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Biographies of Cook County Residents
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LOUIS BECK, tin and hardware dealer, was born in Evanston, Cook County, Ill., May 20, 1859. His parents, John and Eva, settled in Evanston in 1859, where his father was engaged in the tannery business for some years, and afterward for five wears in the varnish business. In 1871, they moved to Glencoe, Cook County, where they now reside, and engaged in farming and stock-raising. The subject of this sketch learned his trade with J. S. Haywood, of Evanston, and for some time worked for Wigein & Lingren. He was then connected with his brother, Charles Beck, in the hardware business up to 1883, when he came to Rogers Park and purchased the tin and hardware store of John McCarthy. He was married to Miss Minnie Teitzen, of Fredenia, Wis., October, 31, 1880. They have one child--Charles C. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

GEORGE H. BROWN, surgical instrument maker, was born in Dayton, Ohio, November 6, 1833. When five years of age, his mother having died, his father moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, and there married. Here he lived until 1842, when he went to Perrysville, Ind., and engaged in the gun business up to 1854, when he moved to Danville, Ill., where he now resides. The subject of this sketch left his father's home in Perrysville, and went to Covington, Ind., where he learned the trade of a tinner. From 1851 to 1854, he worked as a journeyman at various points, and then with his father engaged in the tin and stove business at Danville, Ill., remaining with him up to 1858. He then went into partnership with James Dean in the same business at Champaign, Ill., which continued up to 1860, when he returned again with his father to Danville, Ill. In 1863 he enlisted in the United States Secret Service up to the fall of 1864, when he came to Chicago and engaged in the tin and stove business on Madison Street, rear of Franklin, which he carried on up to 1865, when, having sold out, he went to Evanston and engaged in the same business until the fall of 1866, again selling out and returning to Danville, Ill. In August, 1869, he moved to Indianapolis, Ind., where he remained up to 1875, part of the time in the tin and stove business, and the balance of the time as superintendent of the mechanical department of the National Surgical Institute. In the summer of 1875, he came to Chicago, and commenced the manufacture of surgical instruments, and in 1879, to Rogers Park, where he is now engaged in the same business. He is a trustee and steward of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and also Secretary of the Board of Trustees. He was married to Miss Mary V. Burt, of Champaign, Ill., May 9, 1860. She died April 14, 1867, leaving three children --Edwin B., Ina B. and Frederick W. He married his present wife Miss Jennette McDonald, of Lodi, Ind., September 2, 1868. They have three children--Frank Mc., Harry R. and Arthur C. Mrs. Brown's father died when she was seven years old, and her mother moved to Attica, Ind. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

G. H. CARPENTER, carpenter, was born in Bristol, Kenosha County, Wis., August 22, 1853. At the age of sixteen, he commenced to learn the trade of a carpenter, and in the fall of 1870 went to Palatine, Cook County, where he finished learning it, working then for two years there as a journevman. In 1872, he came to Rogers Park. and worked for his father two years, then went to Leadville, Col., mining and prospecting. In 1880, he returned to Rogers Park, and formed a co-partnership with C. H. Ceperly. as the firm of Ceperly & Carpenter, builders and contractors, which was dissolved July 1, 1882, when, with C. H. Wharton, he formed the present firm of Carpenter & Wharton, builders and contractors. He was married to Miss Lida Dawson. of Union Grove, Wis., January 31. 1883. They have one child. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

G. W. CARPENTER, grocer, was born in Sharon, Windsor County. Vt., July 10, 1819. From the age of seventeen he worked at the carpenter's trade at Hanover, N. H., and in 1840 then being only twenty-one years of age, engaged in contracting and building. In 1842, he went to Ohio, where lie remained up to 1844, when he went to Wisconsin. There he lived up to 1868, engaged for four years of the time in Kenosha at his trade, and the balance of the time farlning in Bristol, Kenosha Comity. In 1870; he came to Palatine, Cook County, where he resided up to 1872, when he moved to Rogers Park and engaged in building and contracting June, 1879, he opened his present grocery. He has been one of the Trustees of the village of Rogers Park and also trustee and steward of the Methodist-Episcopal Church. He was married to Miss Nancy Hall, of Hanover, N.H. They have seven children-- Clara E. (now Mrs. James Shumway, of Bristol, Wis ), Sarah J. (now Mrs. C. S Brough, of Kenosha), Serena F, Daniel S, Don O, George H. and Minnie O. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

C. H. CEPERLY, builder and contractor, was born near Albany, N.Y., October 31, 1840. His father having died in New York State, he went to Northfield with his mother when four years of age, where he resided until the breaking out of the Civil War in 1861, when he enlisted in Company G, 113th Regiment Volunteer Infantry, and served as Sergeant for three years After the close of the war, he returned to Northfield, and in 1866 came to Chicago, where he learned the trade of carpentering, and worked there for nine years, part of the time at contracting and job work. In 1872, he moved to Rogers Park, where he has since engaged in building and contracting, and has constructed the most of the buildings of that village. He was Trustee of the village of Rogers Park on its organization, and also Street Commissioner for four years. He is at present school director, and has been for four years. He was married to Miss Frances Kerr, of Winnebago County, Ill., April 19, 1866. They have five children--Clara F, Cornelia F., Waiter R., Alice J. and Lydia K. His mother died in 1878. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

E. A. CHISHOLM was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, July 1, 1840. For six years he was engaged in the dry goods trade in Edinburgh, Scotland, and for three yearn in London, England. He came to Chicago in 1862, and was connoted for the first three years with Ross & Foster, when he became connected with the dry goods house of Carson, Pirie & Co., with whom he remained for fifteen years, five years of that time as their general manager. In 1877, upon the business being bought out by J. W. Touhy & Co., he remained in the same position, and has entire charge of the business. Mr. Chisholm has resided in Rogers Park since 1883. He was married to Miss Emma S. Berry, of London, June 10, 1860. They have six children --George D., Edward A., Henry G., Charles B., Fred and Lillie E. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

