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Greene County, IL Biographies

Theodore P. Bates
BATES, Theodore P., industrial commis­sioner; born, White Hall, Greene Co., ILL., Aug. 25, 1873; son of Wesley P. and Mary M. (Baker) Bates; educated in public and high schools, White Hall. In employ of Swift & Co., 1892 and 1893; handling manufacturing properties, East St. Louis, 1894-1906, and in same business in St. Louis and East St. Louis, 1906-09; sales manager for Kettle River Com­pany's creosoting plant, wood paving blocks, etc., 1909 and 1910; industrial commissioner for Business Men's League since 1910. Clubs: Missouri Athletic, Mercantile, Normandie Golf. Recreations: golf and motoring. Office: 510 Locust St. Residence: 11 Beverly PL. (Source: "The Book of St. Louisans", Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Charles Albert Bowman
BOWMAN, Charles Albert, lumber; born, Carrollton, ILL., Feb. 5, 1874; son of John A. and Angie (Black) Bowman; educated in public schools, graduating from high school in 1890; married, Carlinville, ILL., June 5, 1901, Myra May Parker. Began business career in the general merchandise store of L. F. Wheeler, Carrollton, ILL., continuing, 1890-1900; came to St. Louis, 1900, and was with the South Arkansas Lumber Co., 1900-01; joined in organization, 1901, of Huie-Hodge Lumber Co., Limited, of which became vice president; now secretary South Arkansas Lumber Co. Member Order of Hoo Hoo. Office: Fullerton Bldg. Residence: 5228 Von Versen Avenue. (Source:"The Book of St. Louisans", Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


James Harvey Cranfill
CRANFILL, James Harvey, manufacturer; born, Rockbridge, ILL., Aug. 21, 1862; son of Zachariah and Mary J. (Cato) Cranfill; educated in public schools; married, St. Louis, 1890, Mary S. Page; one son: Pha. Began active career in printing business, with which was connected until 1889; then became identified with firm of F. Applegren, manufacturers of burnt sugar color, and since 1902 has engaged in same line of business on own account, as president J. H. Cranfill Manufacturing Co. Republican. Presbyterian. Scottish Rite Mason; member Keystone Lodge, No. 243, A. P. & A. M.; St. Louis Chapter, No. 1, R. A. M.; Moolah Temple, Mystic Shrine. Recreation: fishing. Office: 1?23 N. 7th St. Residence: 3832 Russell Ave. (Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)


Estas Edwards
Estas Edwards, who is carrying on general farming in Roodhouse township, was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, February 10, 1875, and is a representative of one of the old pioneer families of the state. His paternal grandfather was Isham Edwards, a natives of Kentucky, who came to Illinois when twenty-five years of age and devoted his attention to general farming and stock-dealing. He was not only reliable in business and active in the early development of the locality in which he made his home but displayed so many other sterling traits of character that he commanded the highest respect and confidence of all with whom he was associated. He lived at Barrow for twenty years and his last days were spent in Walkerville township. His son, Joseph L. Edwards, was born in Greene county, in 1854 and he, too, has always followed farming. He married Miss Jane Wells, who was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, in 1854.
Mr. Edwards was educated in the school of Barrow, and under his father's direction received his business training, working in the fields when not occupied with the duties of the schoolroom and through the long summer vacations. Since attaining his majority he has carried on fanning on his own account and is now operating land in Rood-house township, cultivating his fields with energy, discretion and good management., so that the result is desirable and his labors are thus rendered profitable.
On the 24th of February, 1895., Mr. Edwards was married to Miss Mettie Barnhart, who was born in Walkerville, Greene county, and their union has been blessed with three interesting children: Edith, Leona and Ernest, aged respectively nine, five, and two years. The parents are members of the Christian church and are highly respected., having a wide acquaintance, for they have spent their entire lives in the county and the qualities which they have manifested in all life's relations have commended them to the confidence and srood will of those with whom they have been associated. Mr. Edwards is a wide-awake young business man, watchful of opportunity and making the most of his advantages and has already attained desirable success.
Source: "Past and Present Of Greene County, Illinois"; by Hon. Ed. Miner, Ex-Secretary Old Settlers Society; Illustrated; "A people that take no pride in the noble achievements of remote ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered with pride by remote generations.'' - Macauley; Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1905, page 624-625 - Submitted by Sara Hemp


S.M. Link
Born in Carrollton, Illinois, in 1837; died in Kirksville {Mo}, September 01, 1904. At the age of Twenty-One he went to Colorado. In 1867 he came to Kirksville, where he continued to reside until his death. He was at first engaged in stock and implement business. Later he became connected with the First National Bank, more commonly known as the Baird Bank. For twenty years he was its President. He was an ardent member of the Baptist church, having joined it when only sixteen years of age. He was married in 1861 to Miss Link; to them eight children were born, six who survived him. Of him it was said that "his quiet, unostentatious acts of charity towards the deserving poor, his kindly friendship for all the deserving, and his gentle life, strong in all the Christian graces of tenderness, generosity and loving-kindness, will always be a constant example." [Source: "The History of Adair County Missouri", by E.M. Violette (1911) - DR - Sub by FoFG]


