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Biographies of Muscogee County, Georgia


BARNETT, J. N.
Columbus, Georgia - J. N. BARNETT, city treasurer of Columbus, Ga., was born in Danville, Va., May 10, 1818, and is a son of William and Lucy (Batt) Barnett, also natives of Virginia.  William Barnett, father of our subject, was a son of William, Sr., was a planter, and in 1837 moved to Russell County, Ala., and for two terms served that county in the lower house of the State legislature.  In 1838 J. N. Barnett removed to Columbus, Ga., and from 1845 until 1861 was engaged in mercantile trade.  In the year 1863 he enlisted in the Confederate army, under Capt. W. C. Gray, and served until the close of the war.  On his return to Columbus he was elected, in 1872, to the office of city treasurer, and filled the positon so satisfactorily to the public that he has been re-elected at the close of each term and still fills the position.  In September, 1845, he married Miss Lucy Pitts, daughter of Henry Pitts, of Muscogee County; this lady died October 28, 1875, a debout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which church Mr. Barnett is also a member.  Of the children born to this marriage there are six living, viz.: Mrs. Fannie Young, Mrs. Mary Illges, Mrs. Lucy Grimes, Mrs. Julia Redd, Mrs. Boudie Jones and James A. [Source: Biographical Souvenir of Georgia and Florida by FA Battey & Co., 1889-Transcribed by LA Bauer]


 BRADLEY, WILLIAM C. cotton merchant, Columbus, Ga., was born in Russell County, Ala., June 28, 1863, and is the youngest of seven living children born to Forbes and Theresa (Clark) Bradley, viz: Mrs. Emma J. Nuckolls, Mrs. Alice B. Nuckolls, Edmund, Forbes, Jr., Dan, Fannie B., Orr and William C.  Forbes Bradley was born in Connecticut, December 1, 1809.  He moved to Georgia in 1828, settled in Milledgeville, and remained until 1832, then removed to Columbus, Ga., and engaged in merchandising until 1840, then removed to Russell County, Ala., where he has since resided.  He was a large slaveholder and is and always has been a very successful planter.  His father was Dan Bradley, a native of Connecticut and of Scotch extraction.  Theresa (Clark) Bradley is a daughter of William Clark, of Welsh extraction.
      William C. Bradley was educated in Russell County, Ala., and at Slade’s High School, Columbus, Ga., and at the Agricultural and Mechanical College, Auburn, Ala.  After finishing his education he engaged in planting with his father in Russell County, Ala., for about three years.  He then settled in Columbus, and acted as clerk for Bussey, Goldsmith & Co. in their cotton establishment, for about one year.  He then bought out his employers and became associated with S. A. Carter, April 1, 1885, the style of the firm being Carter & Bradley.  This firm is considered one of the largest cotton warehouse and commission firms in the city of Columbus.  Mr. Bradley is a young man with rare talent and experience.  April 27, 1887, he married Sarah Hall, of Muscogee County, Ga., a lady of culture and refinement, and daughter of Harry T. and E. J. (Howard) Hall.  Harry T. Hall is a native of Boston, Mass.  In politics Mr. Bradley is a Democrat. [Source: Biographical Souvenir of Georgia and Florida by FA Battey & Co., 1889-Transcribed by LA Bauer]


BROOKS, JUDGE FRANCIS M. of the court of ordinary, Columbus, Ga., was born in Washington, Rhea County, Tenn., April 15, 1818; his father, P. L. W. Brooks, was a native of Wilkes County, Ga., and died November 6, 1829; Sarah (Ballard) Brooks, mother of the judge, was born in Roane County, Tenn., and died October 1, 1847, a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Of the six children born to these parents our subject is the only one living.  He has been a resident of Georgia since 1825, and was a merchant at Thomaston until 1835, when he moved to Columbus and continued in mercantile business until about 1831; in 1848 he was elected magistrate, served four years, and in 1853 was elected sheriff of Muscogee County, which office he filled eight years; in 1861 he was elected clerk of the superior court, served seven years, and was then removed by Gen. Pope (1868); in 1872 he was elected judge of the court of ordinary and has held that office down to the present time, his long tenure affording ample evidence of the fact that he is a faithful and conscientious officer.  In 1842 he married Miss Clemantina Beauchamp, a daughter of Sabird and Mary (Lanier) Beauchamp, of De Kalb County, Ga., and of the five children that were born to this marriage three are living, viz.: Francis L., M. D., located at Lakeland, Fla., Mrs. Emma B. Scott, and Mrs. Helen M. Dasher.  The mother of these children died May 10, 1880, a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  December 15, 1886, the judge took for his second wife Miss Fannie W. Davidson, a native of Georgia, and daughter of Larkin Davidson.  The judge has attained the Royal Arch degree in Masonry, and the order of Knights Templar; has been several times worshipful master of the Blue Lodge, and with his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  [Source: Biographical Souvenir of Georgia and Florida by FA Battey & Co., 1889-Transcribed by LA Bauer]


 

BROWN, W. R., president of the Columbus Iron Works, Co., was born in Jasper County, Ga., April 27, 1822, the eldest of five children born to William and Jennie (Cook) Brown, the remaining four being named Carrie, Matilda Warren, Emily Swan and Elizabeth.  The father, William Brown, was born near Petersburg, N. C., in 1796, moved to Georgia when a young man, settled in Elbert County, whence he moved to Columbus in 1839.  He was a hatter by trade, and died in 1851 or 1852.  His father, also named William, was a native of Wales.  Mrs. Jennie (Cook) Brown was born in Georgia in 1798.
W. R. Brown settled in Columbus, with his parents in 1839, learned molding, and worked at the trade until 1851, when he became connected with Wildman & Craig, with whom he remained about four years.  He then built the Columbus iron works, of which he was superintendent until 1860, when he was elected their president, which office he still retains.  They do railroad and steamboat work, all kinds of job work, and for the past three or four years have made a specialty of the manufacture of ice machines, of which, the past year, they sold and put up for use one per month.  The works cover about three acres and employ two hundred hands.  Mr. Brown has served two terms as alderman of Columbus and is very popular.  In 1852 he married Maria Broodnax, a daughter of Robert Broodnax, of Columbus, and of the three children born to this union but one survives, Lincy Whiteside.  Mrs. Brown breathed her last in 1859, and in 1865 Mr. Brown married Mrs. Jane Clayton, of New Orleans, a daughter of Thomas Savage, but in 1867 M. Brown was called upon to mourn the loss of his second wife.  [Source: Biographical Souvenir of Georgia and Florida by FA Battey & Co., 1889-Transcribed by LA Bauer]



CHAMBERS, WILLIAM LEA, lawyer, was born March 4, 1852, in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga.; a son of William Henry and Anna Lane (Flewellen) Chambers (q. v.), who In 1854 removed to Eufaula. Ala., where he began his education, his first teachers being a Miss Sinkfield; followed by his uncle, Robert Alexander Chambers, who was killed In the battle of Rome, Ga.; Prof. Patterson; and Capt. S. H. Dent. He attended Emory College, Oxford, Ga., 1869-71, leaving a few months before graduation to teach school: subsequently he received the degree of A. B.; and the honorary degree of LL. D. In 1909. His legal education was acquired in the office of Stone & Clopton at Montgomery, both of whom served on the supreme court bench.
Mr. Chambers began practice in Montgomery, In November, 1873. and continued there until May, 1888, as a member of the firm of Clopton, Herbert & Chambers; then removed to Sheffield. In the meantime he had served as cashier and president of the First National Bank of Montgomery; was Instrumental in organizing the Montgomery Land & Improvement Company, of which he was vice president; and became president of the company which founded Sheffield, which has become the second city In the south in Iron production. Since then he has engaged in the practice of law In Washington, D. C. He was a member of the commission appointed by the United States. England and Germany to settle the trouble in Samoa In 1893 and in 1897 was chosen by the U. S. government as chief Justice of Samoa; In 1901 was appointed a member of the Spanish treaty commission; and later was chairman of the arbitration board to settle the controversy between the labor brotherhoods and railroads. He has always supported the Democratic party and was secretary of the state Democratic committee in two campaigns; Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. South; was chairman of the board of stewards of Court Street church, Montgomery, and of Mount Vernon Place church, Washington D. C: and is a member of the Chi Phi college fraternity and the Knights of Pythias. He has frequently contributed articles to newspapers and magazines; and throughout life has been In some way identified with educational, social and religious movements; was a teacher for several years before entering upon the practice of law; was chairman of the board of education of Montgomery for several years; a member of the Society for Promotion of Religious Education, Washington, D. C; recent of Fairmont Seminary: a member of the National Geographic Society and American Institute of Archaeology.