W. L. CRAWFORD secretary Excelsior Iron Works, Chicago, was born in Jefferson County, N.Y., June 14, 1849. He was engaged in that county as a clerk in a dry goods store. He came to Chicago in 1869, and was connected first with Fox, Howard & Walker on the Illinois & Michigan Canal, then with the Vulcan Iron Works, Chicago, and in 1874 came to the Excelsior Iron Works as book-keeper, and in 1882 was made secretary of that company. He has resided in Rogers Park since August, 1873, and been Treasurer of the village since its organization. Mr. Crawford was married to Miss Alice Easterly, of Jefferson County, N. Y., January 27, 1872. They have two children--Neil D. and William E. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

H. P. DALY was born in Quebec, Canada, December 13, 1843. From 1857 to 1860 he was engaged in the lamir trade with Le Masurier, Tilestone & Co., when he went to New York City and was employed as book-keeper in the linen department of the house of A. T. Stewart. In 1866 he came to Chicago and went into the employ of Field, Palmer & Letter up to 1868, when he became book-keeper for J. V. Farwell & Co. up to 1875. He then went into the dyeing business on Fifth Avenue, Chicago, as firm of Ran Co., for two years. In 1879 he was employed as book-keeper for the Exposition, and since P Y 1880 has been assistant secretary of the same. Mr. Daly has resided in Rogers Park since May, 1875. He was married to Miss Mary Slater, of New York City, April 11, 1866. They have five children--Catharine. Edward B., Caroline, Henry and Mary, and one deceased, Ruth. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

JAMES DALY was born in Quebec, Canada, April 17, 1848. He was first engaged in ship building with the firm of Maxwell & Stephenson up to 1867, when he came to Chicago and, in April, 1868, became connected with the house of J. V. Farwell & Co. as book-keeper, his present position. He has resided in Rogers Park since May, 1875, and was one of its school directors for three years. He was married to Miss Rebecca Reynolds, of Quebec, Canada, October 9, 1878. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

ALONZO A. EXLINE attorney, was born in Kankakee County, Ill, January 28, 1849. He was engaged in teaching and farming in Kankakee County up to the time of going to Ann Arbor, Mich., where he attended a legal coupe at the University, graduating March, 1874. On March 26, 1874, he was admitted to the Bar of Michigan. In May, 1874 he came to Chico, and was admitted to the Bar of Illinois on June 15, 1874, and has been engaged in the general practice of the law ever since in Chicago. He has resided in Rogers Park since May 1, 1877, and has been Village Attorney ever since its organization; has also held the position of township school trustee. Mr. Exline was married to Miss Ella Deerson, of Kankakee County, Ill., April 26, 1877. By the death of his wife, November 18, 1883, he is left a widower with one son, John S. Exile, aged five years, the only issue of such marriage. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

MARSHALL FAY was born in Philadelphia, Penn., February 14, 1845. In 1867 he went to Will County, Ill., and worked upon a farm for one year; then engaged in the lumber business in Muskegon, Mich. Then he returned to Will County, where he resided for seven years. He served as Deputy Sheriff of Will County for six months, then as keeper for two years of Illinois State Penitentiary, and for fourteen months keeper of Michigan Penitentiary, at Jackson. In 1875 he came to Chicago and has been in the employ of Fairbanks, Morse & Co., as a constructor of stales. Mr. Fay has resided in Rogers Park since 1880. He was married to Miss Irinda Spafford, of Will County. Ill., July 8, 1873. They have two children, Orville D. and Edgar A. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

PATRICK GOODWIN, farmer, P. O. Rogers Park, was born in the county of Derry, Ireland, in May, 1822. His boyhood was mostly spent in England driving cattle and farming. In 1846 he came to the United States, and first engaged in farming in New York State for four years. He then came to Chicago, and five months afterward settled upon his present farm, where he has since resided. He was married to Miss Frances M. Dart, of New York State, October 8, 1849. Her parents settled in Evanston Township in 1849, her mother dying in 1852, her father in April, 1864. They have three children--James H., Harriet E. (now Mrs. Daniel Ward, of Denver) and Francis M. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

C. W. HALLMAN was born in Philadelphia, Penn., November 21, 1849. He was connected there with the carpet house of G. W. Hill and then with that of Boyd. White & Co., then afterward William Hughes. He came to Chicago February 9, 1874 with Mr. Hughes and connected himself with the firm of Jackleon & Hughes, which afterward became Bean, Hughes & Co., the present firm, and of which Mr. Hallman is cashier. He has resided in Rogers Park since August, 1876. He was elected member of the first Board of Trustees of the village, and was also re-elected to serve the second term. He was married to Miss Mary A. Ellis, of Philadelphia, June 22, 1875. They have three children--Frank E., Clara V. and Edna A. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

JOHN L. HEALY. entry clerk of L. H. Thomas, manufacturer of inks, was born in Waterbury, Vt., May 12, 1864. He learned the printer's trade in Belleville, Ill., and worked there for two years; then in Battle Creek, Mich., up to 1880, when he came to Chicago, and for two years worked for Donnelly, Loyd & Co., printers. In 1883 he came to Rogers Park and accepted his present position with L. H. Thomas. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

O. F. HERREN was born in Ashtubule County. Ohio, February 19, 1844. He came with his parents to Boone County, Ill., in 1848, remaining with them up to 1869, when he enlisted in Company D. 95th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. and served until the close of the war. In 1867 he went to Nashua, Iowa, where he engaged in the drug business up to 1870. when he came to Chicago and was first employed by Van Schaack, Stevenson & Reed for two years. It then engaged in the commission business after which he worked for Chase & Pond up 1874, at which time he became a member of the present firm of H. H. Pond & Co., commission merchant, Chicago. He has resided in Rogers Park since the spring of 1880. Mr. Herren is treasurer of St. Mark's Episcopal Church of Rogers Park. He was married to Miss Clara V. Griffin. of Bristol, England, November 14, 1869. They have one child, Clara I. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