A. P. Lovelace
A. P. Lovelace, who follows farming and for the past twelve years has also been successfully engaged in the raising of poultry, was born in Patterson township, Greene county, and is a son of Price and Sarah (Hubbard) Lovelace. Both were representatives of old families of Kentucky. The father was born in that state and died in 1859. The mother, also a native of Kentucky, was a daughter of John Hubbard.
A. P. Lovelace is indebted to the public schools for the educational privileges he enjoyed in his youth and which fitted him for life's practical duties. He was trained to farm labor and has always engaged in the tilling of the soil, being now engaged in the further cultivation and improvement of his land. In addition to raising the cereals best adapted to soil and climate, he has been engaged in the raising of poultry for the past twelve years, and has some very fine breeds of chickens.
On the 24th of April, 1864, Mr. Lovelace was united in marriage to Miss Ioletha Cotter, a daughter of John and Rebecca Cotter, who were natives of Kentucky and belonged to old families of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Lovelace have three children: Etta, born February 17, 1865, is the wife of A. T. Clarke, a resident of Patterson township and they have six children; Abbie, born February 20, 1867. is the wife of Denver Coates, a resident of Seattle. Washington, and thev have two children: Ada, born October 20, 1874, is the wife of E. E. Steelman and has four children. Mr. Lovelace is a Democrat in his political views and is a stanch advocate of the principles of the party.
"Past and Present Of Greene County, Illinois"; by Hon. Ed. Miner, Ex-Secretary Old Settlers Society; Illustrated; "A people that take no pride in the noble achievements of remote ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered with pride by remote generations.'' - Macauley; Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1905, page 625-626;- Submitted by Sara Hemp


Henry M. Walls
Henry M. Walls, who is engaged in carpentering and contracting in Roodhouse, was born in Scott county, Illinois, on the 10th of March, 1864, and is a son of George and Sarah J. Walls, who are still residents of Scott county, where they have made their home for many years, the father devoting his energies to agricultural pursuits.
Henry M. Walls is indebted to the public schools for the educational privileges he enjoyed and since putting aside his text-books and entering upon business life he has followed farming and carpentering. He rented land in Scott county until 1901, and in addition to the cultivation of the fields, he also engaged in building to some extent. In the year mentioned he removed to Roodhouse, where he has since conducted business as a carpenter and contractor, and he receives a liberal share of the public patronage, because he is a good workman and conscientious in the performance of any work that devolves upon him.
In 1885 Mr. Walls was united in marriage to Miss Emma Pryor, a daughter of Isaac Pryor, who with his family is living in Glasgow, Illinois. Mrs. Walls was born in South Carolina and in early girlhood was brought by her parents to Illinois, being reared in Scott county, where she was married and where her death occurred. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Walls were born five children, four sons and a daughter, all yet at home, namely: George, twenty years of age; William I., aged eighteen; James, thirteen years of age; Earl, a youth of eleven; and Ida May, a maiden of nine summers. The children reside with their father in Roodhouse and are attending the public schools.
Mr. Walls has always given his political allegiance to the Democratic party and although he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, as every true American citizen should do, he has no desire for public office, preferring to give his undivided attention to his business affairs, so that he may provide well for his family.
Source: "Past and Present Of Greene County, Illinois"; by Hon. Ed. Miner, Ex-Secretary Old Settlers Society; Illustrated; "A people that take no pride in the noble achievements of remote ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered with pride by remote generations.'' - Macauley; Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1905, page 626; - Submitted by Sara Hemp


ANDREWS N. J.
ANDREWS N. J. Ex-Sheriff of Carrollton. Mr. Andrews was born Sumner Co., Kentucky, in 1830; he was but five years old when his mother, Mary P. Andrews, set out in company with friends for Illinois. His father, Baker Andrews, a man of wealth and position in his native place, died in Kentucky. To the care of his wife he left a family of six children; Mrs. Andrews became a resident of Carrollton in 1835, where Nathaniel J. Andrews, from whom this sketch is obtained, grew to manhood; receiving a liberal education, he ventured forth as a farmer, which he has followed very successfully many years of his life. In 1860 he was elected Assessor and County Treasurer, a position he filled to the satisfaction of all for a period of ten years. With Jas. S. Vedder, Mr. Andrews became identified in the grocery trade, doing a prosperous business for one year, when Mr. Andrews disposed of his interest to Mr. Vedder. The following year he was elected Sheriff of the county, holding this responsible position two years. Since his retirement from official duties, Mr. Andrews has turned his attention to his farm, comprising 300 acres of choice land. In 1852 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Jones, a daughter of Dr. Jones, of Greene County. Of eleven children born of this marriage, nine are living: Catherine, Benjamin B., Lizzie, John B., Mattie V., Mary H., Nathaniel L., Lela Belle, and Beatrice. Mr. Andrews is a true lover of nature, who loves to roam the fields in quest of game or watch the streams in quest of wild fowl; this passion for nature has made him an extensive traveler over a great portion of the West; he it was who, in company with Col. Jacob Bowman, laid out the town knows as Brown's Grove, Pawnee County, Kansas
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