Married: October 27. 1873. In Montgomery to Laura Ligon Clopton, daughter of David band Martha (Ligon) Clopton, who lived at Tuskegee and later Montgomery. Mr. Clopton was a member of the U. S. congress prior to the War of Secession; enlisted as a private In the C. S. Army; and was a member of the Confederate congress at the time of Lee's surrender.
Children:
     1. Anne Laura, m. in 1900 Benjamln Palmer Carter, of New Orleans, a distinguished mining engineer and general manager of the greatest gold producing mine In the world at Johannesburg, Transvaal. South Africa;
     2. David Clopton, m. Elisabeth McLean, of Tuscumbla. and Is a successful farmer of Montgomery County, Ml, having resigned a lucrative position In the department of Justice;
     3. William Henry, associated with his brother in the conduct of Bon Acre Farm, of which dairying is the principal feature;
     4. Louise L., living with her parents at their country home near Washington, D. C. Residence: Washington, D. C.
[Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, Published by The S. J. Clarke publishing company, 1921; Transcribed by C. Anthony]

 


COLQUITT, Hon. WALTER T. was born in Halifax County, Virginia, on the 27th of December, 1799, a scion of one of the representative colonial families of that historic old commonwealth, and within a short time after his birth his parents came to Georgia and became pioneer settlers in the vicinity of Mount Zion, Carroll County, where he passed the period of his childhood and early youth and where he acquired his preliminary education. Later he was sent to the College of New Jersey, now familiarly known as Princeton University, but before he had completed the prescribed course leading to graduation he was called to his home, owing to the illness of his father. Later he prosecuted the study of law under the preceptorship of Col. Samuel Rockwell, of Milledgeville, Baldwin County, and in 1820 he was admitted to the bar of the State of Georgia, and his novitiate in the work of his profession was served at Sparta, Hancock County, whence he later removed to the now extinct Village of Cowpens, in Walton County. In the meanwhile he not only made advancement in professional prestige and success but was also elected by the Legislature to the office of brigadier general of the state militia when he was but twenty-one years of age.
       Alert and ambitious, with a fine mind and with well fortified convictions concerning matters of public import, he early became influential in political affairs, and in 1826 he was a candidate for Congress, on the Troup ticket, as it was familiarly known. In a district which had a majority that tallied for the opposition a majority of fully 2,000 votes in a normal way, he was defeated by only 32 votes, his opponent having been Hon. Wilson Lumpkin. At the age of twenty-seven years he was elected judge of the Chattahoochee Superior Court. In 1836-7 Judge Colquitt represented Muscogee County in the State Senate, and in 1838 he was accorded further official distinction, in that he was elected to Congress, as candidate on the whig ticket and as a supporter of the policy of individual state rights. He resigned his seat in the national Legislature at the time of the nomination of Gen. William Henry Harrison for the Presidency and in the ensuing campaign he ardently supported Martin Van Buren, the democratic candidate. His course met with the unequivocal commendation of his constituency, and he resumed his seat in Congress, in the lower house of which he continued to serve until March, 1843, when he became a member of the United States Senate. He gave stanch support to the Polk administration and to the government policies concerning the Oregon question and the issue of the Mexican war, and he conscientiously and insistently opposed the historic Wilmot Proviso.
 Apropos of the professional ability of Judge Colquitt the following consistent estimate has been given: "As an advocate he stood alone in Georgia and perhaps in the whole South. No man could equal him in vigor and brilliancy where the passions of the jury had to be led."
      Senator Colquitt's entire life was guided and governed by a fine sense of personal stewardship and by deep Christian faith, both he and his wife having been earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Though of splendid physical constitution, this distinguished Georgian was notably improvident in fortifying his health, and he died in the prime of his strong and useful manhood, at the age of fifty-six years.
      Senator Colquitt was thrice married. On the 23d of February, 1823, he wedded Miss Nancy H. Lane, daughter of Joseph Lane, of Newton County, and they became the parents of six children. In 1841, a number of years after the death of the wife of his early manhood, he married Mrs. Alpha B. Fauntleroy, whose family name was Tood, but she survived her marriage only a few months. In 1842 was solemnized his marriage to Miss Harriet W. Ross, daughter of Luke Ross, of Macon, this state, and she survived him by a number of years, no children having been born of this union.  
Source: A standard history of Georgia and Georgians, Volume 5 By Lucian Lamar Knight
 


DU BOSE, Mrs. MIRIAM HOWARD, woman suffragist, born in Russell county, Ala., 28th November, 1862. She is a daughter of Ann Lindsay and Augustus Howard. Though born in Alabama, her life has been spent in and near Columbus, Ga. At an early age she showed marked musical talent, playing simple melodies before she was tall enough to mount the piano stool unassisted. At fourteen years of age she began the study of music under a teacher in Columbus, and studied there about two years, which was the only instruction she received. At seventeen she applied for the organist's place in the First Presbyterian Church of Columbus, and held the position' until her marriage. She was at that time the youngest organist in the State. She has composed several pieces of instrumental music. Her first piece "Rural Polka," was composed at the age of fifteen. She performs on the piano with brilliancy. Gifted in sketching, she has done some life-like work in that line. For the last three years, having been aroused to the work of woman's enfranchisement, she has worked for woman suffrage with heart, pen and purse. Her articles in its interest are earnest and convincing. She is vice-president of the Georgia Woman Suffrage Association, and her busy brain and fingers have originated many schemes to fill the treasury of that organization. It was her generosity which made it possible for Georgia to send her first delegates to the twenty-fourth convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, held in Washington in January, 1892. The money donated was earned by her own hands. She has one son. Her home is in Greenville, Ga.  (Source: American Women, Frances Elizabeth Willard, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Volume 1 Copyright 1897.  Transcribed by Marla Snow.)

 


 

FLETCHER, JOHN T., is one of the representative business men and citizens of Columbus, where he is president of the Georgia Fertilizer Company, and is also the owner of valuable farming lands in Muscogee county.  He was born in the city which is now his home, Nov. 1, 1861, and is a son of James Monroe and Mary Elizabeth (Hurst) Fletcher, the former of whom was born in Chambers county, Ala., in 1837, and the latter in Chattahoochee county, Ga., in 1840.  The father was one of the leading merchants of Columbus for many years, his death occurring there in 1902.  He was a loyal soldier of the Confederacy during the Civil war.  His widow now resided with her son John T., subject of this sketch.  John Thomas Fletcher was afforded the advantages of the public schools and also private schools of Columbus, continuing his studies until he has attained to the age of nineteen years, when be became bookkeeper for the firm of Fletcher & Gammel, of which his father was a member.  Later he became a clerk in a grocery store, and afterward became associated with his father in the livery business, under the firm name of J. M. Fletcher & Son.  Still later he became a member of the firm of Fletcher & Bullock, in which connection he was engaged in the carriage, wagon and harness business for a period of eleven years.  In 1904 he purchased Mr. Bullock’s interest and thereafter continued the business individually for two years, at the expiration of which he sold the same.  In the meantime, in September, 1904, Mr. Fletcher organized and incorporated the Georgia Fertilizer Company, of which he has since been president, the enterprise now representing one of the leading industries of Columbus.  He is a member of the Columbus board of trade and is the owner of more than 1,000 acres of valuable land in this county.  Upon his farms he has planted 51,000 peach trees, and of the number 15,000 are now bearing fruit.  He takes much interest in this branch of the rapidly developing pomological industry in Georgia and his success in the same has been pronounced.  Mr. Fletcher is a Democrat in his political adherency and he served two years as a member of the board of alderman of Columbus.  He is a member of the board of stewards of St. Luke’s Methodist Episcopal church South, and is superintendent of its a Sunday school.  He is also vice-president of the Columbus Young Men’s Christian Association and manifests a deep concern in all that makes for the moral and material wellbeing of his home city and state.  He is identified with the Knights of the Maccabees, the Royal Arcanum and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  On Jan. 12, 1881, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fletcher to Miss Bettie Fontaine Gammel, daughter of the late Abraham Gammel, of Columbus. and they have three sons, -John T., Jr., born April 24, 1883; Ben Hill, born Aug 9, 1884; and Fred Eugene, born Jan. 21, 1886.  [Source: Georgia: Sketches, Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions & People, Vol. 2, Publ. 1906 Transcribed By:  Maggie Coleman]


