer University from which he was graduated in 1870, and after some further training in the University of Georgia was admitted to the bar in 1879. Since then he has been continuously identified with his profession in Athens. From 1886 to 1889 he served as circuit judge of the Oconee Circuit, and during that time presided over many notable trials and gained a reputation for impartial administration of justice and served to give dignity to his office. He was also a member of the State Legislature two terms from Clarke County, serving from 1896 to 1898, during which time he succeeded in having passed by that body a law donating $100,000, for building purposes, to the University of Georgia. Judge Thomas is well known as a member of the Clarke County Bar Association, is an active democrat and a member of the Baptist Church.

In 1871 at Athens, in his twenty-first year, he married Miss Mary Anna McWhorter, daughter of Moses E. McWhorter, who for many years was a merchant at Athens. Six children were born to their union: Jethro Thomas, who was born at Rome, Georgia, and is now deceased; George C., Jr., who was born at Oconee and died there: Mary, who married H. C. Edwards of Athens; Anna and Kate, twins, who died in infancy; and William Milton, who was born at Athens and since graduating from the University of Georgia with the A. B. degree in 1902 and from the law department in 1912, has been associated with his father in practice, and is one of the rising young attorneys of the state. Judge Thomas in his early youth had many difficulties to struggle with, and gained his education and promoted himself to distinction in the bar through his own efforts. He is extensively interested in farming and has several small farms in the vicinity of Athens.

Henry Jones Carswell, M. D. Exemplifying the best ability and attainments of the modern physician and surgeon, Doctor Carswell has found success in his chosen calling at Waycross and has also been a factor in business and civic affairs.

He was born in Burke County, Georgia, March 9, 1885, a son of Rev. John Hamilton and Fannie (Janes) Carswell. His parents were also born in Georgia, his father in Burke and his mother in Greene County. His father became a well known Baptist minister, and spent twenty years in one church. He is now retired from the ministry at the age of sixty-six, and lives at Hephzibah. The mother is still living at the age of sixty-five. Eleven children were born to their union, one of whom died in infancy. Miss B. J. Smith lives at Hephzibah; John F. lives at Avera; Dr. Thomas Janes a young physician, is now deceased; Arthur Eugene lives at Blythe, Georgia; William Davis is in Blythe, Georgia; Washington Kirkpatriek lives at Dublin, Georgia; William is deceased; Henry J. was the next born; Hattie M. lives at Hephzibah; James Hamilton lives at Hephzibah; and Alexander is an attorney at Augusta.,

The eighth in order of age. Dr. Henry J. Carswell attended school at Hephzibah, graduating from high school in 1903, and acquired some of the means which enabled him to complete his medical education by one year of teaching. He then entered the medical department of the University of Georgia at Augusta and graduated M. D. in 1908. He gained valuable experience as an interne in the hospital at Augusta, after which he began practice at Waycross. In 1910 he removed to Kingsland, Georgia, and' followed his profession there for two years. 'While at Kingsland he was one of the promoters of the state bank, also served as a member of the city council and as town treasurer.

Since returning to Waycross Doctor Carswell has acquired a practice that now almost tests his capacities and energies. In 1913 and again in 1915 he took courses in general medicine and gynecology in the Post-Graduate and Polyclinic at New York. He is censor of the local medical society, a member of the Eleventh District and the State Medical Societies, the Southern Medical Association and the American Medical Association. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of the Modern Maccabees. He belongs to the Baptist Church and in politics is a democrat.

On May 26, 1910, at Waycross he married Miss Marion E. Carswell, daughter of William J. Carswell of Waycross. They are the parents of two children: Miss Virginia Lyon, born in 1911; and Miss Helen, born in 1913.
Source: A standard history of Georgia and Georgians, Volume 5  By Lucian Lamar Knight

Gresham, Emmet B., ex-member of the state legislature and present incumbent of the office of county school commissioner of Burke county, has been identified with educational affairs for a number of years, and in his present position is accomplishing a splendid work. He was born on a farm in Burke county, March 7, 1875, and is a son of Job A. and Annie L. (Lasseter) Gresham, both of whom were likewise born and reared in Burke county, where they still reside, having their home in the city of Waynesboro. Job A. Gresham has been identified with agricultural pursuits throughout his active career and is a veteran of the Confederate service in the Civil war, in which he served as ordinancesergeant in the Forty-eighth Georgia volunteer infantry. He is a son of Edmund Byne and Mary (Anderson) Gresham, the former of whom was a son of Job A. Gresham, the family being founded in Burke county in a very early day. The maternal grandparents of the subject of this review were Orrin and Mary (Burke) Lasseter, both of whom died in Burke county. Emmet B. Gresham availed himself of the advantages of Waynesboro academy, after which he continued his studies in the Hephzibah high school, in Richmond county. At the age of eighteen years he left school and engaged in teaching in the public schools of Jefferson county, continuing his pedagogic labors in that county for three years and thereafter teaching in Burke county five years, meeting with unequivocal sucess in his work and gaining not a little prestige in the connection. In 1898, at the age of twenty-three years, he was elected to represent Burke county in the state legislature, being reelected in 1900, and thus serving two consecutive terms. In 1904 he was elected to his present position, that of county commissioner of schools, and he maintains his residence and official headquarters in the city of Waynesboro. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church South, is identified with the lodge and chapter of the Masonic fraternity, and since 1896 he has been a member of Company E, known as the Burke light infantry, in the First Regiment of the Georgia state troops, being a second lieutenant in the same at the present time. He is well known throughout his native county, where he enjoys merited popularity.

Fulcher, William M., clerk of the superior court of Burke county and head of the insurance and brokerage firm of W. M. Fulcher & Co., of Waynesboro, was born on a farm in that county, Dec. 3, 1858. In the same county were born his parents, Vincent W. and Eloise (Wimberly) Fulcher,—the former on Feb. 13, 1814, and the latter April 26, 1825. The father, who was a planter by vocation, is deceased, and his widow is still living, wonderfully well preserved in mind and physical powers, though eighty-one years of age, in 1906. Her husband was never confined to his bed by illness until the day prior to his death, which occurred April 18, 1889. They became the parents of six sons and six daughters, and of the number five sons and three daughters are living, two of the sons having been loyal soldiers of the Confederacy in the Civil war. The subject of this sketch was a child at the time of the war, but he was identified with the state militia for a number of years, having been for four years captain of the Burke light infantry, constituting Company E, First regiment of Georgia state troops. Captain Fulcher had practically no specific educational advantages in his youth, as he was reared in the period of great depression in the south after the Civil war, the family fortunes having reached the lowest ebb, so that he had no opportunity to attend school. By observation, absorption and practical experience he has made good to a large degree this handicap of his youth, and is a man of broad information and strong mentality. At the age of fifteen years he started forth to fight the battle of life on his own responsibility. For several months he was manager of a country store and later he was employed as salesman in a store in the city of Augusta. He then went west, passing one summer in the city of St. Louis, Mo., where he was employed as a solicitor. Upon his return to Waynesboro he became a clerk in the general store of his brother Julian L., and four years later formed a partnership, under the firm name of J. L. Fulcher & Bro. This partnership continued five years when Captain Fulcher withdrew from the firm and became manager of the Waynesboro Supply Company, retaining this position two years, at the expiration of which, in 1895, he engaged in his present line of enterprise, insurance and general brokerage, in which he has been very successful. In 1904 he admitted to partnership his brother Vincent M. and also Arthur F. Evans, and the business has since been conducted under the title of W. M. Fulcher & Co. In politics the captain is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, and he has been called to offices of public trust. He was a member of the board of aldermen of Waynesboro for six years; served an equal period as registrar of Burke county; was elected clerk of the superior court in 1902; was chosen as his own successor in 1904 and is the present incumbent of the office. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained to the rank of Knight Templar, is also identified with the Mystic Shrine, and is past master of his lodge and past high priest of his chapter. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church South, and is a steward of the Waynesboro church of this denomination as well as superintendent of its Sunday school. Mrs. Fulcher holds membership in the Presbyterian church. On Dec. 21, 1898, Captain Fulcher was united in marriage to Miss Sadie Dent, daughter of Dr. James M. Dent, a representative physician of Waynesboro, and they have one son, William M., Jr., born Sept. 23, 1902.