ARMSTRONG DR. C.
ARMSTRONG DR. C. physician and surgeon, r. Maple av. and W. 7th St., office N. Main st., Carrollton, Ill, Clinton
Armstrong is a native of Rogersville. East Tenn., where he was born on the 10th of March, 1823. Tracing back the genealogy of the Armstrong family we find that Joseph Rogers, who was the father of the mother of our subject, was the founder of the town of Rogersville; he was born in the county of Tyrone, in the north of Ireland; in 1786, while yet in the flush of early manhood, he crossed the ocean for the New World; after a voyage of some weeks' duration he landed at Norfolk, Va., and eventually made his way to Tennessee, where he was destined to bear a prominent part in the mercantile world; we have only space to say that he platted the town of Rogersville the year of his arrival, afterward became one of the most prominent merchants of his day, having intercourse with some of the leading men of his time; he died at Rogersville, where his ashes now repose, in 1833. William Armstrong, the grandfather of the subject of this biography, was born in Augusta Co,, Va., in 1758; he was of Scotch Irish origin, and early turned his attention to farming and became a leading man in his profession; during its early settlement he moved to Tennessee, where he married Miss Elizabeth Galbreith, by whom he had eight children, of whom Clinton Armstrong, whose career we now follow, was the third son. He was born in Tennessee on the 10th of March, 1793, lived in Tennessee until 1845, when he moved to St. Louis, where he died in 1853, a merchant and farmer of prominence. Dr. C. Armstrong, of Carrollton, was born in Hawkins Co., Tenn., town of Rogersville, on the 10th of March, 1823; lived here until 1844, when he located at St. Louis, studied medicine three years, and graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Missouri, known at this early date, 1847, as the McDowell School. Dur- this year in Tennessee he was married to Miss Mar ha Lynn, a daughter of Wm. Lynn, of Kingsport. Of this marriage four children were born, all living, whose names are William, Clinton, Lucy and Mary. Residing in St. Louis five years, in 1849 he came to Carrollton, where he has since resided, securing in his profession a large and lucrative practice. Dr. Armstrong is one of our most liberal citizens, secretary of the Old Settlers' Association and takes a deep interest in educational matters. Mrs. Armstrong died April, 1872, and lies at rest in Oak Ridge cemetery, Mo. Oct. 30, 1878, Dr. Armstrong was married to Miss Lottie E. Hayden, a daughter of David Hayden, late of California, and granddaughter of General Eaton, who entered the United States service during the Revolutionary struggle, gaining fame and wealth, and was afterward Counsul at Tunis. When the late Civil War was in progress Dr. C. Armstrong served two years, doing noble work as an acting assistant surgeon of the 61st Ill., from Greene County, and was an eye witness of the siege and capture of Vicksburg
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


BOWMAN M.
BOWMAN M. resides in Carrollton; one of the first settlers within the borders of Greene County; was born in Virginia; he was in his 15th year when his parents moved to Illinois, settling four miles southwest of Carrollton, Greene County, in 1820. The subject of this sketch received the usual pioneer education; for a number of years he worked on the old homestead. In 1830 he was married to Miss Harriet Cristy, a sister of the late Hon. Andrew Cristy, who ranked among the wealthier citizens of St. Louis. Digressing a little from the subject in hand, it may be here stated that for many years the hardy pioneer roughed it in the little log cabin. The table, constructed of puncheon, fairly groaned each day beneath the weight of venson and wild turkey, brought down by the unerring aim of the backwoodsman. M. Bowman, whose name heads this sketch is an unassuming Christian gentleman, well and favorably known in this county. The marriage of Mr. Bowman to Miss Cristy was blessed with eight children : Mary, Elizabeth, Emily, Anna, Kate, Alvin C, Francis and Lucy. Mrs. Bowman not living
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


BOYD THOMAS H.
BOYD THOMAS H. retired merchant; was born at Alexandria, Virginia, in 1817; his father, John Boyd, was a saddler and harness maker by trade, who married Miss Mary Kirk, a native of Philadelphia, Penn. In an early day they moved to Washington City, where they passed the remainder of life. Thomas was but 10 when he accompanied an emigrant to Illinois; this was in 1834. At 25 he entered into the mercantile business at Columbiana, Greene County, where he started a small store, and became a dealer in cord-wood and also a successful grain shipper. He transacted a good business here until 1856. About this time he married Mary Ann Ellis, a native of North Carolina, by whom he had six children; three are living: Oily A., Carrie and Thomas. In 1859 Mr. Boyd was elected Probate Judge; faithfully discharging the manifold duties of this office he received a re-election. In 1872 he was elected by a large majority to the State Legislature, serving four sessions. When his term of office expired he settled down to quiet life, so consistent with his abunbant means
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


