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Campbell County, Georgia


Campbell County, Georgia was a county of the U.S. state of Georgia from 1828 to 1931.
(Wikipedia)

Fairburn, the county seat of Campbell county, located on the Atlanta & West Point railway, was incorporated by act of the legislature in 1853.  It is on the dividing ridge between the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers, so that the rains falling on the east side of the town run into the Flint and those on the west side into the Chattahoochee.  Fairburn has a money order post office with rural free delivery, express and telegraph offices, a court house, some good mercantile establishments, two banks and a large saddle and harness factory which employs sixty hands, and turns out an annual product valued at more than $150,000, which is sold by traveling salesman in the states of Virginia, Kentucky, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama.  The Fairburn Oil and Fertilizer Company also does a large business.  The schools and churches are in good condition.  The population of Fairburn district is 2,461 of whom 761 live in the town.
[Source: Georgia: Sketches, Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions & People, Vol. 2, Publ. 1906 Transcribed By:  Maggie Coleman]

Palmetto, a town in the southern part of Campbell county, on the Atlanta & West Point railway, was incorporated by act of the legislature in 1854. It had by the census of 1900 a population of 620 in its corporate limits and in its entire district 1,478. It has express and telegraph offices, a money order postoffice with rural free delivery routes, a bank, prosperous business houses, and some manufactories, the most important of which is a cotton factory with 5,500 spindles and 100 looms, using annually about 3,000 bales of cotton and producing material worth about $75,000. Other factories are a wood-working and blacksmith shop, an iron foundry, and a public ginnery. The town is also well supplied with churches and schools.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Rico, a post-hamlet in the western part of Campbell county, is about ten miles from Palmetto, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Stonewall, a village in the eastern part of Campbell county, is a station on the Atlanta & West Point railroad, five miles northeast of Fairburn. It has a money order postoffice, with rural free delivery, and is the principal trading and shipping point in that part of the county.

Sandtown, a little village of about 30 inhabitants in the extreme northern part of Campbell county on the Chattahoochee river, was the scene of a skirmish on Oct. 2, 1864, as Hood was marching northward.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Rivertown, a post-hamlet of Campbell county, is on the Chattahoochee river. Fairburn and Palmetto, on the Atlanta & West Point railroad, are the most convenient railroad towns.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Rico, a post-hamlet in the western part of Campbell county, is about ten miles from Palmetto, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Sileo, a post-village of Camden county, with a population of 52, is on the headwaters of Crooked river, six miles west of Seals, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Shelbine, a post-hamlet of Camden county, is near the mouth of Crooked river and on the sound opposite Cumberland island. Seals is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

 

 

Campbell County Bios

Johnston, Hal L., of Palmetto, Campbell county, was for a number of years, actively and successfully engaged in the practice of dentistry, but is now giving his attention principally to the management of the plant and business of a well equipped cotton mill at Palmetto. He was born in the city of Rome, Ga., Jan; 4, 1852, and is a son of William and Mary A. (Hardin) Johnston, both of whom were born and reared in Georgia. The father was for many years identified with the transportation business, with the Georgia Central railroad, having charge of boats on the Tombigbee and Mobile rivers. He died Feb. 11, 1891, in Atlanta and his first wife, mother of the subject of this sketch, died in September, 1853, her remains being laid to rest at Rome. Doctor Johnston was afforded the advantages of the common schools, after which he learned the dental profession under an excellent instructor, and became skilled in all departments of the work. He took up his residence in Palmetto in 1870, and there followed his profession about fourteen years. He then removed to Atlanta, where he was interested in a wholesale grocery business until 1899, when he returned to Palmetto and identified himself with his present line of industry, being vice-president and general-manager of the company with which he is connected. In politics he is a stalwart in the camp of Democracy; has rendered effective service as a member of the state executive committee, as well as the county and congressional committees of his party; and has represented his county in the state legislature. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and both he and his wife are valued members of the Methodist Episcopal church South. On Oct. 8, 1872, Doctor Johnston was married to Miss Ella Carleton, daughter of John and Cecely (Griffith) Carleton, of Palmetto, and of the six children of this union only two are living; Herman L., who is now in the government educational service in the Island of Guam, and Nellie Estelle, wife of John E. Smith, a manufacturer and prominent business man of Atlanta.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Longino, John T., M.D.,  A successful physician and surgeon of Fairburn, Campbell county, where he also conducts a well equipped drug store, was born on the homestead plantation, near his present residence town, July 20, 1869.  He is a son of George F. and Fannie E. (Wilson) Longino, both of whom were likewise born and reared in Campbell county and now reside in Fairburn, the father having retired from active business.  He was a valiant soldier of the Confederacy during the Civil war, having served as a member of the Thirtieth Georgia Volunteer Infantry, and being held a prisoner of war at Camp Chase, Ohio, during the last year of the war.  Doctor Longino completed the curriculum  of the common schools, including a course in the high school at Palmetto, and then entered upon the work of preparing himself for his chosen profession, being matriculated finally in the Southern medical college at Atlanta, and graduated in the same as a member of the class of 1893, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. In the same year he entered upon the active practice of his profession in Fairburn, where he has built up a large and representative patronage, and also conducts a drug store.  He is known as one of the loyal and public-spirited citizens of the town; is a staunch adherent of the Democratic party; served four years as mayor of Fairburn, and in 1904 was elected to represent his county in the state legislature, of which body he is a member at the time of this writing.  He is a member of the Georgia medical association; the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows; is identified with the lodge, chapter and commandery of the Masonic fraternity, as well as the Ancient Arabic Order of the Mystic Shrine; and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church South.  Dr. Longino is a bachelor.
(Source: Georgia
Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)

