Carroll County Biographies

TAVENER, J.E.

Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

TAYLOR, James
Mayor of the pleasant town of Chadwick, IL and owns farm land in Carroll county and conducts a furniture store here, was born in Otsego county, N. Y., April 20, 1864, a son of William and Elizabeth Taylor. They were natives of Ireland and William Taylor was nine years old when his parents brought him to America, while she was only a babe In arms. They were reared in the state of New York and married there. Ten children were born to them and of them two daughters and five sons survive and the record may be given us follows: William, who lives at Morrison, Whiteside county, IL, Joseph, who owns and occupies the old home farm in New York. John Taylor is an educator in New York. David is a physician In New York City. Edward is a farmer and merchant at Moreville, la. Charles is in business at Lawrence, N. Y., while James, of Chadwick, IL is the fifth son. Elizabeth is the widow of Eli Bridges and resides in the state of New York, and Mary also lives in her native state.
William Taylor, the father, was a drover and merchant in his early married life and drove stock as far as Indiana and marketed it. Finally he bought the farm on which he spent the balance of his life, devoting his attention mainly to sheep growing. He was a prominent man in his section and was affiliated with the democratic party, on which ticket he was frequently elected to local offices. His death occurred in 1884 when he was fifty-five years of age, his wife having passed away in 1881, at the age of forty-seven years. She was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church.
James Taylor remained on the home farm until he was about eighteen years of age and attended school until his fifteenth year. In 1879 be came to Illinois and for n time was engaged in hauling cream for farmers to the Round Grove Creamery in Whiteside county, where he located on coming to the state. Afterward he became connected with the Singer Sewing Machine Company and opened an office at Chadwick, with seven sewing machines to exhibit, and soon demonstrated his business capacity and for many years remained identified with that company. Later he established himself in the piano and organ business and to this stock he added a fine line of furniture in 1910.
Through close attention and reliable dealing. Mr. Taylor won the confidence of the people and has prospered. He is also interested in his farm of eighty-two acres. He has, by no means, devoted all of his attention to his personal undertakings for there are few more public spirited men in the county and it has seemed to him a citizen’s duty to take part in public matters. For ten years he served as a member of the board of aldermen of Chadwick and for the past eight years has been its very capable mayor. Under his wise administration the little city has grown and flourished, public utilities have been installed, electric light, water and sewer plants have been constructed, fond a four-foot cement walk laid on side streets and a wider one on the main streets of the place. These fine Improvements have been paid for through his excellent business methods. For eight years he was a director of the Carroll County Fair Association and for four years was vice president of this body, and is a director of the Mutual Telephone Company.
On October 2, 1888, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage at Sterling IL with Miss Dora Conrady, who came to the United States from Germany. To this marriage the following children were born: Pearl, who is the wife of Lyman Webster, a farmer in Wysox township; Mabel, Lloyd and Esther, all of whom live at home; Chester, who died an infant; and Glenn, who remains at home. The mother of the above family died October 3, 1904. She was an active worker in the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a valued member of the order of Lady Maccabees.
On February 4, 1900, Mr. Taylor was married a second time, the lady being Mrs. Mae (Herb) Miller, a daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Misner) Herb, and widow of William H. Miller, the latter of whom died January 21, 1901. Mrs. Taylor was born at Brookville, IL, July 11, 1867, and is an orphan, her mother dying when she was a child and her father passing away in 1902.
Mr. Taylor has always been stanch in his support of democratic principles and has consistently voted for his party’s candidates. He has been Instrumental in large degree In the organization of many of the public spirited enterprises of this section and his name gives added confidence to such financial institutions as the Farmers State Bank of Chadwick, in which he is a stockholder and a member of its board of directors.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