D. W. KEAN, real estate dealer, Chicago, was born in Crawford County, Penn., September 28, l841. He came to Chicago in 1862, and first taught school. Then enlisted in the 2d Board of Trade Regiment Volunteer Infantry, and one year afterward was discharged on account of wounds received at battle of Perryville. In 1864 he engaged in the banking business in New York City up to 1866, when he was made financial agent of the Northern Pacific Railroad, holding that position up to 1873, when he engaged in the real estate business at Rogers Park. As the representative of the Rogers Park Land Company he has constructed most of the residences of that village, and its organization was mainly due to the exertions of Mr. Keen, though in the face of great opposition. He was one of the members of the first Board of Trustees, anti has been prominently identified with the Methodist Church of that village. He married Miss Eliza A. Pratt, of Comicclient. in Bloomington, Ill., she being at the time first assistant principal of high school at Bloomington. They have three children, Jessie, Ralph D. and Mabel ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

J. M. KEAN, real estate dealer, Chicago, was born in Crawford County, Penn, April 30, 1849. He came to Chicago in 1865, and for eight years was employed in the banking house of Preston, Keen & Co. In the fall of 1874 he engaged in the wholesale tea business, and in the fall of 1879 became connected with his brother D. W. Kean, in the real estate business. He has resided in Rogers Park since 1873, Mr. Keen married Miss Florence A. Scholes, of Montreal, Canada. They have three children--Frank P., Richard M. and Gertrude E. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

JOSEPH P. KLEIN was born in Prussia, Germany, August 5, 1833. He came with his parents to the United States in 1847, who settled in Dutchess County, New York, where they lived up to 1852, when they came to Evanston Township, Cook County, Ill. His father died there on February 7, 1872, and his mother July, 1874. The subject of this sketch lived with his parents up to 1863, assisting them on the farm, which now forms a part of The village of South Evanston. Since the death of his parents, Mr. Klein has carried on the farm. He has been Overseer of Highways for two terms; also Commissioner of Highways one term, and is now a school director of Rogers Park. He was married to Miss Catherine Schmidt, of Prussia, June 18, 1863. They have six children Elizabeth K., Jacob. Emma B., Joseph N., Frank J. and Henry W. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

ROBERT KYLE, farmer, P. O. Rogers Park, was born in Liverpool, England, December 27, 1823, although his parents, William and Alice, were residents of St. John, New Brunswick. His boyhood days were spent in St. John. In 1836 his parents came to the United States and settled in Buffalo, N. Y., where they resided up to 1869, when they moved to Evanston Township. His father died in 1880, his mother is still living. Our subject at the age of fourteen commenced sailing on the lakes from Buffalo to Chicago, which he followed up to 1873, having in that time passed through the different grades up to master of a vessel before he was nineteen. He has resided in Evanston Township since 1847, and since abandoning a sailor's life, has engaged in gardening. He has been school director for five years He was married to Miss Ann Marshall, of Arnold, England, February 3, 1847, whose father died in Albany, N.Y., of cholera in 1832, and mother, Sarah, settled in Evanston, Cook County, in 1843. They have four children, Emma I. (now Mrs. H. W. Phelps, of Rogers Park), Alice (now Mrs. William Maxwell, of Rogers Park), William T. and Sadie P. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

WILLIAM L. KYLE, farmer, P. O. Rogers Park, was born in St. John, New Brunswick, January 3, 1833. He came with his parents in 1836 to Buffalo, N.Y. Sailed upon the lakes up to 1882, filling all the different positions "before the mast" up to master of a vessel. He has resided in Evanston Township since 1856. He was married to Miss Helen M.Fisher, of New York State, May 25, 1863. They have one son Nell R. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

S. T. LANPHEAR, grocer, was born in Morristown, Lamoille County, Vt., September 13, 1837. He was engaged in farming until he was twenty-two years of age, when he engaged in the manufacture of cane-bottomed chairs, mop sticks, etc., with Case, Thomas & Co., in Waterbury, Vt. In 1879 he went to Iowa and engaged in stock-raising with G. A. Smith up to 1880, when he came to Rogers Park, and for two years manufactured ink for L. H. Thomas. In 1882 he opened his present grocery. He was married September 29, 1872 to Miss Margaret Rattan, of Belleville, Ontario. They have two children, Frederick O. and Florence M. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

MATHIAS MANN, farm gardener, was born in Chicago February 16, 1844. His parents Tillman and Katrina Mann, settled in Chicago in 1842, when his father worked in a brick yard shortly afterward coming to Evanstown Township, where he bought the present farm from Philip Rogers. The father died there January 26, 1872, and the mother September 10, 1882. Mr. Mann lived with his parents on the farm up to their death, since which time he has carried on the farm. He has been Trustee of Rogers Park for two years, school director for six years, and director of St. Henry's Catholic Church. He was married to Miss Margaret Mane, of Prussia, April 23, 1868. They have six children--Mary, Kate, Henry, Elizabeth, Birdie and Edward. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]


ROLAND P. MARKS was born in Durham, N.Y., November 26. 1844. His father, Almeron Marks, a native of Connecticut, was an attorney and a member of the New York State Legislature. He died in 1853. His mother in 1860 married Chauney Brooks, of Baltimore (his uncle by marriage), and formerly president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The subject of this sketch came to Chicago in 1865 as a clerk in the house of Field, Palmer & Letter, through application to Potter Palmer, who had previously been a clerk in his father, Almeron Marks's store at Durham. Mr. Marks has ever since that time been connected with that wholesale house. and at this time has charge of the departments of flannels and blankets in the house, which is now Marshall Field & Co. In October, 1875, he took up his residence in Rogers Park, but from the first of the following year up to 1879 was absent in New York City on business connected with present firm. In 1881 he returned to Rogers Park, where he now resides. He has been one of the Trustees of Rogers Park. He was married to Miss Emma Hutchinson, of Southold, Long Island, December 3, 1872. They have two children, Grace E. and Edith H. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

J. J. PITKIN, farmer, P.O. Rogers Park, was born in Hartford, Conn., August 15, 1829. He learned the trade of tool-making in Massachusetts, and worked for ten years at Amherst. From there he came to Chicago in 1857, and worked for six years for different firms, when he engaged in business for himself. He took up his residence in Lake View in 1869, while carrying on his business in Chicago up to 1874, when he moved to Rogers Park, where he was engaged in farming. He was one of the Village Trustees of Rogers Park for four years from its organization, and was president of the board during the years 1881-82. He is now street commissioner. Mr. Pitkin was married to Miss Susan J. Thompson, of Northampton, Mass., February 5, 1852. They have three children--Charles T., Susan L. and Esther A. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