Candler, Milton A., lawyer, state senator, congressman, was born on Jan. 11, 1837, in Campbell County, Ga. He was a member of the state legislature in 1861-63; and a member of the state constitutional convention in 1865. He was a member of the state senate in 1868-72. In 1875-79 he was a representative from Georgia to the forty-fourth and forty-fifth congresses.
[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Golightly, J. F., was born in Fairburn, Campbell county, Ga., on May 12, 1850.  His father, Pinchney Golightly, was a farmer and died in Campbell county, Ga., in 1891, and his mother’s name was Emily Rainwater, daughter of James and Polly Rainwater.  His maternal grandfather, James Rainwater, was born in Spartanburg district, South Carolina, and moved from there to Georgia in 1840, locating in Coweta county, and later moving from there to Campbell county.  He was of English and Welsh descent and was ordained to preach as a Baptist minister in South Carolina in 1835, and preached in many churches in Campbell, Coweta, Meriwether and Carroll counties, and died in Campbell county, in 1873 being a prominent minister in his denomination to the date of his death.  Mr. Golightly’s grandfather on the paternal side was also a native of Spartanburg district, South Carolina, his name being David Golightly, and his wife’s maiden name being Nancy Ogburn.  His father was William Golightly, who was born in Scotland, moving to South Carolina and dying in that state.  The paternal grandfather of the subject was a farmer and moved from South Carolina to near Gaylesville, Alabama, buying a farm near that place, living and dying there.  Mr. Golightly’s maternal grandfather was also a farmer and died in Campbell county, Ga., in 1873.  Mr. Golightly acquired only an English education, being taught in various common schools in Campbell county, and living on a farm with his father until 1871 when he removed to his grandfather’s, and lived there until the death of the latter in 1873.  He then clerked at Fairburn, Ga., until 1874 at which time he removed to Atlanta and engaged with Stewart, Wood & Fain as a traveling salesman.  He remained with this firm until 1879 at which time he located in Greenville, S. C., forming a partnership with Z. T. Dobbs, doing wholesale and retail business in stoves, crockery, etc.  In 1881 they sold their store and the partnership was dissolved.  In 1882, Mr. Golightly removed to New York and formed a partnership with W. T. Roberts of Fairburn, and opened up a wholesale crockery business, their field of operations being in the Southern States.  In 1885 the business in New York was disposed of and Mr. Golightly removed to Fairburn, Campbell county, Ga., and read law under L. S. Roan, who is now Judge of the Stone Mountain circuit, and was admitted to the bar in Aug., 1885, under the late Chief Justice Simmons, who was then presiding for Judge S. W. Harris.  In 1886 he formed a law partnership with L. S. Roan, at Fairburn, Ga., and remained with him until 1890, the firm title being Roan& Golightly.  In 1893 he formed a second partnership this time with J. H. Longino of Atlanta, Ga., and removed his office there, and they practiced together in this city of Atlanta since that date.  In 1901 he removed his family to Atlanta and he is now residing in that city, where he has built up a large and lucrative practice, ranking as one of the foremost attorneys of the Atlanta bar.  He has been a member of the Missionary Baptist church since he was sixteen years of age.  In 1886 he was elected mayor of the town of Fairburn and was reelected in 1887, in both cases being elected without opposition.  In 1896 he was elected senator for the 36th senatorial district of Georgia, which is composed of the counties of Meriwether, Coweta, Campbell and Douglas, and was chairman of the committee on corporations and vice-chairman of the committee on county and county matters.  He has always been a Democrat in politics, and as stated he is now engaged in the practice of law in Fulton county, Ga., having a splendid practice in the counties of Fulton, Campbell, Fayette and Clayton and doing practice in other adjoining counties.  In 1886 Mr. Golightly joined the Masonic fraternity and served as master of Fairburn Lodge No. 180 in 1888-9, and was also High Priest of Fairburn Chapter No. 36 Royal Arch Masons for 1891-92-93, and in 1891 was anointed High Priest in the order the High Priest hood at Macon, Ga.  In 1875 he was married to Henrietta J. Vickers, daughter of Leander and Mary Vickers of Fairburn, Campbell county, Ga., and they have seven children as follows:  Mary Golightly Roan, age thirty years; James Bernard, age twenty-six years; Aubry Rainwater, age twenty-four years; Logan Blekley, age twenty-one years; Henry Tucker, age seventeen years; Urvyle Sinclair, age fourteen years and Helen Goodman, age eleven years.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)

