Short Biographies Of Selected Members Of

The Hampshire Colony Congregational Church

Written by Alice Horner


Alice Horner’s note:  Ella Warren Harrison’s 1931 book, “The Hampshire Colony Congregational Church – Its First Hundred Years, 1831-1931,” has a chapter listing its members and the years they joined.  Genealogical information is available for many of these people, either online or in books which I’ve collected.  I have selected these people either because they were on my family tree, they were people who were significant in the history of Bureau County, or just because their names sounded interesting.  In many cases I’ve been unable to confirm whether the information I found is correct.  Please submit all corrections to Alice Horner.  I encourage everyone to write bios of other people on the book’s membership list, to be added to this section.  Submit your bios to Nancy Piper.


 

1831

Ebenezer Strong Phelps and Anne, his wife.  Ebenezer Strong Phelps was born September 13, 1788 in Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts.  His parents were Nathaniel Phelps and Lucy Strong.  He married Anna Wright on February 24, 1812 in Northampton; the references I’ve found show her name as Anna and not Anne.  She was born May 10, 1791 in Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, to Asahel and Rachel (Searle) Wright.  Ebenezer Strong Phelps and his wife Anna had seven children, six of whom lived into adulthood, and five who survived their mother.  They were:  Epaphras, Charles, Ebenezer, James, Mary, Susan, Lucinda.  Ebenezer died March 19, 1872 in Princeton.  Anna died July 6, 1873, also in Princeton.  Both are buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Illinois.

 

Elijah Smith.  Elijah Smith and his brother, Eli Smith (member in 1835), are listed in detail in virtually every account of the early history of Bureau County.  Briefly, both were among the very earliest settlers in Bureau County, arriving in 1831, just after marrying their wives, who were sisters.  Elijah’s brother Eli, who was a carpenter by trade, built the two couples a double log cabin on Bureau Bluff, two and a half miles north of Princeton.    Elijah Smith was born November 7, 1806 in Conway, Franklin County, Massachusetts, and he died March 2, 1882.  His and Eli Smith’s parents were Chester Smith (1771-1812 and Anna Jewett (1773-1860), who did not emigrate with them.  Elijah Smith married Sylvia Childs on March 31, 1831 in Conway, Franklin County, Massachusetts.  She was born May 6, 1806 in Conway, Franklin County, Massachusetts, and died in Sandwich, DeKalb County, Illinois in December 17, 1874.  (Elijah and Sylvia Smith had moved there in 1870.)  Her parents were David Wright Childs (1778-1810) and Eunice Clapp (1777-1865).  Elijah and Sylvia (Childs) Smith had at least 5 children:  L. Baker, Lucien F., Susan, Sylvia, Sarah J.  Both Elijah and Sylvia Smith are buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

Elisha Wood.  He was born September 1, 1795 in Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, the son of Daniel Eber and Sarah (Barnes) Wood.  He died July 24, 1845, probably in Bureau County.  He married Abigail Thorpe on Mary 20, 1817 in Westfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts.  She was born February 27, 1792 in West Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, the daughter of Eli and Mary (Beers) Thorpe.  She died between 1838-1840 in Illinois. They had four children:  Eli, Elvira, Cecelia, and Lyman C. 

 

1835

Chauncey D. Colton.  He was Chauncey Donaldson Colton, and born August 9, 1810 in Gouverneur, St. Lawrence County, New York, the son of Jonathan Strong and Elizabeth (Donaldson) Colton.  He married Emily W. Smith on January 12, 1837 in Princeton.  She was born in Vermont in 1818, the daughter of Albigence and Sarah Smith. According to text on his listing on Findagave.com (as of January 15, 2012), Chauncey Colton was a farmer, but also worked with Rev. Owen Lovejoy in operating the Underground Railroad. Chauncey and Emily Colton had five children:  Elizabeth, Asa, Alby S., Alice, Buel, and Ada.  Chauncey died August 7, 1895 in Princeton, and his wife died on January 8, 1892.  Both are buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Illinois.1859.

 

Heman Downing.  He was the brother of Alice Horner’s great-great-grandfather, Sumner Downing.  Heman Downing was born July 29, 1810 in South Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, the son of Abner and Emerancia (Preston) Downing.  According to the book “Past And Present Of Bureau County, Illinois”, Heman Downing came to Bureau County in 1834.  “Reminiscences of Bureau County” states that in the fall of 1834 he, Enos Holbrook, and Joseph Knox settled in Perkins Grove, which was a few miles south of La Moille, and therefore northeast of Princeton.  Enos Holbrook was to become Heman Downing’s father-in-law in about 1836. Their wives and probably many if not all of Enos Holbrook’s children, came that year as well; all of Enos’ children were adults in 1834.  Heman became a member of the Congregational Church in 1835.   The next year his uncle Samuel Preston (1791-1850) and his wife, Elizabeth Ingram (Gunn) Preston and probably two of their eldest children arrived in Bureau County from South Hadley.   Their son, Samuel Preston (b. 1818), definitely came at this time, and Sophronia (b. 1814), their daughter, probably did also.   Elizabeth’s brother, Gustavus Gunn, born about 1790 and a member in 1859, probably came in 1835 too.  I’m not certain whether Heman’s parents came with the family in 1835, or waited until the family had moved to Carroll County, Illinois.

 

My source, Lavisa Ferrin Hollinger’s Genealogical Record on the Preston Family, states that Samuel Preston and his wife left South Hadley, Massachusetts in June 1, 1835, “They traveled by private conveyance to Albany, New York; thence by rail to Schenectady, then by way of the Erie Canal and the Great Lakes to Chicago, Illinois, having spent the fourth of July in Mackinaw.  They went from Chicago to their destination by ox team, arriving previous to August 25, when Asahel, the youngest child, was born.”  I don’t know if other future church members accompanied them, but their journey sounds typical of how may emigrants came to Illinois in the early days.

 

Heman Downing and the Prestons lived in Bureau County until December 19, 1836, when they moved to Carroll County.  Samuel Preston (b. 1791) and his son Samuel (b. 1818) had gone to what was then the southern part of Jo Daviess County, in northern Illinois in the fall of 1836 and took up the first claim in what became Mount Carroll Township, west of what is now Mount Carroll, Illinois.  They built a large log cabin (large for the time), and left the younger Samuel Preston there to guard the claim, after arranging him to board with another small group of emigrants in what became Cherry Grove Township, also in what became Carroll County.  Samuel Preston and probably Heman Downing, then returned to Bureau County until December 19, 1836, when they had packed up their families and set out for their cabin in Mount Carroll Township in what quickly became a raging blizzard.  I feel certain Heman Downing was with them on that trip, and probably on the one when they built the cabin, because Heman was known as a carpenter and builder of cabins and houses, including some of the earliest houses in Princeton. 