Hayne, Linwood C, president of the National bank of Augusta, and also the Planters' loan and savings bank, of the same city, was born in Waynesboro, Burke county, Ga., April 23, 1858. He is a son of James B. and Julia Whitehead (Clinton) Hayne, the former of whom was born in South Carolina and the latter in Richmond county, Ga., both being now deceased. The father was a lawyer by profession and was a veteran of the Mexican war, in which he served as a member of the Palmetto regiment, from South Carolina. Linwood C Hayne attended the common schools of Burke county and supplemented this discipline by study in the high school at Hephzibah, Richmond county, while later he was graduated in Moore's business university, in the city of Atlanta. He initiated his business career as clerk in the mercantile establishment of J. B. White & Co., of Augusta, soon afterward being made assistant bookkeeper for the concern, in whose employ he remained consecutively for a period of fourteen years, within which time he rose through various grades of merited promotion to the responsible position of credit man and confidential adviser. He severed his connection with this well known house in 1894. In the preceding year he had been elected president of the Planters' loan and savings bank, which is now the largest and strongest savings bank in Augusta, and he has remained its executive head to the present time. In January, 1894, he also became president of the National bank of Augusta, which was established in 1865 and which is one of the stanch financial institutions of the state, being capitalized for $250,000. In addition to these two important positions Mr. Hayne is also president of the Southerland Manufacturing Company, of Augusta; vice-president of the Georgia Chemical Works, of Augusta; member of the board of directors of the Warren Manufacturing Company, of the same city; and a director of the Augusta Land Company and the United States Fidelity and Guarantee Company, the headquarters of the latter being in the city of Baltimore, Md. In politics he accords allegiance to the Democracy, and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in St. John's Methodist Episcopal church South, of whose board of trustees he is chairman. He is a member and ex-president of the Georgia bankers' association and a member of the American bankers' association. Mr. Hayne is an appreciative member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has completed the circle of the York Rite, being a past master of Webb Lodge, No. 166, Free and Accepted Masons; past eminent commander of Georgia Commandery, No. 1, Knights Templars, the oldest in the state; and a member of Yaarab Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in the city of Atlanta. He is also a member of the Augusta Country club and is president of the Augusta Game Preserve club.

Lester, Rufus Ezekiel, lawyer and statesman, was born in Burke county, Ga., Dec. 12, 1837, and was identified with the affairs of his native state all his life. He graduated at Mercer university as a member of the class of 1857, and two years later was admitted to the bar in Savannah. He had scarcely entered upon his professional career when the Civil war broke out and he subordinated all private interests to take up arms in behalf of the Confederate cause. In August, 1861, he enlisted as a lieutenant in the Twentyfifth Georgia volunteer infantry, commanded by Col. C C Wilson, and was made adjutant of the regiment. L'ntil the spring of 1863 he was with his command in Georgia, his regiment forming part of Walker's brigade. In the spring of 1863 Walker was ordered to Mississippi and Lieutenant Lester participated in the battle of Jackson, Miss., and other engagements of the Vicksburg campaign, rising to the position of brigade adjutant. He distinguished himself by his bravery at Chickamauga, where he was twice wounded, and was recommended for promotion. When the surrender came he was stationed at Macon, Ga., and after the war was over he resumed the practice of law at Savannah. During the reconstruction period he was a prominent figure in opposition to the policy of the national government. In 1868 he was elected to the state senate; was reelected in 1871, 1877 and 1878, and during the last two terms was president of the senate. In 1880 he was the choice of many people for governor of Georgia. From 1883 to 1889 he served with distinction as mayor of Savannah, and his administrations have passed into history as among the best the city ever enjoyed. In 1888 he was elected representative in Congress from the first district of Georgia, and by successive reelections he remained a member of that body until his death, which occurred on June 16, 1906, as the result of an accident that happened on the evening before. Mr. Lester was a strong and able lawyer and as an orator had few superiors, his eloquence and logic winning the plaudits of his friends and the respect of his opponents. While in Congress he was for the greater part of his service a member of the river and harbors committee. In his political affiliations he was an unswerving Democrat and was one of the admitted leaders of that party in his native state. He was an active member of the Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the United Confederate Veterans. On Nov. 9, 1859, Mr. Lester was united in marriage to Miss Laura Hines, daughter of James J. and Georgia (Bird) Hines of Burke county. To this union was born one daughter, Laura, who married Thomas J. Randolph.
Source: Georgia: comprising sketches of counties, towns, events, institutions, and ... edited by Allen Daniel Candler, Clement Anselm Evans

Quincy O. Mulkey, M. D. Though young in years, not yet turned thirty, Doctor Mulkey has had unusual opportunities and has made a record of special proficiency and skill as a physician in Jenkins County. Doctor Mulkey now practices at Millen. .

He was born at Girard in Burke County, Georgia, February 8, 1886, a son of James W. and Lavincia A. (Mallard) Mulkey. Both parents were born in Burke County, where his father has for many years been a well known farmer and is still living at the old homestead at the age of sixtyseven. He was too young to take part in the war between the states. The mother is now sixty-one years of age. Their children were: W. M. Mulkey of Burke County; E. L. Mulkey of Sardis, Georgia; J. D. Mulkey of Girard, Georgia; D. T. Mulkey of Girard; and oldest of all the children is Dr. Quincy O.

As a boy he attended the Rockville Academy, and then followed a period of employment on his father's farm. Next he became a salesman for W. R. Buxton of Girard, and remained with the firm from the time he was thirteen years of age until he was eighteen. With this as preliminary to his professional work, he entered the medical department of the University of Georgia at Augusta, and in 1909 was graduated M. D. Then followed a hospital experience in Augusta during 1909-10, and on taking up active practice he located at Vidette where he remained until 1912. Since then Doctor Mulkey has looked after a larger field at Millen. He is surgeon for the Atlantic Compress Company in Millen, is chairman of the Jenkins County Board of Health, is secretary of the County Medical Society, and a member of the State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He is also physician for the local camp of the Woodmen of the World.

At Vidette, Georgia, December 21, 1909, Doctor Mulkey married Miss Angie Oates, a daughter of the late Thomas J. Oates. They have one child, Arnold P. Mulkey, born at Vidette, December 3, 1911. Doctor Mulkey own* a good home in Millen, has a fine professional and private library, and is prospering as he deserves on account of his energy and thorough ability.

Robert L. Miller, M. D. Prominent among the able and honored physicians and surgeons who are ably upholding the high standard of the profession in Burke County, stands Dr. Robert L. Miller, who is engaged in active general practice at Waynesboro, the county seat, and who is recognized as one of the representative physicians of the section of Georgia which has been his home from the time of his birth and in which he is a scion of an honored and patrician family that was founded in Georgia in the colonial era of our national history. In Eastern Georgia Doctor Miller is a member of a profession that was here signally dignified and honored in earlier years by the services of his father, whose name and memory are revered in Burke, Jefferson and Richmond counties, throughout which his practice extended.

Dr. Robert L. Miller was born at Hepzibah, Richmond County, Georgia, on the 26th of September, 1870, the youngest in a family of seven children, his birth having occurred when his father, a man of strong mind and great physical vigor, was seventy-two years of age. The doctor is a son of Dr. Baldwin B. and Cornelia. (Polhill) Miller, the former of whom was born in Richmond County, this state, in 1798, and the latter of whom was born in King and Queen County, Virginia, a daughter of Rev. Joseph and Julia (Guyon) Polhill, her mother having been born at New Rochelle, Westchester County, New York, but her father having been a member of an old Southern family; he was a man of high intellectual attainments and was a clergyman of the Baptist Church.


Dr. Robert L. Miller gained his earlier education in the Village of Hephzibah and thereafter completed a special course in Mercer University. He then entered the medical department of the University of Georgia, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1891 and from which he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine, immediately after which he went to the national metropolis and took a post-graduate course in the New York Polyclinic. In the late autumn of 1891 he engaged in practice at Sandersville, Washington County, Georgia, where he met with excellent success and where he remained two years. He then returned to his native Town of Hepzibah, where, on the 22d of November, 1893, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Dean Joyner, daughter of Virgil S. and Mary (Graybill) Joyner, her father having served as a loyal soldier of the Confederacy during the Civil war and having thereafter become a prosperous merchant aijd planter at Oconee, Washington County.