FLOURNOY, JOHN F., president of the Muscogee Real Estate Company, and the Columbus Concrete Supply Company, two of the important industrial concerns of the city of Columbus, is one of the representative citizens and business men of that city and has the distinction of being a veteran of the Confederate service in the war between the states, though he was but seventeen years of age when he thus rendered aid to the cause of the fair southland.  He was born in the city which is now his home, March 13, 1847, a son of John M. and Mary Ann (Gordon) Flournoy, both natives of Eatonton, Putnam county, Ga., where the former was born in 1814 and the latter in 1822.  The father was a planter by vocation and served in the Indian war in Florida.  He died in 1859, at the age of forty-five years.  He was a son of Josiah and Martha D. (Manly) Flournoy, both of whom were born in Virginia.  Mary Ann (Gordon) Flournoy died in 1885, at the age of sixty-three years.  She was a daughter of Charles P. and Barbara Gordon and was a first cousin of the late Gen. John B. Gordon, of revered memory.  John F. Flournoy, to whom this brief sketch is dedicated, secured his preparatory education in an academy for boys at Columbus, the institution having been conducted under the direction of Prof. John Isham.  He then entered the University of Alabama, where he remaind a student during one year.  In Tuscaloosa, the university city, he became a private in the Alabama corps of cadets, and in July, 18764, with this command, he entered the Confederate service at Mobile, Ala., but was transferred in November, 18764, to Nelson’s Georgia Rangers, continuing in the ranks until the close of the was and participated in a number of active engagements, including the battle of Franklin, Tenn.  He surrendered with his command at High Point, N. C.  After the termination of the great conflict between the states Mr. Flournoy became indentified with the planting industry, in Russell county, Ala., and remained there until 1873, when he returned to Columbus, where he was continuously engaged in the warehouse commission business until 1895. In the meanwhile, in 1888, he become president of the Columbus Railroad company and retained this position until 1901.  During this time fifteen miles of track was added and the entire system equipped electrically.  His splendid energies and administrative talents have been freely utilized in the promotion and support of enterprises which have conserved the material and civic advancement and prosperity of his native city and state.  He had much to do with bringing to its present high standard the street-rail-way system of Columbus, whish is owned by the Columbus Railroad Company, just mentioned.  Mr. Flournoy has been president of the Muscogee Real Estate Company from the time of its organization, in 1887, which company has developed East Highlands, and it was under his personal supervision and control that beautiful Wildwood park was developed and improved.  Through his efforts the first public park at Columbus was given to the people of the city.  He was president of the Columbus Investment Company from its organization, in 1889, until 1905, when he retired.  He is president and manager of the Columbus Concrete Supply Company, manufacturers of hydraulic presses concrete stone, for architectural and general building purposes, the offices of the concern bring maintained in Columbus and the factory and yards at Concrete, Ga.  Mr. Flournoy is also a director of the Columbus Power Company, the company which is doing so much for the development of the water power on the Chattahoochee river, and was one of the original promoters of the Georgia Midland & Gulf railroad, of which he was vice-president for many years,.  He is essentially public-spirited and progressive and is one of the valued citizens of Columbus.  In politics he accords a stance allegiance to the Democratic party, but he has never cared to enter the arena of “practical” politics.  On Nov. 16, 1869, he was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Epping, who died in 1873, leaving two children-John F., Jr., now cashier of the First National bank of Canton, Miss., and Rebecca, wife of George S. Hamburger, secretary and treasurer of the Hamburger mills, of Columbus.  On Sept. 28, 1881, Mr. Flournoy married Mary Reynolds, of Talladega county, Ala., and they have the following children, viz:  M. Reynolds, Maud, Josiah Gordon, Mary Hannah, John Manly, and Walker Reynolds.  [Source: Georgia: Sketches, Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions & People, Vol. 2, Publ. 1906 Transcribed By:  Maggie Coleman]


GARRARD, FRANK U., junior member of the well known law firm of Garrard & Garrard, of Columbus, is one of the representative members of the bar of Muscogee county, has important capitalistic interests and is now serving as referee in bankruptcy.  He was born in the city of Columbus, his present home, Jan. 1, 1876, thus making his advent at the dawn of the year which marked the centennial anniversary of our national independence.  He is a son of Hon. Louis F. and Annie Foster (Leonard) Garrard, both of whom are living, the form being the senior member of the law firm noted above, and one of the leading representatives of his profession in that part of the state.  Frank U. Garrard secured his early educational discipline in a private school at Columbus, continuing his studies until he had attained to the age of seventeen years, when he entered his father’s law office and began his course of technical reading for the profession in which he is now so strongly and successfully fortified.  On Dec. 4, 1897, at the age of twenty-one years, he was admitted to the bar of his native state, and he forthwith began practice in his father’s office.  On Jan. 1, 1906, the law firm of Garrard & Garrard was formed, and its practice is large and representative in character.  In 1898 the subject of this sketch was appointed United States referee in bankruptcy and he has since remained incumbent of this office.  The firm of Garrard & Garrard is counsel for the Columbus Water Works Company, the Columbus Investment Company, the Columbus Savings bank, the Third National bank, the Columbus Railroad Company, of which the subject of this review is a director and also secretary; the Columbus Concrete and Supply Company, of which he is a director; the Muscogee Real Estate Company, of which he is secretary; the Greenwood Land Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer, and the Columbus Power Company, of which he is assistant secretary.  Mr. Garrard is also a member of the directorate of the Columbus Young Men’s Christian Association.  He holds membership in the local lodge and chapter of the Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men, and the Georgia state bar association.  The principles and policies of the Democratic party appeal to him without reservation and he takes a loyal interest in its cause.  He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. Garrard is also a devoted member.  On Dec. 12, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Garrard to Miss Sarah Gardiner, of Sparta, Ga., and they have two daughters,--Louise Gardiner Garrard, born Dec. 2 1902; and Margaret, born Feb. 3, 1906.
(Source: Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)


GARRETT, JOSEPH SIMPSON, postmaster of the city of Columbus, is one of the honored citizens of Muscogee county and was a valiant soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil war, in which he rose to the rank of colonel of his regiment.  He was born on the homestead plantation of his parents, in Rockingham county, N. C., March 9, 1831, and in the same county were also born his parents, George W. and Emily J. (Young) Garrett.  In that county they passed their entire lives, the father, who was a successful planter, having attained to the venerable age of eighty-two years, and the mother having passed away at the age of sixty-five years. They are survived by three sons and one daughter.  Thomas J. and Robert J. Garrett still remain resident of Rockingham county, the former having been a soldier in the Confederacy service.  The only living daughter, Mrs. E. J. Lynch, is a resident of Greensboro, N. C.  Col. Joseph S. Garrett was afforded excellent educational advantages in his youth, having attended an academy at Trinity, N. C., and later pursuing the higher branches of study in Holbrook academy, Danville, Va.  He remained a resident of his native state until 1856, when he came to Georgia and located in Muscogee county, where his marriage was solemnized in May of the following year.  In the autumn of 1857 he removed with his wife to the state of Mississippi, where he was identified with the plantation industry until 1860, when he removed to Russell county, Ala., where he remained until the inception of the war between the states.  His loyalty to the cause of the Confederacy was of the most insistent and uncompromising type, and on Aug. 1, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company C, Seventh Alabama cavalry.  He continued in active and constant service until the great conflict closed in the defeat of the cause for which the Southern states had battled with all of devotion and consecration.  He was soon promoted to lieutenant of his company, and subsequently was made captain of the same, finally being promoted to the colonelcy of his regiment, retaining command as such until the close of the war.  The Seventh Alabama cavalry was an integral portion of the command of Gen. N. B. Forrest, and among the more important engagements in which Colonel Garrett took part were the battles of Columbia, Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville and Johnson’s Landing.  During his long period of service he was fortunate in that he was never wounded or taken prisoner.  After the close of the war Colonel Garrett located in the city of Columbus, where he has since made his home.  From 1867 until 1896 he was a wholesale merchant and in 1897 he was appointed postmaster of Columbus, by President McKinley.  He has since served continuously in this important office, having been twice reappointed, and his administration has been most able and satisfactory.  Prior to his being appointed to the position of postmaster he served several terms as a member of the board of aldermen of Columbus.  In national affairs he gives his support to the Republican Party, but in local and state politics he is staunch supporter of the Democracy.  He is the owner of valuable real estate in his home city and also has a fine plantation in Muscogee county, located twelve miles distant from Columbus.  He was formerly a stockholder and director in banking institutions in Columbus, but has retired from official associations in this regard, as has he also from active membership in the Muscogee club.  Both he and his wife are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church, being identified with Trinity parish.  On May 7, 1857, was solemnized the marriage of Colonel Garrett to Miss Virginia E Heard, and they have four children,--Robert Y., George J. and Joseph B. are all wholesale merchants in the city of Baltimore, Md., and the only daughter, Josephine V., is the wife of Charles L. Pierce, secretary of the Eagle-Phoenix Mills, of Columbus.
(Source: Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)


