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Chicago Institutions

in 1901
from the "Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" ©1901
© Transcribed by Kim Torp


ALEXIAN BROTHERS' HOSPITAL - located at Chicago; established in 1860, and under the management of the Alexian Brothers, a monastic order of the Roman Catholic Church. It was originally opened in a small frame building, but a better edifice was erected in 1868, only to be destroyed in the great fire of 1871. The following year, through the aid of private benefactions and an appropriation of $18,000 from the Chicago Relief and Aid Society, a larger and better hospital was built. In 1888 an addition was made, increasing the accommodation to 150 beds. Only poor male patients are admitted, and these are received without reference to nationality or religion, and absolutely without charge. The present medical staff (1896) comprises 14 physicians and surgeons. In 1895 the close approach of an intramural transit line having rendered the building unfit for hospital purposes, a street railway company purchased the site and buildings for $250,000 and a new location has been selected.

BENNETT MEDICAL COLLEGE - an Eclectic Medical School of Chicago, incorporated by special charter and opened in the autumn of 1868. Its first sessions were held in two large rooms; its faculty consisted of 7 professors and there were 30 matriculates. More commodious quarters were secured the following year, and a still better home after the fire of 1871, in which all the college property was destroyed. Another change of location was made in 1874. In 1890 the property then owned was sold and a new college building, in connection with a hospital, erected in a more quiet quarter of the city. A free dispensary is conducted by the college. The teaching faculty (1896) consists of 19 professors, with four assistants and demonstrators. Women are admitted as pupils on equal terms with men.

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, organized, April 24, 1856, for the purposes of (1) establishing a library and a cabinet of antiquities, relics, etc.; (2) the collection and preservation of historical manuscripts, documents, papers and tracts; (3) the encouragement of the discovery and investigation of aboriginal remains, particularly in Illinois; (4) the collection of material illustrating the growth and settlement of Chicago. By 1871 the Society had accumulated much valuable material, but the entire collection was destroyed in the great Chicago fire of that year, among the manuscripts consumed being the original draft of the emancipation proclamation by Abraham Lincoln. The nucleus of a second collection was consumed by fire in 1874. Its loss in this second conflagration included many valuable manuscripts. In 1877 a temporary building was erected, which was torn down in 1892 to make room for the erection, on the same lot, of a thoroughly fire-proof structure of granite, planned after the most approved modern systems.. The new building was erected and dedicated tinder the direction of its late President, Ed ward G. Mason, Esq., Dec. 12, 1896. The Society's third collection now embraces about twenty-five thousand volumes and nearly fifty thousand pamphlets; seventy-five portraits in oils, with other works of art; a valuable collection of manuscript documents, and a large museum of local and miscellaneous antiquities. Mr. Charles Evans is Secretary and Librarian.

CHICAGO HOMEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE, organized in 1876, with a teaching faculty .of nineteen and forty-five matriculates. Its first term opened October 4, of that year, in a leased building. By 1881 the college had outgrown its first quarters and a commodious, well appointed structure was erected by the trustees, in a more desirable location. The institution was among the first to introduce a graded course of instruction, extending over a period of eighteen years. In 1897, the matriculating class numbered over 200

CHICAGO HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN, located at Chicago, and founded in 1865 by Dr. Mary Harris Thompson. Its declared objects are: "To afford a home for women and children among the respectable poor in need of medical and surgical aid; to treat the same classes at home by an assistant physician; to afford a free dispensary for the same, and to train competent nurses." At the outset the hospital was fairly well sustained through private benefactions, and, in 1870, largely through Dr. Thompson's efforts, a college was organized for the medical education of women exclusively. (See Northwestern University Woman's Medical School.) The hospital building was totally destroyed in the great fire of 1871, but temporary accommodations were provided in another section of the city. The following year, with the aid of $25,000 appropriated by the Chicago Relief and Aid Society, a permanent building was purchased, and, in 1885, a new, commodious and well planned building was erected on the same site, at a cost of about $75,000.


CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, organized, Sept. 26, 1854, by a convention of Congregational ministers and laymen representing seven Western States, among which was Illinois. A special and liberal charter was granted, Feb. 15, 1855. The Seminary has always been under Congregational control and supervision, its twenty-four trustees being elected at Triennial Conventions, at which are represented all the churches of that denomination west of the Ohio and east of the Rocky Mountains. The institution was formally opened to students, Oct. 6, 1858, with two professors and twenty-nine matriculates. Since then it has steadily grown in both numbers and influence. Preparatory and linguistic schools have been added and the faculty (1896) includes eight professors and nine minor instructors. The Seminary is liberally endowed, its productive assets being nearly $1,000,000, and the value of its grounds, buildings, library, etc., amounting to nearly $500,000 more. No charge is made for tuition or room rent, and there are forty-two endowed scholar ships, the income of which is devoted to the aid of needy students. The buildings, including the library and dormitories, are four in number, and are well constructed and arranged. Western States, among which was Illinois. A special and liberal charter was granted, Feb. 15, 1855. The Seminary has always been under Congregational control and supervision, its twenty-four trustees being elected at Triennial Conventions, at which are represented all the churches of that denomination west of the Ohio and east of the Rocky Mountains. The institution was formally opened to students, Oct. 6, 1858, with two professors and twenty-nine matriculates. Since then it has steadily grown in both numbers and influence. Preparatory and linguistic schools have been added and the faculty (1896) includes eight professors and nine minor instructors. The Seminary is liberally endowed, its productive assets being nearly $1,000,000, and the value of its grounds, buildings, library, etc., amounting to nearly $500,000 more. No charge is made for tuition or room rent, and there are forty-two endowed scholar ships, the income of which is devoted to the aid of needy students. The buildings, including the library and dormitories, are four in number, and are well constructed and arranged.

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS - located at Chicago, and organized in 1881. Its first term opened in September, 1882, in a building erected by the trustees at a cost of $60,000, with a faculty embracing 25 professors, with a sufficient corps of demonstrators, assistants, etc. The number of matriculates was 152. The institution ranks among the leading medical colleges of the West. Its standard of qualifications, for both matriculates and graduates, is equal to those of other first-class medical schools throughout the country. The teaching faculty, of late years, has consisted of some 25 professors, who are aided by an adequate corps of assistants, demonstrators, etc.

COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL, located in Chicago and under control of the Commissioners of Cook County. It was originally erected by the City of Chicago, at a cost of 880,000, and was intended to be used as a hospital for patients suffering from infectious diseases. For several years the building was unoccupied, but, in 1858, it was leased by an association of physicians, who opened a hospital, with the further purpose of affording facilities for clinical instruction to the students of Rush Medical College. In 1863 the building was taken by the General Government for military purposes, being used as an eye and ear hospital for returning soldiers. In 1865 it reverted to the City of Chicago, and, in 1866, was purchased by Cook County. In 1874 the County Commissioners purchased a new and more spacious site at a cost of $145,000, and began the erection of buildings thereon. The two principal pavilions were completed and occupied before the close of 1875; the clinical amphitheater and connecting corridors were built in 1876-77, and an administrative building and two additional pavilions were added in 1882-84. Up to that date the total cost of the buildings had been $719,574, and later additions and improvements have swelled the outlay to more than $1,000,000. It accommodates about 800 patients and constitutes a part of the county machinery for the care of the poor. A certain number of beds are placed under the care of homeopathic physicians. The present (1896) allopathic medical staff consists of fifteen physicians, fifteen surgeons, one oculist and aurist and one pathologist; the homeopathic staff comprises five physicians and five surgeons. In addition, there is a large corps of interns, or house physicians and surgeons, composed of recent graduates from the several medical colleges, who gain their positions through competitive examination and hold them for eighteen months.

EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY, ILLINOIS CHARITABLE - This institution is an outgrowth of a private charity founded at Chicago, in 1858, by Dr. Edward L. Holmes, a distinguished Chicago oculist. In 1871 the property of the institution was transferred to and accepted by the State, the title was changed by the substitution of the word "Illinois" for "Chicago," and the Infirmary became a State institution. The fire of 1871 destroyed the building and, in 1873-74, the State erected another of brick, four stories in height, at the corner of West Adams and Peoria Streets, Chicago. The institution receives patients from all the counties of the State, the same receiving board, lodging and medical aid, and (when necessary) surgical treatment, free of charge. The number of patients on Dec 1, 1897, was 160. In 1877, a free eye and ear dispensary was opened under legislative authority, which is under charge of some eminent Chicago specialists.

HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL, a homeopathic hospital located in Chicago. It was first opened with 20 beds, in November, 1870, in a block of wooden buildings, the use of which was given rent free by Mr. J. Young Scammon, and was known as the Scammon Hospital. After the fire of October, 1871, Mr. Scammon deeded the property to the Trustees of the Hahnemann Medical College, and the hospital was placed on the list of public charities. It also received a donation of $10,000 from the Relief and Aid Society, besides numerous private benefactions. In April, 1873, at the suggestion of Mr. Scammon, the name of the institution was changed to the Hahnemann Hospital, by which designation it has since been known. In 1893 the corner-stone of a new hospital was laid and the building completed in 1894. It is seven stories in height, with a capacity for 225 beds, and is equipped with all the improved appliances and facilities for the care and protection of the sick. It has also about 60 private rooms for paying patients.

HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE - located in Chicago, chartered in 1834-35, but not organized until 1860, when temporary quarters were secured over a drug-store, and the first college term opened, with a teaching faculty numbering nine professors, besides clinical lecturers, demonstrators, etc. In 1866-67 the institution moved into larger quarters and, in 1870, the corner-stone of a new college building was laid. The six succeeding years were marked by internal dissension, ten of the professors withdrawing to establish a rival school. The faculty was curtailed in numbers and re-organized. In August 1892, the corner-stone of a second building was laid with appropriate Masonic ceremonies, the new structure occupying the site of the old, but being larger, better arranged and better equipped. Women were admitted as students in 1870-71 and co-education of the sexes has ever since continued an established feature of the institution. For more than 35 years a free dispensary has been in operation in connection with the college.

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL, located in Chicago; was organized in 1859 as Medical School of the Lind (now Lake Forest) University. Three annual terms, of five months each, at first constituted a course, although attendance at two only was compulsory. The institution first opened in temporary quarters, Oct. 9, 1859, with thirteen professors and thirty-three students. By 1863 more ample accommodations were needed, and the Trustees of the Lind University being unable to provide a building, one was erected by the faculty. In 1864 the University relinquished all claim to the institution, which was thereupon incorporated as the Chicago Medical College. In 1868 the length of the annual terms was increased to six months, and additional requirements were imposed on candidates for both matriculation and graduation. The same year, the college building was sold, and the erection of a new and more commodious edifice, on the grounds of the Mercy Hospital, was commenced. This was completed in 1870, and the college became the medical department of the Northwestern University. The number of professorships had been increased to eighteen, and that of undergraduates to 107. Since that date new laboratory and clinical buildings have been erected, and the growth of the institution has been steady and substantial. Mercy and St. Luke's Hospital, and the South Side Free Dispensary afford resources for clinical instruction. The teaching faculty, as constituted in 1898, consists of about fifty instructors, including professors, lecturers, demonstrators, and assistants.

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY WOMAN'S MEDICAL SCHOOL, an institution for the professional education of women, located in Chicago. Its first corporate name was the "Woman's Hospital Medical College of Chicago," and it was in close connection with the Chicago Hospital for Women and Children. Later, it severed its connection with the hospital and took the name of the "Woman's Medical College of Chicago." Co-education of the sexes, in medicine and surgery, was experimentally tried from 1868 to 1870, but the experiment proved repugnant to the male students, who unanimously signed a protest against the continuance of the system. The result was the establishment of a separate school for women in 1870, with a faculty of sixteen professors. The requirements for graduation were fixed at four years of medical study including three annual graded college terms of six months each. The first term opened in the autumn of 1870, with an attendance of twenty students. The original location of the school was in the "North Division" of Chicago, in temporary quarters. After the fire of 1871 a removal was effected to the "West Division," where (in 1878-79) a modest, but well arranged building was erected. A larger structure was built in 1884, and, in 1891, the institution became a part of the Northwestern University. The college, in all its departments, is organized along the lines of the best medical schools of the country. In 1896 there were twenty-four professorships, all capably filled, and among the faculty are some of the best known specialists in the country.


ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL, located in Chicago. It was chartered in 1865, its incorporators, in their initial statement, substantially declaring their object to be the establishment of a free hospital under the control of the Protestant Episcopal Church, which should be open to the afflicted poor, without distinction of race or creed. The hospital was opened on a small scale, but steadily increased until 1879, when re-incorporation was effected under the general law. In 1885 a new building was erected on land donated for that purpose, at a cost exceeding $150,000, exclusive of $20,000 for furnishing. While its primary object has been to afford accommodation, with medical and surgical care, gratuitously, to the needy poor, the institution also provides a considerable number of comfortable, well-furnished private rooms for patients who are able and willing to pay for the same. It contains an amphitheater for surgical operations and clinics, and has a free dispensary for out-patients. During the past few years important additions have been made, the number of beds increased, and provision .made for a training school for nurses. medical staff (1896) consists of thirteen physicians and surgeons and two pathologists.

WOMAN'S MEDICAL COLLEGE OF CHICAGO. (See Northwestern University Woman's Medical School.)



Chicago Nursery and Half-Orphan Asylum

See From : Chapin Hall

See Also : University of Chicago. Chapin Hall Center for Children

Notes : A home of another kind, 1995: CIP galley (Chicago Nursery and Half-Orphan Asylum; founded in 1860 as a home for dependent children; in 1930's unofficially started being called Chapin Hall; in 1984 became part of University of Chicago as a research and development center and officially changed its name to Chapin Hall Center for Children)


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