In 1908 Doctor Miller established his permanent residence at Waynesboro, where he now controls a large and representative practice as a physician and surgeon and where he stands forth as a progressive and publicspirited citizen. He is identified with the American Medical Association, the Georgia State Medical Association, the First Congressional District Medical Society and the Burke County Medical Society, which he has represented as a delegate to the conventions of the State Medical Association. The Doctor is the owner of a small farm, which he maintains and operates solely for the benefit of his father's old negro valet, who has the supervision of the place. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Christian Church, in which Mrs. Miller is prominent in the various departments of the women's church work, besides which she is actively identified with the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. The Doctor is ardently devoted to hunting and fishing.


Dr. Baldwin B. Miller
was accorded excellent educational advantages. In preparation for his profession he entered the celebrated old Jefferson Medical College, in the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and after his graduation in this institution he established his residence in Burke County, Georgia, where he maintained his professional headquarters during the remainder of his long and noble life and where he amassed a fortune, his extensive practice .as a physician having been a medium through which he added greatly to his material prosperity. Prior to the Civil war he had become the largest land-owner in Burke County, and was also one of the largest slaveholders. He was broad-minded and liberal in his civic attitude and, as the largest single taxpayer in the county, he naturally manifested a lively and helpful interest in all that tended to advance civic and industrial prosperity. He was too advanced in years to be eligible for military service when the Civil war was precipitated, butiiis patriotic loyalty to the South was significantly shown when, at his own expense, he equipped a company of volunteers who entered the Confederate service and made an admirable record. Doctor Miller represented in his personality the gentle culture and refinement that characterized the fine old Southern regime, and was notably courtly and dignified, though possessed of an affability and generosity that gained to him the warm friendship of all with whom he came in contact. In his profession he had high appreciation of his stewardship, and this, as combined with his intrinsic sympathy and kindliness, caused him to respond to every call for his ministrations to the suffering and distressed, no matter how poor and obscure the family or how great the burden imposed upon him by his humane mission, from which he could expect no financial recompense. This revered pioneer physician passed to the life eternal in 1872, at the age of seventy-four years, and only two years after the birth of his youngest child, who is the immediate subject of this review. Dr. Baldwin B. Miller first wedded Mrs. Robert Morrison, who did not survive her marriage by many years, the two children of this union being deceased. In 1851 the Doctor wedded Miss Cornelia Polhill, who survived him by many years and who is still living at the age of eighty-three years. Of their seven children Dr. Robert L., of this article, is the youngest, as already noted; Joseph. B. was a prominent member of the bar of Waynesboro at the time of his death, in 1879; John P.,-who was a prosperous planter of Burke County, died in 1877; Ruth is the wife of Charles H. Thomas, of Waynesboro; Lulu is the wife of Ulysses B. Frost, of Hephzibah, Richmond County; and Benjamin died in 1875, at the age of seven years.

Lott Warren, lawyer, legislator, judge, and congressman, was for many years one of the prominent figures in the public life of Georgia. He was a native of the state, born in Burke County, October 30, 1797, obtained such education as the schools of the day afforded, studied law, and was admitted to practice in 1821. He moved to Marion and served in the Lower House of the General Assembly in 1824, and in the State Senate in 1830. In 1831 he was again in the Lower House, and in that year was elected a judge of the Inferior Court, serving until 1834. Hcwas elected as a whig representative to the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh congresses, serving from 1839 to 1843. Judge Warren was for many years a leader of his party in the state, was accounted one of the foremost lawyers of the day, and a strong man on the bench. He died at Albany, June 17, 1861.

Mark Madison Lively, M. D., now in practice at Statesboro, is a physician and surgeon of forty years' experience. He was born in Burke County, Georgia, September 17, 1854, a son of Alexander and Verlinda (Godby) Lively. Both parents were natives of Georgia, and spent most of their years on a farm in Burke County. The father was born in April, 1832, and during the latter part of the war served in the Georgia Militia as a private. He died October 1, 1912. The mother was born in 1837 and died in June, 1862.

Doctor Lively spent his early youth and boyhood in the troubled period of the Civil war, and had limited opportunities, though he attended the country schools as long as possible, and paid his way by farm work and finally entered the medical department of the University of Georgia, where he was graduated M. D. in 1876, and at once began practice in his native county. That was his home for more than a quarter of a century, but in 1902 he removed to Statesboro. He also spent five years in practice at Macon. At Statesboro he established the Lively Drug Store, and this thriving business is now conducted by his son.

Doctor Lively is a member of the county medical society and is a member of the Georgia Medical Society and the American Medical Association. In polities he is a democrat, is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias and is a member of the Methodist Church.

In July, 1876, he married Miss Martha V. Ellison. She died in 1883 in Burke County. Her parents were Robert J. and Cynthia Ellison. To this union were born two daughters. Mrs. Nina V. Hendricks, the older, was born in Burke County, Georgia, and is the mother of three sons and one daughter: J. Walter, Charles, Martha and Edwin Hendricks. The second daughter is Miss Emory Mattie Lively, who is a teacher in the public schools of Statesboro. In 1885 in Burke County Doctor Lively married Miss Susan Oliver, daughter of Richard and Caroline Oliver. There are two sous of this1 marriage. George P„ Lively, the owner of his father's old drug business at Statesboro, while Mark O. Lively assists his brother in the drug business. Both sons were natives of Burke County.
Source: A standard history of Georgia and Georgians, Volume 5  By Lucian Lamar Knight


Herrington, Lovick Pierce, M. D., a well known physician of Waynesboro, was born at what is now known as Girth, a country post office in Burke county, May 27, 1858. From data supplied by Lord Timothy Harrington, member of the British Parliament from Ireland, it is learned that a prominent family of this name lived in the vicinity of Londonderry. Ireland, about the middle of the seventeenth century. The name was originally spelled "Haerrington," and a division of the family occurred over the spelling, some wanting to retain the "e" and others the "a," the result being that the name is now spelled both ways, and as there are numerous representatives of each in the United States, it is evident that some of each branch immigrated to this country at a very early date. From Connecticut they spread to Pennsylvania and Virginia, and long before the Revolutionary war a father and four sons settled at Greenville, N. C Two of these sons, Richard M. and Ephraim, later settled in Screven county, Ga., where the former built a rock dam across Brier creek, cut several canals and built a number of mills, the place still being known as "Mill Haven." This dam still stands, a wonder to modern civil engineers. Ephraim Herrington was killed near Mill Haven in a skirmish with the Indians in the colonial days. A Henry H. Herrington was a brigadier-general in the American army during the Revolution, and with two others of the name was present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. Five generations of the Herringtons have lived in Burke and Screven counties. Traced from the Richard M. Herrington above mentioned, these generations have been represented by Richard, Martin M., Berry, the father of the subject of this sketch, and Dr. L. P. Herrington, whose name heads this review. Doctor Herrington received his primary education in the schools of his native county during the dark days of reconstruction, just after the Civil war, when everything was very much disorganized, the schools being no exception. Determined to acquire an education, however, he entered Emory college at Oxford, Ga., and as he paid his own way he was compelled to practice all sorts of economy never letting pass an opportunity to earn an "honest penny." At Oxford he found several young men like himself—in straitened financial circumstances, but bent on securing an education. These young men formed a club and rented a small house near the center of the town. As this house had the reputation of being haunted no one would live in it and they rented it very cheap, the supernatural having no terrors for them. This cottage became known as "Round Top," and it was seldom molested by the people of the town, save now and then when some one of its inmates became indisposed, when some gentle maiden would send over a collection of flowers and "good things" for the invalid and his associates. The butcher, the grocer and the milkman passed by, having learned to save time by not stopping for "orders" at Round Top. The housekeeping of the bachelor students was not always systematic, nor their cooking according to the most approved rules of culinary science, but here they lived until Andrew Hall was opened and the Mess House boys found more commodious quarters. Here a number of young men originated the "Helping Hall," which has since become a prominent feature of numerous colleges throughout the country, and which has been the means of aiding many young men to acquire an education. This institution had its start at Round Top, its originators being Col. E. P. Davis, Prof. W. T. Dumas. Dr. O. G. Mingledorf, R. E. L. Folsom, Joseph Baker, Doctor Glover, II. C Carney, Thomas Easterling, Thomas Lang, Rev. McLain, Col. T. B. Harwell, Col. B. S. Williamson and Dr. L. P. Herrington. Later Doctor Huckabee, founder of McRae college, came into the hall, and during one vacation he and Doctor Herrington worked as brickmasons on Seney Hall—the gift of George I. Seney to Emory college. Doctor Herrington taught school in Newton and Burke counties until 1882, when he entered the medical department of the University of Georgia at Augusta, and graduated in the class of 1884, receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He then returned to the old homestead, where he with others secured the establishment of the post office of Girth, fourteen miles south of Waynesboro, where he practiced his profession for some time, and then attended Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Term., where he received the finishing touches of his medical education. Again he took up the practice at Girth, but subsequently removed to Waynesboro, where he has since been actively engaged in professional work, building up a large practice and one of distinctly representative character. He became a member of the Ogeechee medical association; served as president of the Burke county Farmers' Alliance; has been delegate to conventions of that body, especially the one where the jute trust was opposed; and with his father gave the site for the Union academy, afterward laboring to establish this school as a permanent institution of learning, and one of the best in the county. Doctor Herrington is the originator and sole proprietor of a remedy known as "Herrington's Liver Pills for Georgia People." He is the owner of the old homestead plantation, having purchased the interests of the other heirs, and devotes some of his time and attention to his plantation interests. In 1902 he graduated at the "Institute of Science," of New York, the course being taken by mail and express, and received a diploma in the occult sciences. He is a Master Mason, a Phi Delta Theta, an old time Democrat of Scotch-Irish descent, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church South. In October, 1886, he was united in marriage to Miss Annie Laurie Davie, of Nashville, Tenn. , and they have one daughter, Ouida Mae, born Nov. 9, 1896.
Source Georgia: comprising sketches of counties, towns, events, institutions, and ... edited by Allen Daniel Candler, Clement Anselm Evan

