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Coweta County, GA Obituaries and Death Notices


STEGALL - Mrs. Ann Stegall, an aged lady of Newnan, died on Saturday. [The Daily Constitution, Atlanta Georgia Oct. 27, 1876 - submitted by Shauna Williams]

The town sustained a great loss by the death of Major J. C. Wooten, editor of the "Newnan Herald" for nine years, on January 22: He was universally esteemed for his moral worth and unswering integrity. Strictly conscientious in all his dealings with his fellow men, his life was a model of purity and virtue. He was public spirited and aided all enterprises that were for the public good. As an editor he scrupulously avoided personalities making his paper an example of hightoned dignified journalism . . . Never did his paternal affection blind him to the duties he owed his children.   He was born October 6, 1836, in Wilkes county. From the "Herald" of January 23, 1874: (Washington Letter.)
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

The death of Mrs. Frances Carmical, aged ninety years, the mother of Abram Carmical, brought to general knowledge the remarkable fact that she was blind for many years but eventually recovered her sight. Her disposition was most beautiful and lovable. Other deaths were those of the pioneers and progenitors of large families. Jacobus Gibson, whose descendants now number more than one hundred and twenty-five, and Squire Hiram Camp, a local Methodist preacher, at Pucketts Station, died May 19, whose off-spring now (1927) number several more than two hundred. 
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

1880 Major William U. Anderson died at the home of his son, near Newnan, March 10, in his seventy-eighth year. Public spirited and energetic, he never ceased to keep pace with the progress of the age, living in the present and not in the past. Before Newnan had an existence, he became a citizen of the county, when the site for a town was decided on, he was one of the first to put forth the hand of industry in the erection of houses. When the Presbyterian church was first organized at Bullsboro, June 21, 1828, he was one of the fifteen constituting the church. He lived after all the others passed away."—Extract from the Coweta Advertiser" of March 19. Major Anderson with high purpose and the right sense of values in life did what he could to preserve the history of our county. I give him here grateful thanks for his little volume. "History of Coweta County," hut I desire to do more than that by especially mentioning his many efforts for the upbuilding of the county. In the files of the "Herald" I have met with many letters written by him offering to be one of a suggested number to build a male school or a factory. He was one of the few who had ideals, ideas, and ambitions for his town and county, and if he had had more money the history of manufacturing in the county would have many more pages.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

From the Herald: Judge Lucius H. Featherston was born in Murphreesboro, Tennessee, July 9, 1814. After practicing law for many years he was chosen judge of the Superior Court; was chosen a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1877. In each of these positions he rendered the State valuable service. To the legal profession it would be no revelation to affirm that a more upright lawyer, a purer gentleman never lived. Judge Buchanan, R. S. Burch, Judge J. S. Bigby, J. B. S. Davis, Samuel Freeman, W. A. Turner, H. A. Hall, W. Y. Atkinson, P. F. Smith, bore testimony that his record as a soldier was spotless, as a judge he was kind and just, as a lawyer he was able and honest, as a citizen his character was worthy of emulation.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

1900 January 2 George Broom died after having radiated jollity and good-cheer all his days; to hear him laugh was a tonic. As a soldier he bore himself gallantly and faithfully in the Confederate army. The Presbyterians celebrated the forty-three years that Dr. Stacy had been their pastor by a brilliant reception. Cotton sold at seven and a-half cents a pound, but the farmers had raised a lot of feed stuff and the low price did not hurt them as it sometimes did.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