 

 I haven’t found any account of why Heman Downing and his family left Bureau County.  The Hampshire Colony book suggests some church members left the area at that time because of controversies over slavery.  Heman Downing and the Prestons were not slave holders or in favor of slavery.  Heman Downing’s brother-in-law, Jonathan Holbrook, was an ardent abolitionist who is named as a supporter of Owen Lovejoy in his efforts to free slaves.  Twenty-five years later, and maybe irrelevant to the point, I found an entry in Samuel Preston’s  (b. 1818) farm diary indicating that on January 17, 1863 he had hired a fugitive slave as a farm worker in Carroll County.  (The Emancipation Proclamation was delivered on September 22, 1862.)  They may have left merely because the Prestons and the Downings were a large family, and the area which became Carroll County at that time was nearly uninhabited.

 

On January 7, 1836, Heman Downing married Rachel Holbrook in Putnam, County, Illinois;  Bureau County would not be organized and separated from Putnam County until February 28, 1837.  Rachel, born August 17, 1812 in Keene, New Hampshire, was the daughter of Enos and Elizabeth (Thompson) Holbrook, who had settled with her parents and siblings in what became Bureau County in 1834.  Heman and Rachel (Holbrook) Downing had 9 children:  Rosetta (b.1837), Andrew (b. 1838), Edwin O. (b.1839), Elizabeth (b. 1841), David A. (b. 1842), Stephen (b. 1844), Enos (b. 1849), Flora (b. 1856), and Mary (b. 1856.) 

 

Heman and his family moved back to Bureau County in March 1856 and lived there the rest of his life.  I’m not certain why he did this, as none of his other siblings left at that time.  (His brother Nathan later moved to Bureau County, but not until right before Heman died.)  Abner Downing, Heman’s father, had died in 1845 but his mother was still alive, and continued living in Carroll County.  Rachel (Holbrook) Downing’s parents had both died in Bureau County by 1856.  But the family, with several of the younger children, are living in Princeton Township when the 1860 US Federal Census was taken, and Heman was farming.   When the 1867 plat book was drawn, and in 1877 when the book “Voters & Taxpayers of Bureau County, Illinois” was published, sources state Heman Downing and his son Edwin both owned property in Section 20, Princeton Township; they could have both owned the same land.

 

Heman became ill with cancer in 1882.  His brother Nathan, who had been living in Carroll County (after living in both Missouri and Kansas), moved to Bureau County to take care of him.  However, only 2 days before Heman Downing died,  Nathan Downing developed what was called  “congestion of the brain" and he died in a few hours.  Heman Downing died April 29, 1882. Both Heman and Nathan Downing were buried Sunday, April 30, 1882 in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Illinois.  Rachel (Holbrook) Downing died November 8, 1896 and is also buried in Oakland Cemetery.

For more information on Heman Downing and his family, as well as photographs, refer to the biography Alice Horner wrote on him for the Pioneer Families section of Genealogy Trails, Carroll County, Illinois:  http://www.genealogytrails.com/ill/carroll/carrollfamilydowning.html

 

E. Hinsdale Phelps.  He was Epaphras Hinsdale Phelps, a son of Ebenezer Strong Phelps and his wife Anna Wright, who was born December 31, 1812 in Northampton, Massachusetts.  He married Mary G. Morse on December 14, 1837 in Mt. Hope Township, McLean County, Illinois.  She was the daughter of Deacon John and Polly Morse, and born January 21, 1815 in Sutton, Massachusetts.  They had eight children:  Lyman, Leander, Catherine, Mary, Cornelia, Lois, Emma, and David.  Mary G. (Morse) Phelps died on October 10, 1865 in Princeton and is buried at Oakland Cemetery there.  On October 2, 1866, Epaphras Hinsdale Phelps married Mary Burr, who was born January 3, 1812 in Copenhagen, New York.  She died November 10, 1896 in Grinnell, Iowa; I couldn’t discover where she is buried.  Epaphras died in Roseland, Nebraska on February 19, 1899; he probably had been living with or near his son David, who also lived in Roseland.  E. Hinsdale Phelps is buried at Oakland Cemetery in Princeton.

 

Alby Smith.  His full name was Albigence Smith, and he was born February 7, 1790 in Williamstown, Orange County, Vermont.  His parents were James and Martha (Howard) Smith; his mother died in Vermont in 1826, but his father died April 16, 1838 in Princeton, Bureau County.   Alby married Sally Hyde on December 12, 1813 in Williamstown, Orange County, Vermont; she was born January 10, 1788 in Putney, Windham County, Vermont; her father was Joshua Hyde. Their son was Edwin G. Smith; their daughter, Emily Smith Colton was married to Chauncey D. Smith, also an 1835 member.   Alby Smith died in Princeton on March 17, 1841; Sally died June 19, 1855, also in Princeton.

 

Eli Smith.  Refer to the information under his brother, Elijah Smith, a charter member in 1831.  Eli and his brother were among the very earliest settlers of Bureau County.  He was born November 15, 1805 in Deerfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, and died August 30, 1871, two miles north of Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois.  His wife was Clarissa Childs, who was born October 5, 1804 and also in Deerfield, died January 17, 1892.  Refer to text on Elijah Smith for the names of Clarissa Childs’ parents; Elijah Smith’s wife Sylvia Childs was a sister to Clarissa.  .  Eli and Clarissa (Childs) Smith had eight children:  Eunice, Harriet, Mary Ann, Allen, Lucy, Owen, Henry C., Eli. 

 

1836

Charles Phelps.  There are two men named Charles Phelps who were somewhat close in age who both lived in Bureau County in 1836.  One was Charles Chester Phelps, born October 24, 1814 in Northampton, Massachusetts and the son of Ebenezer Strong Phelps (who was born in 1788) and his wife Anna Wright, charter members in 1831.  However, he appears to have moved to Springfield, Illinois in 1837, probably right after marrying, so I don’t think he’s the right Charles Phelps.  (I put his bio in at the bottom of this section though.)

 

The person I think is the correct Charles Phelps is the one who was the youngest brother of Ebenezer Strong Phelps (born 1788 and a charter member).  This Charles Phelps was born October 24, 1802 in Northampton, Massachusetts to Nathaniel and Lucy (Strong) Phelps, and judging by the place of birth of his children, arrived in Bureau County sometime around 1835.  He had married Mary Strong on June 10, 1824.  She was born December 24, 1801 in Northampton, Massachusetts, the daughter of Levi and Mary (Hoxie) Strong.  They had the following children:  George, Ebenezer, Mary, Charles, Harriet, Lucy, Maria, Elijah.  Charles Phelps died July 2, 1874 in Princeton, and Mary died on December 2, 1877.  