Felder, Thomas B., Jr., a leading member of the Atlanta bar and a prominent figure in the political affairs of the state, was born near Waynesboro, Burke county, Ga., Oct. 6, 1864.  He is a son of Thomas B. and Minerva Clara (Corker) Felder, the former of whom was born in Sumter, S. C., in 1843, and the latter in Burke county, Ga., in 1844.  He is a direct descendant of Edward Felder, who was colonel of the Third South Carolina regiment in the war of the Revolution.  The latter’s nephew.  John Myers Felder, was for many years a representative of the south Carolina in the Congress of the United States.  The father of the subject of this review was colonel of a Georgia regiment in the Confederate service during the Civil was.  Stephen A. Corker, maternal uncle of Mr. Felder, was captain of the Burke Guards in the Confederate ranks and after the was represented the eighth district of Georgia in congress.  After due preliminary discipline Thomas B. Felder, Jr., was matriculated in the University of Georgia, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1883, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts.  He then studied law and was admitted to the bar.  He served as mayor of Dublin in 1884-5; as county commissioner of Laurens county in 1866-7; and in 1888 was presidential elector on the Democratic ticket from the third Congressional district of the state.  He was engaged in the practice of his profession in Dublin until 1891, when he removed to Atlanta, where he now controls a large and representative practice.  In1896-7 he represented Fulton county in the state legislature and in 1898 was a candidate for Congress, from the fifth district, but was defeated.  In 1904 he was presidential elector for the state-at-large and was president of the electoral college of Georgia.  He is an active worker in the cause of his party, and has twice been a delegate to its national conventions.  Mr. Felder is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Improved Order of Red Men, the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Order of Beavers; is a member of the Capital City club and Piedmont Driving club, of Atlanta, and the Hermitage Club, of Nashville, Tenn.  He is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal church South, of his home city.  On Aug. 12, 1886, Mr. Felder was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Johnson, daughter of Grafton Johnson, and a granddaughter of Gov. Noah K. Noble, of Indiana.  She was summoned to the life eternal on June 21, 1904, having become the mother of one son who died in infancy.
[Source: Georgia: Sketches, Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions & People, Vol. 2, Publ. 1906 Transcribed By:  Maggie Coleman]

Fulcher, William M., clerk of the superior court of Burke county and head of the insurance and brokerage firm of W. M. Fulcher & Co., of Waynesboro, was born on a farm in that county, Dec. 2, 1858.  In the same county were born his parents, Vincent W. and Eloise (Wimberly) Fulcher,-the former on Feb. 13, 1814, and the latter April 26, 1825.  The father, who was a planter by vocation, is deceased, an his widow is still living, wonderfully well preserved in mind and physical powers, though eighty-one years of age, in 1906.  Her husband was never confined to his bed by illness until the day prior to his death, which occurred April 18, 1889.  They became the parents of six sons and six daughters, and of the number five sons and three daughters are living, two of the son having been loyal soldiers of the Confederacy in the Civil war. The subject of this sketch was a child at the time of the war, but he was identified with the state militia for a number of years, having been for four years captain of the Burke light infantry, constituting Company E, First regiment of Georgia state troops.  Captain Fulcher had practically no specific educational advantages in his youth, as he was reared in the period of the great depression in the south after the Civil war, the family fortunes having reached the lowest ebb, so that he had no opportunity to attend school.  By observation, absorption and practical experience he has made good to a large degree this handicap of his youth, and is a man of broad information and strong mentality.  At the age of fifteen years he started forth to fight the battle of life on his own responsibility.  For several months he was manager of a country store and later he was employed as salesman in a store in the city of Augusta.  He then went west, passing one summer in the city of St. Louis, Mo., where he was employed as a solicitor.  Upon his return to Waynesboro he became a clerk in the general store of his brother Julian L., and four years later formed a partnership, under the firm name of J. L. Fulcher & Bro.  This partnership continued five years when Captain Fulcher withdrew from the firm and became manage of the Waynesboro Supply Company, retaining this position two years, at the expiration of which, in 1895, he engaged in his present line of enterprise, insurance and general brokerage, in which he has been very successful.  In 194 he admitted to partnership his brother Vincent M. and also Arthur F. Evans, and the business has since been conducted under the title of W. M. Fulcher & Co.  In politics the captain is a stanch supported of the cause of the Democratic party, and he has been called to offices of public trust. He was a member of the board of aldermen of Waynesboro for six years; served an equal period as registrar of Burke county; was elected clerk of the superior court in 1902; was chosen as his own successor in 1904 and is the present incumbent of the office.  He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained to the rank of Knight Templar, is also identified with the Mystic Shrine, and is past master of his lodge and past high priest of his chapter.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church South, and is a steward of the Waynesboro church of this denomination as well as superintendent of its Sunday school.  Mrs. Fulcher holds membership in the Presbyterian church.  On Dec. 21, 1898, Captain Fulcher was united in marriage to Miss Sadie Dent, daughter of Dr. James M. Dent, a representative physician of Waynesboro, and they have one son, William M., Jr., born Sept 23, 1902.(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Renae Donaldson)

Houston, John, second governor of Georgia under the constitution of 1777, was a native of the state, having been born at Waynesboro on Aug. 31, 1744, his father, Sir Patrick Houston, being one of those who came over with Oglethorpe. The son received a good education and when the troubles with the mother country arose he was one of the first to assume an aggressive attitude toward the British government. In 1774 he called the first meeting of the band of patriots that organized the “Sons of Liberty” in Georgia, and acted as chairman of the meeting. In 1775 and 1776 he was a member of the Continental Congress, and would have been one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence but for the fact that he had been called home from Philadelphia to counteract the influence of John J. Zubly, who had left Philadelphia to work against the declaration. On May 8, 1777, he was appointed a member of the executive council, and on Jan. 8, 1778, succeeded John A. Treutlen as governor. Savannah was captured by the British during his administration and he was invested by the council with almost dictatorial power, because of the unhappy condition of the colony. In 1784 he was again elected governor and was one of the commissioners to the Beaufort convention to settle the boundaries between Georgia and South Carolina. Houston county was named in his honor. He died at White Bluff, near Savannah, July 20, 1796.
(Source: Georgia
Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