Prom the "Herald" of May 1900: No sadder tidings will reach our readers this week than the announcement of the death of 'Squire J. P. Reese, our correspondent Ripples, which occurred on Sunday night last at his home two miles north of town. He was born in Jasper County, Ga., but moved to Coweta in 1855 and continued to live here up to the time of his death. For nearly twenty-five years he was a regular cor-respondent of the "Herald," and widely known throughout Western Georgia. Few were the issues of the paper for that time that did not contain one of his letters—which were always eagerly read by the people. If a marriage or death occurred   in  the community Squire J. P. Reese, The Herald Correspondent, "Ripples" he heard of it as soon as anyone and was among the first to offer congratulations or to tender condolence. He was devoted to the art of song, and enjoyed a wide reputation as a vocalist, having been President of the Chattahoochee Musical Association for several terms and of the Southern Musical Convention for years, perhaps having presided over more singing conventions than any man in Georgia; taking part in them not for idle amusemerit but in a spirit of worship; never being happier than when leading an exercise of this character. Author of the tunes, "Fill-more," "Sharpsburg," "My Last Moments" 'The Sinner's Friend," "Sweet Union," "Gone to Rest," "Jesus Wept." "Never Turn Back." "Eureka," "Happy Home," "Love the Lord," "Newnan," "Jesus Is My Friend," "Grantville," "Weeping "Pilgrim," "Weeping Mary," "Youth Will Soon be Gone," "Farewell to All," "Asleep in Jesus," "The Golden Harp," "Mulberry Grove," "Weeping Sinners," many of them beloved for years; the first especially is a stirring tune used and enjoyed in conventions and society meetings. His popularity throughout the county won him the election to the office of Tax Receiver. At the time of his death he was a candidate for the Legislature. He was a Notary Public, and ex-officio Justice-of-the-Peace of the Hurricane District. A wife, six sons, and four grown daughters, survive him. His age was seventy-two. He was a Mason and a member of the Baptist Church.

Payson S. Whatley born January 8, 1850, in this county, died June 25, 1900, after a faithful, useful life. A lawyer, he held the office of solicitor of the County (afterwards the City) Court for seven years; he was member and president of the first board of trustees for the public schools. After Cleveland's election, by Hoke Smith's influence, he was given an office connected with the Department of the Interior and was located at the Sac and Fox Agency, Oklahoma, where his faithfulness and ability served to keep him in the office after a Republican victory at the poles made it pie for the hungry spoilsmen of that party. Later removing to Bristow, Indian Territory, he was chosen City Attorney. At the Indian Agency he took great interest in the missionary work. A member of the Baptist church, his Christian heart was in every good enterprise.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

Judge Tolleson Kirby aged eighty-eight died August 26. "With an open hand he gave,—no one but knew of his goodness of heart and his honesty of purpose. He had sown many deeds of kindness. He was buried with Masonic rites.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

J. C. Thompson, sixty-nine years old, deeply religious, gentle, generous and universally beloved; a gallant soldier with the first company for the Confederate army from Georgia. Samuel Olmstcad born in Connecticut, eighty-two years old, came to Newnan in 1866. Major George M. Hanvey seventy-two years old, Mexican soldier, officer in the Confederate service received a wound at the battle of Monocacy from which he died thirty-six years later. William M. Jones one of the pioneers of the county, a soldier of the Confederate army died at El Paso, Texas. Robert S. Burch born in Hancock County, studied law with Alexander H. Stephens, served two terms in the Legislature, was in the Indian War, gave one son, George T., to the Confederate service, a man of convictions and deeply religious, died October 27. Coweta lost one of her most promising sons by the death of Joel J. Gibson November 25, 1900, at the home of his father in Newnan. Of him there are the following records: "In the selection of a business manager (for Pandora, organ of the students of U. of G.) the board very wisely conferred the honor on Joel J. Gibson, of Newnan, (Delta Tau Delta fraternity) who entering college four years ago has risen step by step in the ways of college life and in the esteem of his associates," wrote a correspondent of the Atlanta Journal, but he had other tributes to his worth and ability; a graduate of Newnan High School; historian of the senior class, at Georgia; President and orator of his class in his Junior year and the year before Sophomore declaimer at Commencement; in military affairs promoted from sergeant to a first lieutenancy; studied law with the distinguished William O. Davis, Gainesville, Texas, 1895-96, in September 1896 entering Columbia Law School, New York, from which he graduated in 1898. Of his eventual appointment as confidential clerk to the mayor of Greater New York, this account is given: "Joel J. Gibson, who went to New York a couple of years ago to finish his law course, is coming to the front in that city in a way that speaks well for his ability and popularity as an orator and politician "In the Mayorality race which occurred in New York about a year ago he was one of Van Wyck's supporters and took the stump for him. "Van Wyck was elected, and upon assuming office he showed his appreciation by making Joel Gibson his Confidential Clerk. It is a very important position, and one that requires infinite tact and ability to fill creditably. 'That Mr. Gibson fulfills these requirements is evidenced by his undisturbed tenure and increase of salary since the affairs of greater New York passed into the hands of the present administration."— Herald.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

