Records of the Wiley Brick Church
©2000, Transcribed by Kimberly Torp

This was found at the Illinois State Historical Library as seven loose type-written sheets. The original transcriber, Samuel Stephen Sargent deserves credit and our gratitude for this work even though it doesn't appear to have been formally published. Within the text, Mr. Sargent mentions "today" as being January 1945 and says the church was still standing at that time.

In addition to the church records, you'll find some genealogy notes for some of the families which Mr. Sargent added onto the last page.

All spellings are as in the original and the names are in the original order. (Please don't email me telling me that I misspelled a name) Use your browser's "FIND" function to search for names.

Wiley Brick Church

Here's a picture of the Wiley Brick Church before it was torn down. Many thanks to Mary Overmeyer for this picture.

Also written by Samuel Sargent, a letter about the Wiley Brick school district



The following letter was written by Samuel Sargent to his nephew Loren Lee on February 18, 1933. Loren had written him asking for his help with an essay he was writing in his 8th grade class. The Essay was on the Wiley Brick School District. Attached is a map hand drawn by Mr. Sargent.

512 Isabel Street
Los Angeles, Calif.
February 18, 1933

Dear Loren:- I am glad to help you all I can on the essay. I will write what I know in the arrangement you had it in your papers, and you can use as much of it as you want. As I will take some pains to cover all the subjects, you might file this away in your treasure box and keep it for future time, as by the time your children grow up much of this information may be impossible to get, and it might be valuable to some one later on in the course of time.

Introductory Remarks about the Community of the Wiley Brick School District.

This community is an integral part of the broad expanse of country known as the Mississippi Basin, of the Middle West. The land is rolling and best adapted for grazing purposes, although when the best of the soil is properly rested and taken care of, it will produce grain with the best of any soil. Horticulture might have an equal place with grazing, but this phase of agriculture has not been exploited to any marked extent.
Due to the heavy rainfall which washes the rolling land, the loss of the surface-soil is very considerable, which necessitates the proper protection against such erosion.
The practice of diversified farming was first adopted through necessity by the first farmers and has been carried on throughout the years. No one branch of agriculture has had precedence over another.
The Township of Hutton, of which this community is a part, has always been noted for the industry of hog raising, and one might be safe in saying that in the years of the past, it could rate with any community of equal size, in the raising and feeding of hogs, as a comparison in volume of business.
The land is cut by the numerous ditches and creeks which carry away the water.
Location
This community is located in the eastern side of Hutton Township, within Town II North Range 10 East and Town 12 North Range 10 East, composed mainly in whole or part of sections 11,12,2,1 of the former part and sections 35 and 36 of the latter description.
A general description of the community is that it lays in the water-shed of the Mississippi River, drained in turn by the embarrass River, the Wabash River and the Ohio River which empties into the Mississippi River.
The land is mostly in the Mattoon Moraine, which has a general direction of North east and South west.
Size
This school district covers approximately four square miles.

Topography
The land is rolling or undulative, cut into ravines, hollows, and rather low hills by the many ditches and creeks which carry off the water. However the South east corner of the district in sections 11 and 12 is level or glade land and might be classed as part of Parker Prairie.