Johnson, Herschel Vespasian, lawyer and statesman, was born in Burke county Sept. 18, 1812. In 1834 he graduated at the University of Georgia and having studied law under Judge Gould while attending college was soon after admitted to the bar. He practiced at Augusta for about five years, when he located in Jefferson county. In 1840 he was nominated for Congress, but declined to make the race. Two years later he ran and was defeated. In 1844 he was one of the Polk electors and was prominently supported for governor in the Democratic convention the following year. In 1848 he was appointed by Governor Towns to fill the unexpired term of Walter T. Colquitt in the United States senate; was a delegate to the Democratic national convention that year; elected judge of the superior court in 1849; elector for the state at large on the Pierce ticket in 1852; nominated and elected governor in 1853; reelected in 1855; candidate for vice-president on the ticket with Stephen A. Douglas in 1860; delegate to the secession convention of 1861, where he offered a substitute for the ordinance proposing immediate secession ; elected Confederate state senator in 1862; president of the constitutional convention of 1865; elected United States senator in January, 1866, though he was disfranchised by the act of Congress and not permitted to serve; was appointed judge of the superior court in 1873 and held the position until his death in Jefferson county on August 16, 1880.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Johnston, Philip P., judge of the city court of Waynesboro and recognized as one of the representative members of the bar of Burke county, was born on a plantation near the city of Tallahassee, Leon county, Fla., Sept. 19, 1854. He is a son of George C S. and Maria H. (Whitehurst) Johnston, the former of whom was born in Charles county, Md., in 1805, and the latter in Leon county, Fla., in 1814. As a young man the father removed from his native commonwealth to Florida, becoming a successful planter of Leon county, while he was also a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal church South. His first wife died in 1866, in Fernandina, Fla., and he later removed to Barnesville, Ga., where he married a second time. He passed the remainder of his life in this state, his death having occurred, in Bibb county, in 1878. He was of English and Scotch lineage, having been a son of George Johnston, who was of English descent, and of Frances (Smoot) Johnston who was of Scotch descent. Her father was a Scotsman who escaped from an English prison on the day before he was to have been executed for having taken part in a patriotic rebellion in Scotland. He became a stowaway on a vessel bound for America and located in Maryland, where he passed the remainder of his life. Judge Johnston secured his earlier educational discipline in Fletcherville institute, at Thomasville, Ga., and in a school conducted by Capt. M. C Edwards at Springvale, this state. He left school in his sixteenth year and passed the following two years in southern Florida. At the age of eighteen in 1873, he took up his residence in Waynesboro, where he has since made his home. Here he took up the study of law. The notably receptive power of his intellect was shown in the fact that after but nine months' technical reading he was able to pass the required examination which entitled him to admission to the bar, this being in November, 1873. Though but nineteen years of age at the time, he forthwith entered upon the active practice of his profesion, in which he has attained marked prestige and met with unequivocal success, being known as one of the leading lawyers of eastern Georgia and having been concerned in much of the important litigation in the courts of this section. In 1903 he was elected to his present office. He is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Democratic party, but has invariably declined to become a candidate for office of purely political nature, but was induced to accept the judgeship of the city court in view of the fact that the judge of this court is permitted to practice law in all courts except his own and he is therefore still engaged in the active practice of his profession. He and his wife are prominent members of the Waynesboro Methodist Episcopal church South, in which he is a steward and trustee. Fie is a Roval-Arch Mason and is at the time of this writing incumbent of the office of worshipful master of Waynesboro Lodge, No. 274, Free and Accepted Masons. On Dec. 11, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Johnston to Miss Lena P. Shewmake, daughter of Judge John T. and Elizabeth P. (Jones) Shewmake, of Augusta, Ga. Her parents were both natives of Burke county, where they remained until their removal to Augusta. Judge and Mrs. Johnston have four children: John S. is studying law in the office of his father; Nona was recently graduated in the Wesleyan female college at Macon; and Lena and Adele are attending school in Waynesboro.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Jones, Henry A., M. D., is one of the leading representatives of his profession in Jenkins county, maintaining his residence and professional headquarters in Millen, the county seat. He was born in Herndon, Burke county, Ga., Aug. 27, 1868, and is a son of Henry W. and Martha (Aiken) Jones, the former of whom was likewise born in Herndon, Sept, 24, 1824, and the latter in Madison, Morgan county, in May, 1830. Henry W. Jones rendered valuable service as an engineer for the Confederacy during the war between the states, having been connected with a Georgia regiment. After the war he became one of the successful planters of Burke county, where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred on Aug. 8, 1900, while his widow was summoned to the life eternal in December, 1902. She was a daughter of Bartley and Lucy (Cummings) Aiken, the latter having been a daughter of a prominent physician in Virginia. The paternal grandparents of Doctor Jones were Henry Philip and Sarah (Vickers) Jones, of Burke county, where the respective families were early founded. Doctor Jones secured his literary education in Emory college at Oxford, Ga., and he then entered the medical department of the University of New York, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1892, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He initiated the practice of his profession in Herndon, Burke county, where he remained four years, at the expiration of which, in 1896, he located in Millen. Here he has built up a fine practice and gained a strong hold on popular confidence and esteem. He is a close student of his profession and keeps abreast of the advances made in the same, while he is a frequent contributor to leading medical periodicals. He is a member of the Medical Association of Georgia, and is a local surgeon of the Millen & Southwestern railway. In politics he is a loyal supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church South, in which he is a trustee. He is affiliated with the lodge, chapter and commandery of the Masonic fraternity, and with its adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. He was for several years a member of the Burke Troop of cavalry, a part of the First Georgia regiment, and he served for a time as regimental surgeon. On Nov. 28, 1897, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Daniel, daughter of Elias Daniel, of Millen, and they have one daughter, Miriam Daniel Jones, born May 4, 1899.
(Source: Georgia
Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Jones, John J., lawyer and legislator, was born in Burke county, Ga., in 1824. After graduating at Emory college he studied law and in 1848 was admitted to the bar. He served as a member of the state legislature and in 1858 was elected to represent his district in the lower house of Congress. On Jan. 23, 1861, he resigned his seat, along with the other members of the Georgia delegation, and soon afterward entered the Confederate service as a lieutenant. After the war was over he returned to the practice of his profession in Burke county, in which he continued until his death in 1898. At the time of his death he was commissioner of roads and revenues of the county.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Jones, Seaborn H., of Waynesboro, is one of the leading members of the bar of Burke county, and a representative of one of the old and honored families of Georgia. He was born in Waynesboro, Dec. 20, 1863, and is a son of Hon. John J. and Evaline (Toombs) Jones. His father was a man of prominence and distinction in Georgia affairs, having been a member of the United States Congress at the time when Georgia seceded from the Union, and captain of a company in the Confederate service during the Civil war. After the close of the great conflict between the states he became a member of the state legislature and took a conspicuous part in forming the laws of the commonwealth under the existing exigencies of the new regime. At the time of his death, in 1898, he was commissioner of roads and revenues of Burke county, having large landed interests in the county. His wife, who died in 1900, was a niece of Hon. Robert Toombs, whose name is writ large in the annals of Georgia, which he represented in the United States senate, and was specially prominent in connection with military and governmental affairs of the Confederacy during the Civil war. Seaborn H. Jones was graduated in Emory college, his father's alma mater, at Oxford, Ga., when twenty-one years of age. He then took up the study of law under the preceptor-ship of his father, one of the most prominent members of the bar of eastern Georgia, and was admitted to practice in 1887. He forthwith entered into a professional partnership with his father, and this alliance continued until the death of the latter, the firm having a large and important practice, which the son still controls, the original firm title having been John J. Jones & Son. In his political proclivities Mr. Jones is a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies of the Democracy, in whose cause he has been an active worker. He served three terms as solicitor of the Burke county court, and in 1898-9 he represented his county in the state legislature. In 1901 Gov. Allen D. Candler appointed him judge of the city court of Waynesboro, and he remained incumbent of this office until 1902, when the court was temporarily abolished. Judge Jones is chairman of the Burke county Democratic executive committee. He has extensive plantation interests in the county, owning a portion of the old Jones homestead, known as "Canaan," adjoining the city of Waynesboro, said property having been in the possession of the family for many generations. His only sister, Mary T., wife of Judge George F. Cox, of Waynesboro, owns a portion of the old homestead, the estate having been divided after the death of their mother. On Nov. 19, 1902, Judge Jones was united in marriage to Miss Helen Gresham, daughter of John J. Gresham, of Waynesboro. They have one child, John James Jones, who was born Oct. 8, 1904, and who was named in honor of his paternal grandfather.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Madden, Dr. James M., was born in St. Marks, Fla., in July, 1840 and his early life was spent in his native state.  At the age of seventeen he began the study of medicine at Newport, Fla., under the noted physician, Dr. Mataeu.  A year or so later entered Tulane university, Louisiana, where he graduated with distinction.  He practiced medicine but a short time when his country called him; he promptly answered the call, and was among the first to enlist.  He was assigned a position in the hospital at Richmond, Va., and later was transferred to Staunton.  He was in the Sixty-Ninth Virginia regiment, and remained at his post serving faithfully his country until the end came, when he with his comrades laid down their arms, overpowered but not vanquished.  Like many another Confederate, he turned his face homeward and tried to retrieve the fortune lost.  All was confusion in Florida and in other states at that time, but he had youth, strength and unbounded courage.  He resumed his practice of medicine and soon fortune smiled upon him.  He was a successful physician and surgeon.  His practice extended far from home, and upon one of his visits to a patient in Waynesboro, Burke county, Ga., he met a charming young widow, Mrs. Maria Morris McIntosh.  It was a case of mutual attraction, and in a few months they married and moved to Brunswick, Ga.  This was in 1868.  From that time he made Brunswick his home.  He gave up the practice of medicine, went into the banking business, in which he soon accumulated a handsome property and became one of the leading men in the city.  He organized and became president of the Merchants and Traders bank, and held other positions of trust and honor.  He was a man of handsome appearance, tall and finely proportioned.  His manner was cordial and dignified; he was loyal to friends and appreciative of kindness.  He invested heavily in real estate and was one of the wealthiest men in the city.  Everything he touched seemed to prosper.  His last two years were years of suffering.  He attended John Hopkins’ Hospital to be treated but his health never returned.  Just before the end he seemed better and went out for a drive.  He seemed much brighter and stronger and his wife, who was his faithful nurse, was greatly encouraged and very hopeful.  But the end came when they little dreamed.  The drive that morning was fatal, as the horse became frightened and ran a short distance, throwing him out.  He fell with much force and lived only a short time afterwards.  He leaves a devoted wife and three children, Mrs. Samuel B. Hatcher, of Columbus, Ga., Mrs. Ralph B. Tupper, of Brunswick, Ga., and James Morris Madden, of Jacksonville, Fla.  He was buried from the Presbyterian church, of which he was a member.  The unusually large and beautiful floral offerings lovingly testified the esteem of friends.  The veterans paid their last farewell, and with furled banner and bowed heads followed him to his last resting place.  One more of their number has “crossed over to rest under the shade of the trees.”
(Source: Georgia
Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)

