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Gilmer County History


GILMER COUNTY.
This county was named after the Hon. George R. Gilmer, and was laid out from Cherokee in 1832.
The rivers are Ellijay and Tacoa.

The face of the country is broken by mountains, the principal of which are, Cohuttah, Frog, Coal, Bald, Long Swamp, Amacolola, Turnip Town, Tallona, and Sharp Top. The best lands are in the valleys and on the water-courses.

Ellijay is the capital, situated on the northwest bank of the Ellijay River, 171 miles N. W. of Milledgeville.

The public places are, Prince Edward, Tacoa, Talking Rock, and Blue Ridge.

The country is rich in minerals. Gold, iron, and marble are found in various sections.

Among those who first settled in this county are, B. Chastain, James Cody, Alexander Kell, James Kell, Benjamin Griffith, L. Holt, C. Cooper, J. E. Price, John P. Alexander, Samuel Jones, E. Chastain, A. Johnson, J. A. Johnson, E. Gibson, James Simmons, Jacob Gibson, C. Goble, J. C. King, S. Griffith, H. K. Q.uillian, Thos. M. Burnett, Wm. Cox, B. M. Griffeth, &c.

Extract from the Census of 1850.—Dwellings, 1,396 ; families, 1,396; white males, 4,242; white females, 3,994; free coloured males, 3; 1 free coloured female. Total free population, 8,240; slaves, 200. Deaths, 54. Farms, 577; manufacturing establishments, 5. Value of real estate, $551,451; value of personal estate. 8233,115.

We are indebted to a gentleman well acquainted with the history of the Cherokees for the following items, viz.:—

Old Indian Towns.—Ellija, an Indian town, formerly stood where Ellijay now stands. White Path was the Chief. He accompanied John Ross to Washington, in 1834. General Jackson invited him to dinner, and presented him with a silver watch, which he always kept as a precious treasure. He was taken sick at Hopkinsville, Kentucky. During his illness, the people showed him great kindness. After his death, his watch was sold, and its proceeds appropriated to the erection of a marble monument.

Talona was south of Ellija. It was sometimes called Sanderstown, after the principal Chief, George Sanders, who kept a house of entertainment on the Federal Road, and was considered a high-minded man. He accompanied Ross to Washington. On his return, he was taken sick, and died at Raleigh, North Carolina.

Mountain Town was situated in the eastern part of Gilmer; Cartilana was the principal Chief.

Source: "Historical Collections Of Georgia", by George White, 1855 Transcribed and Submitted by Brenda Wiesner

Towns, Hamlets and Villages


Gilmer County was laid out from Cherokee in 1832, and named in honor of George R. Gilmer.  It is in the northern part of the state and is bounded by Fannin county on the north and northwest, Dawson on the southeast, Pickens on the south and Gordon and Murray on the west.  The Cartecay and Ellijay rivers unite near the center of the county to form the Coosawattee, which flows toward the southwest.  The county is also watered by many smaller streams.  The surface is mountainous and well wooded.  The timber is principally oak and poplar and is being rapidly converted into lumber.  The soil, especially in the valleys is very fertile.  Corn, wheat, oats, field peas and some cotton are raised.  The various grasses and all forage crops do well. Gilmer is a good fruit county.  Apples grow to perfection and find a ready market.  Peaches do well, but have small sale.  Quinces, plums and cherries are grown and vineyards are being planted.  The fruit business is yet in its infancy, but it is believed that it will take its place as one of the best paying resources of the county.  Small game abounds and the streams furnish an abundance of fish.  Gold and iron are the principal minerals and are mined quite extensively.  Beautiful marble, limestone, sandstone, mica, slate and granite are also found.  The healthful climate, pure water and great agricultural and mineral wealth attract settlers and the county is growing steadily in population.  The Atlanta Knoxville & Northern railway, which traverses the county from north to south, contributes to the development of the natural resources.  The population in 1900 was 10,198, a growth of 1,124 in ten years.  Ellijay is the county seat.  Talona, south of Ellijay is sometimes called Sanderstown, from the Cherokee chief, George Sanders, who once kept a house of entertainment on the Federal road.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)

Fouts, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is located about twelve miles southwest of Ellijay.  The nearest station is Keasley, on the Atlanta, Knoxville & Northern railway.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Renae Donaldson)

Globe, a post-village in the southwest corner of Gilmer county, is not far from the Gordon county line.  It reported a population of 107 in 1900 and is a trading center for that section.  Talona, on the Atlanta, Knoxville & Northern , is the nearest railroad station.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

Mountaintown, a post-village of Gilmer county, is about six miles northwest of Ellijay, which is the nearest railroad station. The population in 1900 was 76.
(Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tammy Rudder)

Ollie, a post-village of Gilmer county, with a population of 47, is about ten miles northwest of Ellijay, which is the most convenient railroad station.

[Source: Georgia Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons,  Vol 2, Publ 1906. Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz]

Orr, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is almost on the Pickens county line, and is four miles east of Keasley, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form- Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Protection, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is ten miles due east of Ellijay and six miles southeast of Whitepath, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Rattliff, a post-village of Gilmer county, is in the upper Coosawattee valley, six miles west of Ellijay, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Santa Luca, a post-village of Gilmer county, is three miles northwest of Cherrylog, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Town Creek, a post-village of Gilmer county, with a population of 75 in 1900, is about three miles southwest of Talona, which is the nearest railroad station, and is a trading center for the neighborhood in which it is located.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Round Top, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is five miles west of Talona which is the most convenient railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Roosevelt, a post-hamlet in Gilmer county, is five miles west of Ellijay, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Roy, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is about eight miles southeast of Ellijay, in the valley of the Cartecay river.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Talona, a post-village of Gilmer county, with a population of 58 in 1900, is a station on the Atlanta, Knoxville & Northern railway, seven miles south of Ellijay.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Tickanetley, a post-hamlet in the southeastern part of Gilmer county, is in the valley of the Cartecay river, near the western base of the Blue Ridge. The nearest railroad town is Ellijay.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Roebuck, a post-hamlet in the southwestern part of Gilmer county, is four miles from Talona, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Rolston, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is eight miles east of Ellijay, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Snider, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is twelve miles southeast of Ellijay, near the base of the Amicalola mountain. Talona is the most convenient railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Tailscreek, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is in the valley of the Cartecay river, eight miles west of Ellijay, which is the nearest railroad station.            
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Verdell, a post-hamlet of Gilmer county, is in the valley of the Coosawattee river, four miles northwest of Talona, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz


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