1903  In the "Herald" of January 2, Mrs. Woodrooff (D. B. W.) wrote among other things of Dr. W. F. Cook who died December 19,1902: He graduated from Emory College in 1850.....For fortyfive years he served at God's altar .... and the conference had no truer exponent of the conservative, faithful, self-denying man of God who lived a beautiful, useful, holy life. All the powers of his exquisitely balanced mind were concentrated on the welfare of God's kingdom on earth. A ceaseless strengthener of others—a perennial fount of good cheer and spiritual comfort. For Christian courage, brotherly love, discerning tact, and unswerving faith he had few peers and no superiors. Towards little children he was a gracious epitome of fatherly love. Three daughters, Mrs. T. E. Atkinson, Mrs. F. C. White, Margaret Cook, and two preacher sons. Reverends Ellison R. Cook and Edward F. Cook have entered upon just such lives of service as such a father would plan for his children. Professor Eugene Row died January 9, leaving an influence that is working as leaven in the lives of many students who came into his classes at the Georgia Telegraph School and of those reading the issues of the Senoia Enterprise-Gazette while he edited it—"The county never had a better citizen, or a truer man. A native of Mississippi he became a citizen of Coweta in 1896."
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

1926 In January:   J. B. West aged Seventy-four died near Madres. Mrs. Berry man Thompson in memory of her son Charles Longino Thompson gave 16,000 to the book fund of Carnegie Library with the condition that, the city shall never give less to the sup|iort of the library than the present allowance. J. P. Shaekleford, for eighteen years city clerk of Newnan, died the 19th. In February: Mattie Vie Summers, talked at the First Baptist church on missions in China. Mrs. Mary C. Love joy, aged seventy-eight, died the S, after a beautiful life of Christian grace and service, and "Captain W. L. Gilbert, for ten years the popular and efficient chief of the city fire department, which under his leadership had scarcely a parallel in the State for efficiency or the small property loss of the town from fire," was another who died. Mrs. Anne Herndon, aped eighty-five, of Fourth district, died the 9, and Reverard F. J. Amis the 12, after seventy-two years of glorious service for Christ in Coweta, Heard, Carroll, and Campbell counties. After he graduated at the State University in 1874, besides preaching regularly, he was president of Bowden College, and in his home lie always practiced what he preached and dispensed such generous hospitality as is rarely shown in recent years.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

1926 May: Allen Long colored an employee of R. D. Cole Company for over fifty years, faithful and appreciated, died the 4th. A legacy of $15,000 was left by Robert Orr, who died the 8th, to the First Baptist church of Newnan to build a Sunday school annex to that church in memory of his father I. N. and his mother Dora J. Orr.
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