McCathern, Walker, ex-mayor of Waynesboro, a representative planter and merchant of Burke county, and one of the stanch and valiant soldiers of the Confederacy during the Civil war, was born on the Hughes’ plantation, ten miles distant from Waynesboro, in Burke county, Feb. 10, 1840, being a son of Daniel and Anna (Ingram) McCathern, the former of whom was born in Scotland and the latter in Richmond county, Georgia.  When he was but seven years of age his father died, but his mother lived to attain the age of seventy-five years.  Mr. McCathern was reared on the plantation and received his education in the schools of Richmond county.  In April, 1861, at the age of twenty-one years, he entered the Confederate service, enlisting as a private in Company A, Third Georgia volunteer infantry.  He enjoys the unique distinction of having captured the first Federal gunboat secured by a Confederate command after the outbreak of the war, this incident having occurred at Roanoke island, N. C., where he was in charge of a thirty-two-pound gun and where, with the support of his regiment, he captured the gunboat “Fannie,” manned with seventy men, while 1,000 overcoats were also among the trophies secured on the boat.  He took part in the Seven Days’ battles in front of Richmond; the second battle of Manassas, and the engagements at Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg and Petersburg.  He was wounded at Malvern Hill and was twice wounded at Hatcher’s Run, in front of Petersburg, receiving the two wounds almost simultaneously.  He was first shot through the body, and as he was falling another shot penetrated his neck, either would having been sufficient to probe fatal had he not promptly been accorded skillful surgical and medical aid.  At Belfield, N. C., he was again wounded.  He was captured by the enemy and was imprisoned at Fort Delaware, but five days later he contrived to make his escape, prying off a board in the prison and crawling through the aperture.  He then swam in an angling way down the Delaware river, a distance of nine miles, utilizing empty and tightly sealed canteens as life preservers and making his way across the river, four miles wide at that point.  In this intrepid act he had but one companion, his comrade George C. Tanner, of the Cobb Georgia legion.  He was recaptured near Harper’s Ferry, however, and returned to Fort Delaware, later being sent to Point Lookout, where he was confined five months, when he managed to effect a second escape.  He rejoined his regiment in time to take part in the battle of the Wilderness and thereafter served until the close of the war.  It is needless to say that he is an appreciative member of the United Confederate Veterans.  Since the war Mr. McCathern has continued to reside in Burke county, where he has valuable plantation interests and is successfully engaged in the raising of cotton and other products, also conducting a general store on his plantation.  He has maintained his home in the city of Waynesboro since 1880, and has served as its mayor three terms, while he is held in high esteem in the community which has represented his home from the time of his nativity.  He is a Master Mason and a member of the Baptist church.  On Feb. 23, 1868, Mr. McCathern was united in marriage to Miss Sarah J. Chandler, daughter of William and Jane (Darlington) Chandler, of Burke county, and they have six children living:  William Walker, George Mitz, Otis Adair, Porter Fleming, John Jenks, and Albert Sydney Johnston.  There were five others, all of whom died before reaching maturity.
[Source: Georgia Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons,  Vol 2, Publ 1906. Transcribed by Renae Donaldson]

McElmurray, Thomas J., was one of the influential and honored citizens of Burke county, which was his home throughout life, and he was possessed of large and valuable landed interests in the county, including the fine homestead plantation, “Sunnyside,” six miles south of the city of Waynesboro.  On the plantation of his father, in Burke county, Mr. McElmurray was born, March 1, 1841, being a son of Minas H. and Emily (Leslie) McElmurray, both native of the state of South Carolina.  He was reared to maturity in his home county and educated at Mercer university in the city of Macon.  At the inception of the Civil war he manifested his intrinsic loyalty to the cause of the Confederacy by tendering his services as a soldier, first enlisting in a regiment of Georgia infantry, later being in the artillery branch of the service, and during the latter part of the great conflict between the states he was a member of the militia commanded by Joseph Brown.  After the war he continued his identification with the vocation to which he had been reared, residing on his plantation of “Sunnyside” until 1881, when he completed the erection of a beautiful home in the city of Waynesboro, where he passed the remainder of his life, his widow still remaining in this residence.  Besides the home plantation he owned several other farms in the county, retaining all in his possession until his death, which occurred April 9, 1898.  He was a man of fine intellectual and moral attributes, loyal and public-spirited as a citizen and successful in his business affairs.  He was a stanch adherent of the Democratic party and was an influential factor in its affairs in the county.  He served as judge of the court of ordinary of Burke county, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church South, of which his widow also is a devoted member; was identified with the Masonic fraternity, having served repeatedly as master of his lodge, and was also a member of the United Confederate Veterans.  Mr. McElmurray was twice married.  On March 5, 1861, he wedded Miss Louisa E. Barron, who died Sept. 24, 1873, leaving four children, namely:  Leslie, born Feb. 22, 1862; Tommie, born Nov. 5, 1863, and now the wife of Charles Gray; Judson Sapp, born Aug. 17, 1866; and Minas Hunter, born March 30, 1868.  All are resident of Waynesboro except Minas H., who resides in Harlem, Columbia county.  In October, 1875, Mr. McElmurray was united in marriage to Miss Mary Chandler, who was born in Burke county, Feb. 22, 1855, being a daughter of William and Jane (Darling) Chandler, representatives of old and prominent families of Georgia.  In conclusion is entered brief record concerning the nine children of the second marriage:  Mary Louise, born Feb. 27, 1877, is the wife of Forrest Close; Genevieve, born July 7, 1879, died Oct. 7, 1889; Emily Jane, born Aug. 22, 1883, died Oct. 31, 1884; Edmund Burke, born Feb. 9, 1885, died Nov. 3, 1886; Sarah Annie, born Dec. 19, 1887; Henry Grady and Evan Howell, twins, born Jan. 30, 1890; Joseph Hamilton, born Dec 6, 1891; and Ruth Whitehead, born April 3, 1894.  The younger children remain with their widowed mother, and the family is prominent in the social life of the community.
[Source: Georgia Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons,  Vol 2, Publ 1906. Transcribed by Renae Donaldson]