J. F. PRATT was born in Sterling, Worcester County, Mass., January 1, 1852. He came to Chicago in the fall of 1873, and January 1, 1875, he connected himself with the wholesale boot and shoe house of Phelps, Dodge & Palmer, and the following two years traveled in Illinois and Missouri. In January, 1877, he gave up traveling, and accepted a position as house salesman, which he has occupied up to the present time. He has resided in Rogers Park since 1875, and has been one of the Trustees of the village for the last five years. Mr. Pratt married Miss Helen A. Cheffin. of Holden, Mass., in Worcester, Mass., August 20, 1873. They have three children--Helen L.,George E. and Ida M. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

H. E. ROUNDS was born in Enosburg, Vt., September 29, 1838. His parents, Lester and Aurilla, came West in 1840 and settled in Southport (now Kenosha), Wis., where his father taught school. He was one of the original "Fourierites" who founded the village of Ceresco, adjoining Ripon, Wis. He now lives at Eureka, Wis., engaged in mercantile business. Mrs. Rounds died April 15, 1882. The subject of this sketch came to Chicago in the spring of 185L He learned the printer's trade with S. P. Rounds, and was for some time employed as his foreman. In 1860 he went to Pike's Peak in charge of a mining outfit, and remained there three years, eighteen months of the time mining, and eighteen months connected with the Rocky Mountain News at Denver, having a one-fourth interest in that newspaper. In 1863, having returned to Eureka, Wis., he engaged in the mercantile business with his father. He also served four months in the 41st Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry during the late Civil War. He published for one year the Eureka Journal, and in company with Heram Merley (now deceased), started the Oshkosh Journal, at Oshkosh, Wis., and carried on the same for five years, and having sold out the paper to the Oshkosh Northwestern, returned in 1873 to Chicago, and since that time has been connected with the business of S. P. Rounds and Rounds Type & Press Company. He has resided in Rogers Park since 1874; was school director and also Trustee of the village. Mr. Rounds married Miss Hattie N. Parker, in Racine, Wis., September 26, 1867. They have three children-Elinor. Lafayette and Aurilla. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

MATHIAS SCHMIT, dealer in boots and shoes, was born in Luxembourg, Germany, February 12, 1846. He learned his trade in Luxembourg, and worked at it up to 1872, when he came to Chicago, where he was employed at his trade up to 1877, in which year he came to Evanston Township and opened his present boot and shoe store. He married Kate Schmit, of Luxembourg, in Chicago. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

ROBERT M. SCHOLES, dealer in teas, coffees and spices, Chicago, was born in Belfast, Ireland, October 31, 1829. At the age of three he came with his parents, William and Jane, to Montreal, Canada. His mother died when he was quite young, and his father in 1855. In 1860 he commenced the manufacture of brass work, which he continued up to 1865, when he came to Chicago and engaged in different employments up to 1876, the date of his present business. He has resided in Rogers Park since 1880. He was married to Miss Isabella Brough, of Montreal, Canada, April 15,1851. They have four children--Lewis A., Florence E., Fremont and Parker. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

GEORGE J. SERRIN was born in Terre Haute, Ind., March 21. 1862. He clerked in the grocery store of R. W. Rippetoe in Terre Haute, up to September, 1882, when he came to Chicago in the employ of J. J. Fishel & Co., grocers. He continued with them up to January, 1883, when he engaged as a clerk in the grocery store of S. T. Lamphear, of Rogers Park, which position he now holds. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

PETER SMITH, farmer, P. O. Rogers Park, was born in Prussim Germany, June 7, 1824. His parents came to Chicago in 1840 and in 1842 settled in Evanston Township, having purchased the land of John Smith, upon which they lived up to the time of their deaths, his father dying in 1876 and his mother in 1880. Mr. Smith assisted his father on the farm up to 1849, when he took entire charge, and has carried it on ever since He was elected Justice of the Peace for four years, but resigned after the expiration of two years; was also Town Clerk in 1877. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Phillips. of Prussia Germany, April 29, 1849. They have ten children--Peter K., John J George, Michael. Philip, Andrew. Charles. Mathias, Annie M. and Louisa. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

P. L. TOUHY was born in Feakle, county of Clare, Ireland, March 15, 1842. In 1860 he came with his brother to New York City and engaged in the carpet business with Hiram Antterson, with whom he remained up to 1864, when he came to Chicago and first opened a grocery at the corner of Market and Illinois streets. He then formed a copartnership with Alexander Henderson and P.M. Rogers, as the firm of Touhy, Henderson & Co., which continued up to 1867, when be came to Rogers Park. Mr. Touhy is the founder of Rogers Park, having surveyed and laid out the plat of the village. In 1869 he built his present fine residence, which was completed in 1870. In 1870 he sold an interest in Rogers Park to S. P. Lunt, L. L. Greenleap (Corrections by Ron Sims-S. P. Lunt=Orrington Lunt,) C. H. Morse and A. B. Jackson, who formed the Rogers Park Building Association, with S. P. Lunt as trustee (Corrections by Ron Sims-S. P. Lunt=Orrington Lunt ). The only members of that organization who retain any interest in the partnership are P. L. Touhy and C. H. Morse. Mr. Touhy is also interested in the North Side dry goods store of J. W. Touhy & Co., which was opened September 15, 1883. He has been Trustee of the village since its organization and school director for three terms. He was married to Miss Catharine C. Rogers September 15, 1865, daughter of Philip Rogers, after whom the village of Rogers Park was named. Mr. Rogers settled in Chicago in 1836, and in 1844 came to Rogers Park and purchased at Government sale the land now laid out as Rogers Park. He died in 1856, leaving two children--Philip M. and Mrs. Touhy. Mr. Touhy and wife have seven children--Mary B., Edmund R., Stephen G., Catharine, Patrick J., Alice and Grace. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

