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Tattnall County, Georgia
History




Created by Legislative Act, December 6. 1801, from Montgomery County. Named for General Josiah Tattnall, a distinguished Revolutionary patriot, who became Governor of the State and who, while occupying the office of Chief-Magistrate, was privileged to sign a measure removing the stigma of outlawry from the good name of his Royalist father and restoring to the Boo his beloved Bonaventure. (See Bonaventure: The Country-Seat of the Tattnalls. Originally Tattnall Included a part of Toombs. Reldsville, the county-seat. The local tradition in regard to the name though somewhat at variance with the spelling, Is well authenticated.* In the corner of the court house square there Is quite a depression, Including a point where reeds of the bamboo type abounded in the early days. It Is most likely that a creek or branch was here fed from fountain springs. The original county-seat was four miles distant on the Ohoopee River near Drake's Ferry, where the stream is today spanned by a handsome steel bridge. Reidsvllle became the county-seat in 1832.

Authority: Judge C. W. Smith, Esq., of Reidsville, President of the Tattnall Bank.

The principal towns of Tattnall—in addition to the county-seat—are as follows: Collins, Bellville, Manassas, Hagan, Claxton, Daisy, Glennville and Cobbtown. Collins was named for Perry Collins, Esq., a wealthy land owner, whose plantation was near the site of the present town. Judge E. C. Collins, of the City Court of Reidsvine, is a grandson of this pioneer citizen. Manassas was named for Manassas Foy, a son of George W. Foy, of Egypt, Ga. He was born on July 21, 1861, the date of the first battle of Manassas. He was a successful man of business, but died in the prime of life, at Statesboro, Ga. Hagan was named for Mrs. M. A. Smith, whose maiden name was Miss Hagan. She was a sister of Captain J. S. Hagan, for many years County School Commissioner of Bulloch. Daisy was named f*>r Miss Daisy Edwards, a daughter of T. J. Edwards, of Daisy, and a sister of Congressman Charles G. Edwards, of Savannah. She became the wife of Mr. B. E. Miller, of Claxton. Glennville was named for Rev. Glenn Thompson, a Baptist minister and a well known educator. Cobbtown was named for the Cobb family, a connection which is still somewhat numerous in the upper part of Tattnall. Bellville was named for Mrs. Fannie Bell Smith, the wife of James Smith, Esq. She was a native of the north of Ireland. Included among the descendants of this lady are the following grandsons: C. W. Smith, of Reidsville, President of the Tattnall Bank and Ordinary of the county from 1869 to 1000; Martin W. Smith, of Claxton, an ex-member of the State Legislature from Tattnall; Marshall A. Smith, of Hagan, formerly President of the Rank of Hagan; Judge Oscar M. Smith and Mr. Alvarado Smith, of Valdosta, Ga., and Mike M. Smith, Esq., President of the Orlando Bank and Trust Company, of Orlando, Fla. Claxton was originally known as Hendrix, but there was already a post office in Georgia bearing this name and the ladies of the community, asked to choose a name for the town, selected Claxton.

Original Settlers. The first comers into Tattnall, according to White were: Ezekiel Clifton, Ezekiel Stafford, Henry Holland, Stephen Mattock, William Coleman, William Eason, George Lewis, Joseph Collins, Nathan Brewton, Moses Jernigan, Jones Temples, B. Stripling, A. Daniel, John Mattox, Stephen Bowen, A. Bowen, A. McLeod, John McFarland, James Turner, James Jones, M. Jones, Jesse Collins, David Boyd, Allen Johnson, Elisha Parker, Elisha Curl, James Tillman, Daniel Highsmith, John McArthur, Alexander Gordon, John Jones, Joshua Dasher, Reuben Nail, Luke Sapp, Benjamin Sapp, John Sharp, Grove Sharp, Levi Bowen, Lewis Strickland, John Anderson, James Underwood, and John Dukes.

