Illinois Genealogy Trails


John G. Ackerson
Biography

Portrait and Biographical Album of Fulton County, Illinois: containing full page portraits and biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens of the county: together with portraits and biographies of all the presidents of the United States, and governors of the state; Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, IL; 1890; page 258-259; Transcribed by Margaret Rose Whitehurst
  John G. Ackerson, a veteran of the late war who is now connected with the agricultural interests of Liverpool Township, is a native of this county.  He was born February 15, 1831, in the pioneer home of his parents, Abram and Eleanor (Kent) Ackerson, in Lewistown Township.  His father was one of the very earliest settlers of this county, coming here from Ohio, his native Sate.  He was a son of Garrett Ackerson, who was a native of New York.  The Ackersons are supposed to have originated in Holland.  The grandfather of our subject was a farmer and also engaged in carpentering.  In the early days of the settlement of Ohio he removed from New York to that State and became on of its pioneers.  He cleared a farm which he owned and operated until 1827, when he came by wagon to Fulton County and was among the first to locate in Lewistown Township, settling on a tract of timber land three miles northeast from the present site of the city, for which he paid $1.25 an acre.  The Indians had not then left the country which was in a very sparsely settled condition, and deer, wild hogs and turkeys abounded.  The grandfather developed a farm and remained a resident of this county until his death at a venerable age in 1862.
  The father of our subject came to this county in 1828, about a year later than his father’s removal to this section.  His father gave him forty acres of land, and he actively entered upon the pioneer task of preparing it for farming purposes.  His work was interrupted for a time by the Black Hawk War, in which he served as a soldier.  He lived in this county until his death with the exception of two years residence in Mason County.  He died on our subject’s farm in Liverpool Township, in 1868, at the age of fifty-six years.  He was a man of exemplary habits and was a member of the church nearly all his life, belonging first to the church of the United Brethren and later to the Methodist Church.  His wife, who was a native of Ohio, lived to the age of sixty-seven years and then gave up her life with the calmness and serenity that attends the death of faithful believers.  She was identified with the Southern Methodist Church for many years.  Five children were born to the parents of our subject, of whom four grew to maturity, namely:  Almarinda (deceased), John G., Abram W., Catherine (deceased), and Elizabeth, (Mrs. Wheadon).
  Our subject passed his youth on a farm in this, his native county, and in the common schools obtained a limited education.  The schoolhouse which he attended was a rude log structure with slab sets and furnishings quite in keeping with the day.  He remained at home and assisted in the management of the farm until he was twenty-nine years old.  In July, 1862, he determined to throw aside his work and take part in the great war that was then being waged, and he enlisted in Company B, Eighty-fifth Illinois Regiment, for a term of three years.  His company was drilled for two weeks at Peoria and was then sent to Louisville, Ky.  From there our subject and his comrades went to Crab Orchard, the pride of the Blue Grass State in the way of watering places, and there they took part in a battle and skirmish that lasted a whole day.  At this place, Mr. Ackerson was taken sick with a bilious attack, and was removed to the regimental hospital at Nashville, Tenn., where he remained until February, 1863, and was then discharge on account of physical disability.  So greatly did his health suffer from the hardships that he had to endure while in the army that he felt the effects of his illness for a year after his return home.
  In 1872 our subject removed to Cowley County, Kan., where he bought a quarter section of land.  He broke but sixty-five acres and raised a good crop of corn during his two years residence there.  At the end of that time he sold out, and coming back to Fulton County, bought one hundred and fifty-eight acres that he now owns, a part of which is on the Illinois River bottoms, where the soil is very rich and productive.  He has ever since been a resident of Liverpool Township, and has devoted himself to tilling the soil and raising stock.  He has put many good improvements upon his place, has everything necessary for conduction agriculture, and from his well tilled fields reaps good harvests.
  In the month of June, 1872, Mr. Ackerson and Miss May Wallworth were united in marriage.  Mrs. Ackerson is a native of the State of New York, and came to this State with her parents who settled near Fairbury.  Mr. and Mrs. Ackerson have made for themselves a pleasant home and they enjoy the friendship of many in their community.  Politically Mr. Ackerson is identified with the Democratic party.  He has held the offices of Road Commissioner, Constable and School Director at different times and no one is more wiling than he to help in forwarding the best interests of Liverpool Township.

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