Antony, Edwin Le Roy
, lawyer, jurist, congressman, was born Jan. 5, 1852, near Waynesboro, Ga. In 1886, during the illness of the regular district judge, he filled that office as special judge. In 1892, while an alderman, he was nominated and elected June 14, 1892, as a representative from Texas to the fifty-second congress as a democrat. At the expiration of his term he returned to his home and resumed the practice of his profession of law, in which he is still engaged.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Reynolds, Joseph J., cashier of the Southern Cotton Oil Company, Waynesboro, Burke county, was born on the homestead plantation of his parents in this county, Oct. 9, 1866. He is a son of Joseph J. and Rose V. (Anderson) Reynolds, both of whom passed their entire lives in Burke county. The father, who was a son of James M. and Mary Ann (Jones) Reynolds, was a representative planter of Burke county, a loyal soldier of the Confederacy in the war between the states, and deputy clerk of the superior court of Burke county for many years prior to his death, which occurred in 1901. Rosa V. (Anderson) Reynolds, was a daughter of James Anderson, of Burke county and died when the subject of this sketch was a mere child. After a course of preparatory study in Waynesboro academy Joseph J. Reynolds, to whom this sketch is dedicated, entered the University of Georgia, where he remained as a student until he had attained the age of twenty years. For several years thereafter he was associated with the late Col. William E. Jones in the insurance business. In 1889 he became bookkeeper and cashier for a large mercantile concern in Waynesboro, retaining this incumbency until 1893, after which he held for several years a similar position at Millen. Since 1902 he has been cashier of the Southern Cotton Oil Company, at Waynesboro, and he is also a member of the directorate of the Citizens' bank, of Waynesboro, being held in high regard in both business and social circles. Mr. Reynolds is a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Democratic party and served four years as a member of the board of aldermen of Waynesboro. He is affiliated with the lodge and chapter of the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and served several years in the Burke light infantry, having been a charter member of that popular military organization. On Jan. 2, 1890, Mr. Reynolds was united in marriage to Miss Angie C. Perry, only daughter of Judge H. H. Perry, of Waynesboro, and they have five children, namely: Charlotte E., Barbara, Joseph J., Jr., Heman P., and Oliver.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Herrington, Lovick Pierce, M. D., a well known physician of Waynesboro, was born at what is now known as Girth, a country postoffice in Burke county, May 27, 1858. From data supplied by Lord Timothy Harrington, member of the British Parliament from Ireland, it is learned that a prominent family of this name lived in the vicinity of Londonderry, Ireland, about the middle of the seventeenth century. The name was originally spelled “Haerrington,” and a division of the family occurred over the spelling, some wanting to retain the “e” and others the “a,” the result being that the name is now spelled both ways, and as there are numerous representatives of each in the United States, it is evident that some of each branch immigrated to this country at a very early date. From Connecticut they spread to Pennsylvania and Virginia, and long before the Revolutionary war a father and four sons settled at Greenville, N. C. Two of these sons, Richard M. and Ephraim, later settled in Screven county, Ga., where the former built a rock dam across Brier creek, cut several canals and built a number of mills, the place still being known as “Mill Haven.” This dam still stands, a wonder to modern civil engineers. Ephraim Herrington was killed near Mill Haven in a skirmish with the Indians in the colonial days. A Henry H. Herrington was a brigadier-general in the American army during the Revolution, and with two others of the name was present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. Five generations of the Herringtons have lived in Burke and Screven counties. Traced from the Richard M. Herrington above mentioned, these generations have been represented by Richard, Martin M., Berry,, the father of the subject of this sketch, and Dr. L. P. Herrington, whose name heads this review. Doctor Herrington received his primary education in the schools of his native county during the dark days of reconstruction, just afte Civil war, when everything was very much disorganized, the schools being no exception. Determined to acquire an education however, he entered Emory college at Oxford, Ga., and as he paid his own way he was compelled to practice all sorts of economy never letting pass an opportunity to earn an “honest penny.” At Oxford he found several young men like himself--in straitened financial circumstances, but bent on securing an education. These young men formed a club and rented a small house near the center of the town. At this house had the reputation of being haunted no one would live in it and they rented it very cheap, the supernatural having no terrors for them. This cottage became known as “Round Top,” and it was seldom molested by the people of the town, save now and then when some one of its inmates became indisposed, when some gentle maiden would send over a collection of flowers and “good things” for the invalid and his associates. The butcher, the grocer and the milkman passed by, having learned to save time by not stopping for “orders” at Round Top. The housekeeping of the bachelor students was not always systematic, nor their cooking according to the most approved rules of culinary science, but here they lived until Andrew Hall was opened and the Mess House boys found more commodious quarters. Her a number of young men originated the “Helping Hall,” which has since become a prominent feature of numerous colleges throughout the country, and which has been the means of aiding many young men to acquire an education. This institution had its start at Round Top, its originators being Col. E. P. Davis, Prof. W. T. Dumas, Dr. O. G. Mingledorf, R. E. L. Folsom, Joseph Baker, Doctor Glover, H. C. Carney, Thomas Easterling, Thomas Lang, Rev. McLain, Col. T. B. Harwell, Col. B. S. Williamson and Dr. L. P. Herrington. Later Doctor Huckabee, founder of McRae college, came into the hall, and during one vacation he and Doctor Herrington worked as brickmasons on Seney Hall--the gift of George I. Seney to Emory college. Doctor Herrington taught school in Newton and Burke counties until 1882, when he entered the medical department of the University of Georgia at Augusta, and graduated in the class of 1884, receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He then returned to the old homestead, where he with others secured the establishment of the postoffice of Girth, fourteen miles south of Waynesboro, where he practiced his profession for some time, and then attended Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn., where he received the finishing touches of his medical education. Again he took up the practice at Girth, but subsequently removed to Waynesboro, where he has since been actively engaged in professional work, building up a large practice and one of distinctly representative character. He became a member of the Ogeechee medical association; served as president of the Burke county Farmers‘ Alliance; has been delegate to conventions of that body, especially the one where the jute trust was opposed; and with his father gave the site for the Union academy, afterward laboring to establish this school as a permanent institution of learning, and one of the best in the county. Doctor Herrington is the originator and sole proprietor of a remedy known as “Herrington’s Liver Pills for Georgia People.” He is the owner of the old homestead plantation, having purchased the interests of the other heirs, and devotes some of his time and attention to his plantation interests. In 1902 he graduated at the “Institute of Science,” of New York, the course being taken by mail and express, and received a diploma in the occult sciences. He is a Master Mason, a Phi Delta Theta, an old time Democrat of Scotch-Irish descent, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church South. In October, 1886, he was united in marriage to Miss Annie Laurie Davie, of Nashville, Tenn. , and they have one daughter, Ouida Mae, born Nov. 9, 1896.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Angelia Carpenter)