GOLDEN, THEODORE E., secretary and treasurer of the Golden Foundry & Machine Company, of Columbus, is one of the progressive and public-spirited business men who have made this thriving city forge to its position of marked prominence among the industrial and commercial centers of Georgia.  He was born in Columbus, Nov. 1 1859, and is a son of George Jasper Golden, a native of South Carolina, and Sarah Caroline (Poitevent) Golden, who was born in Alabama.  The father died in 1881, at the age of forty-seven years, having been at the time superintendent of the Columbus Iron Works Company.  During the Civil war he was captain of Company A of the Naval Iron Works battalion of Columbus.  His wife preceded him to the life eternal, her death having occurred in 1876.  They are survived by five children, namely:  John P., Theodore E., George R., Wannie Lee, now the wife of A. E. Dudley, of Columbus, and Cecil Stanford.  Theodore E. Golden was afforded the advantages of the public schools of Girard, Ala., and of an academy for boys in Columbus, the latter institution having been conducted by Capt. J. J. Slade.  In 1882 he became associated with his brother John P. in establishing a foundry and machine shop in Columbus, under the firm name of Golden Bros., both members of the firm being practical men in business, in which they had been trained under the efficient direction of their father.  The enterprise which they founded was of modest order but it served as the nucleus of the large and important concern with which both are identified at the present time.  In 1888 the business was incorporated, under the title of the Golden Foundry and Machine Company, and with executive corps as follows: A. Illges, president; T. E. Golden, secretary and treasurer; and J. P. Golden, superintendent.  This official staff still remains in control of the affairs of the corporation, whose operations have grown in scope and importance from year to year.  The company is capitalized for $200,000; Its plant is modern and complete in all its equipments, the shops covering four acres of ground; and the institution is one of the largest of the sort in the state.  The chief products are power-transmission machinery, absorption ice machines and cane mills.  The subject of this sketch is also a director of the Columbus savings bank, the F. H. Lummus Sons Company, and the Georgia Midland & Gulf Railroad Company, and is president of the Golden Ice and Coal Company.  In politics he exercises his franchise and influence in support of the cause of the Democratic party; is chairman of the board of water commissioners of Columbus, and a member of the board of commons commissioners of the city.  He is identified with the Columbus board of trade, and in a fraternal way has attained to the fourteenth degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Masonry. On April 2, 1881, Mr. Golden was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Antoinette Lennard, of Columbus, and they have six children.,--Mary, Wannie Lee, Susie Carter, Melissa Heath, Theodore E., Jr., and William Swift.  Mary is now the wife of G. B. Smith, of Columbus(Source: Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)


GORDON, FREDERICK BARRETT, is president of the Columbus Manufacturing Company, of Columbus, Muscogee county, one of the most enterprising and flourishing industrial cities in the state, and his interests here are varied and important.  He was born in Auburndale, Middlesex county, Mass., a part of the city of Newton, May 29,1857, a son of James Monroe and Mary Elizabeth (Clarkson) Gordon, the former born in New Hampshire and the latter in New Jersey, the respective families having been founded in America in the colonial era of our national history.  Frederick B. Gordon was afforded the advantages of the excellent public schools in his native place, having been graduated in the Newton high school at the age of nineteen years.  In 1878, shortly after attaining to his legal majority, he came to Georgia and took up his residence in Columbus, where he has since made his home and where he has risen to a position of prominence in business and civic circles.  For a number of years he was identified with the firms of Woods & Co., of Savannah, and J. O. Mathewson & Co., of Augusta, both operating in the fertilizer business.  Thereafter he was for a decade managing partner in the wholesale dry goods house of J. Kyle & Co., of Columbus.  In 1900 Mr. Gordon effected the organization and incorporation of the Columbus Manufacturing Company, of which he has since been president.  The corporation is capitalized for $500,000 and is one of the most extensive manufacturers of cotton goods in the south.  Mr. Gordon is a director of the Columbus board of trade, of which he was formerly president, and is also a director of each the Georgia Midland railway, the Columbus Electric Company and the Columbus Automatic Telephone Company.  He has the distinction of being president of the Georgia industrial association, in which are represented all the cotton mills in the state, is also president of the civic improvement league of Columbus, and a member of the “commons commission” of the same city.  In local and state matters Mr. Gordon gives his support to the Democratic party, and is essentially a loyal and public-spirited citizen.  For ten years he was a member of the board of trustees of Columbus; he is identified with the Royal Arcanum and the Muscogee club, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church, in which he is a deacon.  On Nov. 21, 1883, Mr. Gordon was united in marriage to Miss Rosa Crook, daughter of the late James Crook, who was a distinguished member of the Alabama bar.  They have two children—Mary Elizabeth and Margaret Crook.  Mrs. Gordon is a representative of one of the old and influential families of Alabama, and holds membership in the Colonial Dames and the Daughter of the Revolution.  (Source: Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)


HALL, HENRY M.,  M. D. An influential and honored citizen and representative physician and surgeon of Polk County is Doctor Hall, who is engaged in the general practice of his profession at Cedartown, the judicial center and metropolis of the county, and whose success and prestige in his chosen vocation mark him as one of the leading exponents of the same in the northwestern part of his native state.
     Dr. Henry Morton Hall was born in the City of Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia, on the 2Gth of January, 1870, and is a son of William Fitzgerald Hall and Eola B. (Hatton) Hall. The paternal grandfather of Doctor Hall was William Hervey Hall, who was a native of the State of Vermont and a representative of a staunch old colonial family in New England. In an early day he came to Georgia and became one of the most prominent and influential representatives of the iron industry in this state, as a manufacturer and general founder of iron in the City of Columbus. For many years prior to his death this sterling citizen was one of the prominent and influential business men of the state, and here he and his wife continued to reside until the close of the Civil war, at which period he removed to Rio Janeiro, Brazil, near which place he died.
      William F. Hall, father of the doctor, was born in the State of Alabama, the place of his nativity having been the summer home of his parents, situated just across the Chattahoochee River from Columbus, Georgia. His early education was acquired in excellent private schools at Columbus, and this was supplemented by a collegiate course. At the inception of the Civil war he manifested his loyalty to his native Southland by tendering his services in defense of the cause of the Confederate States. He enlisted as a volunteer in a Georgia regiment and served four years, his valiant military career terminating only when the war came to a close and his record showing that he participated in numerous important engagements marking the progress of the long and weary conflict between the states of the North and the South. After the war he earnestly and effectively played his part in revitalizing the prostrate industries of the South, and like his father he became a prominent representative of the iron-manufacturing business, in which he continued his operations at Columbus until he disposed of his interests in that city and removed to Rome, this state, where he developed a substantial business in the operating of an iron foundry and furnace. After a period of twelve years he sold his business at Rome and removed to the City of Atlanta, where he continued as a prominent exponent of the same line of enterprise until 1882. He then removed with his family to Cedartown, where, venerable in years, he is now living retired from active business, secure in the high esteen of all who know him and recognized as one who has contributed much to the industrial development of the great state in which virtually his entire life has been passed. His devoted wife, a native of Georgia, was summoned to eternal rest in 1914, and her memory is revered by all who came within the compass of her gracious influence. Her father was for many years a leading physician and surgeon at Columbus, Georgia, and the Hatton family has been one of exceptional prominence in the annals of Georgia history. Of the seven children born to William V. and Eola B. (Hatton) Hall five are living: Y\7illiam H., who is a civil engineer by profession, is now a resident of Yalaha, Lake County, Florida; Fulton H. is engaged in the iron and wholesale hardware business in the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Dr. Henry M., of this review, was the next in order of birth; Arthur W. is engaged in the real estate business in New York City; and Anna is the wife of Alexander W. Birkbeck, a prominent cotton manufacturer of Georgia, their home being at Cedartown. 
Source: A standard history of Georgia and Georgians, Volume 5 By Lucian Lamar Knight


 

HATCHER, SAMUEL B., one of the representative members of the bar of Muscogee county and an ex-member of the state senate, is established in the successful practice of his profession in the city of Columbus, which has been his home from the time of his birth, which here occurred on Aug. 27, 1850. He is a son of Samuel J. Hatcher and Elizabeth McGehee, the former of whom was born in Virginia, in 1812, and came from the Old Dominion state to Georgia in 1836, taking up his residence in Columbus, where he passed the remainder of his life his death occurring on April 10, 1861; by vocation he was a trader and he built up a successful business in Columbus, being one of its prominent citizens. His wife, who was born in Georgia, a representative of old and prominent families, survived him by many years, her death occurring in September, 1889. She was a daughter of Thomas and Malinda (Cummings) McGehee, the former being of Scotch and the latter of English lineage. Samuel J. Hatcher was a son of Benjamin and Susan (Boieseau) Hatcher, the former of whom was of Scottish genealogy and the latter of French Huguenot ancestry. After a preliminary course in a private school in Columbus Samuel B. Hatcher, subject of this review, entered an academy at Buena Vista, Ga., where he prosecuted a thorough course of study. He then entered the law department of the historic old University of Virginia, at Charlottesville, where he graduated as a member of the class of 1872 and received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. In September of the same year he was admitted to the bar and since that time he has been engaged in the general practice of his profession in Columbus, his precedence and success offering the best vouchers as to his ability and his personal popularity. He is a member of the Georgia state bar association and remains a close and appreciative student of his profession. In politics he never deviates from the line which represents the trend of the Democratic party, and he has served seven terms as city attorney of Columbus and one term as representative of his district in the state senate, in 1892-3. He is a director of the Merchants’ and Mechanics’ bank of Columbus, is a Master Mason and both he and his wife hold membership in St. Paul’s church, Methodist Episcopal South, in which he is a steward. On Oct. 14, 1875, Mr. Hatcher was united in marriage to Miss Mary Lou Taylor, of Macon, who died Aug. 26, 1887, and who is survived by two children,--Mattie, who is now the wife of M. Reynolds Flournoy, and Samuel B., Jr., who is a student in the University of Georgia. On Feb. 27, 1889, Mr. Hatcher contracted a second marriage, being then united to Miss Susie Madden, of Brunswick, GA. They have three children: Fleurine, who is a student in the Wesleyan female college, in Macon, and Susie and Madden, who are attending the public schools of Columbus.  (Source: Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Angelia Carpenter)