B. H. VARY, attorney, was born in Onondaga County, N.Y., August 18, 1824. His grandfather, Samuel Vary, came to the Colonies during the French War as a Captain under the British General Gage, and was with him at the battle east of Lake Champlain, which occurred before the Revolutionary War. Upon his marriage the British Government gave him a tract of land at Johnstown, N.Y. Richard, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born on July 4, 1776, and was the younger of nine children. B.H. Vary commenced the study of law with the late Attorney-General Myers, of Ogdensburg, N.Y., in 1846. In 1849 he was admitted to the Bar of New York, and for fifteen years practiced law under the style of Morris & Vary. For two years he was also a partner of Hon. Horace Russell, now Judge of the Supreme Court of New York City. In 1881 he practiced law also in partnership with Hon. William H. Sawyer, late Judge of the Supreme Court of New York. Mr. Vary for fifteen years held the position of District Attorney of St. Lawrence County, N.Y., and became noted as an able and successful criminal lawyer. He took up his residence in Rogers Park March 1, l882, and has been engaged since that time in the general practice of law in Chicago, and has been employed in a great many important law cases. He assisted in the organization of St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Rogers Park, and has since been the Lay Reader. He was married to Miss Emma A. Witherell, daughter of the late Hon. Thomas D. Witherell, of De Peyster. St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., September 29. 1853. They have one son, Charles H., proprietor of Vary's Express, between Wilmington and Philadelphia. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

C. H. WHARTON. of the firm of Carpenter & Wharton, builders, was born in Laurel, Del., November 16, 1849. He came with his parents to Evanston in 1857. His father being a carpenter, he learned the same trade, and worked with him for five or six years. In 1873 he came to Rogers Park, working at his trade as a journeyman up to 1888, when be engaged in business for himself, in 1882 forming a copartnership with G. H. Carpenter, as the firm of Carpenter & Wharton, builders. He has been Village Clerk for one year. He married Miss Louisa Woodbury, of Whitewater, Wis., June 1, 1876. They have two children--Clara and Belle. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

HARRISON M. WILD, organist of the Church of the Ascension. and teacher of music, was born in Hoboken, N. J, March 6, 1861. At the age of fifteen he commenced his musical education with Arthur J. Creswold. After two years of study he went to Germany and spent one year at the Conservatory of Music, at Leipzig. He returned to Chicago in 1880, commenced teaching music and at the same time carrying on his studies under H. Clarence Eddy. In August, 1883, he became connected with the Hershey School of Musical Art. Mr. Wild has resided with his parents in Rogers Park since 1882. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

THOMAS S. WILD, of Wild & Hills brass founders, Chicago, was born in Sheffield, England, March 6, 1832. Learning the trade of surgical instrument maker, in Sheffield, he worked for Hutchinson Bros., of the same place, up to the age of twenty-one. From that time up to 1856 he engaged in the optical instrument business, when he came to New York and for eight years worked, first in a surgical instrument manufactory, then in a sewing machine manufactory, after which he learned the trade of brass founder. In 1864, he came to Chicago and took charge of the business of D. C. Smith & Co., manufacturers of organs. In 1872, he started the present business, as firm of Luce, Wild Fawectt & Co. which one year after-ward was changed to the present firm of Wild & Hills. Mr. Wild has resided in Rogers Park since 1882. He married Miss Georgiana H. Major, of Bath, England, April 8, 1860. They have three children-Harrison Frederick S. and Georgiana. ["Biographical Sketches Of Rogers Park". Andreas, A. T. History of Cook County, Illinois: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Chicago, IL: A. T. Andreas, 1884 Transcribed by Debbie Woolard]