Early History
This community lays in what was a vast wilderness, covering the Eastern and Middle Western part of the United States. Most of it until the coming of the white man, was covered with the lofty verdure of the forest which sweep over hill and dale, shadowing a fertile soil. Here and there were green openings where deer and wild animals grazed on the grass. This prolific wilderness was but a hunting-ground for a few fierce hordes of savages. On the rich meadows opening to the sun, they pitched their tents, where the squaws with their rude implements, grew maize and beans.
The solitude's of the forest was only broken by the whoop of the Indians, or the noises of the wild game. Indian arrow-heads and tomahawks found over the hills, are evidence that the Redmen roamed this region.
The Indian with his ruling passions of revenge, envy, jealousy, and warring ambitions, ruled the land with the tomahawk, bow and arrow.
At the time of the coming of the first whites to this region, the Kickapoo Indians used this territory as their forest home. Small tribes of this group lived throughout this section. However they gave very little trouble to the white men, other than stealing.
Spain was the first country to claim ownership of all the land in the Mississippi Basin, by the right of Discovery. Her armored soldiers with their battle-axes and flashing swords have marched over this region.
France in turn occupied and controlled the country, which was to be a part of her horse-shoe empire to enclose the British in along the Atlantic coast. Her colonies occupied the St. Lawrence valley, extending their settlements over the Great Lakes region, thence down the Mississippi River, with a base at New Orleans. In southern Illinois her soldiers built one of the strongest forts on the American continent. It was located on the Mississippi River near Prairie du Rocher. The structure was of stone and cost the French government a million dollars. It was a rallying point for all the Indian tribes in this region who were friendly with the French. Here also the French Coureures de bois (traders) made their headquarters, to dispose of their furs which they had collected in the far west form the Indians. These traders roamed all over this region.
An old French trail angled across the western side of Hutton Township, which possibly was a branch of the one on the other side of the river, used by the French in going from Fort de Chartres to the lake region possible striking at Detroit, where they had a fort. It was an overland route used as a short cut between these two points, and no doubt many cavalcades of French soldiers have followed it in those far off romantic days.
After the French lost control the English ruled until General George Rogers Clark captured Fort Chartres and Vincennes, during the Revolutionary War, after which the American government came into control.
The State of Virginia claimed the land first, then it passed into the Northwest Territory, under a territorial government located at Vincennes. General Harrison kept the Indian tribes under control from his post at Fort Vincennes. Here the Indians traveled annually to collect the gifts and presents form the United States Government, which bribed them to remain peaceful.
The angling road which passes through the Sargent farm, know as the "Palestine" or "York" road is said to have been an old Indian trail, possible used by the Indian tribes of the Northwest going towards the Kentucky hunting grounds.
The first American known to penetrate this region was Levi Doty, who came possible up this trail and settled over in what is now Charleston Township, near the south west corner. History says he came first about 1818. He was soon followed by the Parker families. There were two of these families, one settled on Parker Prairie and the other on the Embarrass River, near where the new State highway crosses. The latter one came in 1824, at which time they took up government land, called "Congress Land", at $125 per acre.
Tradition says that a battle was fought near where this bridge is by a company of rangers, or surveyors, from southern Illinois, and a band of Indians. There isn't any authentic records of it, so we will have to depend upon what the pioneers have told.
While this history doesn't directly cover the history of the Wiley Brick district, yet it indirectly affects it.
It must be held in mind that this section was settled late in the history of Illinois, as the State was admitted to Statehood in 1818. Other sections of the State had received many settlers, mainly the southern or the Wabash county, and along the Sangamon River.
The land diagram will give the names and dates of the respective settlers and where they entered the land.
First Settlers
Henry P. Engle seems to have been the first to have taken up land within the district. Not much is known about him, but he must have been related to the Engles who lived about over Hutton Township in later years. Henry Cox lived and owned the Engle land. Whether Engle built the house or one before the one Henry Cox lived in, is not known.
James and Anthony Cox were brothers it seems and were some of the first settlers. Adam Cox who took up the second entry, which was in 1833 was also a brother. This entry is known now as the Stephen Sargent homestead, who traded Richard Easton out of it. There was an old log house on it when Sargent got it, whether Adam Cox or Richard Easton built it, it not known.
Richard Easton was quite a prominent man in this part of the country when it was new. He originally came from Kentucky and was said to be a great hunter and land judge. Pioneers came to him for information about land. He lived in Clark County before coming into what is now Hutton Township. He served on several road commissions for surveying and laying out new roads. One of them was the road which started at Richwoods, a settlement east of where Westfield is now, and angled south west, to strike the National Road, near where Greenup is located at present. This road crossed the Sargent farm, and the old imprint of the road can be located just west of the Stephen Sargent home, in the woods, and north of the John Sargent home going down through the woods. It was near where the old Wiley Brick school house first stood, which was built of logs. This building possibly was located on this road. Then it angled on through the Goble neighborhood.
Down in the Hutton neighborhood the marks of the road can be seen but it must not be confused with the old road known as "The Pinhook Road" which came over near Salisbury. Oakland at one time was called Pinhook. This road angled south west from Pinhook, and was a much more used road than the other.
As this road which Richard Easton helped to lay out crossed the old York Road about where the ditch is, north west of the Stephen Sargent home about two hundred yards, it looks as though Easton rather expected there might be a chance of this being an important crossing, and this may have had some bearing on his taking out land in this immediate vicinity, in fact the forty where they cross.
Richard Easton had a large family and several of the boys entered land about the neighborhood. He finally removed across the Embarrass River, over in what is now Pleasant Grove Township. He may have died there as some of his children lived there. He was the progenitor of the Easton family in Hutton and Coles County.
Reason Wiley was one of the large families who emigrated to a point south west of Paris, which was the first settlement in Edgar County. Here the family lived for a few years, then removed to what is now called the Dudley neighborhood south west of Ashmore, where several of them settled and died. Another brother Samuel Wiley lived in an old log house in the Dudley neighborhood and he and his wife Hester were buried in the Wells cemetery near there. They were the great-great-great-grand parents of Loren Lee.
Reason Wiley lived in a log house which stood south of the road on what is now known as the John Richardson farm. This Wiley family are buried in the old cemetery on the creek bank about half mile north of where this house stood, know as the Stewart cemetery.
Owen Wiley a son of the Reason Wiley, also lived and owned this farm. He was a Captain in the Civil War of K Company, which was mostly recruited from Hutton Township. This Company was a part of the 123rd Regiment, which had the distinction of being one of the few regiments in Wilder's Brigade, the only brigade to be armed with Spencer rifles in the Army of the Cumberland under General Thomas. It was a mounted infantry brigade, and theirs was a brilliant service, as they were called upon to do much special service.
They were thrown into a gap during the battle of Chickamauga, when the boys in gray were about to route the Union Army. General Longstreet who commanded the Division which was pressing boys in blue at this point, said he never saw men stand more firm than Wilder's Brigade did at that time. The men of Wilder's Brigade were placed about fifteen feet apart and their repeating Spencers made it very hot for the Rebels, so much that several charges were repulsed and time given for the Union Army to get organized.
From this battle the Brigade was taken out and sent after General Wheeler who had a large body of cavalry and was creating havoc in the rear of the Union forces. They soon drove Wheeler back across the Tennessee line after the battle of .
In 1871 Owen Wiley was elected sheriff of Coles County. Later on he removed to Casey, Illinois, where he died and was buried in the cemetery there.
The school was named after the Wiley family, also the church and cemetery.
Nathaniel Lee was a member of a family who first came from Virginia or New Jersey. It was a large family and all the Lee families of Coles and Clark Counties came from this one. He was the great-great-grand father of Loren Lee.
Peter Garrison who lived on the line along the south side of section eleven was one of the early settlers and was a pioneer doctor, as was his wife, who practiced after Mr. Garrison's death.
Burgess Burkley lived outside the school district, but owned land within it. He was the progenitor of the Berkley family. He first came from Culpeper County Virginia, and was of the same family in that state which was so prominent in its early colonial history.
The Walker family was a large one in the early history of Hutton Township. There were several branches, more or less related, living in the locality. Stanley B. Walker was a preacher of the Baptist faith and his activity was not negligent, but comprehensive.
Jacob Cottingham lived on the east side of section eleven and was the son of George L. Cottingham, one of the few Revolutionary War soldiers to settle and live in Hutton Township. It is stated in history that he was a boot-maker for George Washington, during the war.
William Weaver was a very prominent man in the history of the locality; while he entered land in this community, he never lived in it as far as is known. His home was up near the creek in the Law neighborhood. He is said to have been the first man to set out an orchard in the Township.
John C. and Alexander Davis were members of the same family by that name who live in the Township today.
Stephen Sargent came to the Township in 1838 or 40, from New Richmond (Westfield), where he had operated a pioneer store since 1836. This was his first attempt at farming as he had followed the stone-masons trade in Louisville, Kentucky, since he was a boy. He engaged in the occupation of flatboating hogs down to New Orleans from Louisville on several occasions. The hogs in the shape of feeders were loaded on the boat, with enough corn to last till the market was reached, and the fattening process took place as they drifted down the rivers. By the time they reached the destination, they were ready for market.
There were many other pioneers who came and went in the years following the first comers, but it would take too much space here to enumerate them all.
I might name several farmers who lived in the community in the years of my generation, who were rather successful. I will name those only of large land holdings.
In the northeast section of two was John Richardson, who owned several hundred acres of land, and who had his farm improved with good buildings and fences. His home was a two story house surrounded with shade and fruit trees. He was an extensive cattle feeder.
In Section one was Adam Cox, another large land holder, cattle feeder, and successful farmer. He was the son of Anthony Cox a first settler.
John Sargent who inherited much of the estate of his father Stephen Sargent, had at one time one of the best improved and located stock farms in this section. It was a pretentious outlay of buildings and equipment.
Clabourn Fuqua, while not living within the district, but a few paces from the shout east corner, owned the south east forty acres of section eleven. He was noted as one of the most successful farmers in this region, with extensive land holdings mainly on the road to Casey. He practically owned one of the banks in Casey at one time.
William Henry Berkley who lived on the east side of section twelve had as well improved a farm as could be found around this region, well set out in hedge rows, which he kept trimmed perfectly. His home set back from the road, which was approached through a lane of hedge rows, and the house in a grove of large shade trees made as beautiful a home as one could wish. He was very meticulous in all that he did.
Most of these men started without much aid and became outstanding farmers and land holders in their communities.
There are others who lived in the community who I might mention, although not so successful in gathering this world's goods.
There was Nathan Austin who lived about one half mile south of the school. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk War and very prominent in the politics of the Township.
Henry Beavers who lived just across the road west of section tow was a soldier in the Civil War, as were many others of the locality.
The Stewart family was quite large, although they lived north of the district.
The Wiley Brick church was organized in 1871 by David Campbell, and their first church building is the one which stands adjacent to the school yard.
Westfield was organized in 1839. It was known then as New Richmond and was the main trading center for this region. It was on the old Archer Road which angled up from Marshall.
In 1851 the Asiatic Cholera spread throughout the country and many were the victims of it in this locality. People were panic stricken, left their homes, and would not associate with each other. Whole families died without any attention from a doctor or a neighbor. It was even hard to get men to bury the dead. The cemeteries give testimony to the fact that many people passed away from this disease.
There were no stores or places of business in this community as far as I have been able to determine. If there were any mills within the borders of the district I am unable to state where. The earliest settlers took their grain to the Parker Mill on the Embarrass River to have it ground.
The houses of the first settlers were of logs, cut and hewed from the virgin forest standing over the ground. Their barns were built of the same material. Before the land could be farmed it was necessary to cut and burn the trees which stood thick upon the fertile land. This necessitated considerable work and gave rise to the large log rollings that furnished amusement and log rolling contests for the settlers at their gatherings. Men vied with each other to lift the largest log. At night the country was lighted up with great glows from the burning piles of logs, where clearing was in progress. It is hardly necessary to mention that millions of feet of first class oak lumber went up in smoke, as there was nothing to do with it. There were no saw-miles and logs that would make the finest lumber in the world was just debris to be destroyed the easiest way.
The first Wiley Brick school house was made form logs. When it was built I know not. Paul (Sargent) might tell you about when it was moved to the present site.
Oxen were used mostly in the early work about he farms and hauling products to market. As roads improved they were supplemented by horses which could draw loads much faster.
Wagons served the purpose of carrying the family to church, visiting, or to town. It looked very aristocratic for a farmer to have a two or three seated sping-wagon. Roads were almost impassable in the winter and spring of the year, so horseback riding was a most common mode of travel. The first mail delivery through this region came by a horseback delivery man from down on the Wabash, possibly York, Palestine, or Darwin.
I guess I have covered about all the historic part of your essay and the other you can get from others around home. I hope this will help you some. As I haven't more time I will close hastily, without checking the typing mistakes.

