Welcome to Illinois Genealogy Trails

Sick List Newspaper Gleanings



©Except where noted, these were transcribed by K.Torp



Mr. John GALBREATH, in going home from town where he had been to mill, late one night last week, with a two horse wagon, drove off of a bridge over a small ravine on the Ashmore road, about three miles east of town, and severely hurt one of his horses. He had to cut the harness, which was new, nearly all to pieces before he could extricate the unfortunate animal. Fortunately, Mr. G. and the other horse escaped with slight injuries. The bridge was about six feet above the bed of the stream. [March 21, 1867 - Charleston Courier]


N.P. WILLIS is said to be lying at the point of death [5 May 1858 - Charleston Courier]



Wm. KENNEDY has returned from the south apparently improved in health. [The Plain Dealer... April 23, 1868]

Charley BRIGGS was thrown from a horse, the other day, and badly hurt. [The Plain Dealer... April 23, 1868]

Mr. UNDERWOOD of the Courier, mashed his hand, severely while feeding press, a day or two ago. [The Plain Dealer... April 23, 1868]


Thursday, April 26, 1877 - Charleston Courier


Jim Hazelton, of the "Maples" at Charleston, who was injured in that dreadful railroad accident at Ashtabula on the 7th of December, reached home yesterday. We learn that the back of his head and one of his legs, below the knee, were very seriously injured, and he show indications of having endured great suffering. [Mattoon Gazette quoted by the Newton Weekly Press Jan. 25, 1877]


Thursday, April 19, 1883 - Charleston Courier

On Monday Mrs. Hannah MONROE and Mrs. John MARSHALL, both being in poor health, started upon a visit to Eureka Springs, Arkansas, expecting to be absent several weeks.

Miss Lulu FANCLER (Fancier?) is very sick with lung fever.

Mrs. O.T. CURD is confined to her room with rheumatism.

D.H. CALVERT is somewhat better than at this time last week.

Sebern ASHBY, while loading a revolver shot his thumb.

Miss HOUSE of Paris, Ill., has trance-like sleeps, during which, as she and her friends believe, she visits heaven. She gives what purports to be accurate, and certainly are elaborate, reports of what she sees in these celestial trips. It is claimed, too, that she describes persons who died long ago, and about whom she can of herself know nothing. [Thursday, April 19, 1883 - Charleston Courier]


April 23, 1885 - Charleston Courier

Dr. H.C. Barnard, looking better and stronger than for the last ten years, has returned from Pierce City, Mo., and will at once resume the practice of medicine.

Mrs. Sue Traver was very low with congestion Sunday.

"The actor, F.G. White [or Whits] who used to come to Mattoon occasionally a few years ago, has become insane, and last Saturday went to the insane asylum." From the Arcola Record (Douglas County) and reprinted in the Mattoon Gazette, Friday, 13 November 1885 [Contributed by Src #168]

Miss Clara Jones stepped on a nail, which penetrated her foot through the shoe. She is very ill in consequence thereof." From the Arcola Record (Douglas County) and reprinted in the Mattoon Gazette, Friday, 13 November 1885 [Contributed by Src #168]


April 22, 1886 - Charleston Courier

I.P. Gray is able to be up town, but too week (sic) to work.

Mrs. Lucy Haselton's little daughter, Lizzie, is dangerously sick with typhoid fever.

Dr. Fry, assisted by Bridges and Paugh, amputated a part of the foot of young master Hart, Tuesday. It will be remembered that during Goodyear's removal he had the misfortune to get his foot crushed under the safe. The physicians hoped to save the foot entire, but were compelled to cut off the toes. He has gotten along bra vely with it, and it is hoped will now speedily recover. [Mattoon Gazette (Mattoon, IL) • 8 Jan 1886, Fri]



1887
J.J. Beall has been quite ill with bilious fever since Thursday last. [The Plain Dealer...Thursday, April 21, 1887]

......(can't read)...Silas Barnes' drug store. Mr. Barnes is still in poor health. [The Plain Dealer...Thursday, April 21, 1887]

Mrs. Wm. Craig, of Hickory township, is quite ill with lung trouble. [The Plain Dealer...Thursday, April 21, 1887]

Mr. Z.C. O'Hair, whose leg was broken two weeks ago, is rapidly improving. A number of the members of Mullen Grange, of which Mr. O'Hair is a member, gave him a plowing party the other day, and turned over a good area of ground for him. [The Plain Dealer...Thursday, April 21, 1887]

