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Forsyth County, Georgia


FORSYTH COUNTY.
Laid out from Cherokee in 1832; named after the Hon. John Forsyth.
The lands on the rivers and creeks are fertile.
The climate is healthy.

Cumming, named after Colonel William Gumming, is the county town, 145 miles from Milledgeville ; it is surrounded by beautiful scenery.

The public places are Big Creek, Hartford, High Tower, Vickery's Creek, and W'arsaw.

This section lies in the gold region. The mineral resources are supposed to be great.

The principal streams are the Chattahoochee and Etowah. There are several creeks, such as Vickery's, Dick's, John's, &c.

According to the census of 1850, there were in this county—Dwellings, 1,334; families, 1,334; white males, 3,950; white females, 3,862 ; free coloured males, 6; free coloured females, 5. Total free population, 7,823. Slaves, 1,027. Deaths, 39. Farms, 765 ; manufacturing establishments, 8. Value of real estate, 8672,978; value of personal estate, $700,426.

The first persons who made settlements in this county were, J. Scudder, L. Blackburn, John Jolly, W. W. Vaughan, A. Cameron, Wm. Rogers, John Rogers, Noah Strong, L. Hudson, B. Allen, W. H. Bacon, L. D. Harris, E. Harris, Geo. Kellogg, Mr. Julian, Alfred Hudson, W. G. Fields.

On Mr. Rogers's plantation, twelve miles south of Gumming, on the road to Lawrenceville, are several small mounds. On the road from Canton to Dahlonega, ten miles northwest from Gumming, is a very remarkable rock, an unhewn mass of granite, eight and a half feet long, and two and a half feet wide, three-sided, with irregular converging points, upon which are numerous characters, seventeen of them varying in shape. The largest circles are eight inches in diameter. From its appearance, it must have been wrought at a very remote period. The designs are very regular, and it is probable that they were executed by the same race of people who constructed the mounds in this and other sections of the State.
Source: "Historical Collections Of Georgia", by George White, 1855 Transcribed and Submitted by Brenda Wiesner

Forsyth County was laid off from Cherokee in 1834 and named for the Hon. John Forsyth a native of Virginia, who came with his parents to Georgia at an early age and was for many years prominent in the affairs of the state.  The county lies in the northern part of the state and is bounded by Dawson on the north, Hall on the east, Hall and Gwinnett on the southeast, Milton on the south and Milton and Cherokee on the west.  The Etowah and Chattahoochee rivers, with their tributaries, drain the count.  The soil is fertile and yields abundant crops of cotton, corn, wheat, rye, oats, tobacco, fruits and vegetable.  There are no extensive fruit farms, but almost every farmer has an orchard, the products of which are often marketed at Atlanta.  Much of the land id covered with second growth forests of pine, hickory and oak.  Most of the saw-mills are portable and say by contract for those who own the timber.  The Chattahoochee affords almost inexhaustible water-power, only a small percentage of which is utilized.  There are no railroads in the county, but a branch of the Southern system runs within a few miles of the eastern border.  The products are marketed principally at Buford, though some are carried to Atlanta and Gainesville.  The schools both public and private are good.  Among the latter are High Tower institute, a Baptist school, and Hopewell academy, which belongs to the Methodists.  Forsyth county lies within the gold belt and some mines have yielded large returns.  One of these, the Green mine, is a rich placer and is worked by a few men who employ the most primitive methods.  Copper and silver are also found.  The population according to the census of 1900 was 11,550, a gain of 395 since 1890.  Cumming, the county seat, is surrounded by beautiful scenery.  About twelve miles south of this place are several small Indian mounds and ten miles northwest is a peculiar rock of unhewn granite, over 80 feet long, and carved with various characters, which from their appearance must have been wrought at a very early period.  The characters are regular and it is probable they were carved by the same race of people who constructed the mounds in this and other states.
[Source: Georgia: Sketches, Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions & People, Vol. 2, Publ. 1906 Transcribed By:  Maggie Coleman]




Towns, Hamlets and Villages

Gravel Springs, a post-village in the southern part of Forsyth county, is not far from the Chattahoochee river and takes its name from some springs in the vicinity.  Buford and Suwanee on the Southern railway are the nearest stations.  The population in 1900 was 42.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)

Heardville, a post-village of Forsyth county, is about six miles northwest of Cumming, and in 1900 had a population of 91.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Angelia Carpenter)

High Tower, a post-village in the northwestern part of Forsyth county is located about eleven miles east of Gober, which is the hearest railroad station. It has religious and educational advantages and stores with good local trade. The population in 1900 was 120.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Angelia Carpenter)

Liverpool, a post-hamlet of Forsyth county is about six miles southwest of Cumming and not far from the Cherokee county line.  Suwanee is the most convenient railroad station.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)

Mat, a post-hamlet of Forsyth county, is on a branch of the Etowah river, about seven miles north of Cumming. Ball Ground is the most convenient railroad station.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

Martin, a town in the northern part of Franklin county, was incorporated by act of the legislature on Sept. 7, 1891. In 1900 it had a population of 160. It is on the Elberton & Toccoa division of the Southern railway, has a money order postoffice, with rural free delivery, express and telegraph service, and is an important trading and shipping point.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

Mish, a post-hamlet of Forsyth county, with a population of 42, is about seven miles northeast of dimming. Flowery Branch is the nearest railroad station.
[Source: Georgia Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons,  Vol 2, Publ 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister]

Odell, a post-hamlet of Forsyth county, is about eight miles southeast of Cumming and not far from the Milton county line. The most convenient railroad station is Suwanee.
[Source: Georgia Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons,  Vol 2, Publ 1906. Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz]

Oscarville, a post-village of Forsyth county, with a population of 63, is twelve miles northeast of Cumming and not far from the Chattahoochee river. Flowery Branch is the most convenient railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form- Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Silver City, a post-village of Forsyth county, is ten miles north of Cumming and not far from the Dawson county line. It has some mercantile and mining interests and in 1900 reported a population of 110.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Vickery, a village in the southwestern part of Forsyth county, reported a population of 100 in 1900. It has a money order post office and is a trading center for the neighborhood in which it is located. The nearest railroad station is Suwanee, twelve miles southeast.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz






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