Yours truly,
(Signed Sam Sargent)


Record of the Church of Christ of the Wiley Brick Church

Transcriber of Records: Samuel Stephen Sargent, Charleston, IL, c. 1945

"The Wiley Brick church is located near the south west corner of the forty acres, the south west of the north west section I T11N RICE Town of Hutton, Coles County, Illinois.

There seems to be no date written when this Church house was built. The deed for the cemetery adjoining was recorded September 22, 1886. Deeded by Adam and Mary Cox to the trustees to wit:

William Davis, Adin Wiley, John Stewart and Adam Cox and their successors, one square acre in the north east corner of the south east quarter section 2 TIINRICE. Quit Claim Deed.

The building still stands today Jan., 1945, but it has not been used for some years except for funerals. It is constructed of brick, facing the south where the two doors are on either side of the alter. The congregation sit divided, the women on the east side and the men on the west. The middle tier of seats are divided with a partition down the middle, all the way back to the wall. It was heated by two wood stoves on either side of the house near the middle north and south. The cemetery is specified as the property of the Christian Chapel. It takes its name from the fact that the building site was the property of the Wiley family, whose father Reason Wiley and his wife Elizabeth Hicks had settled upon soon after their emigration from Kentucky, where they had lived in Bracken County on Locust Creek some four miles up from the Ohio River. Their home was a story and a half log house which stood on the present site of the John Richardson home now owned by Emerson Mann and his wife, she being a daughter of the former. Elizabeth (Hicks) Wiley is buried at the south side of the Wiley lot in this cemetery, without a marker and her husband was buried north of their home about a quarter of a mile in the Stewart Cemetery on the bank of the creek.

The first date in the Church book is that of Feb. 23rd 1885, however there was a Church organization several years prior to this date as can be seen by deaths recorded of members."