BURRUSS J. C
BURRUSS J. C the enterprising proprietor of the Carrollton Machine Shops and Foundry, was born in 1847, near the present city of Carrollton, in Greene County, upon the old farm homestead of his parents, George L. and Maria Burruss. Geo. L. Burruss is the well-known stock dealer. The subject of our sketch passed his early years upon the farm. In 1869 Mr. J. C. Burruss traveled for the well-known house of J. Sedgbeer, dealer in feed grinders, continuing in his employ for a period of one year; he now became employed upon the farm of his father, sinking an artesian well, getting no supply of water at a depth of a thousand feet. In 1872 Mr. B. married Miss Kate Beaty, daughter of D. E. Beaty, of Jersey County. In 1875 he was employed by the Illinois State Farmers Association as State contract agent, and, during the Winter of 1877, purchased the frame building owned by Winn Bros., and used as a machine shop, which was destroyed by fire six weeks after its purchase. By no means discouraged however by his misfortune, in 1877 Mr. Burruss erected the substantial building now owned and occupied by him for the transaction of a machine shop, foundry, blacksmithing.and machinery business. All varieties of farm machinery, from the most noted establishments are handled; and here is also manufactured to order a very superior wagon, made in a more workman-like manner than those generally in use. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CAMERON J. T.
CAMERON J. T. saddler and harness maker, west side of Square, Carrollton, Illinois. The above named gentleman, who is well and favorably known to the business community here, is worthy of more than a passing notice; the pioneer in the harness trade of Greene County, he began his business career at the early age of 18, in the City of Carrollton, having become regularly apprenticed to the trade of a harness maker at an early age; born in Tennessee in 1832; at five, his parents became residents of Greene County. Since this period of time he has lived here continuously, and has been known here as a business man from his 18th year. Commencing his business career with no capital, save willing hands and an energy that carried him in after years through many discouragements, he went steadily forward to a successful business career, transacting for many years a successful business both at Carrollton and Greenfield. In 1873 the store building owned by him was destroyed by fire, and shortly afterward Mr. Cameron bought the edifice where he now transacts a large and constantly increasing trade. In conclusion, we would say, give Mr. Cameron your patronage and secure good work at living prices. With the exception of alderman, Mr. Cameron has managed to keep clear of office. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CARLIN THOMAS J.
CARLIN THOMAS J. Circuit Clerk for many years; is a native of Greene County; born at Carrollton December 13, 1827, and is the eldest child of William and Mary Carlin. William Carlin was a brother of Governor Carlin, of Illinois, and a native of Fredericksburgh, Va.; born May 31, 1804. Mrs Carlin was born July 3, 1805, in Halifax County, Va., and at the age of 13 her parents moved to Kentucky. Mr. Carlin removed with his parents when quite young to the then Territory of Illinois, and settled on Wood River, in Madison County. At that place they resided several years. During the Autumn of 1820, William Carlin became a citizen of Greene County, and purchased a tract of land now in the corporation of Carrollton. On the 6th of December, 1826, he was married to Miss Mary Goode. Politically his views coincided with those of the Democratic party, of which, in Greene County, he was a prominent member, and such confidence did they repose in his ability and honor that they elected him to the office of County Clerk and retained him in that position 17 years, when he resigned and moved to his farm, eight miles west of Carrollton. Two years later, while on his way to New Orleans with stock, he was nominated by the Democrats and elected in December, 1849, entering upon his official duties at Carrollton. He passed away on the 20th of April, 1850, No man perhaps in the county was more universally liked than he, and his death was universally regretted by a large circle of acquaintances. His widow is still living, a resident of Carrollton. Thomas J. Carlin, while a boy, attended the common schools of Greene County. Shortly after the death of his father, he was appointed by Judge Woodson Circuit Clerk, to fill the unexpired term of his father. When the duties of this office came to a close he was appointed Deputy Sheriff under William Halbrit, and acted in that capacity two years. He married Miss Jane Kelly, a daughter of Andrew Kelly, of Carrollton, by whom he has three children. Their eldest daughter, Louisa, is the wife of William L. Robards. After the expiration of his term as Deputy Sheriff. Mr. Carlin settled on the old homestead, and soon after purchased a portion of the estate. In November, 1864, he was elected to the office of Circuit Clerk, and by re-election officiated in this capacity until December, 1876. Since this date he has followed agricultural pursuits. Viewing his past life, that has been characterized by ability in office and a spirit of generosity, few have contributed more toward the prosperity of the county than Thomas J. Carlin
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CLAPP, Clement L.
CARROLLTON PATRIOT PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT, Clement L. Clapp, proprietor. Publishes the Carrollton Patriot, Clement L. Clapp, editor and proprietor; the White Hall Republican, , Pearce & Clapp, proprietors; the Scott County Arrow , Pearce & Clapp, proprietors. Mr. Clapp, the proprietor of this flourishing printing establishment, was born in Ohio in 1852, spent his boyhood in Connecticut; removed to Iowa, where he graduated from College in 1871. Taught three years, spent two years at Yale College as a post graduate student, was for two years a member of the editorial staff of the New Haven Conn., daily Journal and Courier , was for one year a tutor in Illinois College, Jacksonville, and in 1875 bought the Carrollton Patriot. This establishment employs eight men and its four presses are constantly in motion, turning out commercial printing, legal printing, pamphlets, etc., for a wide section of country. Its customer, are scattered from Jacksonville to Alton, on the C. & A. R.R., and from Winchester to Medora on the C. B. & Q. R.R. There is no country office in central Illinois that executes a greater variety or amount of printing
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


