Welcome to Georgia Genealogy Trails!

Georgia Genealogy Trails

"Where your Journey Begins"


Lincoln County, Georgia History
The Story of Georgia and the Georgia People 1732 to 1860
by George Gillman Smith, D. D.
Originally published c. 1901

Submitted by K. Torp, ©2007

LINCOLN.

When Oglethorpe was cut off from Elbert on the north and Wilkes on the west, a narrow strip was taken from it on the east, and in honor of General Lincoln, of the Revolutionary army, the county was called Lincoln. It was not a large county, but was in the main a county of most ex cellent land. The Broad river was on the north, the Savannah river on the east, and the Little river on the south. Much of the land was rich red land, much of it fertile river and creek bottoms. It was very thickly peopled before the Revolutionary war.

Mr. White gives as the first settlers:
John Lamar, Peter Lamar, John Dooly, Thomas Dooly, Thomas Murray, John Lockhart, B. Lockhart, Thomas Mitchell, Sterne Simmons, J. Stovall, Stephen Handspiker. M. Henly, Robert Flemming.

Those who are familiar with the names of Scotch-Irish people will see how many of these first families of Lincoln were of that stock, who came to Wilkes immediately from North Carolina, but more remotely from Pennsylvania and Ireland.

There was a part of this county which was very sterile, but the lands along the rivers and creeks were soon taken up by large plantations.

Lincoln was admirably suited to tobacco culture, and the wealthy slaveholders from Virginia came into it at an early day, and in 1810 there were 2,443 whites and 2,212 negroes in the county. In 1830 there were 2,869 whites and 3,276 negroes; in 1850 2,218 whites and 3,780 slaves. In 1890 the population was only 6,146.
Much of what is written of Wilkes refers to that part of Lincoln which was in Wilkes up to 1796, and many of the celebrated Kiokee settlers had their homes in Lincoln.

The county was abandoned by many of its best people as soon as the lands in the western counties were opened. The fields grew up in forests, and owing to the distance of the county from markets it has rallied slowly.

Lincolnton was never a large town and is but little changed now from what it was sixty years ago. Goshen was once a place of some importance, but has long since ceased to exist.

The county was the hotbed of Whiggism during the Revolution. Jno. Dooly, the father of Judge Dooly, was a Whig colonel. He was the terror of the Tories and was cruelly murdered by them. His son, Judge Dooly, was famous as a brilliant lawyer and an honored judge, but, alas! as famous for the gross irregularities of his life. The worn-out stories of his coarse wit have been a staple with all writers on early Georgia.

The nearness of the Kiokee church to Lincoln and the influence of Daniel Marshall in this county has made Lincoln largely a Baptist county, and there are some very solid and prosperous churches of that denomination in it now. The Methodists, the only other denomination in the county, have a good following, and it is perhaps somewhat remarkable that the oldest Sunday-school which has had a continuous life in Georgia is in a country church in Lincoln, where for over eighty years a Sunday-school has been held every Sunday.

Judge Longstreet located the scene of the celebrated occurrence when the man was seeing how he “could a fout” in the Dark Corner of Lincoln; but I have been unable to find any part of Lincoln which would consent to acknowledge that it was the part alluded to.



Towns, Hamlets and Villages

Gill, a post-hamlet in the northern part of Lincoln county, is about five miles from the Savannah river.  Mt. Carmel, S. C., is the most convenient railroad station.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)

Honora, a post-hamlet of Lincoln county, is located in the northeastern part of the county near the Savannah river. Bordeaux, S.C. is the nearest railway station.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

Kenna, a post-hamlet of Lincoln county, is about seven miles east of Lincolnton. The nearest railroad station is in South Carolina, on the line of the Charleston & Western Carolina road.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Lisbon-The original name of this place was the “Town of Lincoln.”  It is located in the extreme northern part of Lincoln county at the mouth of Broad River and was founded during the colonial period. On the opposite side of Broad river the town of Petersburg was established sometime later and as it grew Lisbon waned. But the weak town outlived the strong one.  Petersburg has long since disappeared while Lisbon is still a post village. In 1900 the population was 47.  The nearest railway station is Mount Carmel, S.C., on the line of the Charleston & Western Carolina road.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)

Lockhart, A post-hamlet of Lincoln county is on Little river, a few miles from its mouth. The nearest railroad station is on the Charleston & Western Carolina, on the opposite side of the Savannah river.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)

Loco, A post-hamlet of Lincoln county is about six miles south of Lincolnton.  Washington is the most convenient railroad station.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)

Pansy, a post-hamlet of Lincoln county, is on Soap creek, six miles northeast of Lincolnton. Washington is the most convenient railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Raysville, a post-hamlet in the extreme southwestern part of Lincoln county, is on the Little river and is twelve miles north of Thomson, which is the most convenient railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Sybert, a post-hamlet of Lincoln county, is near the headwaters of Soap creek, six miles west of Lincolnton. The most convenient railroad station is Washington.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz



©2007 Genealogy Trails