 

Charles Chester Phelps, the man I don’t think was the Charles Phelps who joined the church in 1836, was born October 24, 1814 in Northampton, Massachusetts, a son of Ebenezer Strong Phelps and his wife Anna Wright.  On July 31, 1837, he married Sophia Anne Little, who was also born in Northampton, on October 13, 1817.  Her parents were John and Sarah (Wilder) Little.  Judging from the place of birth of their first child, they apparently moved to Springfield, Illinois shortly after marrying.  All of their eight children were born there:  Susan, Helen, Henry, Sophia, Charles, Orrin, William, Louie (whose middle name was Edith).   Charles Chester Phelps died March 5, 1866 in Springfield, Illinois; his wife died there on May 2, 1869.  Both are buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery in Springfield, Illinois.

 

1837

Seth Clapp.  He was born in Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts in 1811 and died April 30, 1871.  His parents were John and Lucy (Clark) Clapp.  His first wife was Asseneth Hitchcock, listed below.  After Asseneth died in 1851, he married Amelia Rosanna Ferry. Amelia was born March 18, 1824 in Massachusetts; her parents were Abner and Rosanna (Smith) Ferry. Her prior husband’s  surname was Steel, and they had at least one child, John Steel, who was born about 1850.  (Some sources show this surname spelled Steele, and I don’t know which spelling is correct.)  Seth Clapp and Amelia had a daughter, Stella Clapp around 1860; she is listed as a church member in 1873.  Amelia (Ferry, Steel) Clapp died October 24, 1917 and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Illinois.

 

Butler Denham.  He was born July 25, 1805 in Massachusetts, the son of Samuel and Matilda (Goodale) Denham. His first wife was Lucy B. Storrs, the daughter of Rev. Richard Salter and Sarah (Williams) Storrs, who he married May 26, 1831 in Conway, Franklin County, Maine.  She was born September 10, 1803 and died January 4, 1833.  (She is buried in Howland Cemetery, Conway, Franklin County, Massachusetts.)  Butler Denham and his first wife had no children.  He subsequently married Eunice Conant Storrs, who was Lucy B. Storrs’ first cousin, technically first step-cousin, since their fathers were step-brothers.  (Refer to Mrs. Eunice Denham’s listing below).  Butler Denham died August 8, 1841 in Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.  He and his second wife, Eunice, had 3 children:  Lucy Storrs Denham, Mary B. Denham, and Elizabeth S. Denham.

 

Mrs. Eunice Denham.  Mrs. Eunice Denham’s maiden name was Eunice Conant Storrs; her parents were Joshua and Mary (Perkins) Storrs.  She was born September 21, 1809 in Trenton, Oneida County, New York.  Her first husband was Butler Denham, listed above.  He died leaving her with three daughters, Lucy S., Mary B., and Elizabeth S., also listed above.  On January 18, 1843 she married Owen Lovejoy the abolitionist and minister of the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church in Princeton.  (He is not listed as a church member until 1853, so refer to the additional information I have for him under this date.)  Owen and Eunice (Storrs, Denham) Lovejoy were the parents of the following children:  Sarah, Owen (1845-1846), Owen, Ida, Sophia, Elijah, Charles.

 

Findagrave.com has a good general biography of Owen Lovejoy (as of January 2012) and there are other short bios of him online also.  The book, “Owen Lovejoy:  Abolitionist In Congress” by Edward Magdol is another excellent source which though out of print, is available in libraries and online.   Transcriptions of Owen Lovejoy’s speeches are also available widely.

 

Asseneth Hitchcock.  She was the first wife of Seth Clapp, whose bio is above.  Her full name was Asseneth (or Asenath) Moody Hitchcock, the daughter of George King and Sally (Moody) Hitchcock.  She was born November 23, 1820 in Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts and died in  1851 in Princeton.  They had one child, Franklin Clapp, born in 1842 in Bureau County.  She is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

Caleb Pierce.  He was born February 24, 1813 in Canaan, New Hampshire.  He died February 27, 1877 in Dover, Bureau County, Illinois.  His wife was Martha F. Paddleford, who he had married April 30, 1840.  She was born about 1819 in New Hampshire and died February 24, 1899 in Dover, Bureau County.  They had four children:  Lucy, Mary E., Sherburn, and Abigail.  Both Caleb and his wife are buried at Pioneer Cemetery, Dover, Bureau County, Illinois.

 

Nodiah Smith.  Nodiah Smith, whose name is also spelled Noahdiah by some sources, was born December 13, 1799 in Deerfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts.  His parents were Chester and Anna (Jewett) Smith.  He married Rebecca Patton on December 18, 1822.  She was born May 8 1802 in Troy, New York.  They had 10 children:  Anna, Phoebe, Chester, Diana, Warren, Clarissa, Edna, Mary, Calista, Caroline.  Nodiah died January 10, 1883 in Princeton, and his wife died February 16, 1881; both are buried in Oakland Cemetery.

 

Mrs. Rebecca Smith.  Rebecca Smith was the wife of Nodiah Smith, whose bio is above.

 

1838

Benjamin Mather.  He was born August 12, 1815 in Whately, Franklin County, Massachusetts.  His parents were Joseph and Adeney (Graves) Mather.  He married Pamelia C. Frary on September 14, 1840.  She was born February 28, 1819, also in Whately.  They had 6 children, all born in Altona, Knox County, Illinois:  Dwight, Myron, Artemus, Frank, Elam, and Ella.  Two of their children who died young are buried in Hetzler Cemetery, LeMoille, Bureau County.  Benjamin and Pamelia both died in Riverside County, California; he died September 2, 1906 and she on July 8, 1911.  I have been unable to determine where they are buried.

 

Eben S. Phelps, Sr.  This is very confusing, and I could easily have this wrong.  Two of the men listed as becoming members in 1838 are Eben S. Phelps, Sr. and Eben S. Phelps, Jr.   I believe the Eben S. Phelps, Sr. named here is the one who was the son of the charter members Ebenezer Strong  and Anna (Wright) Phelps.  This Eben S. Phelps was born on October 15, 1817 in Northampton, Massachusetts and came to Bureau County with his parents.  However, I couldn’t find text other than this book indicating he used the name Eben and not the full name Ebenezer.  The text of the book doesn’t say so, but judging from the dates of birth of some of the members on this list, it appears that only adults who were at least 18 years of age became official church members.  The Ebenezer S. Phelps born in 1817 would have been about 21 years old when he joined in 1838.  But his father was still alive in 1838, and didn’t die until 1872, so this Eben S. wouldn’t have been called Jr. until after his father died in 1872. 