George C. Bates, lawyer and politician, was born in Canandaigua, N.Y., and removed to Michigan in 1834; in 1849 was appointed United States District Attorney for that State, but removed to California in 1850, where he became a member of the celebrated "Vigilance Committee" at San Francisco, and, in 1856, delivered the first Republican speech there. From 1861 to 1871, he practiced law in Chicago; the latter year was appointed District Attorney for Utah, serving two years, in 1878 removing to Denver, Colo., where he died, Feb 11, 1886. Mr. Bates was an orator of much reputation, and was selected to express the thanks of the citizens of Chicago to Gen. B.J. Sweet, commandant of Camp Douglas, after the detection and defeat of the Camp Douglas conspiracy in November, 1864 - a duty which he performed in an address of great eloquence. At an early day he married the widow of Dr. Alexander Wolcott, for a number of years previous to 1830 Indian Agent at Chicago, his wife being a daughter of John Kinzie, the first white settler of Chicago. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Jean Baptiste Beaubien, the second permanent settler on the site of Chicago, was born at Detroit in 1780, became clerk of a fur-trader on Grand River, married an Ottawa woman for his first wife, and, in 1800, had a trading-post at Milwaukee, which he maintained until 1818. He visited Chicago as early as 1804, bought a cabin there soon after the Fort Dearborn massacre of 1812, married the daughter of Francis La Framboise, a French trader, and, in 1818, became agent of the American Fur Company, having charge of trading posts at Mackinaw and elsewhere. After 1823 he occupied the building known as "the factory," just outside of Fort Dearborn, which had belonged to the Government, but removed to a farm on the Des Plaines in 1840. Out of the ownership of this building grew his claim to the right, in 1835, to enter 75 acres of land belonging to the Fort Dearborn reservation. The claim was allowed by the Land Office officials and sustained by the State courts, but disallowed by the Supreme Court of the United States after long litigation. An attempt was made to revive this claim in Congress in 1878, but it was reported upon adversely by a Senate Committee of which the late Senator Thomas F. Bayard was chairman. Mr. Beaubien was evidently a man of no little prominence in his day. He led a company of Chicago citizens to the Black Hawk War in 1832, was appointed by the Governor the first Colonel of Militia for Cook County, and, in 1850, was commissioned Brigadier-General. In 1858 he removed to Nashville, Tenn., and died there, Jan. 5, 1863. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Mark Beaubien, a younger brother of Gen. Beaubien, was born in Detroit in 1800, came to Chicago in 1826, and bought a log house of James Kinzie, in which he kept a hotel for some time. Later, he erected the first frame building in Chicago, which was known as the "Sauganash," and in which he kept a hotel until 1834. He also engaged in merchandising, but was not successful, ran the first ferry across the South Branch of the Chicago River, and served for many years as lighthouse keeper at Chicago. About 1834, the Indians transferred to him a reservation of 640 acres of land on the Calumet, for which, some 40 years afterwards, he received a patent which had been signed by Martin Van Buren - he having previously been ignorant of its existence. He was married twice and had a family of 22 children. Died, at Kankakee, Ill, April 16, 1881. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Madore B. Beaubien, the second son of General Beaubien by his Indian wife, was born on Grand River in Michigan, July 15, 1809, joined his father in Chicago, was educated in a Baptist mission School where Niles, Mich., now stands; was licensed as a merchant in Chicago in 1831, but failed as a business man; served as Second Lieutenant of the Naperville Company in the Black Hawk War, and later was First Lieutenant of a Chicago Company. His first wife was a white woman, from whom he separated, afterwards marrying an Indian woman. He left Illinois with the Pottawatomies in 1840, resided at Council Bluffs and, later, in Kansas, being for many yeas the official interpreter of the tribe, and for some time, one of six Commissioners employed by the Indians to look after their affairs with the United States Government. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Alexander Beaubien, son of General Beaubien by his white wife, was born in one of the buildings belonging to Fort Dearborn, Jan. 28, 1822. In 1840 he accompanied his father to his farm on the Des Plaines, but returned to Chicago in 1862, and for years past has been employed on the Chicago police force. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Corydon Beckwith, lawyer and jurist, was born in Vermont in 1823, and educated at Providence, R.I., and Wrentham, Mass. He read law and was admitted to the bar in St. Albans, Vt., where he practiced for two years. In 1853 he removed to Chicago, and, in January, 1864, was appointed by Governor Yates a Justice of the Supreme Court, to fill the five remaining months of the unexpired term of Judge Caton, who had resigned. On retiring from the bench he resume private practice. Died, August 18, 1890 ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Henry BEIDLER, early settler, was born of German extraction in Bucks County, Pa., Nov. 27, 1812; came to Illinois in 1843, settling first at Springfield, where he carried on the grocery business for five years, then removed to Chicago and engaged in the lumber trade in connection with a brother, afterwards carrying on a large lumber manufacturing business at Muskegon, Mich., which proved very profitable. In 1871 Mr. Beidler retired from the lumber trade, in vesting largely in west side real estate in the city of Chicago, which appreciated rapidly in value, making him one of the most wealthy real estate owners in Chicago. Died, March 16, 1893.-Jacob (Beidler), brother of the preceding, was born in Bucks County, Penn., in 1815; came west in 1842, first began working as a carpenter, but later engaged in the grocery business with his brother at Springfield, Ill.; in 1844 removed to Chicago, where he was joined by his brother four years later, when they engaged largely in the lumber trade. Mr. Beidler retired from business in 1891, devoting his attention to large real estate investments. He was a liberal contributor to religious, educational and benevolent institutions. Died in Chicago, March 15, 1898. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Clara Doty BATES, author, was born at Ann Arbor, Mich., Dec. 22, 1838; published her first book in 1868; the next year married Morgan Bates, a Chicago publisher; wrote much for juvenile periodicals, besides stories and poems, some of the most popular among the latter being "Blind Jakey" (1868) and "AEsop's Fables" in verse (1873). She was the collector of a model library for children, for the World's Columbian Exposition, 1893. Died in Chicago, Oct. 14, 1895. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

BAPTISTS. The first Baptist minister to settle in Illinois was Elder James Smith, who located at New Design, in 1787. He was followed, about 1796-97, by Revs. David Badgley and Joseph Chance, who organized the first Baptist church within the limits of the State. Five churches, having four ministers and 111 members, formed an association in 1807. Several causes, among them a difference of views on the slavery question, resulted in the division, of the denomination into factions. Of these perhaps the most numerous was the Regular (or Missionary) Baptists, at the head of which was Rev. John M. Peck, a resident of the State from 1822 until his death (1858). By 1835 the sect had grown, until it had some 250 churches, with about 7,500 members. These were under the ecclesiastical care of twenty-two Associations. Rev. Isaac McCoy, a Baptist Indian missionary, preached at Fort Dearborn on Oct. 9, 1825, and, eight years later, Rev. Allen B. Freeman organized the first Baptist society in what was then an infant settlement. By 1890 the number of Associations had grown to forty, with 1010 churches, 891 ministers and 88,884 members. A Baptist Theological Seminary was for some time supported at Morgan Park, but, in 1895, was absorbed by the University of Chicago, becoming the divinity school of that institution. The chief organ of the denomination in Illinois is "The Standard" published at Chicago. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois", 1901 Transcribed by Kim Torp]

Hiram BARBER was born in Warren County N. Y., March 24, 1835. At 11 years of age he accompanied his family to Wisconsin, of which State he was a resident until 1866. After graduating at time State University of Wisconsin, al Madison, he studied law at the Albany Law School, and was admitted to practice. After serving one term as District Attorney of his county in Wisconsin (1861-62), and Assistant Attorney-General of the State for 1865-00, in the latter year he came to Chicago and, in 1878, was elected to Congress by the Republicans of the old Second Illinois District. His home is in Chicago, where he holds the position of Master in Chancery of the Superior Court of Cook County. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