 


 

HOLSEY, HOPKINS, was born in Virginia in 1799. He studied law in his native state and after his admission to the bar settled at Hamilton, Ga., where he held several local offices. He was elected to Congress in 1834 and again in 1836. Subsequently he engaged in the newspaper business at Athens and died at Columbus in 1859.  (Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

 


 

JOHNSON, WALTER H., is the incumbent of the office of United States marshal for the northern district of Georgia, and maintains his home in the city of Atlanta. Me was born in Columbus, Muscogee county, Ga., Oct. 10, 1847, and is a son of James and Anna (Harris) Johnson. His father, who was a lawyer by vocation, was one of the prominent and influential citizens of Georgia, having represented the same in Congress, to which he was elected in 1852, was appointed provisional governor of the state in 1865; and was afterward judge of the Chattahoochee circuit. Walter H. Johnson was educated in the schools of his native city, where he was reared to manhood. In politics he is a stanch supporter of the Republican party. He served as postmaster of Columbus from 1871 to 1882, and thereafter served as collector of internal revenue until 1885. He was again appointed to this office in 1889, and remained the incumbent of the same until 1893. In 1897 Re was appointed United States marshal for the northern district of Georgia, and has since served continuously in this office. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and belongs to the Methodist church. In January, 1877, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Florence Verstelle, daughter of Capt. Henry W. Verstelle, and she died on Sept. 13, 1890, being survived by two children,— Nellie, who is the wife of Floyd C Furlow, of Atlanta; and Folger, who is attending Columbia University of New York.  (Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)


 

JONES, Hon. SEABORN , lawyer and legislator, was born in Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, February 1, 1788, and died in Columbus, that state, March 18, 1864. He entered Princeton but was obliged to leave before graduation on account of the failure of his father in business. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar by special act of the Legislature in 1808 (being only twenty years old). In 1827 he moved from Baldwin to Muscogee County, where he practiced for many years. He became solicitorgeneral of Georgia in 1817 and was afterward elected to Congress as a democrat, serving from 1833 to 1835, and again from 1845 to 1847.  Source:  A standard history of Georgia and Georgians, Volume 5 By Lucian Lamar Knight


KELLY, MATTHEW WHITFIELD, one of the leading wholesale grocers of the city of Columbus, has demonstrated in his career what is possible of accomplishment on the part of a man who will direct to bear that sterling integrity of purpose, determination and per his energies and powers along normal lines of enterprise, bringing sistence through which alone success is assured. He has been in the fullest sense the architect of his own fortune and has at all times commanded the confidence and esteem of his fellow men. Mr. Kelly was born on a farm in Jasper county, Ga., Nov. 3, 1850, a son of Ezekiel and Elizabeth (Smith) Kelly, both of whom were likewise born in Georgia. The father, who was born in 1813, followed agricultural pursuits as his life vocation. During the Civil war he was in the Confederate service as a member of the Home Guards in Dale county, Ala., whither he had removed with his family in 1855 and where he died in 1899. He was a son of Charles Kelly, who was likewise native of Georgia, showing that the family was early founded in this commonwealth. The mother of the subject of this sketch was summoned to the life eternal in 1903. She is survived by four sons.—Matthew W., subject of this sketch; John R., of Montgomery, Ala.: George W., of Dothan, Ala.; and Charles Henry, of Florala, Ala. Matthew W. Kelly was five years of age at the time of his parents' removal to Dale county, Ala., where he was reared to maturity on the home farm. He attended school in log cabins in the pine woods, continuing his studies until he had attained to the age of seventeen years, and thereafter remained on the homestead plantation until he had reached his legal majority. He then took a position as clerk in a general store in Newton, that county, receiving twenty-five dollars a month and board for his services. He remained thus engaged two years and within this period saved $500 from his salary. With this amount as a basis for independent operations, he located in Columbia, Ala., where he associated himself with his brother, John R., in the retail grocery business, under the firm name of M. W. Kelly & Bro. At the expiration of eleven years Matthew W. purchased the interest of his brother and continued the business individually until December, 1888, when he sold the same and came to Columbus, Ga., and engaged in the wholesale grocery business, in which he has since continued. Within this period of eighteen years he has succeeded in bringing his establishment to the front as one of the principal wholesale concerns of the sort in this city, its trade being substantial and extending throughout the territory normally tributary to Columbus as a commercial center. He began his business career in Columbia, Alabama, with only $500, as already noted, and when he disposed of his interests there he found himself fortified with nearly $50,000, which capital he has trebled since establishing himself in Columbus, a conservative estimate of the value of his estate being placed at $150,000. He is recognized as one of the progressive and influential business men of his city and is a loyal and popular citizen. He holds membership in the Columbus board of trade; is a director of the Fourth National bank of this city, and is vice-president of the Phoenix-Girard bank at Phoenix, Ala., situated opposite Columbus on the Chattahoochee river. In a fraternal way Mr. Kelly is identified with the Masonic order, in politics he is a stanch Democrat, and both he and his wife hold membership in St. Luke's church, Methodist Episcopal South, of Columbus, in which he is a steward. On Dec. 11, 1879, Mr. Kelly was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jane Farmer, who was born and reared in Henry county, Ala. They have six children, concerning whom the following brief record is entered: Ezekiel Brown is bookkeeper in his father's wholesale grocery establishment; John A. is likewise employed by his father; Byrd is a student in Wesleyan college at Macon; and the three younger children are Thomas J., Elizabeth and Sarah.   (Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)


KEY, JAMES B, who is established in a substantial wholesale grocery business in the city of Columbus, is one of the prominent and progressive young business men who are so well maintaining the commercial prestige of that city, which is the place of his nativity, his birth having here occurred on June 21, 1877. He is a son of Dr. Howard W. and Ozella (Biggers) Key, who maintain their home in Columbus and both of whom are native of Georgia, the father having been born at Lumpkin, Stewart county, in 1853, and the mother in Harris county, in 1854. Doctor Key is now southern superintendent of agencies for the Citizens' Life Insurance Company, of Louisville, Ky. He is a son of Rt. Rev. Joseph S. Key, of Sherman, Tex., a bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church South, and a distinguished figure in his church, as he has also been in educational fields. Bishop Key's wife, Mrs. Lucy (Kidd) Key, is owner and president of the Texas female college, of Sherman, the largest school for girls in the South. The maternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch was the late Judge J. J. W. Biggers, of Harris county, Ga. Dr. Howard W. and Ozella (Biggers) Key have four sons and two daughters; James B., Howard W., Jr., Benjamin W., Basom B., Ozella B., who is now the wife of E. L. Klankinship, and Miss Emma S., all being residents of Columbus. Within his earlier youth James B. Key attended several colleges, and in 1896 he was graduated in Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn., receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts. For one year thereafter he remained in Jackson, Tenn., as secretary and treasurer of the Memphis conference female institute, of which his father was at that time president and owner. In 1897 he engaged in the retail grocery business in Columbus, Ga., and five years later, in 1902, he withdrew from the retail trade and established his present wholesale grocery business, at 1133-5 First avenue, from which headquarters he also conducts a large farmers' supply trade. He is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party and served one term as representative of the eighth ward on the board of aldermen of Columbus, being at the present time a member of the board of police commissioners of the city. He is a member of the Columbus' board of trade, is a Royal-Arch Mason, belongs to the Woodmen of the World, and both he and his wife are prominent members of St. Luke's church, Methodist Episcopal South, of which he is a steward and secretary of the Sunday school. On March 3, 1896, Mr. Key was united in marriage to Miss Lyda May Botts, of Jackson, Tennessee, and they have five children,— John B., James W., Lyda May, Josephine W. and Dorothy S.  (Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)


