logo

Illinois Governor Obituaries

©July 2006 - Kim Torp



Thomas Carlin

The Carrollton Gazette

February 21, 1852 - Death of Governor Carlin. It is with fellins of regret that we have to announce the death of Ex-Governor Thomas Carlin, who breathed his last, at his residence, near this place on February 14, 1852. The disease which he had was erysipelas. He leaves behind him an entersting family and many relatives and frinds to mourn his departure. Peace be to his ashes.

January 29, 1853 sale of lands, adjoining Carrollton. The farming land adjoning Carrollton, the property of the late Gov. Carlin were sold on Monday of this week at auction, under a decree of the Circuit Court. Prices ranged from $130 per acre down to $20 per acre.

BACK TO THE GOVERNOR'S PAGE
BACK TO THE STATE PAGE


GOVERNOR FRANK O. LOWDEN (NEW!)

January 26, 1861 - March 20, 1943
Frank O. Lowden was born January 26, 1861 on a farm near Sunrise, Minnesota, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo Lowden. In 1868 the family moved to Pleasant Point, Iowa. Here Mr. Lowden received his elementary education. At 15, he began teaching school, five years later entered the University of Iowa, and was graduated as valedictorian. Moving to Chicago, he studied nights at Union College of Law, and was graduated in 1887, again as valedictorian.
During the next decade he built up a flourishing law business. In 1896 he married Florence Pullman, daughter of the multi-millionaire sleeping car manufacturer. From this union they had 3 daughters, and a son.
During the Spanish American War in 1898, he served as Lieutenant Colonel of the 1st Illinois Infantry. Entering politics he became a national committee-man from Illinois from 1904 to 1912. In 1906 he was elected to Congress from the 21st district, to serve out an unexpired term, and held this office until 1912.
While serving in Washington, leading farm organizations backed many of Mr. Lowden's ideas for solving the agricultural surplus problems which followed the first world war. He declared on many occasions that the farm problem "was more than a class question, it involves the future of American Institutions."
In January 1917—during World War I—Frank O. Lowden became Illinois' Governor. He served one term. During his administration, he introduced a budget system and simplified the State's Government by consolidating 128 interlocking and overlapping bureaus and boards into nine Code Departments. This action saved taxpayers millions of dollars. He helped to develop the Chicago-to-Gulf inland waterway system and evolved a plan for financing the construction of hard roads by using auto registration fees to retire bonds, starting a program calling for 4,800 miles of hard-surfaced roads.
In 1920, Mr. Lowden was a candidate for President. Later, when Calvin Coolidge was nominated at Cleveland as the Republican candidate for president, Mr. Lowden was chosen as vice-president, but declined.
Mr. Lowden was an international authority on agriculture and was owner of the famous 5,000 acre Sinnissippi farm near Oregon, Ill., reputed to be the finest agricultural plant in the nation.
Stricken with pneumonia, he died March 20, 1943, near Tucson, Arizona.
Surviving are 3 daughters, Mrs. Phillip Miller, Mrs. Albert F. Madlener, both of Chicago, Mrs. Frederick Wierdsma of Washington, D. C, and four sisters.
BACK TO THE GOVERNOR'S PAGE
BACK TO THE STATE PAGE


SAMUEL H. SHAPIRO, 79, EX-GOVERNOR OF ILLINOIS


Published: March 17, 1987
Samuel H. Shapiro, who served briefly as Governor in 1968, died today at home. He was 79 years old.

The Kankakee County Coroner, James Orrison, said a preliminary report indicated that Mr. Shapiro had died of natural causes. The police were sent to his home after Mr. Shapiro, a lawyer, did not appear in court, Police Chief Timothy Nugent said.

In May 1968 Lieutenant Governor. Shapiro, a Democrat, became Governor when Otto Kerner resigned to become a Federal judge, then was defeated at the polls in November by the Republican candidate, Richard Ogilvie.

Samuel Shapiro was an infant when his family came to the United States in 1908 from Estonia and settled in Kankakee. He served 14 years in the Illinois General Assembly, followed by seven years as Lieutenant Governor until Governor Kerner resigned.

Mr. Shapiro devoted much of his energy to mental health programs and facilities. While Governor, he called up the National Guard, at the request of Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago, before the start of the turbulent Democratic National Convention in 1968.
[NYTimes.com]

BACK TO THE GOVERNOR'S PAGE
BACK TO THE STATE PAGE


Governor Ford


Story done at the time of the death of Governor Ford's Daughter

BACK TO THE GOVERNOR'S PAGE
BACK TO THE STATE PAGE


Governor Oglesby


Obituary of Gov. Oglesby's widow, Mrs. Emma Gillett Oglesby


Back to our STATE DATA page

©July 2006 - Kim Torp
Genealogy Trails