 

There was also another Ebenezer S. Phelps living in Bureau County at the same time.  This one was the son of Charles Phelps, the youngest brother of Ebenezer Strong Phelps (the charter member).  However, the one who was the son of Charles Phelps was born around 1832 and so although he was living there in 1838, he wouldn’t have been old enough to be on the member list.

 

I’m not related to these people and am unfamiliar with the many members of the Phelps family living in early Bureau County.  But I know the problems inherent in depending upon the censuses for names of family members, and matching them up to online trees with dates of birth and death and relationships.  It is entirely possible that any number of other men named Ebenezer Phelps may have arrived in and departed from Bureau County between 1838 – 1850 who could be either or both of these two men.  It’s also very possible that no one knew about them, or was interested enough in genealogy or had the time to document them on the internet.  Please contact me with any clarifying information on these people.

           

1840

Mrs. Elizabeth Lovejoy.  She was the mother of Owen Lovejoy, the abolitionist and pastor of Hampshire Colony Congregational Church.  She was born February 8, 1770 in Georgetown, Lincoln County, Maine, the daughter of Ebenezer and Mary (Stinson) Pattee.  She married Rev. Daniel Lovejoy on September 30, 1801 in Unity, Waldo County, Maine.  He was born March 31, 1776 in Amherst, Hillsborough, New Hampshire and died August 11, 1833 in Albion, Kennebec County, Maine.  She and at least three of her younger children, Sybil, Elizabeth, and John, apparently moved to Princeton when Owen Lovejoy moved there.  She died April 23, 1857 in Princeton, and is buried at Oakland Cemetery in Princeton.

 

Another child of Elizabeth Lovejoy was Elijah Parish Lovejoy, an early abolitionist and newspaper publisher who was attacked and murdered by a pro-slavery mob in November 7, 1837 in Alton, Illinois.  He was Daniel and Elizabeth Lovejoy’s eldest son, born November 9, 1802 In Albion, Maine.  Their other children, besides Elijah and Owen, were Daniel, Joseph, Owen (1807-1810), Sybil, a son who lived 1 day in 1813, Elizabeth, and John.

 

Sybil Lovejoy.  Sybil was a younger sister of Owen Lovejoy; her parents were Daniel and Elizabeth (Pattee) Lovejoy.  Sybil was born January 1, 1809 in Albion, Kennebec County, Maine.  Sometime between 1842-1843 she married John Roy Blanchard in Middle Creek, Iowa.  They had one child, Charles Edward Blanchard.  Sybil Blanchard died November 11, 1857 in Princeton, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery in Princeton.

 

1841

Mrs. Elizabeth Denham.  She was Eliza Hogeboom, wife of Luther Denham.  Refer to his bio below.

Luther Denham.  He was the son of Cornelius and Lydia (Wells) Denham, and born May 12, 1804 in New York.  He married Eliza Hogeboom in June 1, 1826 in Gorham, Ontario County, New York.  She was born July 9, 1806 near New York City.  They had 8 children:  Elizabeth A., Frances, Cornelius, Oliver, Lucius, Lucinda, Butler L., James.  Luther Denham died September 1, 1856 in Princeton, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery.  Eliza died November 19, 1854 in Princeton, and is also buried in Oakland Cemetery.

 

Mrs. Elizabeth Wiswall.  She was a sister of Owen Lovejoy, the abolitionist minister of the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church.  Her parents were Rev. Daniel and Elizabeth (Pattee) Lovejoy, and she was born May 27, 1815 in Albion, Kennebec County, Maine.  She married Noah Wiswall on June 2, 1839 in Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois.  Their children were Harriet, Austin, Charles E., Edward, and Joseph.  Noah Wiswall died May 3, 1860 in Princeton, and Elizabeth married Henry Laurens Hammond on April 18, 1865 in Princeton.  He was born February 14, 1815 in Smyrna, New York.  He died March 3, 1893 in Evanston, Cook County, Illinois; Elizabeth (Lovejoy) Wiswall Hammond died in July 1893, also in Evanston.

 

1844

John E. Lovejoy.  He was another brother of Owen Lovejoy, the abolitionist and minister of the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church.  His full name was John Ellingwood Lovejoy, and he was born October 13, 1817 in Albion, Kennebec County, Maine.  His parents were Daniel and Elizabeth Gordon (Pattee) Lovejoy.  John Ellingwood Lovejoy had many careers.  He was a farmer, postmaster, railroad station agent, and U. S. Counsel to Peru, under Abraham Lincoln.  His first wife was Margaret Livingston, who he probably married sometime around 1844.  Margaret was born November 23, 1823 in Selkirk Settlement, Red River, Manitoba, Canada.  It appears he moved to Scotch Grove, Jones County, Iowa by the time his first child was born, in November 1845.  They had six children:  Catherine, Mary, Owen, Ada, Joseph, and Daniel, all in Iowa.  Margaret died April 15, 1869 in Scotch Grove.  On September 3, 1871 he married Joanna McBeath, who was born March 12, 1845 in St. John’s Red River, Manitoba, Canada.  He had two children with her:  John, and Bertha.  John Ellingwood Lovejoy died June 5, 1891 in Center Junction, Jones County, Iowa, and is buried in Scotch Grove Cemetery.  I do not have a death date for his wife Joanna.

 

Mrs. Margarette Lovejoy.  I show her name as Margaret Livingston, and she was the first wife of John Ellingwood Lovejoy, who is named above.

 

1848

Frances E. Denham.  She was the daughter of Luther and Eliza (Hogeboom) Denham (who were church members in 1841).  She was born March 5, 1827 in Gorham, Ontario County, New York.  She married Noah Edwards sometime before 1850, and he died before 1853.  They had one child, Butler D. Edwards, born May 2, 1850.  On February 9, 1853 she married John Shugart in Princeton.  He was a stone mason and farmer who was born May 31. 1824 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania; his parents were John and Mary or Maria (Reed) Shugart.  He owned  500 acres in Section 5, Princeton Township.  They had three children, Frances, William, and May.  John Shugart died February 4, 1889 in Princeton and Frances died March 15, 1911 in Princeton; both are buried in Oakland Cemetery.