LUMMUS, EZRA FRANKLIN, president of the F. H. Lummus Sons Company, of Columbus, is one of the successful and influential business men of that city and stands at the head of an extensive manufacturing concern.  He was born in the city of New York, March 27, 1855, and is a son of Franklin H. and Sarah Ann (Smith) Lummus, the former being born in Wenham, Essex county, Mass., and the latter in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada.  The subject of this review received his educational discipline in the schools of the national metropolis and at Stratford, Conn.  At the age of fourteen years he took a position as clerk in the Mercantile National bank of New York City, later becoming bookkeeper in the Kings County bank, of the same city holding each of these positions for two years.  At the age of eighteen years he became assistant bookkeeper for the firm of H. O. Bernard & Co., manufacturers of straw hats, this also being a New York concern.  He held this position two and one-half years, at the expiration of which he became bookkeeper for a Mr. Heuberer, a wholesale grain dealer in the city of Brooklyn.  In 1879 he resigned this position and came to Georgia, taking up his residence in Juniper, Talbot county, where, in 1873, his father had established a cotton-gin factory.  Both he and his brother, Louis E., were admitted to partnership in the business at the same time, the firm name becoming F.H. Lummus Sons & Co.  Upon the death of the father in 1896, Ezra F. succeeded him as head of the firm, and in the same year the business was incorporated under the present title of  F.H. Lummus Sons Company, the subject of this sketch being made president of the company and since, remaining the incumbent of this executive office.  In order to secure better shipping facilities the plant was removed from Juniper in 1899 to Columbus, where it now represents one of the leading manufacturing industries, and in its line is one of the most important concerns of the sort in the entire state.  The plant covers six acres of ground and here are manufactured an annual average of 700 gins and 250 cotton presses.  The company are builders of complete ginning systems, and also manufacture feeders, condensers, pneumatic cotton elevators, battery condensers, metal lint flues, screw conveyors, etc.
      The officers of the company are: E. F. Lummus, President; A. Allges, vice-president; L. E. Lummis, Secretary and Treasurer.  Ezra F. Lummus is a valued member of the Columbus board of trade, is a Republican in politics, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church.  On Nov. 25, 1875, he was united in marriage to Miss Julia Irene Wendt, daughter of Herman and Elizabeth (Vorhees) Wendt, of New York City, the former of whom is deceased and the latter now makes her home with Mr. & Mrs. Lummus.  To this marriage have been born five children: Cora Estell is the wife of C. C. Hartpence, of New Jersey; Franklin Edward was the next in order of birth; Ada Belle is the wife of O. O. Dooly, of Macon, Ga.; and the two younger children are Kenneth Roscoe and Marion.  (Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)


MARTIN JENKINS CRAWFORD was born in Jasper county, Georgia, March 17, 1820. He was the son of Major Hardy Crawford, a planter and prominent gentleman of Middle Georgia of that day. His mother was Betsy Roberts Jenkins. His grandfathers were William Crawford and William Jenkins, natives of Virginia. Martin J. Crawford's schoolboy days were spent at Brownwood Institute near La Grange, Georgia, his parents having removed to Harris county, Georgia, when he was a boy. He afterwards was at Mercer University. He read law and was admitted to the bar when quite a young man, and being under age was authorized to practice his profession by a special act of the General Assembly of Georgia. He located at Hamilton, Harris county, Georgia, and at once took a prominent position at the bar. He represented that county in the State Legislature. Lie moved to Columbus, Muscogee county, Georgia, in 1849, and remained a citizen of Columbus till his death. In 1854, at the age of thirty five, he was appointed from a bar of unusually high character by Governor H. V. Johnson to the office of Judge of the Superior Courts of the Chattahoochee Circuit, which position he held a year or more.

In 1853 he formed a partnership with Honorable Porter Ingram and with only such interruptions as were caused by his public duties, continued to practice with him for about twenty five years. The firm of Ingram and Crawford was one of the leading firms of the Chattahoochee Circuit and both of its members stood high among the lawyers of the State.

Perhaps no bar in Georgia was stronger than the Columbus bar at the time Judge Crawford went on the bench. It might be said, literally, that they were legal giants in those days. The new Judge was still a young man, and having a considerable fortune he had not applied himself very studiously to his profession, so that he could not be considered an experienced lawyer when he assumed the judicial ermine. Yet even under such circumstances, by his sound judgment, distinguished manners and unwavering integrity he commanded the respect and confidence of all, and after a service of only one year retired with a fine reputation as Judge. It is seldom that a man is found possessed of more of the qualities which go to make a judge than was Judge Crawford. He was polished, dignified, and courteous in manner and thus was able to enforce obedience without resorting to power. Having a clear perception of the principles of the common law, a patience in hearing and a willingness to learn from argument and precedent, and above all a fixed determination to decide according to the very right of the case, his decisions were always respected and seldom reversed.

In 1855 he was nominated by the Democratic party as a candidate for Congress against the Know Nothing or American party. This was the first time these parties had opposed each other in a Congressional race and it was generally believed that Judge Crawford was leading a forlorn hope. But he entered upon the canvass with such zeal and ability and had so many strong personal friends amongst his adversaries, he was elected by a good majority. His record in Congress from the first was so satisfactory to all of his constituents, he was returned for two successive terms, and was still a Member when Georgia seceded from the Union. On the happening of this event, he was elected by the Legislature as one of the delegates from Georgia to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States at Montgomery, Alabama, and was afterwards appointed by President Davis, together with the Honorable John Forsyth, of Alabama, and Governor Romaine, of Louisiana, on the Peace Commission to the United States Government. It is a matter of history that this mission failed but not from want of proper effort on the part of these able and distinguished men who constituted the Commission. Feeling it his duty to serve his country in war as well as in peace, Judge Crawford, in 1862, raised the Third Georgia Regiment of Cavalry Volunteers, and was elected its Colonel. He remained with them during the years 1862 and 1863.

At the close of hostilities, in common with his fellow citizens, he found himself deprived of most of his fortune. With out stopping to complain or to mourn over his losses lie entered again upon the practice of the law with his former partner and continued this with diligence and success until 1875, when he was again appointed Judge of the Chattahoochee Circuit. Judge James Johnson had resigned and Governor James M. Smith appointed Judge Crawford to fill the vacancy. For five years he filled that most trying and important position and in his administration of the law, without favor and without fear, he gave the highest satisfaction both to the bar and the people.

In 1880, while still on the Superior Court Bench, he was appointed by Governor Colquitt one of the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of Georgia and was subsequently elected to that office, which position he was holding at the time of his death. For three years he was an honored and useful member of this highest court in Georgia's judicial system. He was a most conscientious and laborious worker and it was thought by many of his friends that his devotion to his work shortened his life, for the duties of a Judge of the Supreme Court are most exacting. The decisions of Judge Crawford were clear and concise and all of them bear the evidence of learning and labor. It was a characteristic of Judge Crawford always to do his best and to make it a point always to succeed. As a consequence he rarely failed and in whatever position he was placed he appeared to advantage.

It was at the close of a term of the court in 1883, after finishing all of his duties, Judge Crawford returned to his home for rest and recreation. He had planned an extensive tour for the summer, and was looking forward to it as promising to afford benefit and pleasure. Though not physically robust, yet he had, by great prudence and self-denial, so preserved his health and strength as to be still in full enjoyment both of bodily and mental vigor. He appeared in the very midst of a useful life and his fellow citizens esteemed him so highly as to consider him worthy of not only all honors he had received but of still higher positions of trust.

While in this condition and in the act of receiving the warm greetings of friends and welcome from the loved ones of the inner circle of home he was stricken with disease and after a lingering illness, on July 22, 1883, he passed out of life. His remains were interred in Linwood Cemetery in Columbus, Georgia.

On December 29, 1842, Judge Crawford was married to Miss Amanda J. Reese, a sister of Judge Augustus Reese, and daughter of Joseph and Betsey (Crawford) Reese, of Morgan county, Georgia. This union continued for forty-one years and to them were born five children: Florence, Clara, Reese, Martin J., and Toombs Crawford. The first named of the children died in infancy, the second just as she was budding into womanhood. The wife and the three sons survived him and in his departure from this world he left to each of them that richest heritage, the memories of a spotless and honorable life.

Martin J. Crawford sprang from one of the most distinguished families in our country's history. He was a lineal descendant of John Crawford, the original settler of that name who came to America during the middle of the Seventeenth Century and settled on the James River in Virginia, not far from the site of the present city of Richmond. This John Crawford came from the county of Lanark, in Scotland, made famous by the border legends of Sir Walter Scott. John Crawford was thought to have lost his life in the historical uprising in Virginia known as Bacon's Rebellion, but descended from him in direct succession were three David Crawfords and it was from the last of the three Davids that most of the Crawfords of prominence in Georgia have sprung.