William Eason was the founder of Methodism in Tattnall. He lies buried at Mount Carmel, midway between Reidsville and Collins. On the one hundredth anniversary of the church, some few years ago, a monument was unveiled to the memory of this pioneer soldier of the Cross. Nathan Brewton, the founder of a noted family identified with this section of Georgia for more than a century, sleeps in the Brewton cemetery, one mile north of Hagan, where recently a handsome monument was placed over his grave. Simon J. Brewton, one of his sons, became a resident of Bulloch, where he was the only man in the county to defeat the celebrated Peter Cone for the State Legislature. Mr. Brewton was not a believer in railroads; and, according to tradition, his solicitude for the cattle cost his county one of the earliest lines projected in the State. When the Central of Georgia was surveying a route from Savannah to Macon, he used his powerful influence in the General Assembly to prevent the road from, passing through Bulloch. Samuel Brewton, a brother, was formerly a representative in the Legislature from Tattnall. The descendants of Nathan Brewton include : Rev. J. C. Brewton, D. D., President and Founder of the Brewton-Parker Institute and President of the Board of Trustees of Bessie Tift; H. J. Brewton, Clerk of the Superior Court of Tattnall; and Jonathan B. Brewton, Cashier of the Merchants and Farmers Bank, of Claxton.
Georgia's Landmarks, Memorials and Legends By Lucian Lamar Knight    

Towns, Hamlets and Villages

Tattnall County was formed from Montgomery county in 1801.Portions of it were given back to Montgomery in 1812 and in August, 1905, another portion was set aside for the formation of Jeff Davis and Toombs counties. It was named in honor of Josiah Tattnall, of Chatham county, who was prominent in the affairs of Georgia for many years. Before the formation of the new counties the boundaries were as follows: Bulloch and Bryan on the northeast, Liberty on the east and southeast, Wayne and Appling on the South, and Montgomery and Emanuel on the west. The Altamaha and the Ogeechee rivers with their tributaries drain the land. Tattnall is noted for its fine climate. The northern portion of the county is hilly, but toward the south the surface becomes level. The soil is fertile and the leading productions are corn, wheat, oats, sweet potatoes, peas, cotton and sugarcane.     Melons and all vegetables are raised and lumber and naval stores are shipped to Savannah. Railroad accommodations are good. The Seaboard Air Line runs east and west through the center of the county, the Glennville & Register runs north and south through the eastern part, the Stillmore Air Line runs northwest from Collins, and a short road called the Collins & Reidsville connects the latter place with the Seaboard Air Line. Reidsville is the county seat. Claxton, Hagan, Glennville, Collins and Manassas are thriving towns. The population in 1900 was 20,419, an increase of over 10,000 in the preceding ten years.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Glennville an incorporated town of Tattnall county and the southern terminus of the Glennville & Register railroad, is about fourteen miles southeast of Reidsville.  It has a money order post office, schools, churches and stores, and is the trading center for a prosperous farming community.  The population in 1900 was 269.
(Georgia: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. VOL III Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Marilyn Clore)

Joice, a post-hamlet of Tattnall county, is about two miles west of Coe, which is the nearest railroad station.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Kennedy, a post-hamlet of Tattnall county, is in the extreme southeastern part, not far from the Altamaha river. Glennville is the nearest railroad station.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)

Lynn, also called Danton Station, a post-hamlet of Tattnall county, is on the Seaboard Air Line railway, about five miles west of Collins.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Joanne Morgan)

Manassas, a town in Tattnall county, is on the Seaboard Air Line railway, about half-way between Collins and Hagan. The population in 1900 was 186.
 It has a money order postoffice, with rural free delivery, express and telegraph offices, stores, schools, churches, etc., and is a shipping point of considerable importance.

(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

Matlock, a post-village of Tattnall county, with a population of 48 in 1900, is about four miles southwest of Glennville, which is the nearest railroad station.
(Source: Georgia Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, VOL II, by Candler & Evans, Publ. 1906. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)

Reidsville, the county seat of Tattnall county, was incorporated by act of the legislature in 1897. It is situated on a high sandy hill about four miles from the Ohoopee river. The Collins & Reidsville railroad gives it connection with Savannah by the Sea­ board Air Line railroad, while the Stillmore Air Line, by its ex­ tension to Wadley, connects Reidsville with the Central of Georgia. According to the United States census of 1900 the population was 257, and the entire Reidsville district had a population of 2,446. Reidsville has a court house, express and telegraph offices, a money order postoffice with rural free delivery, a bank and some prosperous business houses.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Tinkle, a post-hamlet in the southeastern part of Tattnall county, is about three miles west of Coe, which is the nearest railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Tison, a post-hamlet of Tattnall county, is located about seven miles west of Glennville, and is a trading center for that part of the county.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Undine, a post-hamlet in the northeastern part of Tattnall county, is a short distance west of a station of the same name on the Glennville & Register railroad.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz

Vance, a post-village of Tattnall county, with a population of 55 in 1900, is six miles southeast of Reidsville, which the most convenient railroad station.
Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form Transcribed by Kristen Bisanz



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