Carroll County Biographies

WALES, George M.
Formerly mayor of Lanark, is well fitted by nature and experience to fill the highest office In the gift of the city, He is a born leader, popular and intelligent, and in all his actions actuated by good judgment and a high sense of justice. Mr. Wales was born at Polo, Ogle county, and is a son of Horatio and Mary (Williams) Wales, both natives of Massachusetts and early settlers in Ogle county, locating there in 1884. The father was a cousin of Salem Wales, of the firm of Munn, Wales & Company, founders of the "Scientific American,” and Mary Williams was a direct descendant of General Williams, who served in the Revolutionary War and of William Williams, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Horatio Wales and his wife were prominent and well-known In Ogle county, and owned a good farm there. They were parents of nine children. After being graduated from the public schools of Ogle county, George M. Wales attended Clark's Seminary, at Aurora IL and for three years studied dentistry under Dr. Rogers, of Polo. He then practiced the profession at Sterling for three years, abandoning it on account of poor health and returning to the home farm. After carrying on the old homestead for five years, he came to Lanark to join his brother Charles K. who had established a hardware store here in 1865, and remained in that business eight years with successful results. George M. Wales then sold his share of the hardware store and engaged in the grocery business at Lanark, in partnership with William Clemmer, this arrangement lasting two years, when Mr. Wales established himself In a coal, flour and feed business. which he sold four years later to S. McLaughlin, becoming at that time assistant immigration agent at Lanark for the Northern Pacific Railway Company, which position he held seven years, during which time he made several investments in North Dakota farming land. This has proven a very good venture, as the land has been greatly enhanced in value and Mr. Wales still holds a considerable portion of it He also purchased several quarter sections in South Dakota, some six years since. In Lyman county, the value of which has trebled during the time he has held it. He makes several trips each year to his holdings in the Dakotas, and during the last few years has also made several journeys to Florida, where be has purchased several small fruit farms. Since severing his connection with the railway company he has practically retired from active life, devoting considerable time and attention to his large real estate holdings. Besides his other interests, Mr. Wales is a director in the canning company at Lanark, having been active in encouraging the establishment of that industry here, and also was one of the prime movers in bringing a first-class greenhouse business to the city. He was connected with the Carroll county Mutual Insurance Company, having been one of its organizers, and for several years served as one of its directors. Modern and progressive in his ideas, be is one of the most public-spirited men of his community, he owns nine or ten houses in the city and has contributed his share to the general welfare. Mr. Wales was married (first) In 1880 to Viana Fralich, who died childless in 1890, and he married (second) in 1802, Julia A. Champion, daughter of Ferry and Chloe (Chubbuck) Champion, natives of Pennsylvania and old settlers of Carroll county. Mr. and Mrs. Wales have two children: George M. Jr., who was born August 28, 1894, and Althea C., who was born September 7, 1899. It is his aim to educate his children thoroughly, thus providing them with means to fit themselves for whatever comes to them. The family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church and Mrs. Wales is an active member. They own and occupy a handsome residence in the northern part of the city. Mr. Wales is an “Insurgent" Republican and actively interested in public affairs. He has never cared for office for himself, but in 1909, being urgently petitioned by several business and professional men in Lanark to allow his name to he used as a candidate for the office of mayor, consented, and was elected by a large majority.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WALLACE, William S.
Formerly a successful educator and now cashier of the First National Bank, of Savanna, was born October 1, 1867, in Washington county, N. Y., and was reared on a farm. He is a son of Samuel and Mary J. (Miller) Wallace, the father a farmer although he was an engineer in early life and set up and operated the first railroad engine ever used in Ecuador, South America. He came west in 1878 and engaged in farming in Iroquois county IL, living to the age of seventy-five years, dying In January, 1900, bin widow still surviving.
Graduating from the high school at Paxton. IL in 1885, William S. Wallace engaged In teaching school, and in 1893 was graduated from the State Normal school at Normal IL having chosen teaching as a profession, he spent four years as superintendent of schools at Henry IL and in 1897 came to Savanna, where he was five years superintendent of the city schools, for four years afterwards being principal of the township high school, after which he entered the First National Rank as assistant cashier, and in 1910 became cashier, which position he now fills.