(Webmaster's note: Unfortunately, Mr. Sergent did not tell us what the abbreviations he used stood for. However, a small "d." in front of a date probably means death; capital D. could possibly mean dismissed/discharged; W. = withdrawn?; D.M. = ?; D.L. = ?, R = Reclaimed?). Also, Mr. Sergent used shorthand notation of the year, i.e. '71. To avoid confusion, I've added the 18 or the 19 in front of the year)

Church Roll

Name

When Joined

Baptised

Who Bapt.

Consequence

Matthias Beavers Sr.

Dec. 29, 1871

Dec. 30, 1871

David Campbell

d. Feb. 1, 1897

Elizabeth Beavers

Dec. 29, 1871

Dec. 30, 1871

David Campbell

d. Jan. 12, 1887

Nancy E. Beavers

 

 

David Campbell

W. Aug. 14, 1892

R. Jan. 31, 1893

Dicy Beavers

 

 

Thos. Goodman

d. Apr. 1906

Wm. Beavers Jun.

 

 

D. Campbell

d. Mar. 1880

William Beavers Sr.

 

 

D. Campbell

d. Feb. 25, 1882

Mary A. Beavers

 

 

 

D. by removal

Mar. 30, 1884

Sarah Eliza Beavers

 

 

 

d. 1920

Susan Beavers

 

 

 

d.

Hannah Beavers

 

 

J.C. Young

D. by letter

Magie J. Beavers

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

d. Dec. 1880

George A. Beavers

 

 

D. Campbell

 

---- Beavers

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

 

Amanda Beavers

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

 

Della Beavers

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

 

Rosa Brandenburg

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D. by removal

Dec. 13, 1885

Jackson Beavers

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

d. Nov. 24, 1882

Jane Beavers

 

 

D. Campbell

D. by removal

Dec. 13, 1885

John Bennett

Jan. 29, 1884

 

 

D.L. Mar. 26, 1888

Emily Beavers

Nov. 5, 1883

 

 

D.M.

James Brown

Feb. 4, 1884

Feb. 5, 1884

W.H. Williams

W. Nov. 30, 1884

R. Jan. 30, 1888

Mathias Beavers

Feb. 28, 1885

Reclaimed

 

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Hannah Beavers

Feb. 28, 1885

By relation

 

D. by R.

Solomon Beavers

 

 

 

d. 19--

Mary E. Cox

 

 

D. Campbell

d. Sept. 1921

Elijah Connoly

 

 

 

d. Dec. 25, 1915

Lucinda Connely

 

 

 

d. Feb. 5, 1919

Anna Connely

 

 

D. Campbell

D.L. Mar. 26, 1888

Mary Cox

 

 

D. Campbell

 

Adam Cox

 

 

D. Campbell

d. Oct. 15, 1908

Sarrah Connely

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

 

Milton Carol

 

 

 

D. Mar. 30, 1884

Lucinda Cooper

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D. Mar. 30, 1884

Ann Cox

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D.R. Dec. 13, 1885

Malisse Cartright

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D.R. Dec. 13, 1885

S.P. Davis

 

 

Alvin Wiley

d. June 1, 1918

Mary E. Davis

 

 

 

 

Ezekiel Downey

 

 

A. Wiley

D. by L.

Ella Downey

 

 

 

D.R. Dec. 13, 1885

Mary Downey

 

 

 

D.L.

Martha Davidson

 

 

I.N. McCash

d. Apr. 12, 1883

Erastus Davidson

 

rebaptised June 3, 1888

A. Wiley

D.R.

G.W.Davis

Oct. 8, 1883

Oct. 9, 1883

W.H. Williams

 

Elen E. Davis

Jan. 27, 1884

 

 

 

William Davis

Nov. 4, 1883

 

 

 d. Nov. 17, 1894

Elen Davis

Jan. 29, 1884

Jan. 30, 1884

W.H. Williams

d. Apr. 16, 1912

Joseph Dotson

Feb. 4, 1884

Feb. 5, 1884

W.H. Williams

 

Jane Dotson

Mar. 3, 1884

 

 

D.L.

William Dotson

Mar. 5, 1884

Mar. 5, 1884

W.H. Williams

D.L. Jan. 20, 1888

Mary Dotson

Mar. 5, 1884

Mar. 5, 1884

W.H. Williams

D.R.

Mary Fuqua

 

 

D. Campbell

D.R. Mar. 30, 1884

Mary Gulman

 

 

D. Campbell

d. 1884

Hannah Fritt (er) (a)

 

 

A. Wiley

D.R. Dec. 13, 1885

Elmer Garrison

Apr. 15, 1883

Apr. 16, 1883

J. Tipsourd

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Laura A. Louden

 

 

Thos. Goodman

D.L. Mar. 17, 1907

Sarrah E. Lee

 

 

 

 

J.T. Lee

 

 

 

D.R.

Molie Lee

 

 

 

D.R.

Janie Lee

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D.R.

George Pauley

 

 

Alvin Wiley

W. Aug. 14, 1892 - Re. (Jan. 28, 1894 - d. Dec. 18, 189?)

Malisse Pauley

 

 

A. Wiley

W. Nov. 22, 1898

Charles McNary

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D. for bad conduct (Mar. 30, 1884 - Re. Mar. 19, 1891 - W. Aug 14, 1892)

Mrs. Price

 

 

 

 

Hiram Mullen

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D.R.

Vad Parker

Mar. 2, 1884

 

 

 

Alta Parker

-- 4, 1884

 

 

W. Nov. 22, 1898

Elmer Jackson

-- 5, 1884

Mar. 5, 1884

W.H. Williams

 

Lafayette Riggins

 

 

T. Goodman

d. Dec. 1, 1890

Elizabeth Riggins

 

 

T. Goodman

d.

Pauliney Riggins

 

 

 

d.