1840 Pensioners
Contributed by Richard Ramos

Name of Pensioners Age Head of Families who Pensioners Resided Jun 1 1840
Willliam R. Gunnell 88 William R. Gunnell
William Clinton 80 William Clinton
George Norwood 77 Harrison McCain
Benjamin Bledsoe 77 Benjamin Bledsoe
James Akins 90 James Akins


1883 Pensioners
transcribed by Marla Z.

No. of certificate

Name of pensioner Post office address Cause for which pensioned

Monthly rate

Date of Original Allowance

12,127

Haskins, Anna Campbellton  

$8.00

Nov. 1878

22,379

Smith, Sophia Fairburn  

$8.00

Apr. 1879

131,197

Stewart, Rachel Fairburn  

$8.00

Feb. 1881

24,250

Williams, Eliza Jane Fairburn  

$8.00

May 1879

16,865

Yancy, Esther Fairburn  

$8.00

Feb. 1879

22,148

Stewart, Henry D. Fairburn  

$8.00

June 1878

15,233

Shell, Sarah Lee Palmette  

$8.00

Jan. 1879

4,237

Barefield, John Palmette  

$8.00

Sept. 1871

14,450

Bond, Mary A. Palmette  

$8.00

Jan. 1879

19,762

Watson, Nancy Palmette  

$8.00

Mar. 1879

111,812

Fricks, John D Morganton shell wd. R. foot

5.33 1/2

July 1871

105,785

Vanhook, Mary E Morganton widow

$20.00

Sept. 1874

185,005

Talent, Lemuel Morganton dep. Father

$8.00

Nov. 1879

199

Truelove, Sarah Morganton widow

$8.00

Sept. 1870

147,731

Shelton, Sarah Morganton dep. Mother

$8.00

Feb. 1871

181,223

Shuder, Sarah C Morganton widow

$8.00

May 1878

196,118

Sheldon, Cincinnati Morganton dep. Mother

$8.00

June 1882

137,818

Painter, Cynthia Morganton dep. Mother

$8.00

Dec. 1869

117,107

Pittman, Isabella Morganton dep. Mother

$8.00

Aug 1868

166,290

Latta, Ollivet Morganton widow

$8.00

Oct. 1874

19,497

Hagurwood, Sarah Morganton widow 1812

$8.00

Mar. 1879

32,737

Hicks, Eliz'th Morganton widow 1812

$8.00

Nov. 1882

183,627

Corgeal, Martha Morganton dep. Mother

$8.00

Apr. 1879

188,728

Fox, Nancy C Morganton dep. Mother

$8.00

June 1880

129,000

Bell, Eliz'th Morganton widow

$8.00

May 1869

133,883

Frasure, Lydia Morganton dep. Mother

$8.00

Sept. 1869

32,621

Kincaid, Anna Morganton widow 1812

$8.00

Aug. 1882

30,515

Falls, Sarah Morganton widow 1812

$8.00

Sept. 1880

94,368

Green, Eliz'th Morganton widow

$8.00

 

106,030

Bradley, Martha A Vanzant's Store widow

$8.00

Jan 1868

136,293

Ford, Barbary Vanzant's Store widow

$8.00

Dec. 1869

126,441

Colbert, Margaret Vanzant's Store dep. Mother

$8.00

Mar. 1869

114,562

Tilly, Prudence Vanzant's Store widow

$8.00

June 1868



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