Thomas, George C., was born in Burke county, Ga., Oct. 20, 1850. His father was a farmer.  His father J. Thomas, enlisted in Company D, Fifth Georgia cavalry, and spent three years in the army, during the war between the states. In December, 1864, he was captured by the enemy, and kept confined in prison at Point Lookout until after the surrender. The subject of this sketch was educated at Hephzibah high school, from which school he went to Mercer university, which was then located at Penfield, Greene county, Ga., at which university he graduated in August, 1869. After his graduation he taught school in Wilkes county for one year, then married Miss Anna M. McWhorter, the youngest daughter of Moses E. McWhorter, of Athens, Ga., and moved to Watkinsville, Clarke county, Ga., as principal of the Watkinsville high school, where he taught until September, 1879, when he was admitted to practice law. He was soon thereafter appointed judge of the city court of Oconee, which position he held for four years. He then moved to Athens, and opened a law office, where he has been ever since. He was elected to the general assembly in 1896 and '97. While a member of the legislature he secured an appropriation of $45,000 for building purposes, with which to erect new buildings on the university campus. This was the first appropriation ever given the University of Georgia for building new houses, since which time the institution has been receiving annually like appropriations. He was one of the most useful members of the general assembly that ever went from Clarke county, and his work there will be a lasting monument to his skill and ability. He is a great fraternal order man, being an active member of the Masons, Odd Fellows and Red Men, and has frequently represented each of these orders in their Grand Lodges. He, today, is regarded as one of the best lawyers in Georgia, and has been remarkably successful as a practitioner.  He married Miss Anna M. McWhorter of Athens, Georgia, in April, 1872. His family consists of his wife and two children, Miss Mary McWhorter Thomas, and Mr. W. Milton Thomas, who is in the hardware business in Athens. He has held high positions of trust; has always been a Democrat, frequently holding the positions of chairman of his county and district executive committees. He is now filling the office of solicitor of the city court of Athens. He is a member of the Baptist church, and an uncompromising prohibitionist.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Thomas, Nathaniel P., of Waynesboro, is one of the representative merchants and planters of Burke county, which has been his home from the time of his birth, on April15, 1863. He is a son of Joseph H. and Geraldine (Gordon) Thomas, both now deceased. The father, who was a native of Richmond county, was a successful planter of Burke county at the time of his death, and the mother was born and reared in Burke county. Nathaniel P. Thomas passed his childhood on the homestead plantation, and after attending the Hephzibah high school, in Richmond county, he continued his studies in a private school in the city of Augusta until he had attained the age of fifteen years. At the age of six­ teen he began farming on his own responsibility, and during all the intervening years he has been identified with plantation industry in Burke county, having been very successful and is now one of the leading cotton-growers of this section as well as one of the prominent merchants of Waynesboro, where he has a well stocked and well appointed general store. In 1894 he turned his plantation interests over to capable overseers, and established his mercantile enterprise, to which he has since given his personal supervision, and has built up a large business. He is a director of the Citizens' bank and also of the Waynesboro Grocery Company, a wholesale concern. His political allegiance is given to the Democracy, and he is a member of the board of stewards of the local Methodist Episcopal church South, of which Mrs. Thomas also is a devoted member. He is identified with the Waynesboro Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in which he is a past chancellor, and enjoys marked popularity in his native county. On Feb. 11, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Thomas to Miss Emma Thomas Marsh, of Savannah, Georgia, and they have three daughters,-Natalie, Georgia Estelle, and Marian M.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Thomas, Charles H., a resident of Waynesboro,    numbered among the prominent planters of Burke county, where his landed estate includes more than 2,000 acres, was born in Waynesboro, Oct. 13, 1854, a son of Jethro and Nancy (Cates) Thomas, both of whom were likewise born and reared in Burke county. Prior to the Civil war the father was a successful planter, and after its close he engaged in mercantile pursuits in Waynesboro, where he passed the remainder of his life. He was a loyal soldier of the Confederacy in the war between the states and was captured by the enemy and imprisoned for some time at Point Lookout. He was twice married, the only surviving child of the first union being Judge George C. Thomas, a prominent member of the bar of the state, residing in the city of Athens. The three surviving children of the second marriage are Charles H., subject of this sketch; Kate, wife of C. T. Milner, of Waynesboro, and Jethro B., also a resident of the same city. The widowed mother still lives, at a venerable age. Charles H. received his educational training principally in the Hephzibah high school in Richmond county, continuing to attend school until he had attained the age of nineteen years, since which time he has devoted his attention to mercantile pursuits and the industry of agriculture, having formerly been a merchant in Waynesboro. About 1892 he suffered the amputation of his right arm, which had been accidently caught in a cotton gin, and since that time he has given his attention to the management of his plantation, having disposed of his store.    He is the owner of three well improved farms in his native county, and his average annual yield of cotton is about 200 bales. Mr. Thomas is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party but has never sought official preferment. He and his wife are members of the Baptist church, and in his early manhood he was for several years a member of the Stonewall Rifles, a local military organization. On April 8, 1878, he was united in marriage to Miss Ruth M. Miller, daughter of Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Dr. B. B. Miller, formerly a resident of this county but now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have two children: Nellie, wife of W. C. Hillhouse, of Waynesboro; and Kate F., wife of Maj. W. A. Wilkins, of the same city.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

E. L. BRINSON.  In the year 1798 five brothers of the name Brinson came form North Carolina and settled in the lower part of Burke County, Ga.  They opened and improved farms and in time became wealthy land-owners and extensive planters.  They married and each became the head of a family, and their children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren have scattered throughout most of the Southern States until representatives of the name are found from the Savannah River through to Texas.  The youngest of these five brothers was named John, and he was just seventeen years of age at the time of the settlement in Burke County.  He raised a large family, being the father of ten sons and four daughters.  One of these sons was named Simeon.  He was born at the old homestead, February, 1823, grew to manhood there, married a Miss Wallace, by whom he had three children; after her death his second marriage was to a lady of his own name, being a distant relative, by whom he had two children, Edward L. and Elizabeth S.
Edward L. Brinson is the subject of this sketch and the representative about whom it is intended to group these meager facts of early family history.  He too was born on the old Brinson homestead in South Burke, and passed his boyhood there much as his father and grandfather had done.  He attended the neighborhood schools and the academy at Hephzibah till of college age, when he entered the junior class of the University of Georgia at Athens, graduating in 1874.  He taught school in 1875, attended the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn., graduating in 1876; located in Waynesborough in 1877 and began to practice.  He was appointed ordinary of Burke County in 1884 and filled an unexpired term; was elected to a full term the following year, and is now serving out that term.  Being a lawyer and a young man, he has necessarily been somewhat in politics, but he is not a professional.  He takes that interest in political matters and other matters of public concern that any good citizen might be expected to take.  December 14, 1887, he married Miss Anna L. Hearn, of Franklin, Tenn., and accomplished young lady whom he met and formed the acquaintance of while attending college at Lebanon, the State.
[Biographical Souvenir of Georgia and Florida by FA Battey & Co., 1889-Transcribed by LA Bauer]
Scales, Floyd L., the present mayor of the city of Waynesboro, and one of the able members of the bar of Burke county, was born at Waynesboro, July 15, 1871. He is a son of Robert W. and Frances R. (Martin) Scales, the former born in Rockingham county, N.C., and the latter at Mason, Ga. Prior to the Civil war the father was a wealthy planter, owning fine estates in North Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi. At the inception of the war he tendered his services in defense of the cause of the Confederacy, but met with an accident which incapacitated him for service in the field, and he was accorded an honorable discharge. He gave largely of his means in upholding the Confederate government. Before the war he had taken up his residence in Burke county, and he died, in the city of Waynesboro, Dec. 12, 1872, when the subject of this sketch was but one and one-half years of age. His widow still survives and resides with her son Floyd L. Robert W. Scales was a brother of ex-Governor Alfred M. Scales of North Carolina. Mrs. Frances R. (Martin) Scales is a representative of an old and influential North Carolina family, and her father, Robert Martin, was an uncle of    the wife of Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, Mrs. Douglas having been a Martin. Floyd L. Scales attended Waynesboro academy until he had attained the age of sixteen years, and two years later began reading law under the direction of Judge Philip P. Johnston, of that city. He was admitted to the bar at the age of nineteen years and at once became a member of the law firm of Lawson, Callaway & Scales, his associates having been Judge Floyd Lawson and Judge E. H. Callaway. In 1894 the latter was elected to the bench of the superior court of this district and withdrew from the firm, and since that time the firm name has been Lawson & Scales. Owing to the impaired health of Judge Lawson the large business of the firm has devolved chiefly upon Mr. Scales for several years past. The firm was a representative clientage and extensive practice, numbering on its clientele many prominent eastern persons and corporations having interests in Burke county. Mr. Scales is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party, but has never been a candidate for office until the present year, having been elected mayor of his native city in February, 1906. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church South, and in a fraternal way is a Royal-Arch Mason; a member of the Knights of Pythias, in which he is past chancellor; the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which last he is noble grand of his lodge.  He is a director of the Bank of Waynesboro. For fifteen years Mr. Scales was an officer in Company E, First Georgia regiment, known as the Burke Light Infantry, and for several years was captain of his company. He is now captain in the Nation.al Guard of Georgia (Retired).
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form- Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz


POWELL, MRS. LEONA. County Agent, Burke Co. Address: Waynesboro, Ga.     (No data for sketch furnished.)['Georgia Women of 1926', Compiled by Ruth Blair]



©Genealogy Trails