Robert Mayfield, of Saylor Springs, a brother of Mrs. J.O. Brown, was in our city last week visiting the family of Joseph Liston. He reports his sister, Mrs. Brown, who went to the springs this spring to recover her health, as greatly improved. Mr. Brown, also, is greatly pleased with their new location. [The Plain Dealer...Thursday, April 21, 1887]

Mrs. James McNutt has been suffering with a sore throat, but it is better. [The Plain Dealer...Thursday, April 21, 1887]

We visited Uncle Levi Doty last week and found him on his bed, where he has lain for three years and suffered untold misery. Mr. Doty is one of the oldest settlers of Coles county, having come here in 1825 and lived here ever since. He was born in Kentucky in January, 1806, being now nearly 82 years old. He is surrounded by a host of children and grand-children who care for him in his old age and afflication. [The Charleston Plaindealer, Thursday...April 21, 1887]

Newton Walden is on the sick list (Hickory Twp) [The Plain Dealer... Thursday, June 23, 1887]

The little daughter of Mr. J.C. Braddock is suffering from what seems to be a mild attack of biliary derangement. The two sons, Fred and Alfred have been taking their first lessons in harvesting. Their career hitherto has been almost exclusively in the city; but they take hold of farm labor in a manner that would elicit commendation from an Agricola. (Hickory Township) [The Plain Dealer - July 28, 1887]

Judge Peterson has been quite ill for several days, but is somewhat better now. He is still in feeble health, however. [The Plain Dealer - July 28, 1887]

Mrs. A.N. Bain was seriously Sunday night, but is better now. [The Plain Dealer - July 28, 1887]

Circuit Clerk J.J. Beall was taken very ill, Tuesday.... [The Plain Dealer - July 28, 1887]

Mrs. George Huson has been very ill since Sunday having had a number of attacks of cholera morbus. [The Plain Dealer - July 28, 1887]

Mrs. William Snow is quite ill with typhoid fever. [The Plain Dealer - July 28, 1887]



1888
Janesville: Measles are thick as hops. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Hindsboro: Mrs. Samuel Johnson is very sick. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Bushton: John Ferbrache is on the sick list. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Bushton: Miss Anna Gerard returned home last Saturday after a few days in Charleston with her sister-in-law, Mrs. Charley Gerard, who has been very sick. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Loxa: Mrs. J.T. Talbott, who was seriously hurt some time ago, is reported a little better. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Hardin: Mr. Walton has a sick boy. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Hardin: The measles are here at last. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Hardin: Mrs. Ed Lee is on the sick list. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Hardin: John Williams, one of our promising young men, is very sick with lung fever. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Lerna: Dr. Leitch is again able to be out. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Lerna: Miss Allie Rhea, Lerna's popular milliner, is at the bedside of her sick mother in Neoga. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Farmington: Minnie Harris is quite sick. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Farmington: Jno. Cain says indications are still good for the measles. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Ashmore: Fount Davis has a sick boy. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Ashmore: Mrs. Jane Hogue, of St. Omer, and L. M. Colson, of this place, are still quite poorly. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Ashmore: Mrs. Joe Phelps met with quite an accident Wednesday, by falling from a spring wagon and breaking an arm. [The Plain Dealer - April 14, 1888]

Miss Belle Barnard is still very low with but little hopes of her recovery.[The Plain Dealer - Either April 5 or April 12, 1889 - the newspaper says both]

Editor Peck, of the Mattoon Gazette, has been limping around all week - the effects of an encounter with a Town Cow, we suppose.[The Plain Dealer - Either April 5 or April 12, 1889 - the newspaper says both]



1890
Janesville: Martin Brady's least child has been quite sick - little better at present. [The Plain Dealer - April 11, 1890]

Unity Chapel: Mr. Geo. Gideon's health is improving. [The Plain Dealer - April 11, 1890]

Loxa: Uncle John Hurst is better at this writing. [The Plain Dealer - April 11, 1890]

Dick Brown was intoxicated Saturday night and in attempting to get on a freight train at Greenup to beat his way to Mattoon, got caught between two bumpers. His foot is so badly mashed that amputation, it is thought, will be necessary. He was warned against making any effort to board the train but he took his chances with the above result. [From the "Toledo Democrat" by the Newton Press, Dec. 17, 1890]