John Henry BARROWS, P. D., clergyman and educator, was born at Medina, Mich., July 11, 1847; graduated at Mount Olivet College in 1867, and studied theology at Yale, Union and Andover Seminaries. In 1869 he went to Kansas, where he spent two and a half years in missionary and educational work. He then (in 1872) accepted a call to the First Congregational Church at Springfield, Ill., where he remained a year, after which he gave a year to foreign travel, visiting Europe, Egypt and Palestine, during a part of the time supplying the American chapel in Paris. On his return to the United States he spent six years in pastoral work at Lawrence and East Boston, Mass., when (in November, 1881) he assumed the pastorate of the First Presbyterian Church of Chicago. Dr. Barrows achieved a world-wide celebrity by his services as Chairman of the "Parliament of Religions," a branch of the "World's Congress Auxiliary," held during the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. Later, he was appointed Professorial Lecturer on Comparative Religions, under lectureships in connection with the University of Chicago endowed by Mrs. Caroline E. Haskell: One of these, established in Dr. Barrows' name, contemplated a series of lectures in India, to be delivered on alternate years with a similar course at the University. Courses were delivered at the University in 1895-96, and, in order to carry out the purposes of the foreign lectureship, Dr. Barrows found it necessary to resign his pastorate, which he did in the spring of 1896. After spending the summer in Germany, the regular itinerary of the round-the-world tour began at London in the latter part of November, 1896, ending with his return to the United States by way of San Francisco in May, 1897. Dr. Barrows was accompanied by a party of personal friends from Chicago and elsewhere, the tour embracing visits to the principal cities of Southern Europe, Egypt, Palestine, China and Japan, with a somewhat protracted stay in India during the winter of 1896-97. After his return to the United States he lectured at the University of Chicago and in many of the principal cities of the country, on the moral and religious condition of Oriental nations, but, in 1898, was offered the Presidency of Oberlin College, Ohio, which he accepted, entering upon his duties early in 1899. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

CLEAVER, WILLIAM - pioneer, was born in London, England, in 1815; came to Canada with his parents in 1831, and to Chicago in 1834; engaged in business as a chandler, later going into the grocery trade; in 1849; joined the gold-seekers in California, and, six years afterwards, established himself in the southern part of the present city of Chicago, then called Cleaverville, where he served as Postmaster and managed a general store. He was the owner of considerable real estate at one time in what is now a densely populated part of the city of Chicago. Died in Chicago, November 13, 1896. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

BROWN, William H., lawyer and financier, was born in Connecticut, Dec. 20, 1796; spent his boyhood at Auburn, N. Y., studied law, and, in 1818, came to Illinois with Samuel D. Lock wood (afterwards a Justice of the State Supreme Court), descending the Ohio River to Shawnee-town in a fiat-boat. Mr. Brown visited Kaskaskia and was soon after appointed Clerk of the United States District Court by Judge Nathaniel Pope, removing, in 1820, to Vandalia, the new State capital, where he remained until 1835. He then removed to Chicago to accept the position of Cashier of the Chicago branch of the State Bank of Illinois, which he continued to fill for many years. He served the city as School Agent for thirteen years (1840-53), managing the city's school fund through a critical period with, great discretion and success. He was one of the group of early patriots who successfully resisted the attempt to plant slavery in Illinois in 1823-24; was also one of the projectors of the Chicago & Galena Union Railroad, was President of the Chicago Historical Society for seven years and connected with many other local enterprises. He was an ardent personal friend of President Lincoln and served as Representative in the Twenty-second General Assembly (1860-62). While making a tour of Europe he died of paralysis at Amsterdam, June 17, 1867. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

CHILDS, Robert A., was born at Malone, Franklin County, N. Y., March 22, 1845, the son of an itinerant Methodist preacher, who settled near Belvidere, Boone County, Ill., in 1852. His home having been broken up by the death of his mother, in 1854, he went to live upon a farm; In April, 1861, at the age of 16 years, he enlisted in the company of Captain (afterwards General) Stephen A. Huribut, which was later attached to the Fifteenth Illinois Volunteers. After being mustered out at the close of the war, he entered school, and graduated from the Illinois State Normal University in 1870. For the following three years he was Principal and Superintendent of public schools at Amboy, Lee County, meanwhile studying law, and being admitted to the bar. In 1873, he began the practice of his profession at Chicago, making his home at Hinsdale. After filling various local offices, in 1884 he was chosen Presidential Elector on the Republican ticket, and, in 1892, was elected by the narrow majority of thirty-seven votes to represent the Eighth Illinois District in the Fifty-third Congress, as a Republican. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

WITHROW, Thomas F., lawyer, was born in Virginia in March, 1833, removed with his parents to Ohio in childhood, attended the Western Reserve College, and, after the death of his father, taught school and worked as a printer, later, editing a paper at Mount Vernon. In 1855 he removed to Janesville, Wis., where he again engaged in journalistic work, studied law, was admitted to the bar in Iowa in 1857, settled at Des Moines and served as private secretary of Governors Lowe and Kirkwood. In 1860 he became Supreme Court Reporter; served as Chairman of the Republican State Central Committee in 1863 and, in 1866, became associated with the Rock Island Railroad in the capacity of local attorney, was made chief law officer of the Company in 1873, and removed to Chicago, and, in 1890, was promoted to the position of General Counsel. Died, in Chicago, Feb. 3, 1893.
["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

WOLCOTT, (Dr.) Alexander, early Indian Agent, was born at East Windsor, Conn., Feb. 14, 1790; graduated from Yale College in 1809, and, after a course in medicine, was commissioned, in 1812, Surgeon's Mate in the United States Army. In 1820 he was appointed Indian Agent at Fort Dearborn (now Chicago), as successor to Charles Jouett- the first Agent- who had been appointed a United States Judge in Arkansas. The same year he accompanied General Lewis Cass and Henry Schoolcraft on their tour among the Indians of the Northwest; was married in 1823 to Ellen Marion Kinzie, a daughter of Col. John Kinzie, the first permanent settler of Chicago; in 1825 was appointed a Justice of the Peace for Peoria County, which then included Cook County; was a Judge of Election in 1830, and one of the purchasers of a block of ground in the heart of the present city of Chicago, at the first sale of lots, held Sept. 27, 1830, but died before the close of the year. Dr. Wolcott appears to have been a high-minded and honorable man, as well as far in advance of the mass of pioneers in point of education and intelligence. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

NORTON, Jesse O., lawyer, Congressman and Judge, was born at Bennington, Vt., April 25, 1812, and graduated from Williams College in 1835. He settled at Joliet in 1839, and soon became prominent in the affairs of Will County. His first public office was that of City Attorney, after which he served as County Judge (1846-50). Meanwhile, he was chosen a Delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1847. In 1850 he was elected to the Legislature, and, in 1852, to Congress, as a Whig. His vigorous opposition to the repeal of the Missouri Compromise resulted in his re-election as a Representative in 1854. At the expiration of his second term (1857) he was chosen Judge of the eleventh circuit, to fill the unexpired term of Judge Randall, resigned. He was once more elected to Congress in 1862, but disagreed with his party as to the legal status of the States lately in rebellion. President Johnson appointed him United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, which office he filled until 1869. Immediately upon his retirement he began private practice at Chicago, where he died, August 3, 1875. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