BARNETT, W. L.
CARROLLTON TILE WORKS, near the C. & A. passenger depot, was constructed last Spring by that enterprising gentleman, W. L. Barnett, whose genial face, for the past ten years, has been frequently seen at the window of the C. & A. passenger depot, at Carrollton, where he officiates as agent and telegraph operator. To his practical mind it became evident that what the farmers of Illinois were in need of was more tile and less wet land. With his usual zeal he set to work, and the result is, that we to-day have tile works that will bear comparison with any other similar establishment. The clay used is of a very superior quality, and thoroughly ground before entering into the manufacture of tiling. This tile is manufactured from three to eight inches, is of very superior quality, and finds a ready sale. Mr. Barnett, senior member of this firm, was born in Indiana, November 11, 1846. When but eleven years old his parents moved to Mattoon, Ill., where young Barnett received a liberal education; attaining the age of fifteen he entered the employ of the Terre Haute R.R. Co., becoming a telegraph operator in the city of Mattoon, Ill. When the Jacksonville division of the St. L.,J.& C.Ry. was constructed, he went to Murrayville, Morgan county. Ill., where he officiated in his former capacity, and was probably the first operator on that line; proceeding from here to Jacksonville, thence to Mason City, remaining here thirteen months; he came to Carrollton. At Mattoon Mr. Barnett was married to Miss Amelia Allen, daughter of H. A. Allen, of Mattoon, now of Geneva Lake, Wis.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CLARK JOSEPH A.
CLARK JOSEPH A. farmer and stock raiser, res. Second st., Carrollton; farm property situated in township 9, range 13, and township 8. range 13, and consisting of 720 acres. Joseph A. Clark is a native of Iowa, was born in 1839, the second child of Joshua and Paulina Clark, whose maiden name was Hoffman. The family moved from Iowa when our subject was a child, and settled on land at a point familiarly known as the Bluff, where the head of the family followed agricultural pursuits, until his entree into the hotel business at Carrollton. He officiated in this capacity for six years, when he again took up the life of a farmer, and here young Clark passed his early years, and first embarked in business on Macoupin Creek; at a point now known as Clark's Landing; here he kept a grocery, and attended to the duties pertaining to his farm, and also rafted logs down the river to St. Louis and Alton, during the greater part of ten years. Mr. Clark energetically pursued the calling of rafting logs down the river, and on which transaction he realized a handsome profit, and in due time he accumulated a handsome property, and now owns as above stated, 720 acres. In Fuldom, Jersey Co., Mr. Clark transacted a general merchandise business, and held the position of postmaster when he moved to Carrollton, where he purchased a residence and town property. In 1861. Mr. C. was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Fulks, a daughter of John Fulks, by whom he has six children : Clara B., Mary, Jennie, Cyrilda, Rosa and Zana
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CLEMMONS DR. C. P.
CLEMMONS DR. C. P. physician and surgeon, for the past twenty years in practice at Carrollton, was born in Davidson Co., North Carolina, January, 1817; at twenty-one he became a resident of Louisville, Ky., where he entered the medical university, remaining three years, graduating as an M.D. in 184S. It may be here stated, that Dr. C. is, in every sense of the word, a self-made man, whose studies in the medical profession were made under difficulties that many would have given way under, and never have risen to any worthy position in life. From this institution he graduated with high honors. In 1841 he took up the practice of medicine. For eighteen years, he was a resident of Pike Co., Ill., where he obtained a large and lucrative practice. In 1858 the Doctor moved to Carrollton, where his skill as a physician soon becoming known, he secured a very liberal patronage. In 1862 he erected the large brick building east of court-house, where, from '62 until '76, he transacted a large drug business. In addition to this Dr. Clemmons owns some four or five other substantial dwellings in the city, and a country property, consisting of 227 acres of land, within a short distance of the city. In Nebraska he also owns two sections of valuable land. For three terms has been alderman of Carrollton. In 1851 he was married to Miss Matilda Thomas, daughter of the Hon. Samuel Thomas, by whom he has four children: Emma, who married Dr. Lindsay, of Carrollton; Thomas, a farmer; Charles, a graduate of St. Louis Medical College, and Eliza, now attending Godfrey College, at Monticello Ill.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CLOUGH JOHN
CLOUGH JOHN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 23, P.O. Carrollton. The whole-souled gentleman, whose name appears at the head of this biography, is a native of Yorkshire, England, where he was born on the eighth day of October, 1821; the youngest child of Robert and Elizabeth Clough. The days of his childhood and early youth were spent upon European shores, where he followed agricultural pursuits and received a liberal education in the subscription schools of his native place. In 1850 he crossed the Atlantic for the new world; landing in New York City on the 5th of April of the year above given. Remaining in New York but a short time he came direct to the West, locating at Carrollton where he subsequently found employment as a butcher, and for twenty years was associated in business with W. O. Greaves, whose biography appears elsewhere, in a city meat market at Carrollton. Some eight years since Mr. Clough retired from the above business, turning his attention to farming, and now resides at his farm residence in Township 10, R. 12. In 1855 Mr. Clough was married to Miss Emma Greaves, a daughter of W. O. and Harriet Greaves. Seven children were born of this marriage, four of whom are living, and whose names are in order of birth, John, Robert, George, and Hattie. Mr. Clough has been twice mayor of Carrollton, and was first elected to this prominent position in 1873, and subsequently received a reelection to the same office in 1875
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CONNOLE ANTHONY
CONNOLE ANTHONY, Deputy County Clerk, r cor. W. 9th st. and Maple Av. Anthony Connole is a native of County Clare, Ireland. Born July 3d, 1842, crossing the Atlantic in his 17th year he landed in the city of New Orleans; from the " Crescent City" he made his way to Carrollton, where he first worked as a farm-hand for David Black and attended school during the winter, having previously received a liberal education in his native land. When the war broke out Mr. Connole enlisted in Co. F., 1st Mo. Cav., and subsequently re-enlisted as a veteran in Co. A., 53d Ill. Infantry; detailed as a sergeant, he became a participant in many noted battles; honorably discharged when the war closed, he proceeded to Kentucky where he became employed as clerk for a railroad contractor; afterwards proceeding to Springfield, he officiated as clerk for the U.S. Marshal; from here he went to Berdan, in Greene County,where he entered into the mercantile business, and was elected justice of the peace, and during the present year was appointed deputy clerk under the Hon. L. R. Lakin, County Clerk. In 1869 Mr. Connole was married to Miss Mary Markham, by whom he has five children
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CROW DR. J. T.
CROW DR. J. T. physician and surgeon. The above gentleman was born in Pike County, Mo., on the 14th of April, 1S27, where he remained until he had attained his 17th year, date 1846, when he proceeded to Danville, Kentucky, where he entered upon a literary course of study, graduating with the honorary degree of Bachelor of Arts, with Dr. Geo. B. Wilcox, who was among the first families of Virginia, an eminent surgeon and a participant during his younger days, in the war of 1812. After remaining with Dr. Wilcox for a period of one year, the youthful student attended a course of lectures at the medical department of the St. Louis University, now the St. Louis Medical College. Graduating at this school in 1854, he first entered upon the practice of his profession in Scotland Co., Mo.; while here he married, in 1855, Miss Martha E. Gorin, a daughter of H. M. Gorin, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Decatur, Macon Co., for many years. In 1862 Dr. Crow became a resident of Greene County; the following year proceeding to Quincy, where he resided one year; then to Carrollton, and thence to the golden shores of the Pacific coast in 1865; here, for a short time, practicing as a physician, when he again turned his footsteps towards Illinois, locating in due time at Carrollton, where he has since became a permanent resident; where his skill as a physician is recognized and where he has a large and constantly growing practice. Of the marriage above referred to seven children were born, two only of whom are living, Charles C. and Albert S.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