Engineer Billy DeShane of the Clover Leaf got despondent and silly and took a bottle of laudanum Wednesday night but the doctors pumped him out. - Charleston News The Mattoon Gazette, 13 January 1893 [Contributed by Src #3]

April 6, 1893 - Charleston Courier




1896
One of Tom Brown's children is not expected to live at this writing. [Oakland Messenger, Oakland, IL, 15 Jan 1896 (Jan 1897?) - Contributed by Src #2]


1922
Sol Diehl of Charleston received $1,567.50 in compensation for injuries received on May 19, 1924 when a "clam shell" bucket fell and struck his leg and foot. He claimed he had lost partial use of the limb. He was employed by Etchison & Patterson, road paving contractors who were laying the slab on route 16 when the accident occurred. [June 7, 1922 - Charleston Courier]

1911

Raymond Hawkins May Not Recover
Isabel, IL, March 20- Raymond Hawkins, age 6 years, is lying in a very serious condition at the home of his parents, Mr and Mrs William Hawkins who reside near Isabel, as the result of being run over by a horse.
About 8 o'clock Sunday morning Mr Hawkins went to the barn to turn the horses late a pasture (sic) and was unaware that his son had followed him. The horses started to run when let out of the barn and one of them ran against the little fellow knocking him down and rendering him unconscious. It is thought that the horse's hoof struck the boy behind the ear as this portion of the head is injured.
He remained in an unconscious condition until Monday morning and the attending physician gives out little hope for his recovery. - [Paris News, reprinted in the Oakland Messenger - 23 Mar 1911- Contributed by Src #2]

Mrs Maud Shaw, formerly Miss Maud Parker, sister of Claud Parker of this city came over from Terre Haute last Wednesday to spend a short time with her sister Mrs O. F. Swinford who is slowly improving from her long seige of typhoid. [Oakland Messenger 30 Nov 1911- Contributed by Src #2]



1922
Miss Ruth Rose of Windsor submitted to an emergency operation Thursday night for appendicitis. [The Mattoon Journal ~ Gazette. April 21, 1922, Contributed by Src #3]

Mrs. O.L. Sowers of Hidalgo has arrived at the hospital to take treatment. [The Mattoon Journal ~ Gazette. April 21, 1922, Contributed by Src #3]

Patrick J. Anderson, 2920 Richmond Avenue, submitted to a major operation Thursday afternoon. [The Mattoon Journal ~ Gazette. April 21, 1922, Contributed by Src #3]

Mrs. T.N. Kendall of Lafayette Heights submitted to an emergency operation this morning. [The Mattoon Journal ~ Gazette. April 21, 1922, Contributed by Src #3]

Miss Lydia Thilker, who underwent an emergency operation for appendicitis several days ago, is reported doing well. [The Mattoon Journal ~ Gazette. April 21, 1922, Contributed by Src #3]

Mrs. Catherine Fisher of DeSoto, Mo., who has been at the hospital for treatment to a badly fractured limb, has been moved to the home of her sister, Mrs. C.C. Brooks, 2521 Richmond Avenue. [The Mattoon Journal ~ Gazette. April 21, 1922, Contributed by Src #3]


Rev. W. W. Wilson of Kewanee has been at the bedside of his sister, Miss Mary Wilson, who is dangerously ill. [Charleston Courier, Thursday March 12, 1925 - Contributed by Src #2]

Dr. Harold Day spent the weekend with his father, Rev. Day, at Vincennes. Rev. Day is in very poor health. [Oakland Messenger - Thursday March 12, 1925 - Contributed by Src #2]

Marion Logan Hurt in Route Accident
Marion Logan, resident of Ashmore township, was badly injured Saturday afternoon when the horse he was riding on Route 16 slipped and fell with him in front of the Garden Spot, a half mile east of Ashmore. Logan sustained a painful wrench of the right knee and will be forced to use a cane for some time. Fortunately he sustained no fractures. [Charleston Courier - May 19, 1930]

Scarlet Fever
The home of Jim Dean in the southeast part of the city was placed under quarantine for scarlet fever Wednesday. A child of Mr and Mrs Everett Duzan, this city, also has scarlet fever. [The Oakland Messenger 27 Mar 1930, Contributed by Src #2]





©K. Torp and Genealogy Trails