BROWNE, Francis Fisher, editor and author, was born in South Halifax, Vt., Dec. 1, 1843, the son of William Goldsmith Browne, who was a teacher, editor and author of the song "A Hundred Years to Come." In childhood he was brought by his parents to Western Massachusetts, where he attended the public schools and learned the printing trade in his father's newspaper office at Chicopee, Mass. Leaving school in 1862, he enlisted in the Forty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, in which he served one year, chiefly in North Carolina and in the Army of the Potomac. On the discharge of his regiment he engaged in the study of law at Rochester, N. Y., entering the law department of the 'University of Michigan in 1866, but abandoning his intention of entering the legal profession, removed to Chicago in 1867, where he engaged in journalistic and literary pursuits. Between 1869 and '74 he was editor of "The Lakeside Monthly," when he became literary editor of "The Alliance," but,, in 1880, he established and assumed the editorship of "The Dial," a purely literary publication which has gained a high reputation, and of which he has remained in control continuously ever since, meanwhile serving as the literary adviser, for many years, of the well-known publishing house of McClurg & Co. Besides his journalistic work, Mr. Browne has contributed to the magazines and literary anthologies a number of short lyrics, and is the author of "The Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln" (1886), and a volume of poems entitled, "Volunteer Grain" (1803). He also compiled and edited "Golden Poems by British and American Authors" (1881); "The Golden Treasury of Poetry and Prose" (1886), and the "Laurel Crowned" series of standard poetry (1891-92). Mr. Browne was Chairman of the Committee of the Congress of Authors in the World's Congress Auxiliary held in connection with The columbian Exposition in 1893. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]


FEEHAN, Patrick A., D.D., Archbishop of the Roman Catholic archdiocese of Chicago, and Metropolitan of Illinois, was born at Tipperary, Ireland, in 1829, and educated at Maynooth College. He emigrated to the United States in 1852, settling at St. Louis, and was at once appointed President of the Seminary of Carondelet. Later he was made pastor of the Church of the Immaculate Conception at St. Louis, where he achieved marked distinction. In 1865 he was consecrated Bishop of Nashville, managing the affairs of the diocese with great ability. In 1880 Chicago was raised to an archiepiscopal see, with Suifragan Bishops at Alton and Peoria, and Bishop Feehan was consecrated its first Archbishop. His administration has been conservative, yet efficient, and the archdiocese has greatly prospered under his rule. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

FARWELL, William Washington, jurist, was born at Morrisville, Madison County, N. Y., Jan. 5, 1817, of old Puritan ancestry; graduated from Hamilton College in 1837, and was admitted to the bar at Rochester, N. Y., in 1841. In 1848 he removed to Chicago, but the following year went to California, returning to his birthplace in 1850. In 1854 he again settled at Chicago and soon secured a prominent position at the bar. In 1871 he was elected Circuit Court Judge for Cook County, and, in 1873, re-elected for a term of six years. During this period he sat chiefly upon the chancery side of the court, and, for a time, presided as Chief Justice. At the close of his second term he was a candidate for re-election as a Republican, but was defeated with the remainder of the ticket. In 1880 he was chosen Professor of Equity Jurisprudence in the Union College of Law (now the Northwestern University Law School), serving until June, 1893, when he resigned. Died, in Chicago, April 30, 1894. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

WARREN, John Esalas, diplomatist and real-estate operator, was born in Troy, N. Y., in 1826, graduated at Union College and was connected with the American Legation to Spain during the administration of President Pierce; in 1859-60 was a member of the Minnesota Legislature and, in 1861-62, Mayor of St. Paul; in 1867, came to Chicago, where, while engaged in real-estate business, he became known to the press as the author of a series of articles entitled "Topics of the Time." In 1886 he took up his residence in Brussels, Belgium, where he died, July 6, 1896. Mr. Warren was author of several volumes of travel, of which "An Attache in Spain" and "Para" are most important. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

SCRIPPS, John L., journalist, was born near Cape Girardeau, Mo., Feb. 18, 1818; was taken to Rushville, Ill., in childhood, and educated at McKendree College; studied law and came to Chicago in 1847, with the intention of practicing, but, a year or so later, bought a third interest in "The Chicago Tribune," which had been established during the previous year. In 1852 he withdrew from "The Tribune," and, in conjunction with William Bross (afterwards Lieutenant-Governor), established "The Daily Democratic Press," which was consolidated with "The Tribune" in July, 1858, under the name of "The Press and Tribune," Mr. Scripps remaining one of the editors of the new concern. In 1861 he was appointed, by Mr. Lincoln, Postmaster of the city of Chicago, serving until 1865, when, having sold his interest in "The Tribune," he engaged in the banking business as a member of the firm Scripps, Preston & Kean. His health, however soon showed signs of failure, and he died, Sept 21, 1866, at Minneapolis, Minn., whither he gone in hopes of restoration. Mr. Scripps was finished and able writer who did much to elevate the standard of Chicago journalism. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Transcribed by Kim Torp]

HAMMOND, Charles Goodrich - Railway Manager, was born at Bolton, Conn., June 4, 1804, spent his youth in Chenango County, N. Y., where he became Principal of the Whitesboro Seminary (in which he was partially educated),and entered mercantile life at Canandaigua; in 1834 removed to Michigan, where he held various offices, including member of the Legislature and Auditor; in 1852 completed the construction of the Michigan Central Railroad (the first line from the East) to Chicago, and took up his residence in that city. In 1855 he became Superintendent of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, but soon resigned to take a trip to Europe for the benefit of his health. Returning from Europe in 1889, he accepted the Superintendency of the Union Pacific Railroad, but was compelled to resign by failing health, later becoming Vice-President of the Pullman Palace Car Company. He was Treasurer of the Chicago Relief & Aid Society after the fire of 1871, and one of the founders of the Chicago Theological Seminary (Congregational); also President, for several years, of the Chicago Home for the Friend less. Died, April 15, 1884.


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