 

1851

Lucien F. Smith.  Lucien F. Smith is elusive.  I couldn’t find him on any census after 1850.  He was the son of Elijah and Sylvia (Childs) Smith, who were charter members of the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church in 1831.  (Refer to Elijah Smith’s bio there.)  Lucien was born in Bureau County in 1837.  All the online trees are similarly sketchy about him, but they show he died in 1912.   He did serve in the Civil War.  The source U. S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles shows he enlisted on August 28, 1861 as a private with Company E, Illinois 33rd Infantry Regiment.  He mustered out December 26, 1861.  Beyond that, I have found nothing.  He’s elusive.

 

Harriet Wiswall.  Harriet Wiswall was the eldest daughter of Noah and Elizabeth (Lovejoy) Wiswall, the latter of whom joined the church in 1841.  Harriet was born about 1839.  The last reference I could find for her was her appearance on the 1860 US Federal Census for Bureau County.

 

1853

Owen Lovejoy.  Although Owen Lovejoy was the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church from October 1838 – December 1855, he may not have become an official member until 1853.  1853 is the first year on the members list where he appears.  Perhaps that’s because in 1854 he became the State of Illinois representative for the Republican Party, which he was helping to organize.  (The Republican Party was an emerging political party then.)  In addition, he was an ardent abolitionist, prominent conductor and organizer of the Underground Railroad to free the slaves, and one of the most influential men in America.  His wife, Eunice Conant (Storrs) Denham became a member in 1837, and she is listed as Mrs. Eunice Denham in that section.  Refer to Owen Lovejoy’s bio under her name.

 

Mrs. Amelia Steel.  Amelia was born March 18, 1824 in Massachusetts; her parents were Abner and Rosanna (Smith) Ferry. Her prior husband’s  surname was Steel, and they had at least one child, John Steel, who was born about 1850.  (Some sources show this surname spelled Steele, and I don’t know which spelling is correct.)  Her subsequent husband was Seth Clapp, who joined the church in 1837.  They married probably between 1854 – 1859.  Refer to his bio above for more information.

 

1856

Mrs. Mary Denham.  There are a couple of choices here.  There was a Mrs. Mary Denham who was the wife of a William C. Denham.  In 1860, this couple was living in Mineral Township, Bureau County, Illinois, and in 1870 in Concord Township, Bureau County.  Both places are substantially west of Princeton, so even though the book states that early settlers who were church members sometimes lived fairly far from Princeton, I don’t know that this couple did.  I’m also not certain how this William C. Denham is related to the other Denhams who were church members.  That said, they had two children:  John, who was born around 1854 and Lydia, who was born about 1862. 

 

I think it’s more likely that this “Mrs.” Mary Denham is a typo in the text of the book, and it’s really Owen Lovejoy’s step-daughter, Mary B. Denham who is the member who joined in 1856.  (I found typos as I was transcribing the book, so I know this could also be a typo.)  Mary B. Denham was the child of Butler and Eunice Conant (Storrs) Denham, and born in 1840 in Princeton. As far as I can determine, church members seem to have made this list only when they turned at least 16, and usually 18, and she would have been 16 when she joined in 1856.  This Mary Denham never married and lived all of her life in Princeton.  She died there in 1913, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

Heman Downing.  Refer to the substantial bio on him in the 1835 section.

Mrs. Rachel Downing.  Refer to the information for her and her husband Heman Downing in the 1835 section.

1857

Mrs. Ermina D. Cochran.  She was probably Ermina Day, wife of Samuel Davies Cochran.  She was born April 2, 1820 in Mansfield Ohio, and married Samuel Cochran November 8, 1843.  Her father was Matthias Day.  Refer to material below on Samuel D. Cochran.

 

Samuel D. Cochran.  He was Samuel Davies Cochran, son of John Cochran and Martha Thompson.  He was born in Somerset County, Pennsylvania on January 8, 1812.  He married Ermina Day on November 8, 1843.  They had a daughter, Ermina Day Cochran on October 24, 1852 in New Jersey.  I could only find the family on one census, the 1880 in Normal, McLean County, Illinois; he was a clergyman and his daughter Ermina was a music teacher.  Samuel Davies Cochran died October 5, 1904 in Lincoln, Johnson County, Nebraska.  His wife Ermina died September 28, 1893, and his daughter Ermina died March 7, 1894.  As far as I can determine, he is not related to Rachel (Cochran) Downing, whose husband Nathan Downing lived in Bureau County perhaps at this time and certainly later, and who is mentioned in the bio of his brother Heman Downing.

 

1858

Mrs. A. E. Prouty.  She may have been Mrs. Adeline (French) Prouty, who was born in Canada about 1827 and married to John Prouty.  In 1880, they were living in Dover Township, Bureau County; I couldn’t find them on an earlier census..  Her husband was a farmer and livestock feeder.

 

1859

Gustavus Gunn.  His full name was Gustavus Adolphus Gunn and he was born about 1790 in South Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts.  His parents, Moses and Elenor (Ingram) Gunn, had him and his sister late in their lives.  Moses Gunn was born in 1728 and died in 1793; his wife was born in 1754 and died in 1814.  He was also related to Aaron Gunn, which the book “Reminiscences of Bureau County” identifies as a member of the Hampshire Colony, although he is not named as a member of the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church.  (He had served in the Blackhawk War, lived in LeMoille, Bureau County at least until 1835, but by 1838 had settled in LaSalle County, Illinois.) Aaron Gunn was the son of Deacon Elihu Gunn and Lucy Phelps; Elihu was a first cousin of Gustavus Gunn.

 

Gustavus and his sister, Elizabeth Ingram Gunn, were left alone in the world.  Elizabeth married Samuel Preston, whose sister Emerancia Preston married Abner Downing.  Heman Downing, a church member in both 1835 and 1856, was their son.  So far as I have determined, Gustavus Gunn never married and apparently lived most of his life either with his sister and her family or with Heman Downing and his.  According to a History of Carroll County, Illinois written by nephew Samuel Preston (b. 1818), “…in August 1836, he, his father, and G. A. Gunn, an uncle, hitched a prairie schooner and drove it from Princeton to Carroll County, Illinois.”  I show his sister and her husband had emigrated to Bureau County arriving on June 1, 1835, and it’s likely that Gustavus arrived at that time also.  In any case, he lived with Heman Downing and his family in Carroll County, and returned with them when they moved back to Bureau County in 1856.  It appears he died in Bureau County sometime in 1871.  I have been unable to find any marked grave for him.  I believe strongly he would have been buried in the Downing plot in Oakland Cemetery in Princeton.  But I spoke with the sexton of all cemeteries in Bureau County in 2007, who told me there were no Gunns buried in Oakland Cemetery at all, and no Gustavus or G. A. Gunn buried anywhere in Bureau County.  Please email Alice Horner if you have information.