On June 20, 1894, Mr. Wallace married Elizabeth Horning, who was born near Rogersford, Pa., daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Horning. Two children have been born of this union: Paul, born at Henry, April 30, 1896, and Mary Elizabeth, also born at Henry, March 8, 1897. Mrs. Wallace was at one time principal of the Savanna high school and is n lady of high culture and mental superiority. She takes an intelligent interest in the various progressive movements among the women of the community and is recognized at a leader among women in her part of the state. Mr. Wallace is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and the Eastern Star. He served as president of the Illinois State Teachers’ Association in 1894-95 and has held various minor offices in educational societies, always enjoying the good will and esteem of his associates and those working under his supervision and has handled the affairs under his charge with unusual ability and tact.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WARNER, Joseph A.
From the ranks of Carroll county's agriculturists have come the men who are advancing the section's Interests. Strong in their belief that the country’s resources have not yet been fully developed, they are directing their energies along the lines of progress, and are not confining themselves to furthering their own interests but are finding time to bring about the advancement of their community’s development along the lines of morality, education and good citizenship. In this class belongs Joseph A. Warner, general farmer and stock raiser of section 6, Lima township. Mr. Warner was born August 30, 1858, in Franklin county, Pa., a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Martz) Warner.
The Warners are of German descent, the grandfather, Isaac Warner, being a native of the Fatherland. The men of the family have always teen agriculturally inclined, and Joseph Warner, the father, spent his life in farming in Franklin county. Pa., where his death occurred about the year 1880. Mrs. Warner died in 1880, when she was fifty-six years old her husband having been sixty-five years old at death. They had children as follows: Isaac, who died when about twenty-four years old; Joseph A.; Clara, who married (first) William Craig, by whom she had these children,— (Jeorge and Iladdle. and married (second) Harry Fowel and hid five children.—Fannie, Lydia, Charles, Dolly and May, and they now reside at Pinder, Neb., Mr. Fowel farming near that point: William, who is a retired resident of Shannon IL, married Mrs. Susan Straw; and two who died In Infancy. Joseph A. Warner received his educational training In the public schools of his neighborhood, and was reared on his father's farm. At the age of eighteen years, he left the parental roof and came to Carroll county, but during the same year returned to Pennsylvania. In 1878 he again turned his face towards the west, locating In Darke county, O., returning, however. In the fall of the same year to his own state. He remained with his parents until 1880, when he went to York county, Pa., where he secured employment In a whip factory, and in 1881 came again to Carroll county and worked for two years or more on the farm of a Mr. Byers in Shannon township.
On July 3, 1884, Mr. Warner wan married to Mary A. Thornton who was born September 6, 1854, In Carroll county, a daughter of George and Annie (Holmes) Thornton, natives of Berkshire, England, where they were married. Mr. and Mrs. Thornton emigrated to the United States In 1851, settling in Cherry Grove township, Carroll county IL, buying a prairie farm from the government. They succeeded In developing a handsome property and became one of the most highly respected couples In their locality. Mrs. Thornton died In 1877, and her husband followed her to the grave In 1883, they having been the parents of the following children: Mary A., who married Mr. Warner: John, who is engaged In farming at Summerville, Tenn.; Elizabeth who is the wife of Robert Cheese man. a retired farmer of Shannon township, mid hits five children; Lewis, who is carrying on operations on one of his father's farms; Francis, who is living at Freeport, Ill.; Harry of Shannon; and Maude and Scott, who are living at home.
After marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Warner settled on the farm on section 0, that is now their home. The property of 160 acres is in a high state of cultivation, Mr. Warner being not only an able farmer and excellent Judge of stock, but also a shrewd, alert business man and efficient manager. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Warner are: Annie who was born January 30, 1885, on the farm as were all the rest; Porter, who was born July 17, 1887, Is one of the progressive young hardware merchants of Shannon; Florence who was born August 10, 1889, married February 8, 1911, Elmer Cheeseman living on a farm near Hein beck, la., issue,—Dorothy, born February 9,1912; John, who was born April 3,1892; and Joseph Walter, who was born April 1, 1894. All of the children have been given good educational advantages, and fitted for any position in life they may be called upon to fill.
Since coming to Carroll county, Mr. Warner has firmly established himself in the confidence of his fellow citizens, while in business circles be is recognized as a man of sterling integrity, he breeds the finest of roadster and Percheron horses for which he finds a ready market in whatever field he offers them for sale. For more than ten years, he has served his community as highway commissioner, for several years he has been a member of the board of supervisors of the county, and for a period covering fifteen years, has feen a director of school district No. 38. For eight years he was president of the Carroll County Fair Association, and being progressive in his ideas, he is one of the directors of the canning factory at Lanark and holds the same office in the Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He has always supported the principles and candidates of the Democratic party, and for some years was a member of the State Central Committee from Lima township. His fraternal connection is with the Modern Woodmen of America. Any movement that makes for the welfare of his community will find in Mr. Warner an enthusiastic supporter. He does not profess the belief of any particular religious organization, but It is a well known fact in his community that the principles of the Golden Rule have been supported by him since young manhood, and that, successful himself, he is always ready to help others less fortunate. The family are members of the United Evangelical church.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WEBER, Henry F.
