OUTLAWS AND OTHER BAD GUYS



"TETON" JACKSON




"TETON" JACKSON

The story of “Teton” Jackson is very sketchy. The following is all that research has been able to find on him. The newspapers for the early part of February, 1884, that carry the first reports of this murder are unfortunately missing. Therefore, this account starts seemingly in the middle.

Our readers will remember the account of two men named Thompson and Jackson coming in and giving themselves up, claiming they had killed a man named Cooper in self-defense. After a hearing before Justice Green, they were remanded to jail to await the action of the grand jury and a party sent out to secure the remains of Cooper, if possible. The party consisted of W. F. Wither, Ed Winns, Ed. Smith and Bob Tarter, left on the 2d, and after a terrible trip of eleven days through snow and snowstorm they returned on Wednesday. They found the body, but owing to the terrible deep snow were unable to bring it in. They severed the head from the body, and after burying the body, brought it with them. This was done in order that the brain might be examined to give some idea of the sanity of Cooper. Many conflicting reports and opinions are in circulation in reference to this case, but we refrain from making any comments until the parties under arrest have had a fair trial.

Blackfoot Register, February 11, 1884, p. 3, c. 2.


This is the rest of the story of “Teton” Jackson that has been found so far:


Taken Back to the Pen
Deputy Marshal Tiner of Boise City passed through Eagle Rock on Sunday night with Teton Jackson, who was captured in Montana a few weeks ago.

The first that was known of Jackson was about the first of Feb. 1884, when he and a man named Thompson came into Eagle Rock and gave themselves up stating that they had killed a man named Cooper up in Teton Basin. They were held here until a party consisting of Ed. Winn, Dick Wilbur, J. Ed Smith and Bob Tarter went up to bring in the body. They were eleven days on the trip and found it impossible to bring the body, but cut off the head and brought it in. The examination of the head did not correspond with their story and they were held to appear before the grand jury. They were not convicted however but returned to that part of the country and the place, a small basin under the Teton Mountains became known as Jackson’s Hole and was the rendezvous of the toughest gang that ever infested the Rocky Mountains. In 1886 he, with one of his “pals” called “Red” were captured in the vicinity of Buffalo, Wyo. He was brought to Blackfoot and convicted of horse stealing and sentenced to 14 years in the penitentiary, but remained there only a few months when he and “Red” dug a trench from their cell out under the wall and escaped.

When arrested in Montana he stoutly asserted that he was not Jackson and continued to deny it until he was on the U. & N. Train, when he gave up, saying there were too many in this country who knew him.


Idaho Register, Eagle Rock, May 5, 1888, p. 3, c. 3.

There are very few copies of the Idaho Register available today and apparently the only other paper from around the state to pick up the story was the following, which is just a shortened version of the above.

Deputy Marshal Tiner of Boise City has returned to the penitentiary Teton Jackson, who was captured in Montana a few weeks ago. The first that was known of Jackson was about the first of Feb. 1884, when he and a man named Thompson came into Eagle Rock and gave themselves up stating that they had killed a man named Cooper up in Teton Basin. A party was organized to bring the body in. They were eleven days on the trip and found it impossible to bring the body, but cut off the head and brought it in. They were acquitted. Jackson was subsequently convicted of horse-stealing and sentenced to 14 years in the penitentiary, but remained there only a few months when he dug a trench from his cell out under the wall and escaped.

Source: Idaho.gov
Submitted and transcribed by Sandra Davis




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