 

1863

Sarah J. Smith.  She was Sarah June Smith, daughter of Elijah and Sylvia (Childs) Smith, two of the charter members of the church in 1831.  Sarah June Smith was born March 24, 1847 in Princeton, and married Johnson Foster about 1878.  He was a farmer, the son of Johnson Foster and Lucy Nobles, both of New York, and was born August 22, 1838 in New York.  He and Sarah June Smith married about 1878 and by June of 1880, when the US census was taken, they had a 1-year-old daughter, Julia, and were living in Olive Precinct, Saline County, Nebraska.  By June 1900 the three of them were living in Fairmont, Fillmore County, Nebraska; Johnson Foster was a day laborer and Julia Foster was a milliner.  But by 1910 they’d returned to Illinois.  The three of them were living in Plano, Kendall County, Illinois.  Johnson Foster died on February 22, 1918 in Plano; his wife Sarah died there also, on March 25, 1934.  Both are buried in Plano, at Little Rock Township Cemetery, where Johnson Foster’s parents are also buried.

 

Sylvia Smith.  She was the sister of Sarah J. Smith (the bio above), and was born in Bureau County, on September 23, 1844, the daughter of Elijah and Sylvia (Childs) Smith, charter members of the church in 1831.  In 1866 she married Darius Fisher Fay, who was the son of Samuel F. Fay (a church member in 1836, on whom I haven’t written a bio).  Darius Fisher Fay was born in Bureau County on October 5, 1842.  He served in the Civil War with Company F, 151st Illinois Volunteer Infantry beginning in February 1865 until the close of the war.  He was a farmer all his life.  He married Sylvia Smith in 1866.  They had three children:  Jennie L., Clara E., and a child who died in infancy.  Jennie L. Fay married Frank Hoffman, and Clara Fay married Gilbert G. Weller.  Sylvia (Smith) Fay died in 1911; her husband died on October 31, 1925 in Bureau Township, Bureau County, Illinois.  He is buried at Oakland Cemetery in Princeton, and it is likely Sylvia is also, but I don’t have proof of that.

 

Mrs. Orpha (Page) Stacy.  She was born on May 15, 1797 in Coventry, Tolland County, Connecticut, and when a child moved with her parents to Oneida, New York.  She married Isaac Stacy, who was born May 25, 1790 in Cooperstown, Otsego County, New York.  She later settled in northern DeKalb, St. Lawrence County, New York, where her children were born.  In 1859, undoubtedly after her husband died on March 23, 1859 in DeKalb, St. Lawrence County, she moved to Malden, Bureau County.  Two of her children were Hon. Wm. C. Stacy and Edwin Page Stacy.  She died June 29, 1873 in Princeton.

 

1866

Richard D. Harrison.  This full name was Richard Dearmond Harrison.  His wife’s name was Sarah Smith.  They were the parents of Richard Dearmond Harrison, who married Ella Warren, the primary author of the book. 

 

1867

Lucy S. Denham.  She was the daughter of Butler and Eunice Conant (Storrs) Denham, both of whom were church members in 1837 and who I have written bios for under that year.  After Butler Denham died on August 8, 1841, Lucy S. Denham’s mother Eunice married Owen Lovejoy, whose bio is written with Eunice’s and under the year 1853.  Lucy’s full name was Lucy Storrs Denham and she was born in 1837 in Massachusetts.  She never married.  She served as her step-father Owen Lovejoy’s secretary for many years.  She died in 1907 in Princeton, Bureau County, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

Sarah M. Lovejoy.  She was the eldest child of Owen and Eunice Conant (Storrs, Denham) Lovejoy, and born March 15, 1844 in Bureau County.  She was well educated and became a music teacher in Chicago.  Sometime after 1870 she married William R. French.  She died in Chicago on August 28, 1881 and is buried in Oakland Cemetery in Princeton. 

 

1871

Mary E. Downing.  Her surname is misspelled as Donwing in the book’s membership list.  She was Mary Eliza Downing, the daughter of Heman and Rachel (Holbrook) Downing.  She was born in 1856 in Illinois, probably right after her parents moved back to Bureau County from Carroll County.  She married George Fetrow on November 18, 1884 in Princeton; his parents were William and Rosanna (Huffstodt) Fetrow.  Right after marrying, Mary E. Downing and her husband moved to Kansas.  They had six children there.  Mary E. (Downing) Fetrow died in 1936 and is buried in Attica Cemetery, Harper County, Kansas; her husband died August 4, 1953 and is also buried in Attica Cemetery.

 

1873

Anna J. Beach.  She was the daughter of J. M. Beach, a dentist in Princeton.  He was born on December 13, 1813 in Burlington, Hartford County, Connecticut.  He located in Princeton in 1864.  He had married Josephine Williams in 1844 and had one son with her, James Beach, but she died in 1849.  In 1851 he married Mrs. Ann (Wiley) Smith and they had a daughter Anna J. Beach , who was born about 1853 in Illinois, probably in Princeton.  By the time the 1880 census was taken for Princeton, she had married William Landerath, who was born about 1850 in Pennsylvania and was also a dentist.  Anna J. and William had a daughter, Anna J. Landerath, who also appears on the 1880 census.  Beyond that I couldn’t find anything on this Landerath family.  J. M. Beach died May 6, 1900 in Princeton and he and his second wife are buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

Stella E. Clapp.  She was the daughter of Seth and Amelia (Ferry, Steel) Clapp, whose short biographies are in the 1837 section.  Stella was born about 1860.  She was living with her mother when the 1880 US Federal Census was taken in Princeton, Bureau County, but I’ve been unable to find further information on her.

 

Flora Downing.  Flora Downing was the daughter of Heman and Rachel (Holbrook) Downing.  She was born February 19, 1856 in Mount Carroll Township, Carroll County, Illinois and worked as a teacher in 1880 before marrying.  She married Walter Scott Clay in Princeton on September 19, 1883.  He was a school teacher in Wyanet before marrying, and born March 12, 1852 in Dexter, Maine.  They moved to Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa after marrying.  They had 3 children.  Flora died in Council Bluffs on November 19, 1919; Walter died there September 8, 1907.

 

1875

Mrs. Ella W. Harrison.  She was Ella Warren Harrison, and the primary author of the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church book.  She was born July 6, 1851 in Quincy, Massachusetts, the daughter of H. V. Warren and Lorenae Kendall.  She married Richard D. Harrison .  They had two children:  Edwin Warren, and Robert H.  She died April 16, 1937 in Princeton and is buried in Oakland Cemetery.