A progressive farmer and citizen of Carroll county, was born in Salem township, Carroll county, August 5, 1867, a son of Peter and Mary (Schultz) Weber, the former of whom was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, a son of Casper Weber. At the age of fourteen years, Peter Weber came to America with his parents and Joined an older brother, Henry, who was living at Mt. Carroll, Ill. He worked also for a Mr. Dill, in Salem township. Carroll county, and in 1855, when Casper Weber came, he settled In Salem township, where he died In 1881. His widow died in York township in 1887. In their last years they were kindly cared for by their children.
Henry and Peter Weber bought eighty acres of land in Salem township and there engaged in farming, but shortly afterward Henry Weber died and was survived by his widow and one son, Charles C., who lives in York township. The brothers had been closely attached to each other and in 1864, when Henry knew of his approaching death he could see no better way to promote the happiness of his brother and his widow than to request that they marry, which they subsequently did. After his marriage, Peter Weber continued on the old homestead for a time but later sold his interest in the eighty acres, Henry's son Inheriting the other half. Peter then bought 155 acres in York township and in 1880 moved to that place, later adding 160 acres and on his fine farm of 315 acres continued to reside until 1912, when he sold and bought a small farm near Mt. Carroll, Ill. He was one of the best known men in his part of the county, a shrewd business man, successfully carrying on numerous activities. Iu addition to farming and dealing In cattle and stock, for twenty-seven years he operated a threshing machine, starting into the business with one of the old Buffalo- Pitts machines. He then bought a ten-horse power threshing machine and with it threshed thousands of bushels of grain but retired from the business Just about the time that the steam power machines came into use. For years he was a tireless worker, often being out in the saddle looking after his stock all day and into the night, in all kinds of inclemency of weather. He was blessed with an Iron constitution and survived all the hardship and exposure and now with his wife, lives in great comfort, although he manages to and occupation for his leisure time, being one of the men who will wear out and never rust out. His family consisted of five children: Henry P.; Ida. who la the wife of Frederick K. Seim, a farmer in York township; Oscar, who is a farmer in York township, married Adella Rohda; Peter, who died in Chicago, at the age of twenty-two years; and Caroline, who died in Infancy. Peter Weber and wife were reared in the Lutheran Church and have continued to worship there. In politics he is a Republican and has frequently been elected to office for seventeen years serving in the office of pathmaster and coroner.
Henry F. Weber helped his father on the home farm from the age of ten years until he was twenty-two. In the meanwhile attending the district schools when he hod a chance. In 1889 he started to work by the month for a Mr. Heinbough and in the summer of 1890 he was In the employ of Joseph Spralman, after which he returned home and helped his father In the threshing business. In 1891 he bought 120 acres of land in York township, near Argo, and lived on that farm for three yearn, selling ln 1864 and once more returning home, where he lived until his marriage, after which he rented 160 acres in York township, near Argo. In March 1888, he rented another farm, this being the Hathaway farm in Fair Haven township, on which the family lived until December, 1801. On account of ill health, Mr. Welter kept out of business for some five years, residing at Chadwick, until 1896, when the family moved to the original farm of his father-in-law, Emanuel Spralman. In 1897 he embarked in the horse business, beginning with a Suffolk stallion and each year added to his stable, in 1808 purchasing a valuable Percheron. He then admitted a partner, selling a half Interest to F. M. Spralman, and the firm of Weber & Spralman continued until September, 1910, when he sold his interest, Mr. Spralman still continuing the business.
Mr. Weber has 105 acres of magnificent land, devoting 135 to his stock and poultry interests. Probably there Is no man In this section of the state better qualified than he to judge the merits of stock of all kinds, having made a close study of it and while he has expended a large amount of money in securing the finest breeds, he has proven that such expenditure pays. He has long been a breeder of the Duroc and Poland China hogs and Shorthorn cattle, and at the present time of writing has 200 head of the former eligible to register. In both 1910 and 1911 he took premiums of stock and cattle at the Carroll county fairs, receiving nine first premiums on his hogs, one second and three sweepstakes. His estimable wife, not to be outdone, for the past six years has interested herself successfully in raising White Plymouth Rock chickens, having yearly flocks of from 250 to 000 birds. She has no trouble in disposing of her fine stock, demand for the same coming from distant sections and in 1911 she sold fifty roosters for shipment. On January 15, 1890, Mr. Weber was married to Miss Effie May Spealman, who was born on the present home farm adjoining the little city of Chadwick, Ill., December 13, 1873, a daughter of Emanuel and Margery (Tigh) Spealman.