CULLIMORE JAMES
CULLIMORE JAMES, retired hardware merchant. For a number of years transacted a successful business under the firm name of Cullimore Brothers. Was born in the city of Baltimore in 1842, where he resided until his parents removed to Greene County, in 1851; in the city of Carrollton passed his early years and became apprenticed to the trade of a carriage-maker and subsequently that of a tinsmith. A tinner when the war came on, he enlisted in Co. I, 91st Illinois Infantry for three years; served and became a participant in the battle of Elizabethtown and others of less note. When the war closed Mr. C. returned to Carrollton, where he, shortly after, formed a co-partnership business with his brother, John W. Cullimore, in the hardware, tin store and furniture trade. Both were men of enterprise and soon established a good trade; continuing in business for a period of ten years; at the expiration of this time the firm was dissolved by mutual consent. In 1874 Mr. Cullimore was united in marriage to Miss Alice E. Black, a daughter of William Black, by whom he has two children; Eddie and Gracie. Mr. Cullimore, Sen., first settled in Greene Co. in 1847
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


DAVIS JAMES M.
DAVIS JAMES M. prominent among the leading physicians of Greene County; was born in Boyle County, Ky., in 1828. His father, Cyrus A. Davis, was a prominent physician in Kentucky, who there married Miss Anna R. Montague, by whom he had eleven children, and of whom James was the fourth. He was in his fourth year when his parents settled at Carrollton, Greene County, III., then a village composed of a few rough stores and dwellings. Purchasing a farm, the head of the family followed agricultural pursuits, when he moved to Carrollton and began the practice of his profession. At first he gained but little practice, but as the town grew quite rapidly, his practice increased in proportion to the growth. Above the average in education and natural intelligence, in 1836 he received the nomination and was elected to the House of Representatives. When the Legislature was in session at Vandalia, then the capital of the State, Dr. Davis bade his family farewell and set out on horseback to attend to his new duties. On reaching the scene of his labors he remained until his term expired, when he once more entered upon the duties of his profession at Carrollton, and where he held many responsible offices. He died in 1852, universally regretted for his sterling qualities. At the early age of 19, James M. Davis began the study of medicine under his father. At the end of one year of unremitting study, he proceeded to St. Louis, where he attended the medical department of the Missouri State University, graduating as an M. D. March, 1852. Digressing a little it will be well to state that at 17 Dr. Davis entered the Mexican war, enlisting in Co. H, 2d Reg. Kentucky Infantry, honorably discharged on account of general disability, he resumed his studies. Dr. Davis, now a prominent physician of Carrollton, has held numerous responsible positions, but a short time ago becoming the regular Republican nominee for State Senator. In 1857 Dr. Davis was married to Sarah A. Vedder, a daughter of E. P. Vedder, by whom he has five children: Francis A., Edgar L., Nellie, Nettie, and Belle
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