TODD, Samuel H.
A retired farmer living at Milledgeville, was born in Elkhorn Grove township, Carroll county IL June 2, 1849, a son of Ellakim W. and Mehetabel (Buck) Todd, the former of whom was born in Litchfield, Kent township, Conn., and the latter in Bradford county. Pa. The Todds were originally of Vermont and then of Connecticut and from New England, Ellakim W. Todd went to Bradford county, Pa. While there he worked at farming and in the mills but later decided to seek a home in what was then the far west.
One day in early summer, in company with Joseph Hire, he started on foot for Illinois, and as the young men had no capital they found work on the way to support themselves and on December 2, 1837, reached Elkhorn Grove township, Carroll county. They looked the land over and finally decided to invest in a tract of about 640 acres belonging to the Hughes Bros., for which they were to pay the sum of $1,000.
In the spring of 1838 Mr. Todd returned to Bradford county, and assisted his wife in packing up their belongings, and as soon as the roads could be safely traveled over they all came to Elkhorn township and theirs was one of the first log cabins in the grove. Mr. Todd was what is called “handy with tools" and he thus was able to build and keep in repair all his own farm structures and help his neighbors and also engaged in farming and stock raising. He was an old line Whig and became a Republican when that party was organized and voted for John C. Fremont and gave to Abraham Lincoln, as its great exponent, the loyal support of a patriotic citizen when war fell upon the country. His wife was reared a Presbyterian but late in life both united with the Methodist Episcopal church and he was a trustee of the South Elkhorn church for years. During the Civil war he belonged to the organization known as the Union League. Born October 9, 1808, he died February 2, 1890.
Ellakim W. Todd was married twice, first to a lady by the name of Campbell and the children of this marriage who survived infancy were: Ensign, who lives at Eldora, Iowa; Prudence P., who lives at Bloomington IL, is the widow of Jacob Ike; Lucy, who died in 1906, was the wife of James Etherlge. of Lanark, IL and Jabez W., who resides at Milledgeville, IL served three years and three months in the Civil war as a member of Company K, Fifteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The second marriage was to Mehetabel Buck, who was born July 20, 1810, and died December 28, 1906, when aged ninety-six years, five months and eight days old. Of their four children there are two living: Samuel H. and Sophia, who is the wife of Robert Burnett, who grows fruit at Del-Rae, Fresno county, Calif.
Samuel H. Todd obtained his education in the district schools and at Mt. Morris Seminary and after his preparation decided to engage in teaching school but two terms made him willing to return to the farm, on which he remained until he was thirty-one years of age. In 1881 he went to northeast Nebraska, where he bought 550 head of sheep, and rented a ranch and sold profitably in the fall of that year. Came back to Illinois for a short time and then embarked in grocery business at Pueblo, Colo., where he erected a building for the purpose. In 1884 he traded his business for 530 acres of land in Miami county Kans., and this deal proved a mark of good judgment. Finally he returned, with health restored, to the old home farm, the deed for which bears the signature of President James K. Folk. Mr. Todd bought seventy-three acres south of the homestead, and with his father bought eighty more acres. When the father died the mother bought part of the old home farm of ninety acres, the west half of the home farm that was willed to them after her death from tho first family of four children, which Mr. Todd now owns. In 1908 he made many improvements, erecting a commodious and comfortable dwelling together with other farm buildings, having skilled labor employed and all the material within a few miles of haulage. This was something of a contrast to the days when his father had building done here when the pine lumber had to be brought from Albany on the Mississippi Railroad now extinct, and the hardware from Mt. Carroll from Samuel Campbell. He recalls when wild strawberries covered miles of the land and when snakes were all too plentiful to make wandering through the meadow to pick berries an altogether unmixed joy. Grain had to be hauled a distance of 123 miles to find a market at Galena and Chicago, in his boyhood, and provisions could be secured at no nearer point.
Mr. Todd was married December 21, 1875, to Nellie D. Taylor, born March 15, 1859, in Lee county IL, by Rev. Meredith, of the Methodist church, of Sterling, IL. She is a daughter of James W. and Sarah (Kidder) Taylor. On the maternal side Mrs. Todd comes of old Puritan stock and her father, who is one of the honored and venerable pioneers of Carroll county, still lives in Elkhorn Grove township. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Todd: Lilly, who died at the age of twenty-three months; Leroy L., who was born September 3, 1878, a prominent attorney at Seattle. Wash., married Minnie Rowland, of Lanark IL, Vernon S., who was born April 29, 1880, is in charge of the old home farm, married Harriet Ankeny, and they have two children—Stanley V. and Kenneth; Perrilla, who was born iu Colorado, November 30, 1882, is the wife of George R., Bailey, residing at Minneapolis, Minn,, and is connected with the North Western Fuel Company, of that place; Bertha M., who was born August 19, 1885, is engaged in teaching music, at Seattle, Wash.; and Mabelle L., who was born January 24, 1898, at home. All the children have been given excellent educational advantages and Misses Perrilla and Bertha are graduates of tho Northwestern school of music. Hoy and Vernon, were both graduated from same academy at Evanston IL in the scientific course.
Politically, Sir. Todd has always been a Republican and has frequently been elected to important local offices. For six years he was a member of the board of supervisors, has been highway commissioner and has ever been one of the men of progress and enterprise in this section. In 1909, after a sojourn of two years at Seattle, Wash., he come to Milledgeville and by 1910 and completed his elegant residence here, one that is a model of comfort, with a hot and cold water system and modem lighting. He contributes moderately to the Methodist church which he attends with his wife and family who are Methodists, without having identified himself with any. He is a Mason of high degree and a Shriner and both he and Mrs. Todd belong to the auxiliary order of the Eastern Star.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

TOMMAN, D.L.
Of Chadwick, IL whose operations in the real estate business there have had a perceptible effect on the growth and upbuilding of that locality, was born in Salem township, Carroll county, on the 23d of June, 1869. He is a son of Christain and Hattie T. (Harrington) Tomman. The father was a farmer by vocation, living in Salem township during D. L. Tomman's youth; and it was here that the boy gave help to his father with the work and also attended the district school when oportunity offered. Some years later, Mr. Tomman removed to Chadwick IL making his home on Snow Ave., and in Chadwick he has engaged in the transfer of real estate, for some years. He is a man of considerable civil and social Influence in the surrounding territory, and his intimate knowledge of realty valuations developed as it has been through long association with the business there, enables him to handle the transfer of properties wisely and advantageously. He makes a specialty of dealing in western lands.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