Few citizens of Carroll comity deserve to be more generally remembered with esteem than the late Emanuel Spealman. He was a farmer, carpenter and builder for many years and prior to his marriage, in October 1881, made his home with his brother, Joseph Spealman. He was the seventh son in a family of eleven children, one of whom survives. One of his brothers, Lawson Spealman served all through the Civil War and during this time once had his horse shot from under him. The Spealman family came to Illinois from Maryland. The first land purchased by Emanuel Spealman was a tract of eighty acres known as the Dr. Stephenson farm, where he immediately began to make improvements. The residence was burned down in 1891 but he erected a second one just like the old one. To the first tract of land be added until he owned 320 acres In one body. lie was one of the most enterprising and public spirited men of his day in the county, ready to assist and promote every worthy enterprise, with word, time and money. He was one of the first to take stock in the new hotel enterprise; took stock in the Percheron Horse Company, and was one of the founders of the First National Bank at Chadwick, of which he was a director. He was the real founder of Chadwick, being one of a party of three capitalists to buy its site from the St. Paul Land Company, sixty acres, which they platted. Mr. Spealman began selling town lots and mainly through his efforts and example the venture proved a success. Business firms located here and home seekers came, and having his encouragement in every way, and today it may be said that this town is a monument to his energy and foresight. He was an earnest member of the Evangelical Church and assisted largely in the erection of the present edifice at Chadwick. His busy and useful life terminated July 1, 1893. His widow still occupies the beautiful home he had provided at Chadwick. They had three children: Mrs. Weber, Martin L. and Harvey, the last named being engaged in the drug business at Chadwick. Mr. and Mrs. Weber have had the following children: Joseph P., who was born in York township, February 12, 1897: May M., who was born in Fair Haven township, September 20, 1898; Laura L., born at Chadwick, March 7, 1902; Roy H., who was born July 11, 1901; and Elmer K., who was born September 15, 1908. Politically Mr. Weber has been identified with the Republican party but he is a very intelligent and close thinking man and with the present grave issues presented in his state has decided to exercise his own Judgment in canting his vote. For ten years he has been a member of the village board and for the past five years has been township clerk. He owns stock in the Farmers State Bank and was one of its founders. Since 1911 he has largely interested in the business of buying and shipping stock.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WESTBROOK, William Luther
One of the leading citizens of Savanna, has always been a man of business energy and enterprise and a type of the best citizenship. Mr. Westbrook is a native son of Savanna, born October 1, 1863, a son of Luther H. and Mary Rhodes Westbrook. After completing the course in the public schools of Savanna, he became a clerk in his father's dry goods store and in 1881 entered the firm. This arrangement continued until the death of the senior member, a few years later when Mr. Westbrook became sole owner and proprietor continuing the business until the summer of 1902 when he disposed of his dry goods business to organize the Commercial State Bank of Savanna. The bank's charter was issued In July, 1902, but the institution was not opened for business until the completion of its new banking house in January, 1903. Mr. Westbrook became cashier of the bank upon its organization, and holds this office, which he has filled with success and credit, at the present time. The Commercial State Bank has grown to be one of of the leading and substantial financial institutions of Savanna.
In October, 1885, Mr. Westbrook married Mabel C. Chambers, daughter of Frederick and Laura Chambers, who were among the pioneers of Carroll county, and of this union one child, a son was born, Luther F., who died at the age of twelve years.
Mr. Westbrook. is a member of Mississippi Chapter No. 385, A. F. & A. M.. of Savanna, also Mississippi Chapter O. E. S., and a member of Savanna Camp 113, M. W. A. and for the past eighteen years has been banker of the latter order, he served fifteen or more years, oh member of the school board but retired from this office a few years since. One of his services to tbe public is the part he had in securing from Mr. Carnegie the donation for the Savanna library, and was for many years a member of the library board, being on it when the present library building was erected.
At present he is president of the Savanna Township Cemetery Board of Trustees, and has filled many offices of private as well as public trust. He was one of the administrators of the large estate of Bothwell Pulford, probably the largest ever probated iu Savanna, and was true to his trust in this as well as in all other matters. Mr. Westbrook stands high in business and fraternal circles, as well and favorably known, and has many friends.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WILLIAMS, Wallace F.