DAVIS K. H.
DAVIS K. H. grain dealer, near C.& A. passenger depot, Carrollton, Ill.; successor of Davis & Nelton; began in the grain trade in 1868. The present large building for the storage of grain was erected in 1867. Here are stored thousands of bushels of grain, ready for transportation to points north and south, Mr. Davis, who is sole proprietor of this extensive establishment, was born in Kentucky. His father is Dr. C. A. Davis. R. H. Davis moved to St. Louis, Mo., in an early day, entering into a successful grain trade. In 1867 he came to Carrollton, Greene Co., his former home, and in company with his brother entered upon a successful business career as a grain buyer. In 1372 he was elected Mayor of Carrollton. On retirement from office he attended quietly to his large interests in the grain trade, until called upon again to serve as Mayor in 1877, receiving a large majority of the votes cast. Mr. Davis was married to Miss Cornelia Newson, of Petersburg, Virginia, by whom he has four children: Anna, Daisy, Lizzie, and Robbie. In I872 Mrs. Davis was laid at rest in the Cemetery of Carrollton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


DEE JOHN V.
DEE JOHN V. retired farmer, a resident of Carrollton, and one whose name will go down to posterity as one of the pioneers of the Northwest; was born in Vermont Feb. 15, 1S04, the fifth child of John and Elizabeth Dee, who died during the early infancy of the subject of this sketch. During the Summer of 1821, John Dee and John, Jr., father and son, settled in Greene County, within eight miles of what is now Carrollton. Wild game of every description, peculiar to the Northwest, abounded, and here and there nestling among the tall native grass might have been seen the frontiersman's cabin. The father entered 160 acres of land, but tilled the soil but little, as he was a carpenter by occupation; a man who knew no idleness, he became moderately successful in life. He died in 1858. John, Jr., grew to manhood in Greene County, having for his associates some of the best men who trod the prairies of Illinois. When the first war with Blackhawk occurred, in 1830, he enlisted in Captain Fry's company. Mr. Dee recollects well the signing of the treaty of peace at the old fort on Rock Island. But little more remains to be told; but to such men as John Dee, who pave the way for a high grade of civilization, we owe our national prosperity. From boyhood to manhood, from middle age to old age, Mr. Dee has followed farming with a success, brought about by no lucky accident, but by systematic and well laid plans. For the past few years, a resident of Carrollton, he lives in the enjoyment of the comforts of our modern day. In 1814 Mr. Dee was witness, among others, of the passage on the Ohio River of the first steamboat
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


DODGSON CHRISTOPHER
DODGSON CHRISTOPHER, who bore no secondary part in the growth and development of the flourishing County of Greene, was a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born in 1802. In his 18th year, date 1820, he looked about him for a new field of labor, and accordingly embarked on board a sailing vessel for America, landing in the City of Baltimore, thence to Madison County, Ill., where he first worked as a farmhand. Two years later, he became a resident of Greene County, locating near the present City of Carrollton, on the farm now owned by Benjamin Roodhouse. As this date, 1822, was an early one even the history of the great Northwest, we here append a few facts relative to an early settlement in a new country. There was but one building then in Carrollton, a rough dwelling composed of logs, which was used as an inn, and known as the Jack Traveler. It stood for many years on the site now covered by the dry goods establishment of McFarland & Weagley. On the old farm homestead of his parents, John and Elizabeth Dodgson, our subject passed his earlier years, and subsequently became a distiller. In 1843 he united his fortunes to Miss Mary Morfoot, a daughter of John and Elizabeth Morfoot. During this term of years Mr. Dodgson had become exceedingly prosperous, and began to take a leading position as an agriculturist, having purchased the property formerly owned by John Dodgson, his father. He continued on the home place many years, and some 13 years ago moved to Carrollton, where he built one of the most substantial and handsome residences that the city affords; and here, while enjoying the fruits of his early labors, he passed quietly away to that world of spirits to which we all are tending, on the 4th of April, 1878. None of his great success in life was due to accident or fortunate circumstances, but lay in his own indomitable will and an energy that never flagged. And to such men, who made a home in the wilderness, do we owe the comforts that we to-day enjoy. Mrs. Dodgson, from whom this narrative is obtained, resides on the home property, in Carrollton, is a native of England; born in 1810, the second child of John Morfoot, whose name is mentioned elsewhere, who settled in Greene County in 1820, who was the first among the early settlers who were attacked by the cholera then prevalent, and died some 45 years ago
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


ELDRED L. S.
ELDRED L. S. merchant, firm of Eldred & Hardcastle, Sec. 21, P.O. Carrollton. Mr. Eldred is the third child of Elon and Jane Eldred, of whom a full account is given elsewhere in the historical portion of this volume. The subject of this sketch, who is well and favorably known in Greene County, was born in April, 1834, on the old homestead of his parents, within the borders of Greene County. Growing to manhood when times were very different to what they are at the present time, he obtained a hardy vigor that led to a future success. In 1855 he was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Cavanaugh, a daughter of Dr. T. H. Cavanaugh, who held the position of colonel in the late war, by whom he had ten children : Carrie R., Fannie J., Belle M., Edward, Louise, Julia, Elon, Charles H., David P., and Philo C. and Albert G., deceased. At the present writing, Mr. E. resides in township 10, range 12. In 1874 Mr. Eldred served in the capacity of president of the agricultural board. During Black Hawk's raid on the white settlers Elon Eldred took an active part; and also witnessed many stirring events in his sojourn in California as a gold miner
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