 

Richard D. Harrison.  Richard Dearmond Harrison, the husband of Ella Warren Harrison, was born November 29, 1848 in Putnam County, Illinois, the son of Richard Dearmond and Sarah (Smith) Harrison.  He was a farmer.  He died December 18, 1943 in Princeton, and is buried at Oakland Cemetery.

 

1881

Albert Holbrook.  He was also known as A. H. Holbrook.  He was born in Massachusetts in January 1848, according to the 1900 US Federal Census, and his wife was named Susan, born in November 1854 and also in Massachusetts.  They had only one child, a son named Allan, born in November 1880 in Illinois.  They appear on the 1880 census for Princeton, Bureau County, where A. H. is working as a clerk.  But by 1900, he and his wife and son are back in Massachusetts, living in Hanover, Plymouth County, and Albert was farming.  As far as I can determine, Albert Holbrook was not related to Rachel (Holbrook) Downing, Heman Downing’s wife, who is listed as a member in 1856.

 

1889

Amanda Bodfish.  She is the same person who is Mrs. Amanda Shugart on the 1904 list.  (Refer to her under this name in the 1904 bios for more information.)  Her parents were Andrew A. and Mary (Sinnott) Bodfish.  Their other children were:  William H., Margaret A., whose bio is below, and Mary.

 

Margaret A. Bodfish.  Her parents were also Andrew A. and Mary (Sinnott) Bodfish.  She was born February 19, 1865 in Concord Township, Bureau County, Illinois.  She married James H. Herron in about 1890; he was a house painter who lived in Princeton Township.  He was born about October 1864 in Illinois.  They had one child, James, who was born probably about 1900.  Margaret A. (Bodfish) Herron died on July 13 1936 in Princeton, and is buried at Oakland Cemetery in Princeton. I have been unable to determine where James Herron died.  He was still alive when the 1920 census was taken, but I’ve found nothing about him subsequently from then.

 

1891

E. Warren Harrison.  He was Edwin Warren Harrison, whose mother, Ella Warren Harrison, was the primary writer of the Hampshire Colony Congregational Church book.  (Her bio is in the 1875 section.)  He was born in 1875 in Illinois, probably in Bureau County; his father was Richard D. Harrison.  Sometime after April 1930, when the census was taken, he married Estelle Darnell.  He died in 1950 in Princeton, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery.  His wife Estelle died February 18, 1961 in the state of Oregon, and is also buried in Oakland Cemetery.

 

Robert H. Harrison.  He is the other son of Richard D. and Ella (Warren) Harrison, and a brother to E. Warren Harrison.  But he’s much more elusive.  He was born about 1879, but I have found nothing about him since then.  There is a Robert Harrison about that age who was born in Illinois and living in Nebraska when the 1930 US Federal Census was taken, but I have no idea whether he’s the same person.

 

John Prouty.  His wife, Mrs. A. E. Prouty, is listed as a member in 1858.

 

1894

Mrs. May Simons.  Her maiden name was May Shugart, and she was a daughter of John and Frances E. (Denham) Shugart.  Her mother had become a church member in 1848; refer to her bio above.  May was born on May 9, 1871 in Princeton.  She married Dana Lynde Simons, a farmer in Princeton Township, on August 30, 1893.  His parents were Nathaniel and Rebecca Simons.  Dana and May Simons had two children:  John Nathaniel, and Marjorie.  Dana Simons died April 1, 1951 in Princeton; May died in August 1953, also in Princeton.

 

1895

Nora Ellen Downing.  She was the daughter of Edwin O. and Susannah (Greenameyer)  Downing.  Nora was the granddaughter of Heman and Rachel (Holbrook) Downing.  She was born in February 1876 in Bureau County and was a school teacher before marrying Harry Linwood Hartwell in 1907.  He was born August 16, 1866 in Baltimore. Maryland. After marrying they moved to Bonne Terre, Missouri.  They had one child, named Olive.  Later they lived in Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin.  Harry Hartwell died February 28, 1950 in Madison; Nora on November 13, 1950 in Madison.  Both are buried at Roselawn Cemetery, Dane County, Wisconsin.

 

1897

Estella Mabel Downing.  She was probably Mabel Downing, the daughter to Edwin O. and Susannah (Greenameyer) Downing, and a granddaughter of Heman and Rachel (Holbrook) Downing.  I’ve never heard her called Estella Mabel; all family sources I’ve seen call her Mabel Downing and state that she was born in May 24, 1871, in Princeton, Bureau County.  It appears that she never married.  My great-grandmother Ellen Eliza (Preston) Downing’s address book, shows her living in La Prairie, Minnesota, probably before 1918, but no street address is given.  Further along in the address book, so probably in the years after maybe 1918, Mabel lived at

217 South Euclid Ave. and 225 N. Vernon Street, both in Princeton, Illinois.

 

Mabel Downing died December 2, 1946 in Princeton according to the Illinois Statewide Death Index, 1916-1950, which shows her as Estella M. Downing.  She is said to have been buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, on December 4, 1946 but no one has taken a tombstone photo of her grave (for Findagrave.com or other sources, as of January 2012).  The new source Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 doesn’t show her date of death either.   Mabel Downing was a sister of Olive Logan Downing (whose bio is also in 1897), Nora Ellen Downing (in 1895), and the daughter of Mrs. Susie Downing, listed in 1906, if in fact Susie is Susannah (Greenameyer) Downing.

 

Olive Logan Downing.  She is another daughter of Edwin O. and Susannah (Greenameyer) Downing.  She was born in April 1877 in Illinois, according to the 1900 US Federal Census, and was a public school teacher as late as the 1910 census.  After that I have found nothing.  It’s possible she could have married, but I’ve found no indication of it.  She isn’t on the Illinois Statewide Death Index, 1916-1950, and the Pre-1916 Index doesn’t show Bureau County people yet (as of January 2012).  I suspect she may have died before 1916, but I don’t know.

 

1902

Cora May Phillips.  She was the daughter of Isaac and Frances (Shugart) Phillips, whose bio is below.  She was born in 1883, probably in Princeton, and died in 1954 in Bureau County.  As far as I can tell, she never married.  She is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

Isaac Phillips.  He was born December 7, 1838 in Gorham, Ontario County, New York, the son of James and Mary (Stults) Phillips.  He was a banker.  He married Lucinda Denham on October 25, 1860.  Her parents were Luther and Eliza (Hogeboom) Denham, whose bio is in the 1841 section.  Lucinda (Denham) Phillips died on June 3, 1876 in Bureau County, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery.  I couldn’t determine whether they had any children. 