Of Mt. Carroll, who for several years operated a farm near that city, was elected in 1906 to the office of sheriff of Carroll county. He is one of the best known and most popular men in the county and has given faithful service in the position of honor and trust to which the people called him. He was born at Pleasant Valley, Jo Daviess county, Ill., December 28, 1859, a son of John and Margaret (Rock) Williams, the father n native of Pennsylvania and the mother of Danville, Ill. John Williams was a boy when his parents came went and his father was a native of Wales, who came to Pennsylvania and spent some years in the coal mines there, then located in Jo Daviess county and engaged in farming. John Williams served in the Union Army and died in February, 1863. Margaret Rock was a daughter of George and Clarinda (Snoddy) Rock, and moved with her parents to Wisconsin, where her father died. When she was thirteen years of use the family moved to Jo Daviess county, where she met her future husband. Mrs. Williams now lives in Mt. Carroll. Of the three children born to her and her husband, Wallace F. was the oldest: one died in youth, and the other is Mrs. Lizzie Heed, and lives in Jo Daviess county.
Mr. Williams was reared on a farm and received a common school education. In 1890 he came to Carroll county and located on a farm in Salem township, four miles from Mt. Carroll, which he brought to a high state of cultivation. He had served two terms as collector in Jo Daviess county prior to his election in 1906 as sheriff of Carroll county on the Republican ticket. Fraternally he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being now noble grand of Carroll lodge No. 50, and is also militated with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Court of Honor.
On September 29, 1885, Mr. Williams married Montana V. Laughrin, of Pleasant Valley, Ill., a daughter of John and Margaret (Price) Laughrln and four children were born to them: Temperance Blanche, who is Mrs. Ward Neuschwanger of Carroll county; Orrin J., who served under his father as deputy sheriff; John H., who died in infancy; and Marlon R. Mr. Williams retained and conducted his farm while serving as sheriff.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WOLF, Amos
The Exchange State Bank of which substantial institution Amos Wolf was president, was established by his father, John Wolf, and opened for business at Lanark, Ill., April 2, 1878, as the Exchange Bank, and has since had a continuous and healthy growth. In 1908 it was incorporated under its present name. John Wolf was the proprietor of this bank for five years after its establishment, when the firm of Wolf Brothers & Roland was formed. The latter conducted it twenty-five years. This bank is one of the leading establishments of its kind in Carroll county with a capital stock of $50.000, and belongs to the State and American Bankers Association.
John Wolf was born at Martlnshurg Va., May 25, 1818, and when six years of age was taken by his parents, John and Elizabeth (Middlekauff) Wolf, to Washington county Md., where he resided eighteen years, meantime receiving a good education. In 1841 he came to Illinois, spending one year in Ogle county, when he located near Lanark and began farming, loaning money and Investing in land. In 1878 he established a bank nnd continued Investing extensively in land in the vicinity. He was a Whig before the inception of the Republican party, which he Joined in 1850 never forgetting the time of the Lincoln-Douglas debate in Freeport, when the committee came to his farm In Freedom township and asked him to bring his big Pennsylvania wagon and six horses (almost the only horses in that part of the State) to drive Mr. Lincoln to the hall from the Brewster House. With these he had brought his family and household belongings from Maryland to Ogle county. His son Amos Wolf, had some of the furniture in his own home which was brought to Illinois in this way. The committee asked him the night before the debate and he readily consented, being from that time on a great admirer of Mr. Lincoln. Mrs. Wolf died in 1873 but he survived until 1896, and both are buried in Lanark, having been the parents of eight children. They were members of the Christian Church.
Amos Wolf was born in Carroll county, January 1, 1815, and after receiving his education in the public schools. In 1868 engaged in farming in Salem township remaining there one year, when he went on a farm In Hock Creek township remaining there until 1892. at which time he came to Lanark and took a position as cashier in the bank which had been established by his father. Mr. Wolf continued as cashier until 1908 when he was succeeded by his nephew. Guy Wolf, becoming president, which office he retained until his death. Having been closely identified with the bank for a number of years, he was representative of the best financial interests of his city and county. Mr. Wolf owned and occupied one of the handsomest residences in tbe beautiful city of Lanark and was one of the leading men in his community. Successful in his agricultural operations he also brought under his able management, the affairs of the bank to a prosperous condition.