It was about the close of the American Revolution that some of the Crawfords from Virginia came South. Joel Crawford was one of the earliest and he settled in Georgia, close to Augusta. He brought with him the young country bred, fourteen-year-old stripling, W. H. Crawford, who afterwards became United States Senator, Ambassador to France, Secretary of the Treasury, and save for an unfortunate attack of paralysis, would have been President of the United States. After Joel came Peter Crawford, the father of George W. ' O Crawford, who became Attorney-General, Governor, Member of Congress, and Secretary of War under President Tyler. Martin J. Crawford was directly descended from Michael Crawford, a brother of the David Crawford who was the paternal ancestor of the eminent men mentioned above, but he had many of those characteristics of the David branch of the family and it was this that made for him the distinguished place he filled in the history of the State during the more than half century in which he was permitted to live and serve her people. In personal appearance he had the characteristics of the early Crawfords. He was tall, slender, but well proportioned and of the blonde or florid type. He was the personification of dignity and courtesy, yet no man enjoyed a joke more than he and few could excel him in telling an anecdote. He had a fund of reminiscences and interesting stories about bench and bar and public lives, and when at his ease among congenial companions he was one of the most interesting of talkers.

He was an orator of great force and his style in public speaking was indicative of rare gifts of eloquence. As a specimen of his power in the use of language and also as illustrating his ornate and cultured style of thought the writer takes the liberty of inserting in this sketch an extract from a most beautiful memorial address delivered by Judge Crawford at the bier of his illustrious friend, Governor Alexander H. Stephens.

The quotations are also illustrative of the fact that Judge Crawford was contemporary with and equal in power and force in the State, with the distinguished men to whom reference is made by him in this address.

A note of sadness is sounded by the speaker along each line of which and in the light of his own death, occurring only a few months later, this adds interest to the tender and beautiful tribute which in forceful language Judge Crawford paid to the lamented Stephens ; the extract is as follows :

"The reaper goes forth, and one after another is harvested unto death.

"We have stood and wept over the grave of the great Cobb, whose mighty brain and loving heart not only commanded the admiration, but won the affection of all who fell within the range of their influence; Johnson too, the grand old Georgian, who shed honor upon his native State, has passed away. Benning, the incorruptible and able Judge, the gallant leader of a brigade in Longstreet's bloody corps, and who followed the plume of that great Captain for four lung, weary year she too, has been called away ; Chappell, one of the noblest and purest of his race, sleeps his last sleep in the soil of the State he so long served and loved so well. Stephens, the younger, though he died in manhood's prime, has given himself an honored name and place with the great judges who in the past gave such grandeur to the Georgia bench. It was but yesterday that Warner, one of the most honored of those upon whom Georgia ever placed the ermine, fell asleep among you and upon that great Judge we shall never look again. "Of course I need not remind this people that the emblem of Georgia's grief and the Republic's sorrow have scarcely disappeared over the new-made grave of Benjamin Harvey Hill.

"And now again we are surrounded with new evidences of mourning. After the midnight watch of Saturday last had marked the time, and when this mighty city of struggling life and unceasing activities had been hushed in silence and just before the

" ' Morn, waked by the circling hours, With rosy hands unbarred the gates of light,'

the heart of another great Georgian ceased its weary throbbing and the spirit winged its way to its eternal home to join the mother whose image was ever present with him during his long and eventful life. The death of Governor Stephens was no surprise to him; he had grappled with it a thousand times before and never feared to face its grim presence, because he had lived for death as well as life.

"But it is pleasant to remember that he lived out man's allotted time and passed to his great rest with a painless death.

" ' He sat as sets the morning star,
Which goes not down behind the darkened West,
Nor hides obscure amid the tempest of the sky,
But melts away into the very light of heaven.' '

The foregoing eulogy was penned and delivered by Judge Crawford in Atlanta, Georgia, in March, 1883. In the following July his spirit went to join those noble spirits of whom he on that occasion so tenderly and beautifully spoke. The State was called to mourn his death and no more fitting close to what is now written of him can be made than to quote from an editorial published at the time. Referring to Judge Crawford a leading paper at the State Capital paid him this most deserved tribute:

"Of scrupulous integrity, of commanding ability, and high souled in all things, he was a fit companion of those men of his time, who lived without fear and died without reproach. He was essentially of fine fiber and literally incapable of low or sordid conduct. He moved on an elevated plane and served well his people and his State.

'There has not been a day in a quarter of a century when this reserved and quiet gentleman was not a strong force in Georgia. To his honor be it said that he never, through fear or favor or ambition, wantonly misused this power or made it subservient to demagogism. All in all he was a clean, decorous gentleman, honorable in all things, because he loved honor and despised that which had the suspicion of dishonor. Other Georgians may have borne a larger part in current affairs, but no Georgian has lived a cleaner or more consistent life, no one has been truer to his people, to his convictions, and his country, and no one has left in the heart of Georgians a monument of chaster and purer white than the great Georgian we are called on to mourn today."

Such was the language written of him at the time he passed from the sphere of active life. He made his mark in Georgia and left the imprint of great service well performed. It is very proper that in this work, dedicated to the memory of men who have made and who are continuing to make this great State, his name should be placed as among those who fill a large space in her history.

HENRY R. GOETCHIUS


McCANN, JAMES EDWARDS, Methodist minister, was born September 3, 1857, at Newbern. Hale County; son of John Wilson and Jane Teresa (Goff) McCann, the former spent his boyhood in his native state and his early manhood in Alabama, where he taught school in Clay County, admitted to the Methodist ministry by the Conference in 1845 at Mobile, and of which he was a member for forty-four years; grandson of Michael and Polly (Bishop) McCann of Hawkins County, Tenn., the former a member of the Tennessee bar who died at the age of forty-one; and of Edmund and Lucretia (Wells) Goff, of Jackson County, Miss.; greatgrandson of James McCann who immigrated from Ireland and settled in Virginia, a Roman Catholic in religion, a physician by profession, surgeon in the Revolutionary War, twice married, his second wife, a widow Arnold, who bore two children, Michael, and a daughter, who married a Reese. James E. McCann was educated in the village schools, and graduated at the Southern university, A. B., 1877; taught school for two years after graduation, joined the Alabama conference at Tuskegee, December, 1879, has held pastorates in Alabama and California conferences continuously since admission to the ministry. Married: October 1, 1884, at Santa Maria, Calif., to Sarah Ann, daughter of Irving Noland and Sarah Esther (Condit) McGuire. Her father was a "Forty-niner," and her mother was from Ohio. Children: 1. James, jr.: 2. Irving Goff, pastor Green street congregational church, Chicago, m. daughter of William H. Sands, Richmond, Va.; 3. Annie Ezell, m. a Russell of Columbus, Ga.; 4. John Wilson; 5. Christine Esther; 6. Ruth Aline; 7. Allie Boone; 8. Mary. Residence: Eufaula.
[Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Transcribed by AFOFG]


McDUFFIE, JAMES HENRY, M.D., is one of the leading physicians and surgeons of the city of Columbus, ex-vice-president of the Georgia state medical association and vice-president of the Georgia Pasteur institute in Atlanta.  He was born in Fayetteville, N. C., Dec. 12, 1859, a son of James Robert and Mary (Johnson) McDuffie, the former born in Fayetteville, and the latter in Robeson county, N. C.  The father was an extensive turpentine and lumber operator and passed the closing years of his life in Liberty county, Ga., where he died in 1902, his wife having died at the same place, in 1898.  They removed from North Carolina to Georgia in 1890.  Doctor McDuffie attended the public schools of his native town until he had completed a course in the high school and in 1880, soon after attaining to his legal majority he became associated with his father and his brother, William R., in the turpentine and lumber business, with which he continued to be actively identified for a period of four years, at the expiration of which he took up the study of medicine under Dr. James A. Sexton of Raleigh, N. C.  He finally entered the medical department of the University of Maryland at Baltimore in which old and honored institution he was graduated in March, 1887, duly receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine.  Thereafter he was engaged in the practice of  his profession at Keyser, N. C., for eighteen months and for the ensuing three and one-half years he was established in practice at Anniston, Ala.  During his residence in Anniston he was a member of the board of censors for Calhoun county; member and secretary of the Calhoun county medical society, and a member of the medical association of the State of Alabama.  In July, 1892, he located in Columbus, where he has since remained in the general practice of his profession, having attained prominence and success in his chosen vocation and gained distinctive popularity as a “man among men.”  In the winter of 1898 he took a post-graduate course in the New York polyclinic, as did he also in the winter of 1902.  He realizes how rapid are the advances made in both branches of his profession and he keeps in close touch with the same, being a careful and appreciative student of the best technical literature, both standard and periodical.  He is a member of the American medical association, the Georgia state medical association and the Muscogee county medical society.  In 1903 he was first vice-president of the Georgia state medical association and he is now vice-president of the Georgia Pasteur institute, as has already been noted.  He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, is aligned as a stanch supporter of the principles and policies of the Democracy and is an elder in the First Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. McDuffie also is a devoted member.  On Dec. 5, 1882, he was united in marriage to Miss Sallie Helen Page, daughter of Lewis A. Page, now of Candor, N. C., and they have six children-Annie Laurie, Love Alexander, James Henry, Jr., Lewis Robert, David Page and William Archibald.
[Source: Georgia Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons,  Vol 2, Publ 1906. Transcribed by Renae Donaldson]