Nelie Ross

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D.R. Mar. 30, 1884

Susan Stewart

 

 

 

D.L. Apr. 1900

d. Dec. 17, 1903

Julia A. Stuart

 

 

T. Goodman

 

John Stuart

W. Nov. 30, 1884

Re. Dec. 27, 1885

W. Nov. 23, 1898

 

 

Jessey Strader

 

 

 

W. Nov. 30, 1884

d. 1908 (?)

Martha J. Strader

 

 

D. Campbell

d. 1904

Nancy Strader

   

J.T. Brandenburg

d. Mar. 8, 1884

Rosetta Strader

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D.R. Mar. 30, 1884

Nancy B. Stuart

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

D.R. Nov. 22, 1898

Louis Strader

 

 

 

D.R.

Millie Smith

Mar. 1, 1884

 

 

D.R. Dec. 13, 1885

E.J. Stuart

-- 4, 1884

Mar. 5, 1884

W.H. Williams

D.L. Nov. 3, 1889

Alvin Wiley

Jan. 17, 1867

Jan. 18, 1867

B.B. Tyler

D. by R.

Lydia Wiley

 

 

Elder Bursus

D. by R.

Elizabeth Wiley

 

 

 

d.

Mary A. Wilcox

d. Aug. 13, 1922

 

D. Campbell

D.R. to Stringtown

Re. Oct. 3, 1915

Esther Wilcox

Age 16 yrs

 

T. Goodman

d. Dec. 20, 1933

Edgar Wilcox

 

 

T. Goodman

D.R.

Nancy J. Williams

 

 

J.T. Brandenburg

 

Wm. H. Williams

funeral by T.V. Nidy

 

 

d. Apr. 11, 1908

Rosa Williams

Reclaimed Feb. 10, 1886

Withdrawn Aug 14, 1892

 

D. for conduct

d. 1900

Zebedee Wiley

Feb. 4, 1884

Feb. 5, 1884

W.H. Williams

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Zelda Wiley

Apr. 6, 1884

Apr 7, 1884

W.H. Williams

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Levi Arbuckle

 

 

 

D. for conduct Mar 30, 1884

Elen Arbuckle

 

 

T. Goodman

died

Dollie Turner

Sept 9, 1882

Sept 10, 1882

J.T. Brandenburg

d.

Richard Riggins

Feb. 2, 1885

From U.B. Church, rebaptised by W.H. Williams

d. Jun 30, 191?

Adeline Riggins

Feb. 3, 1885

From U.B. Church, rebaptised by Jas. Stewart

Dec 20, 18??

Charles Riggins

Feb. 2, 1885

bapt

 

d. July 1897

Mandila Riggins

Feb. 4, 1885

Mar. 5 

W.H. Williams

 

Mary Mullen

Feb 5, 1885

 

by relation

D.M.

Emma Parker

Mar. 21, 1885

rebaptised

From Baptist - rebaptised by Jas. Stewart

 

Henry Devee

May 3, 1885

May 4, 1885

W. H. Williams

D.L. Mar. 1, 1891

Robert Beavers

Nov. 23, 1885

Nov. 24, 1885

Jas. Stewart

D.M.

Elizabeth Gobson

Feb. 7, 1886

 

 

d. Jan. 1894

Vincent Lowery

Feb. 8, 1886

Feb. 9, 1886

Alvin Wiley

W. Mar. 23, 1891

Lawrence Beavers

Feb. 8, 1886

Feb. 9, 1886

Alvin Wiley

D.M.

Jerry Hoy

Feb. 9, 1886

Feb. 10, 1886

Alvin Wiley

D.M.

Joseph Lowery

Feb. 10, 1886

Feb. 11, 1886

Jas. Stewart

D.M.

Emanuel Riggins

Jan. 13, 1887

By relation

 

 

Roseline Riggins

Jan. 13, 1887

By relation

 

 

Ida White

Jan. 13, 1887

From M.E. Church

 

D.M.

R.C. Hodge

Jan. 13, 1887

   

W. Mar. 23, 1891

Anna Worth

Jan. 22, 1888

Feb. 1, 1888

Wm. H. Williams

D.M.

Leona Ashby

Jan. 24, 1888

Feb. 1, 1888

Wm. H. Williams

 

Hanna Beavers

Jan. 2, 18888

Feb. 1, 1888

   

Allice Goodman

Jan. 2, 1888

Feb. 1, 1888

   

Etta Beavers

Jan. 26, 1888

Feb. 1, 1888

Wm. H. Williams

d. July 31, 1922

Sarah Robinson

Jan. 27, 1888

Feb. 1, 1888

Wm. H. Williams

d.

Retta Brown

Jan. 29, 1888

by relation

   

Sarah A. Ashby

Jan. 29, 1888

by relation

 

d. 1897

Geo. Downey

Jan. 29, 1888

Feb. 1, 1888

Wm. H. Williams

D.L.

Anna Philips

Jan. 30, 1888

N.R. Church

 

D.M.

Dr. Worth

Jan. 30, 1888

by relation

 

d.

Louis Martin

Jan. 31, 1888

Feb. 1, 1888

Wm. H. Williams

 

Wm. Green

Feb. 1, 1888

by relation

   

Eliza Green

Feb. 1, 1888

by relation

 

d.

Cora Parker

Feb. 1, 1888

Nov. 2, 1888

Wm. H. Williams

 

James Cox

May 27, 1888

June 3, 1888

A. Wiley

d. Oct. 5, 1890

Mrs. Davidson

May 27, 1888

June 3, 1888

A. Wiley

D.M.

John Garner

June 24, 1888

July 10,

A. Wiley

d.

Louis Beavers

Aug. 24, 1888

Aug. 26,

Wm. H. Williams

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Eva Beavers

Aug. 24, 1888

Aug. 26,

Wm. H. Williams

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Laura Cox

Aug. 26, 1888

Aug. 26,

Wm. H. Williams

d. Dec. 23, 1888

Louella Cox

Oct. 24, 1888

Oct. 25,

A. Wiley

D.L. Aug. 5, 1915

Mary Davee

Oct. 25, 1888

From the Church of God

D.L.