In 1907 Mr. Wolf was married to Miss Susan Sword, daughter of Henry and Hannah (Martin) Sword, and they had the following children - Ada A., who is Mrs. Dysin of Carroll county; Carrie H., who is Mrs. Earlsman of Lanark; Franklin G. who is a farmer of Lima township; Ora M. who is of Los Angeles, Calif.; Albert L., who in deceased: John K. who is a graduate of an engineering course in the University of Illinois was in the employ of Allis Chalmers Company, then taught manual training at Whiting. Ind. and is now in charge of his father's estate. Mr. Wolf was a member of the Christian Church and for several years served as a deacon and trustee. He was a Republican in politics and much interested in local affairs, but cared nothing for public life, being a business man of excellent judgment who was successful in his investments and ventures but not an office seeker. The family is an old one in Lanark and enjoy the respect and esteem of all with whom they are associated. Until the death of Mrs. Wolf, she and Mr. Wolf passed a number of winters in California. This most estimable lady passed away on September 26, 1910, and is laid to rest in Lanark cemetery. Mr. Wolf died in 1912.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WOLF, David
A resident of Lanark IL and for many years a successful farmer In Carroll county, was born In Freedom township, on the 19th of April, 1847, a son of John and Mary Ann (Howland) Wolf. The father wan a native of Virginia and came to Illinois that that might follow his chosen vocation, agriculture, in the virgin soil of this state. The home farm furnished the environment In which David Wolf was reared to manhood, dividing bin time, as circumstances would permit, between assisting in the operation of the farm and attending the schools of the neighborhood. In both of these branches of his education he secured for himself a practical knowledge and experience which were the foundation of his later success in the community. When school days were over he immediately settled himself onto the carefully planned routine of the life of a farmer and to this work he has always devoted the major part of his interest.
David Wolf was married to Miss Mary E. Sword on the 21st of January 1870, in Cherry Grove township, where his wife was born on the 13th of December 1849.
Mr. Wolf in his religion connection is a devout member of the Christian church. He is a stanch prohibitionist. Mr. Wolf Is the present owner of eight hundred acres of well-improved land in the vicinity of Lanark; and os also a director of the State Bank of Lanark.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WOLF, John E.
Belongs to one of the old and substantial families of Carroll county, has shown great good judgment and much business capacity in the management of the large interests of his father, Amos Wolf, of whose estate he is administrator. John E. Wolf was born in Rock Creek township, Carroll county, July 7, 1885. The late Amos Wolf was born in Carroll county, and was a son of John Wolf, who was here on 1841 and settled in what was practically a wilderness. To a large part of his accumulated property his son Amos fell heir, and he in turn, was equally judicious on his investments, and at the time of death, while visiting in California, in the winter of 1911-12, owned many broad cultivated acres and had other assets including stock in the Exchange State Bank of Lanark, Ill. John E. Wolf attended the public schools in Rock Creek township and later those of Lanark, and was graduated on 1900, from the Lanark high school. In the fall of that year he entered the Illinois State University, where he took a four years' course in the mechanical engineering department, which he completed with the class of 1909, after which he accepted a position as erecting engineer with the Allis-Cbalmers Company, at Milwaukee, Wis. He proved the value of his training and successfully handled the work assigned him and continued until 1911, when he resigned and accepted a position as operating engineer at Grand Rapids, Mich., in the municipal pumping and lighting plant. In August 1911, he was elected by the board of education of Whiting, Ind. as superintendent of the manual training department, and continued in that position until December of that year, when, on account of falling health, he resigned and returned home. The death of his father succeeded and John E. Wolf was in charge of the large estate which includes 1300 acres in Carroll county, 320 acres in South Dakota and a twenty-five-acre orange grove near Covina, Calif. this aggregating 1045 acres over which Mr. Wolf has control as administrator.
On March 7, 1910. Mr. Wolf was married to Myrtle B. Pollock, who was born at Cincinnati, Ohio January 22, 1884. and is a daughter of William and Clementine (Braun) Pollock. The parents of Mrs. Wolf died In Cincinnati. She has one brother. Clifford W. Pollock, who is now private secretary to the collector of customs at Cleveland. O. In June, 1012, Mr. Wolf purchased a beautiful residence In the southeastern port of Lanark, where many friends have since been royally entertained. In politics Mr. Wolf is a Republican and he is intelligently and deeply interested in all public matters and readily lends his Influence to advancing the welfare of the community in which he has his home. Mr. and Mrs. Wolf have one son, George Clifford, born November 20, 1912.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WOLF, John R.