TURNER, John D.
Of Mt. Carroll, one of the best known men in his county, who was elected county Judge in 1906, is a descendant of an old and well known family of Pennsylvania. He is a native of Carroll county, born May 22, 1872, a son of Joseph and Harriet (Brink) Turnbaugh, the father a native of Pennsylvania and the mother of Lee county, IL. Joseph Turnbaugh came to Lee county at an early day, was there married, and soon afterward came to Carroll county. He was a farmer by occupation, who died November 22, 1908. His wife died several years ago.
Judge Turnbaugh attended the district schools, Mr. Carroll high school and Beloit College, before entering the law department of Northwestern University, from which he was graduated In 1892, he began the practice of his profession at Chadwick, IL where he remained a year or two, then came to Mt Carroll, where he has since resided. He served as master in chancery from 1898 until his election to the county Judgeship in 1906, and in the fall of 1910 he was reelected, his term to expire in 1914. A stanch Republican in politics he is interested in the welfare and advancement of his county, and Is one of the best-known lawyers in the county, having been in public life since an early age. He is a patriotic son of Carroll county and has most faithfully fulfilled the duties of every office to which he has been called.
Judge Turnbaugh was married April 11, 1900, to Miss Allia Wildey, daughter of William H. and Emily Wildey of Mt. Carroll, and they have one child, Emily Alberta Turnbaugh, born July 30, 1911, at Henrotia Hospital, Chicago, IL.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

TURNER, Silas E.
Among the well-known residents of Carroll county perhaps none are more highly or justly respected and valued for real worth than la Silas E. Turner, a substantial retired farmer now living In his comfortable home in Mllledgevllle, retired from active agricultural labor after many years of successful effort. In large measure he is a self made man, having earnd his way unassisted from early manhood. He was born in Bedford county. Pa., October 23. 1955, a son of Joshua and Elmira (Curley) Turner. The parents were also natives of Bed- ford county. In 1862 they moved to Grantsvllle, Md., and later to Shades Mills, where he engaged in farming and stockraising and still resides there. The mother died in 1900, aged seventy- one years. In politics the father is a Republican and in religious connection is a member of the Reformed church. The family consisted of four sons and five daughters, as follows: Silas E.; Sarah, who is the widow of T. W. Frost, resides at Frostburg, Md., a village named for Grandfather Frost, in whose house the first loaf of bread in the settlement was baked; Annie M. who is the widow of Norman Durst, lives at Shades Mills, Md.; Laura Belle, who is the wife of Norval Layman, a retired farmer in Iowa; Jennie, who is the wife of Rev. Weaver, pastor of a Methodist church in Virginia; Emma, who died at the age of four years: James H., who is a farmer near Shades Mills; and William and George, both of whom reside in this section.
Silas E. Turner was seven years old when his parents moved to Maryland and he attended the district schools through boyhood and learned no trade except farming at which he had early and late experience. In 1877 he started out for himself, going to Nebraska as he had an uncle living near Falls City. He easily secured work on farms in that neighborhood and for three years he worked by the month, receiving reasonable wages and good treatment. However, he was attacked with a disease which knows no tense of time, place, sex or condition, that of home-sickness against which he struggled for a long time. He wished to be able to give a good account of himself before he appeared again in the old home but turned his steps eastward and in 1881 reached Milledgeville, IL. Here he found employment and afterward resumed farm work and gradually became acquainted with the kind people of this section and decided to settle here permanently. After live more years of work, during which time he had saved his money, he married and then became the farmer for his father-in-law and operated the old Miller homestead farm for five years. In 1891 he rented the old Chisholm farm of 640 acres and for five years more operated It on shares. Careful, judicious and industrious, Mr. Turner succeeded well in his undertakings. He resided with his family on the above farm from 1892 until 1897 when he purchased the old Miller homestead situated on section S. Wysox township. Carroll county. He then owned 403 acres of fine land, for which he had paid $60 per acre and when ready to retire in 1911, sold 200 acres for $130 per acre, this being a pretty fair showing. In addition to general fanning he did a large amount of feeding of young stock and made it profitable. In 1907 he purchased his present handsome residence on Thorp avenue, Milledgeville.
Mr. Turner was married in 1886 to Miss Annie Alice Miller, a daughter of the late Daniel M. Miller. They have one child, Laura Belle, who has been given educational advantages of a high order and is a favorite in social circles. Mrs. Turner and her daughter are members of the Brethren church. Politically he is a Republican and is a man who may always be counted on to do his full duty whether in politics, public movements or in purely personal matters. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

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