Obituary. Died on Sabbath evening the 27th of February last at his residence in Newnan, Ga., Deacon Handle Robinson in the eightieth year of his age. Bro. Robinson was born in Granville county* N. C, May 2, 1762. He removed to Edgefield district S. C, where he and his wife united with the Baptists, worshipping at a place on Stephens creek known as Hardy's meeting house, ten miles N. of Augusta. From this he removed to Putnam county, Ga. about 37 years ago. This county was then comparatively a wilderness, but soon he with his wife and others united in forming a church, called at that time, Glady Creek, since known as Tirza. The church, soon after its organization, in obedience to the apostolic command to the church at Jerusalem in looking out among them a 'man of honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom,'  selected Bro. Robinson to fill the office of Deacon. Here he was an active and useful officer and one highly esteemed as a man and a Christian taking a firm stand in all the liberal schemes for promoting the interest of the church of Christ.   In tins church he lived nearly twenty years beloved and respected by his brethren and fellow citizens.   About the year 1826 he emigrated to Butts county which was then a new section of the country.  Here also he and his wife united in organizing a church at Towlaggee where he also discharged the duties of a deacon for about two years.   Removed to Coweta county and settled in the woods one mile and three-quarters east of Newnan, about the close of 1827.  In 1828 a few Baptists in and near Newnan organized a church which they called Newnan Baptist Church. Bro. Robinson was a man a little above the ordinary size, he was active, industrious, prudent and persevering in the prosecution of his worldly interest and by these means and the blessings of heaven he prospered in the affairs of this life and accumulated an ample competency for himself and children—notwithstanding his devoted interest in things of Religion, and his liberality in the support of the ministry, and that he was the warm friend of and a lil>eral contributor to the benevolent operations of the church. The Bible, Tract, Missionary, Temperance Educational and Sabbath School Societies found in him an efficient friend and supporter. About six years ago he distributed the principal part of his property among his children and grandchildren, reserving a mere competency for his own support; he removed to the village in order to be near the church and to enjoy the privilege of devoting himself more fully to the service of God. Soon after his removal, owing to his age and consequent inability to attend conventently the weekly prayer-meeting of the church, at his request, it was held at his house every Tuesday night up to the time of his death, a period of about five years. This prayer-meeting at the request of his surviving consort is still held there.
Bro. Robinson having surplus funds which he put out at interests made it his uniform rule never to exact usurious interest; and it was his custom also to dispose of his funds generally to those who most needed them. Deacon Robinson was twice married, his first wife died shortly after their union, by the last marriage he has three surviving children, two daughters and a son; all of them hopefully the children of God. The greatest enconium we can bestow in relation to the character of our departed venerable brother is found in the apostolic injunction respecting the character of tliose who should be selected by the church to fill the deacon's office, 'a man of honest report full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom,' he was beloved by all his brethren in the church, highly esteemed by all Christians and reverenced by men of the world as an honest, amiable, kind and benevolent citizen. Afflicted with the palsy several years before his death he bore his afflictions with Christian patience and resignation."  His prayer that he might see his only son converted and baptised was answered within the last year of his life. He conversed on the subject of death with great composure retaining his reason to the end.  This man of God fell asleep in Jesus, "Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth. Yea, sayeth the Spirit, for they rest from their labors and their works do follow them!"
In the resolutions on his death are these impressive words: "This church will ever cherish a grateful remembrance of his works of love and mercy and the truly scriptural manner in which he fully employed the excellent traits of the Christian character in all his intercourse with the church and the world. We esteem him a man of God."
Original data: Jones, Mary G.. Coweta County chronicles for one hundred years : with an account of the Indians from whom the land was acquired, and some historical papers relating to its acquisition by Georgia, with lineage pages. Atlanta, Ga.: Stein Print. Co., 1928.

J. C. Cole, Lawrenceville
Lawrenceville, Ga., October 22--(Special)---James C. Cole, a former well known teacher of Gwinnett county, died at his home at Lilburn Wednesday night following a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Cole is survived by his wife. Funeral services will be held at Liberty church Friday morning, of which church he was a member. The deceased was a native of Coweta county.
Submitted by Tam Inman
Date: 1914-10-23 Paper: Atlanta Constitution, Georgia Page: 3

Dent, Hon. W. B.
At Newnan, Ga., on Sunday, Hon. W. b. Dent, late member of Congress. Richmond Whig (Richmond, VA) September 18, 1855. Transcribed by AFOFG.






 
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