A leading citizen of Rock Crook township, well known in business and politics and one of the county's largest land owners, was born and reared on a farm as has been the case with the larger number of the legitimately successful men of the country. He belongs to an old settled and honorable family of this section, extended mention of which will be found in the sketch of his brother, Amos Wolf, in this volume. He was born in Freedom township, Carroll county, February 1, 1851. There his boyhood was spent, alternating with attendance at the district schools and healthful exercise on the home farm, and he grew to manhood with his main interests concerned with agricultural activities.
Mr. Wolf remained on the old homestead until he was thirty-one years of age and then moved on what was known as the Mellinger farm, in Cherry Grove township, and remained on that place for nineteen years, moving then to an eighty-acre tract, near Lanark, on section 6. Rock Creek township. Mr. Wolf has acquired a large acreage in Illinois and this includes his home farm of eighty acres; 280 acres of the homestead; 110 acres on the Mellinger tract and 240 acres adjoining it; 100 acres east of Lanark and several town properties of considerable value. He has interests also in Georgia, Oklahoma and Missouri, together with 800 acres in Adams county, N. Dak., and 400 acres in Yakima county, Wash. Mr. Wolf, by no means, has confined his business activities to the accumulation of valuable lands although his undertakings in this direction have been large and important.
He in one of the firm of Wolf Bros. & Roland, grain dealers and elevator men at Lanark, and the president of the Exchange State Bank. This was started as a private bank but after its reorganization, November 1, 1908, Mr. Wolf became vice-president, his brother, the late Amos Wolf, being president, and at the death of the latter he became the head of this flourishing institution.
On February 6, 1872, on the Mellinger farm in Cherry Grove township, Carroll county, Mr. Wolf was married by a relative. Rev. John Wolf, to Miss Emma C. Mellinger, a daughter of Henry and Sarah (Wolf) Mellinger. The father of Mrs. Wolf was one of the earliest settlers of Carroll county and spent his entire subsequent life engaged in agricultural pursuits, his death occurring at Dixon, Ill., in advanced age, his wife having passed away on the farm. They were laid to rest in the Lanark cemetery. Seven children survived them: Anna, Emma, Edward. Ellen, Alice, Mazie and William. To Mr. and Mrs. Wolf the following children were born: May, who is the wife of F. A. Sword, and they hare two children—Grace and Joy; Sybil, who is the wife of H. M. Howland; Guy, who married Mary Nycum; Grace M. who resides at home; Lloyd D. who married Pearl Zillinger, and they have one child—Dorothy H.; and Fred, who has home interests. Mr. Wolf and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In his political affiliation Mr. Wolf has always been a Republican and while desiring no public office for himself he has been a loyal party man and has heartily supported men and measures that have appealed to his public spirit and sense of citizenship.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WOODSIDE, J. Frank
The Woodside family are worthy of extensive mention in this volume, the parents of J. Frank Woodside, being among the pioneers of Carroll county, where they were highly reflected and esteemed. He is a son of Joesph and Henrietta (Esbleman) Woodside, both of whom died while he was a child. The father was in an undertaking business in Lanark, which he started in 1861. He died June 15, 1870. His wife died In 1866, and both are burled in the Lanark Cemetery.
J. Frank Woodside was born June 15, 1862 in Lanark. After finishing his course in the Lanark public schools be learned tho trade of painting and decorating, and later spent a number of years in contracting in these lines in partnership with Ed Meyers, after which he for several years conducted the same business alone. He has been active in the interests of the Republican party ever since attaining his majority and being well known and respected as a man of sterling integrity and good judgment, has taken a prominent part in local affairs. He retired from business about ten years ago to accept the office of city marshal which he still holds, and also served fourteen years as constable and two years as deputy game warden. He has the confidence of his party leaders and the general public and in August 1910, his name was placed before the primaries for nomination to the office of county sheriff, the result being he was defeated by but a small majority. Modern and progressive in business he ever has in mind the beat interests of the public. Is a man n good judgment, was successful in building up a fine business, and now owns a beautiful home in the northern part of Lanark. He Inherited considerable property from his parents and has handled his personal affairs in an able and judicious manner, so that be is well provided for in this world's goods. While not a member of any church, Mr. Woodside governs his actions by good principles and believes in the equality of all mankind before the law.
Mr. Woodside was married in October 1894 to Miss Cora B., daughter of Christian and Anna Speicher, old residents of Lanark, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Woodside are parents of three bright daughters: Henrietta E., born July 4, 1896, a student in Lanark High School; Mildred A. born February 17, 1901; and Josephine, born February 14, 1908. Mr. Woodside is a member of the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic Order and of the Knights of Pythias of Lanark, where he has spent his entire life.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

WRIGHT, James A.