Mrs. Law

Oct. 25, 1888

by relation

 

d.

Sarah Law

Oct. 25, 1888

by relation

 

D.M.

Amanda Thomas

Oct. 20,

Nov. 2,

Wm. H. Williams

D.M.

Elizabeth Cox

 

by relation

 

d. Dec. 1890

Alonzo Thompson

Feb. 5, 1889

 

I.G. Lamb

W. Aug. 14, 1892

Robert Stewart

Feb. 10, 1889

 

I.G. Lamb

D.R. d.

Nancy Wells

Jan. 19, 1891

by relation

 

d. Sept. 16, 1898

Bryant Wells

Jan. 19, 1891

 

A. Wiley

D.M.

Chas Thompson

Jan. 20, 1891

U.B. Church

 

W. Aug. 14, 1892

Hannah Law

Feb. 15,

 

S.C. Hill

 

Jenie Parker

Mar. 15, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

 

Lily Beavers

Mar. 15, 1891

   

D.L. Jan. 18, 1915

Name

When Joined

Baptised

Who Bapt.

Consequence

S.A. Cox

Mar. 15, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

 

Claudus Cox

Mar. 15, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

d.

Loma Williams

Mar. 16, 1891

by relation

 

d. Sept. 28, 1900

Martha Williams

Mar. 16, 1891

Baptist

 

d. April 7, 1908

John Riggins

Mar. 16, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

D.L. Sept 18, 1910

Emma Riggins

Mar. 16, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

 

Mary Riggins

Mar. 16, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

d. 1906

Thomas Williams

Mar. 19, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

d.

David Towles

Mar. 22, 1891

by relation

 

d.

Mollie Strader

Mar. 18, 1891

 

S.C. Hill

d. Oct. 13, 1900

Amy Law

Oct. 19, 1991

 

S.C. Hill

d. Sept. 3, 1898

Tho. Beavers

Feb. 26, 1892

 

S.C. Hill

d.

Jas. A. Parker

Feb. 28, 1892

 

S.C. Hill

 

Mathias Williams

Feb. 29, 1892

   

d.

Peter Chambers

Mar. 6, 1892

by relation

 

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Henry Towles

Jan. 26, 1893

 

Bro Hudson

D.L. Dec. 20, 1903

Amanda Towles

Jan. 26, 1893

from Baptist

 

d. date unknown

Milton Lowden

Feb. 1,

Baptised

I.I. Hudson

d. Dec. 24, 1894

Sylvester Lemons

May 21,

Baptised

I.I.Hudson

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Mary A. Sloan

Jan. 7, 1894

by relation

 

D.L.

Wm. Fogleman

Jan. 24, 1894

 

Bro. McCash

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Christie Goodman Dallas

Jan. 28, 1894

 

Henry Towles

 

Jas. Pauley

Jan. 28, 1894

 

McCash

d. Jan. 1895

John Pauley

Jan. 28, 1894

 

McCash

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Julia A. Trader

Jan. 28, 1894

 

H. Towles

D.R.

Sarah N. Trader

Jan. 29, 1894

 

H. Towles

D.R.

Wm. Beavers Jun.

Jan. 30, 1894

 

McCash

 

Lucy Beavers

Jan. 30, 1894

 

McCash

 

John Beavers

Jan. 30, 1894

 

McCash

d. date unknown

Alice Black

Jan. 30, 1894

by relation

 

d. Jan. 30, 1899

Flora Montgomery

Nov. 18, 1894

by relation

 

D.R.

Minnie Riggins

Dec. 6, 1895

 

A.I. McCash

d.

Minnie Cox

Dec. 6, 1895

 

A.I. McCash

D.R.

Drucilla Beavers

Dec. 8, 1895

 

A.I. McCash

D.R.

Nan Beavers

Dec. 8, 1895

 

A.I. McCash

W. Nov, 23, 1898

Wm. Collins

Oct. 30, 1895

 

H. Towles, M.E.

D.R.

Wm. Richards

Nov. 2, 1895

by relation

H. Towles, M.E.

D.R.

Sarah Richards

Nov. 6, 1895

 

H. Towles, M.E.

D.R.

Nancy Beavers Hacker

Nov. 6, 1895

   

d. Dec. 6, 1912

Orpha Parker

Nov. 6, 1895

 

H. Towles, M.E.

D.R.

Stephen N. Jackson

Nov. 7, 1895

 

H. Towles.

Re. by Letter

Nellie Towles

Mar. 2, 1896

 

H. Towles

D.L.

Charles Towles

Mar. 2, 1896

 

H. Towles

 

Lily Baker

Mar. 3, 1896

 

H. Towles

 

Frank Towles

Apr. 26, 1896

 

D.E. Towles

D.L.

Katie Beavers

June 14, 1896

 

H. Towles

 

Margaret C. Ingram

June 20, 1897

 

Wm. Dudley

W. Nov. 23, 1898

Della Bidle

Oct. 24, 1897

 

Wm. Dudley

 

Carrie Belle Davis

Nov. 22, 1897

 

H. Towles

 

Minnie M. Davis

Nov. 22, 1897

 

H. Towles

 

Jane Mullen

Nov. 19, 1898

 

D.E. Towles

 

Lily B. Davis

June 18, 1899

 

A.I. McCash

 

Della F. Davis

June 18, 1899

 

A.I. McCash

 

I.W. Wilmar

Oct. 15, 1899

 

A.I. McCash

L. from Baptist

D.L. Mar. 17, 1907

M. McKee

Nov. 12, 1899

by relation

A.I. McCash

 

Maggie Helmbrecht

Nov. 19, 1899

 

A.I. McCash

D.R.