McGEHEE, CHARLES C., manager of the southern department of the Home Life Insurance Company, of New York, has his headquarters in the city of Atlanta, is one of the prominent business men of the city, and is a representative of one of the old and honored families of Georgia. He was born in Columbus, Muscogee county, Ga., on Oct. 22, 1870, a son of Christopher C. and Josephine (Garrett) McGehee, the former of whom was born in Russell county, Ala., and the latter in Lumpkin, Stewart county, Ga.  His paternal great-great-grandfather was Edward McGehee, who was a patriot soldier in the war of the Revolution.  The original American progenitor was Thomas McGregor or Mack Gehee, who changed his patronymic to the latter form on fleeing from Scotland to America, in the latter part of the seventeenth century.  The clan McGregor had been outlawed in Scotland during the reign of Charles II, of England, and the name was proscribed on this account, the annals of Scotland recounting the deeds of the sturdy patriots of this famous clan.  This Thomas McGregor, or Mack Gehee, was born near Loch Katrine, Scotland, and upon coming to America he settled in King William county, Va., where his last will and testament was probated in July, 1724.  Representatives of the family removed to Prince Edward county, Va., where in 1796, was born Isaac McGehee, grandfather of the subject of this sketch.  During the year 1801 the family removed from the Old Dominion to Georgia and settled on the Broad river, where they were extensive tobacco planters in that and succeeding generations.  Christopher C. McGehee gave loyal service to the Confederate cause during the war between the states, having first enlisted as a private in the City Light Guards of Columbus, Ga., which company was promptly sent to the coast of Virginia near Norfolk.  He spent about a year in Virginia and then returned to Columbus, where he was for some time connected with the naval iron works, operated in the interest of the Confederate government.  Later he served two years in the army in Virginia, rose to the rank of captain, took part in a large number of engagements, and in one battle received a severe wound, being struck with a fragment of shell.  He was identified with the cause of the south during the entire period of the war.  Mr. McGehee is now living in Atlanta, where he gives his entire attention to the management of his property.  Charles C. McGehee was graduated in the University of Georgia as a member of the class of 1887, with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, and two years later, in 1889, before he was nineteen years old, he was graduated in Harvard university, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts.  Soon after leaving the latter university he became identified with the insurance business, and eleven years of his early business career were marked by his association with the Atlanta Home Insurance Company as special agent and later as assistant secretary.  Since 1901 he has been associated with the Home Life Insurance Company of New York as manager of its southern department, embracing the states of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.  At the time of this writing (1905) the Atlanta office is the largest producing office maintained by the company in the entire Union.  That the efforts of Mr. McGehee have been exceptionally able and discriminating is evident when reversion is had to the fact that when he assumed his present position the Atlanta general office held only eighth place.  Mr. McGehee has never sought political preferment.  Both he and his wife are members of St. Marks Methodist church, prior to which he was for many years a member of the First Methodist Episcopal church South, of which he served as steward for four years.  He is identified with the Calumet and Harvard clubs, of New York city; the Virginia Historical Society; and the Capital City and Piedmond Driving clubs, of Atlanta.  On Nov. 16, 1892, Mr. McGehee was united in marriage to Miss Pattie McClung, daughter of Matthew and Julia (Anderson) McClung, of Knoxville, Tenn.  She died on Sept. 4, 1897, and is survived by her only child Pattie McClung McGehee, who was born on the 18th of the preceding month.  On Oct. 22, 1903, Mr. McGehee wedded Miss Vera Hatcher, daughter of Benjamin T. and Martha (Estes) Hatcher, of Columbus, Ga.  [Source: Georgia Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons,  Vol 2, Publ 1906. Transcribed by Renae Donaldson]


 

PAGE, RINALDO WILLIAM, a member of the firm of R. W. Page & Co., proprietors and publishers of the Columbus Ledger, of which he is business manager, is one of the representative citizens of Columbus. He was born in Lee county, Ala., April 17, 1862, a son of William B. and Annie Maria (Green) Page, both of whom were likewise natives of Alabama, where the former was born in 1830 and the latter in 1832. The paternal grandfather, John R. Page, was born in Virginia, where the family was early established, but removed thence to Alabama, where he became a successful planter. William B. Page was a loyal soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil war, in the Alabama volunteer infantry, with which he served four years. Rinaldo W. Page was reared on the homestead farm and was educated in the public schools of his native state. In 1886 he took up his residence in Columbus, Ga., where he became advertising solicitor for the Columbus Ledger. In 1892, in company with his brother-in-law, Larkin T. Jones, he purchased the plant and business of the Ledger, whose publication they have since continued most successfully. The Ledger ably advocates the principles and policies of the Democratic Party. It has much influence in shaping public affairs in this section and an excellent circulation both in Georgia and Alabama, being the official paper of Columbus. Mr. Page has given unqualified allegiance to the Democratic Party from the time of attaining his legal
majority and is at the present time secretary of the board of police commissioners of the city of Columbus. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Improved Order of Heptasophs. On Dec. 16, 1886, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret E. Burrus, daughter of James William and Martha (Putnam) Burrus, of Phoenix, Alabama, and they have five children, namely: William Eugene, Rinaldo Burrus, Edmond James, Wyoline and Annie Laurie.  Source: Cyclopedia of Georgia Transcribed by Friends for Free Genealogy


 

PECOT, GEORGE SULLY, is president of the City Grocery Company, of Columbus, conducting one of the finest retail grocery establishments in the state, and is prominent in the business life of the thriving city in which he maintains his home. He was born in the city of New Orleans, La., March 17, 1869, and in the agnatic line is of pure French lineage. He is a son of Sully Joseph Pecot, a native of St. Mary's parish, La., and Sallie Lavonia (Heard) Pecot, born in Muscogee county, Ga., their marriage having been solemnized, in Columbus in 1865. The father was a bookkeeper and accountant by profession and was a soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil war, having served in Fenner's battery. After his marriage he removed to New Orleans, where he remained until 1875, when he returned with his family to Columbus, the girl-hood home of his wife, and here both passed the remainder of their lives, his death occurring in 1882 and his devoted wife passing away in the following year. They are survived by only two children,—the subject of this sketch and Joseph Garret Pecot, who is a traveling salesman and maintains his home in the city of Atlanta. George Sully Pecot was graduated in the Columbus high school at the age of fourteen years, and then initiated his business career, in the capacity of shipping clerk for a wholesale grocery house, in which he was employed four years, during the latter two of which he held the position of city salesman. At the age of eighteen years he took a position in the counting rooms of the Third National bank of Columbus, in which he remained thirteen years, filling various responsible positions. He resigned in October, 1902, to become one of the organizers of the City Grocery Company, of which he was made secretary and treasurer. In October, 1904, he was elected president of the company, of which he has since remained the executive head, the concern having one of the most metropolitan retail groceries to be found in the state, the headquarters being at 27 Eleventh street. A. C. Chancellor is vice-president of the company and E. P. Dismukes, Jr., is secretary and treasurer, all of the interested principals being enterprising and substantial young business men. Mr. Pecot is a member of the Columbus board of trade; is vice-president and secretary of the Columbus retail merchants' association and an active member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In politics he accords allegiance to the Democracy and both he and his wife hold membership in the First Baptist church. On Nov. 5, 1891, Mr. Pecot was united in marriage to Miss Lila Garnett Coles, daughter of Nathan Byrd and Eugenia (Upshaw) Coles, of Coleridge, Ala., and they have two children,—Meryl Eugenia and Sully Coles Pecot.  Source: Cyclopedia of Georgia Transcribed by Friends for Free Genealogy 


 


WILSON, AUGUSTA JANE EVANS (nee Evans), novelist: b. Columbus, Ga., May 8, 1835; d. near New Orleans, La., May 9, 1909. Her father moved from Georgia to San Antonio, Texas, in 1847, where she lived with him for two years, and returned east to Alabama, and since 1849 had resided in Mobile, Ala. She was educated at home. Her interest was strongly enlisted in behalf of the Southern Confederacy, and her earlier novels had a great vogue in the South during that period. She was active in her ministrations to the soldiers of the Confederate army; and an encampment near Mobile was named "Camp Beulah" in honor of the novel Beulah, which served to make her first reputation as a writer of fiction. At this camp she was a frequent and assiduous visitor and nurse to the sick, the wounded and the dying. Her first novel, Inez, Tale of the Alamo (1856), was founded on the knowledge of the famous defense of the Alamo which she derived from her childish associations with San Antonio; and this was followed by Beulah (1859), Macaria (1864), St. Elmo (1866), Vashti (1869), Infelice (1875), At the Mercy of Tiberius (1887), A Speckled Bird (1902), and Devota (1907).  [Source: THE SOUTH in the Building of the Nation Volume XI; Edited by James Curtis Ballagh, Walter Lynwood Fleming & Southern Historical Publication Society; Publ. 1909; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack]


 
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