For twenty-four years, he has faithfully and effectively followed his noble profession at Fair Haven, Ill., and perhaps there is no better known resident. He was born in Randolph county Ill., December 22, 1858, and is a son of John and Lucinda (Royd) Wright, and a grandma of Stephen Wright. It was the grandfather of Dr. Wright who way the founder of the family in Illinois and he was a pioneer in every sense. He was born in Virginia and married there and when his son John was yet small removed to Ohio and from there some years later, came to Illinois, settling in a wilderness in Randolph county, where he secured heavily timbered land at $1.25 per acre. On a stream of water he erected his log cabin and later developed an excellent farm and he and his sons became men of consequence in that section of Illinois.
John Wright, father of Dr. Wright, was born in Virginia in 1828, and was eleven years of age when his parents settled in Randolph county. In 1849 he married Lucinda Boyd, who died in 1899, at the age of seventy-three years. John Wright died in 1896. All his life he was temperate in his habits and his health and vigor kept with him into old age and even then he could crush a hickory nut in his teeth. He and his wife were early and earnest members of the Presbyterian Church. Thirteen children made up their family but five of these passed away in infancy, five sons and three daughters survived to maturity and four sons and one daughter still live: William K., who is a practicing physician at Manistique, Mich.; George W., who is an auctioneer, with home at Ellis Grove, Ill.; John W, who is a retired farmer living at Sparta, Ill.; Joseph Luther, who is a farmer near Sparta; and Ida C., who is the wife of Joseph Wood, residing near Sparta.
James A. Wright spent his boyhood on the home farm and attended the district schools. His parents were anxious to see him suitably educated and he was sent to McKendree College at Lebanon IL where he completed a two-year course with the class of 1885. He then entered the Beaumont Medical College. St. Louis Mo., having taught school for a time previously, as he was determined to provide for his medical education through his own efforts. Thus he spent several summers traveling in the interest of the Deering Harvester Company and attending school and lectures during the winters, and was creditably graduated with the class of 1888. He located first at Percy IL, but in April, 1880, established himself in practice at Fair Haven, where he continued until 1906, when he spent two years in practice at Chadwick, but his old friends and patients then prevailed on him to return and in 1908 he resumed practice in the pleasant town where he has remained ever since. Dr. Wright was married (first) October 24, 1888, to Miss Mattie Fair, who was born at Sparta, Ill., a daughter of the late William Fair. Two children were born of this marriage; Leatha Wright, who was born March 31, 1901, married John Adolph, a farmer of Fair Haven; and Howard, who was born January 18, 1898. Mrs. Wright was a devout member of the Evangelical Church at Fair Haven, and died January 31, 1898. On August 24, 1904, Dr. Wright was married (second) to Miss Nellie Thompson, who was born in Whiteside county, June 2, 1876. a daughter of William H. and Bertha Louise (Hoover) Thompson. The father of Mrs. Wright is a retired farmer of Fulton, Ill. Dr. and Mrs. Wright have two children: James L., who was born March 1, 1906; and Vada Belle, who was born November 3, 1900.
It Is not much of a problem to solve the secret of Dr. Wright's success as a physician, for he is well equipped professionally and has the personality that Is so absolutely necessary to a medical man; the sympathetic manner combined with firmness and the interest in every patient that attaches to each real physician. He is a constant student, owning a fine library and is a subscriber for all the leading medical publications. Dr. Wright puts up all his own prescriptions and owns modern appliances of all kinds to assist in his surgical work. He is frequently called into consultation with other physicians and saves time in visiting his patients by making use of his automobile. He is a member of the county and State medical societies. In politics, Dr. Wright is a strong Republican and in the spring of 1911, after a hard campaign struggle, was elected township supervisor by a large majority. He has been much interested in school affairs and has been a school director ever since locating in Fair Haven. Fraternally, he is identified with Lodge No. 1220, F. & A. M.. at Chadwick, and belongs also to the M. W. A. and the Mystic Workers.
While Dr. Wright has earned his way into the confidence of the people through his professional skill and his sterling qualities as a man, he has also proved a good business man and has acquired considerable property. When he came here he had certain obligations to discharge and was dependent on his practice. He now owns 640 acres of fine land in the Province of Saskatchewan. Canada, forty town lots there, two more at Outlook. Canada, two at Vancouver, British Columbia, and 100 acres of fine farm land in North Dakota, together with home and other property at Fair Haven.
Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of Carroll County
Edited by Newton Bateman, Paul Selby, Charles Linnaeus Hostetter
Chicago: Munsell Publishing Co 1913 VOL 2

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