John W. Beavers

Nov. 20, 1899

 

A.I. McCash

d. Feb. 1, 1908

Nan Beavers

Nov. 20, 1899

 

A.I. McCash

 

John Riggins

Sep. 29, 1901

 

SamL Piety

 

Helen Beavers

Oct. 16, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Frances Beavers

Oct. 16, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Mollie Garner

Oct. 16, 1904

by relation

T.V. Nidey

 

Maud Garner

Oct. 16, 1904

by relation

T.V. Nidey

 

Minnie Hacker

Oct. 16, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Edward Hacker

Oct. 16, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Emma Beavers

Oct. 20, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

d. Mar. 23, 1912

Viola Beavers

Oct. 20, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Grace Beavers

Oct. 20, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Elsie Beavers

Oct. 20, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Oral Beavers

Oct. 20, 1904

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Clen Davidson

Jan. 15, 1905

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Joseph Smith

June 17, 1905

by relation

T.V. Nidey

d. date unknown

Henry Brooks

June 18, 1905

by relation

T.V. Nidey

 

Clara Louden

Oct. 15, 1905

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Alexander Conley

Oct. 17, 1905

 

T.V. Nidey

d. May 6, 1920

Mollie Davis

Oct. 18, 1905

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Alta Davis

Oct. 18, 1905

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Dovie Davidson

Nov. 19, 1905

 

H. Towles

 

Earl Garner

Dec. 17, 1905

 

T.V. Nidey (minister today 1945)

Fred Fasig

Mar. 4, 1906

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Lillie Fasig

Oct. 26, 1906

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Nellie Beavers

Oct. 26, 1906

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Jessie Garner

Nov. 20, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Anna Riggins

Nov. 20, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Tillie Cox

Nov. 20, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Emma Evans

Nov. 24, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

date unknown

Hezekiah Evans

Nov. 24, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Hugh Garner

Nov. 24, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Russell Dotson

Nov. 24, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

d. Oct. 11, 1918

Harman Davis

Nov. 26, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Curtis Riggins

Nov. 26, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Arthur Horsley

Nov. 26, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Jossie Jackson

Nov. 28, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Ethel Jackson

Nov. 28, 1907

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Henry Beavers

Feb. 9, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

d. 1914

Dessie Beavers

June 14, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Jas. Doty

June 14, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Harry Garner

June 14, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

d. Dec. 31, 1917

Davis Garner

June 14, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Sollie Beavers Jr.

July 12, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Earnest Beavers

Aug. 8, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Oscar Conley

Aug. 8, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Cora Dotson

Aug. 8, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Ivory Dotson

Oct. 25, 1908

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Roy Doty

Jan. 2, 1909

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Clara Beavers

Jan. 2, 1909

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Joel G. Conley

Sept. 12, 1909

 

T.V. Nidey

 

Alice Conley

Sept. 12, 1909

 

T.V. Nidey

d.

Lloyd Riggins

Mar. 12, 1911

 

Bro. Leach

 

Edith Riggins

May 14, 1911

 

Bro. Leach

 

Belle Garner

May 14, 1911

 

Bro. Leach

 

Fannie Conley

May 14, 1911

 

Bro. Leach

 

Nellie Reed

July 30, 1911

 

H.C. Towles

d.


Record of the Church of Christ at the Wiley Brick Chapel, Hutton Twp., Ill., of those who obeyed the Gospel and united with the Church

Name

 

Date

Preacher

Opal Conley

obeyed the gospel

Oct. 18, 1911

H.V. Leach

Iris Garner

obeyed the gospel

Oct. 18, 1911

H.V. Leach

Esther Conley

obeyed the gospel

Oct. 18, 1911

H.V. Leach

Maud Riggins

obeyed the gospel

Oct. 18, 1911

H.V. Leach

Janie Beavers Blagg

obeyed the gospel

Oct. 20, 1912

T.V. Nidy

Iris Conley

obeyed the gospel

Oct. 20, 1912

T.V. Nidy

Stella Dotson

obeyed the gospel

Oct. 20, 1912

T.V. Nidy

Fara Conley

obeyed the gospel

Dec. 9, 1914

H.W. Cuppy

Willis Scott

obeyed the gospel

Mar. 7, 1915

H.W. Cuppy

Daisey Dotson

obeyed the gospel

June 6, 1915

H.W. Cuppy

Gertrude Davis

by relation

Sept. 27, 1915

 

Hamilton Tefft

by obedience

Sept. 29, 1915

 

Albert Riggins

by obedience

Sept 29, 1915

 

Nolla Riggins

by obedience

Oct. 3, 1915

 

Mary Wilcox

by relation

Oct. 3, 1915

d. Aug. 13, 1922

Mrs. H.W. Towles

by relation

July 30, 1917

H. Towles

Leah Conley

by relation

Aug. 5, 19178

H. Cuppy

Mary Garner

by relation

Oct. 28, 1912

T.V. Nidy

Stella Garner

by relation

Oct. 28, 1912

T.V. Nidy

Joseph Groves

by relation

June 9, 1918

H. Towles

Walter Davis

by obedience

June 9, 1918

H. Towles

Homer Goodman

by obedience

1918

H. Towles

Lloyd Conley

by obedience

1918

H. Towles

Lilly Riggins

relation from Kemp, Ill

1918

H. Towles

Letter:

Hugo Church of Christ, June 24, 1895: This is to certify that Bro. Stephen N. Jackson has been a member of our Congregation, worshiping near Hugo, Illinois and that he is in good standing and full fellowship with us and he being desirous of transferring his membership to another Congregation more convenient of him, he is hereby commended to the Christian care and fellowship of any Church of Christ where his lot may be cast, and when he is received by them will be discharged from us. Done by order of the Elders this 24th of June, 1895. L.L. Parker, Ch. Clerk.


Received

Mrs. Earl Garner placed her membership July 1922

Mrs. Hugh Garner placed her membership March 25, 1923


Henry Towles and Joseph Dotson chosen Elders and Geo. Davis, John Riggins and Claud Cox, Deacons, May 2, 1909.


We the unsigned agree to pay A.J. McCash the amount apposit (sic) our names for preaching, commencing the second Lord's day in June 1885 and preach Saturday and Sunday once a month until Oct., the one fourth of his time until after the 2nd Lord's day in Dec. 1885.