 

Sometime before 1883, Isaac Phillips married Frances Shugart, whose parents were John and Frances E. (Denham) Shugart.  Frances Shugart, who had been a niece of Lucinda (Denham) Phillips, was born on June 23, 1860 in Princeton Township, Bureau County.  They had two children:  Mary Frances, who was born in 1883 and died in 1892 (buried in Oakland Cemetery), and Cora May Phillips.  Isaac Phillips died Mar 27, 1927 in Princeton, and his wife Frances died November 18, 1931 in Princeton.  Both are buried in Oakland Cemetery.

 

1904

Mrs. Amanda B. Shugart.  She was the wife of Milford H. Shugart.  She was born October 19, 1868 in Concord Township, Bureau County, Illinois; her parents were Andrew A. and Mary (Sinnott) Bodfish.  She married Milford H. Shugart on about 1890.  He was the son of Calvin A. and Caroline (Coddington) Shugart, and born October 4, 1869 in Dover Township, Bureau County.  He was a manufacturer of ice cream and soda pop.  They had one daughter, Margaret.  He died August 21, 1940.  She died July 13, 1940; they are both buried at Oakland Cemetery in Princeton, Bureau County.

 

1906

Mrs. Susie Downing is probably Susannah (Greenameyer) Downing, wife of Edwin O. Downing.  She was the mother of Nora Ellen Downing, who married Harry Linwood Hartwell in 1907 and appears on this list as joining the church in 1895.  It seems logical to me anyway that Susie was Susannah and her single daughters may have joined the church because Nora had done so.  Susannah Greenameyer ws born February 13, 1842 in Portage, Ohio, the daughter of Solomon and Mary Ann (Best) Greenameyer.  She married Edwin O. Downing on December 23, 1862 in Princeton; he was a son of Heman and Rachel (Holbrook) Downing.  Edwin O. Downing died June 19, 1903 in Princeton.  She and Edwin had the following children:  Mary Angela, Adelaide, Mabel, Nora Ellen, Olive, Harvey Edwin, and William.  Susannah (Greenameyer) Downing died May 23, 1912 in Princeton, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, with her husband.

Mrs. Cora B. Shugart.  She was Cora Bell Matson, born March 27, 1868 in Bureau County.  Her parents were Enos and Helen (Westbrook) Matson.  She married John Judson Shugart on September 1, 1887 in Princeton.  They had three children:  Grace M., Helen R., and Ina May.  Cora Bell (Matson) Shugart died Apr 25 1944 in Dover Township, Bureau County, Illinois and is buried at Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

Grace M. Shugart. She was born February 5, 1894 in Dover Township, a daughter of John Judson and Cora Bell (Matson) Shugart.  She was a school teacher in January 1920 when the US Census was taken in Bureau County, but by 1930 when the census was taken she and her sister Helen were both school teachers in Detroit, Michigan.  It appears that Grace Shugart didn’t marry.  She died April 19, 1977 in Princeton.

 

Helen R. Shugart was born August 12, 1897 in Dover Township, a daughter of John Judson and Cora Bell (Matson) Shugart.  She and her sister Grace were public school teachers in Detroit, Michigan when the 1930 US Federal Census was taken.  She died April 29, 1979 in Princeton, Bureau County.

 

Ina May Shugart       She was born August 18, 1890 in Dover Township, a daughter of John Judson and Cora Bell (Matson) Shugart.  She  married Milton Hoover on November 24, 1910 in Bureau County.  He was born April 21, 1885 in Dover Township, the son of Jonas and Sally Hoover.  They had two children:  Lillian Carol, and Shugart Philip.  Lillian Carol Hoover was born January 31, 1916 in Dover Township and died February 27, 1937 in Princeton.  Shugart Philip Hoover was born March 23, 1926 in Princeton and died July 25, 1932, also in Princeton.  Both are buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.  Milton Hoover died in March 1968 in Naperville, DuPage County, Illinois.  Ina May died on February 2, 1969 in Princeton.

 

J. Judson Shugart.   His full name was John Judson Shugart, and he was born January 30, 1864 in Dover Township, Bureau County.  His parents were Phillip R. and Rebecca (Cox) Shugart.  He married Cora Bell Matson on September 1, 1887.  His three children are  Grace M., Helen R., and Ina May.    He died May 21 1941 in Dover Township and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Princeton.

 

1914

Mrs. W. R. Shugart.  She was Dora (Wilson) Shugart, the wife of William Reed Shugart.  She was born February 28, 1864 in Dover Township, Bureau County; her parents were Harrison W. and Elizabeth (Matson) Wilson.  Elizabeth Matson’s parents were Enos and Elizabeth (Mercer) Matson, who had arrived in Bureau County in 1834.  William Reed Shugart was born on May 9, 1866, and was the son of John and Frances E. (Denham) Shugart.  He married Dora on June 20, 1905 in Bureau County.  It was the first marriage for both and they had no children.  He was a farmer in Princeton Township.  William Reed Shugart died October 4, 1942 in Bureau County, and Dora died February 27, 1948 in Princeton.  I cannot confirm their burial location but almost has to have been Oakland Cemetery in Princeton, since their ancestors several generations back are buried there.

 

W. R. Shugart.  He was William Reed Shugart, whose parents were John Shugart and Frances E. Denham.  He was married to Dora Wilson; refer to the text above.

 

1917

James Herron.  He is either the James Herron who was the husband of Margaret A. Bodfish, a member in 1889, or her son, who was probably born about 1900, and would therefore have been listed as an adult member of the church.  (Children who were under 18 years of age don’t seem to be listed as members.)  Refer to Margaret A. Bodfish’s bio in the section of members who joined in 1889.

 

1927

Charles Vroom is probably Charles Henry Vroom, who was born September 24, 1883 in Bureau County, and died in Princeton in June 1969.  His wife was Ella Stiles.  He was a farmer, at least in September 1918 when he signed his World War I Draft Registration Card; the location of the farm then was R. F. D. 2, Princeton, Illinois.

 

Mrs. Charles Vroom was born Ella Stiles in about 1886, also in Bureau County.  Her parents were  Sanford Stiles and Hannah Joanna Schafer.  Hannah Schafer’s father. Charles Carl George Schafer, immigrated from Germany to the United States as early as 1854, and was definitely living in Bureau County in 1862, when he married Hannah’s mother, Anna Bierman.  Ella (Stiles) Vroom died December 1963 in Bureau County.  They’d had two children, Sanford S. Vroom, who was born on March 17, 1918 in Princeton, and died April 24, 1990, also in Princeton.  They also had a daughter.




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