S. Beavers - $6.00

A. Wiley - $1.00

Hiram Mullen - $1.00

R.S. Riggins - $3.00

E. Conley - $7.00

Anie Bennett - $1.00

Mat Beavers - $2.00

Wm. Davis - $4.00

Noah Sims - $1.00

Dicy Beavers - $1.00

Mathias Beavers - $3.00

S.P. Davis - $4.00

W.H. Dotson - $3.00

Elmer Jackson - $1.00

Sarah Lee - $2.00

M.E. Cox - $2.00

C. Wiley - $1.00

G.W. Pauley - $2.00

E.H. Downey - $2.00

G.W. Davis - $3.00

C. Riggins


The following appointments were made on the twelfth day of January in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred nineteen, by Wiley Brick Congregation.

H.C. Towles, Evangalist

Lloyd Riggins

Walter Davis Elders

Lloyd Riggins, Clerk

G.W. Davis

J.H. Riggins

Albert Riggins

Harmon Davis Trustees


Hutton, Ills., March 1, 1884

We the undersigned agree to pay the amount opposit our names for the support of Bro. W.H. Williams as Minister and incidental expenses for the ensuing year.

E. Connely - $12.00

S.P. Davis - $5.00

S. Beavers - $12.00

A. Cox - $12.00

G.W. Davis - $4.00

E. Davidson - $2.00

Wm. Davis - $6.00

Zebedee Wiley - $1.00

E. Garrison - $2.00

L. Riggins - $1.00

J. Bennett - $2.00

James Brown - $5.00

J. Dotson - $5.00

A. Wiley - $2.00

A. Beavers - $1.00

M. Beavers - $10.00

G. Cox - $1.00

Dicy Beavers - $1.00

W.H. Dotson - $2.00


We the undersigned agree to pay the sum set opposite our names to A.J. McCash for preaching this year on the same conditions as last year. (note: date not given)

E. Connely - $12.00

A. Cox - $12.00

Sol Beavers - $12.00

M. Beavers, Jr. - $10.00

S.P. Davis - $5.00

A. Wiley - $2.00

R.S. Riggins - $5.00

Wm. Davis - $6.00

John Bennett - $1.00

Elizabeth Price - $1.50

Zebedee Wiley - $1.00

Elmer Jackson - $1.00

Deo. Pauly - $2.00

Wm. Dotson - $1.50


Some genealogy of Wiley Brick Chapel prominent families

(Webmaster's note: Please remember this is Mr. Sargent's research, not mine)

Alvin Wiley was the son of Reason Wiley (1802-1851) and Elizabeth Hicks who lived north west of the Church about one fourth of a mile.

The Beavers family are descended from William Beavers born July 23, 1797 Loudoun Co., Va., and his wife Nancy Brandenburg - born 1803 - died 1880, both buried in Beavers graveyard near the village of Salisbury, Hutton Twp., Coles Co., Ill., near where their homestead was located on which they settled in 1830, having lived previously in Clark Co., Ill., Clay Co., Ind. and Barren Co., Ky, where they were married 1818. His mother died in Virginia and his father in Adams Co.,Ohio. The Indians were camped around his house when they settled in Coles County, where he saw the runners sent out by Black Hawk to gather the Indians together for the War. They had seventeen children as follows: Matthias, Henry, Solomon, Wm. Barnett, John, Joseph, Sallie, Nancy, Martha, Rebecca, J. Calvin, Polly, Elizabeth, Fannie, Two infants died without names. Mrs. Beavers was the daughter of Henry Brandenburg of Meade Co., Ky.

The Riggins family are descended from Reeves Riggins - born Mar. 4, 1802 in North Carolina and died Feb. 2, 1881 at his home in Hutton Twp., and his wife Perlina A. White - born Sept. 25, 1803, died Jan. 25, 1895 in Hutton Twp. Both buried Wiley Brick Chapel cemetery. She was the daughter of Asa White and Mary Lewis who lived in Indiana. Their children: Charles White, Asa Vanburen, Richard Stoke, who married Adaline Davis, Sarah Elizabeth, Bathsheba Catherine, Emanuel, Mary Jane, John Alfred, Lafayette Jackson and Permela Adaline.

The Davis family are descended from John Calvin Davis - born April 28, 1809 in Ky., died Nov. 30, 1871 Hutton, and his wife Elizabeth Tolliver born June 22, 1813 died Feb. 8, 1862 - both buried in Whetstone Cem. Hutton Twp. They had fifteen children: Commodore Perry, James Riley, Nancy, Lucinda, Greenberry, Nathaniel, Wm. Harrison, Doctor Franklin, John Wesley, Kate, Sara E., Mahala, Fountain, Samuel, George W. He married second Elvira Tippy and had Marion Curtis Davis. See History and Genealogy on John Calvin Davis by Mrs. Frank J. Sherman, 1944.

The Cox family are descended from Anthony Cox and ----- Gilbert. They had children, James, George Washington, Anthony, Sylvester and possibly Canida. He married second Eliza Fuqua and had Adam and Henry. The Cox family came about 1828 to Coles Co., Ill., from Jersey City, N.J.

The Conley family came from Lawrence Co., Ind., to Coles Co., Ill. The family had emigrated there from Ky. and North Carolina. The members of Wiley Brick Chapel are from the Conley families of John Conly who married Jane Rennels and Elijah Conley who married Lucinda Davis, of the above Davis family. The latter had children: Alexander, Anna, Flora and Joel. John Conley had children Mary Jane, Elijah who married Lucinda Davis, Wm. Taylor, Elizabeth, Nancy, James, John, Mayrina, Cynithia, Armilda, Susan and Sarah Ann.

The Strader family are descended from Rolla and Vincent Strader who settled in Hutton.

Anyone wishing to learn more about the people in this church record may correspond with the writer, Samuel Stephen Sargent, Charleston, Ill.

(Webmaster's note: This was written in 1945 and Mr. Sargent is no longer with us in the current year of 2000)


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