ELDRED SILAS
ELDRED SILAS. In noting the life history of men and early times in Greene County, none are more worthy of note than Silas Eldred, whose daring nature inured him to the stirring scenes of Western life. He was a native of New York State. Of his parents but little can now be learned, save that they moved to Greene County in an early day, probably about the year 1820. Amid pioneer associations young Silas passed his boyhood, and grew to vigorous manhood. he proved a sterling actor in the battle of life, and was destined to play no secondary part in the growth and development of Greene County. When Black Hawk made war on the white settlers, in 1832, he joined the forces that were organized to protect the frontier. Many anecdotes are told of Silas Eldred; one will be worthy of especial notice here, to show the daring nature of the man; on one occasion a man by the name of Roveley, a high tempered and somewhat quarrelsome man, drew a bead upon him with a shot gun, the old veteran silently advanced and wrenched the gun from the hands of the bully, completely subduing him. He became a farmer of prominence in Greene, and passed away in 1873, at the village of Roodhouse. The survivors of the family are seven children : Elisha, who married Carrie Taylor; Mary, who married James Wood; Jehosaphat, who married Carrie Eldred; Ward, who married Lottie Lane; Silas, jr., who married Miss Augusta Trimble, a daughter of Harvey Trimble, one of the first settlers of Greene County; Lucy, who married first Archie Anderson afterward Rice Trimble, and on his decease Presley Rice; William, who married Margaret Kelley; Calvin and Rufus not living
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


HARDCASTLE, O. B.
ELDRED & HARDCASTLE, dealers in hardware, furniture, stoves and tinware, n.e. cor. Square, the only house carrying this line of goods, and one of the best and favorably known houses in Greene Co. The present members of the firm are Messrs. L. S. Eldred and O. B. Hardcastle. Of the former gentleman notice will be given elsewhere; of the latter it may be said, that he is a native of Carlinville, Macoupin Co., born in 1853, where he grew to manhood. Obtaining a liberal education at Chillicothe, Ohio, one year later, he embarked in the above business
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


ENGLISH JAMES W.
ENGLISH JAMES W., prominent among the attorneys of Greene County; was born in Mason County, Va., March 11, 1829. His father, Nathaniel English, was a prominent physician, who married Miss Hannah Worth, a daughter of John Worth, a scout during the war of 1812. James was but eight years old when his parents moved from West Virginia to St. Louis, from which point they made their way to Jacksonville, Morgan County, Ill., in 1836. In 1844 Mr. English entered upon a classical course of study at the Illinois College, graduating with honor in 1848. He now took up the study of law in the office of Richard Yates, afterward Governor of Illinois, and William Brown; in 1850 he was admitted to practice as an attorney in the State of Illinois; in 1860, the Federal Courts; and the Supreme Court of the United States in 1873. For five years the young but able attorney struggled for a foothold among such legal lights as Murray McConnell, and others. In 1856 he came to Carrollton, where his ability was soon recognized and the following year he was elected to fill the responsible position of State's attorney. He served in this capacity in an able manner until 1860, entering upon his law studies with renewed zeal. In 1871 he moved to Leavenworth, Kansas, remaining a number of years. On being apprised of the mortal illness of his old friend and colleague. Judge Woodson, of Carrollton, and at the solicitation of his many friends in this enterprising town, he decided to return here. He has practiced for a period of eighteen years, and his course has been marked by no ordinary ability. Mr. English married Miss Eliza Stryker, a daughter of Henry Stryker, formerly a merchant, of Jacksonville, Oct. 6, 1852. Mrs. English is also a sister of Henry Stryker, Jr. attorney at Jacksonville. There are six children: Julia, Clara L., Charlotte, Nathaniel and Henry; Maria not living
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


ENGLISH WARREN
ENGLISH WARREN, auctioneer, residence Locust street, Carrollton. Warren English is a native of Greene County, born at the city of Carrollton, on the 7th of August, 1S40. Tracing back the genealogy of this family we find that L. H. English, the father of our subject, was a native of Kentucky and early in life he followed farming, although subsequent years developed an aptitude for any pursuit he might follow. When a young man, prior to his majority, he wended his way to the southern portion of Illinois, and landed in Greene County, as near as can now be ascertained, in 1822. We can not, owing to limited space, follow his eventful life in Greene County, where he was destined to take a prominent part in the administration of its municipal affairs. He probably worked as a farm hand on his first entree into Illinois, and subsequently he developed both energy and skill as a trader and auctioneer. As a trader he was unsurpassed, and as a skillful auctioneer he is well remembered by the early inhabitanls of Carrolllon. The first office he ever held in Greene County was that of a district constable. When the Black Hawk war broke out he was serving in the capacity of a deputy sheriff, but with the patriotism born of frontier life he joined forces for the subjugation of the Indians. After the war he erected a substantial building in Carrollton and became the successful proprietor of the Greene County House. For the greater portion of his life he lived in Carrollton, although for some cause he once moved down on the Hurrcane, where his property was washed away by floods. Returning to Carrollton, his restless, ambitious nature led him into many business speculations, although his chief ability lay in his skill as an auctioneer. His first wife. Miss Arabel Turney, a daughter of General Turney, was born in Tennessee, and was united in marriage to Mr. English in 1828 at Carrollton. Mr. English subsequently married, on the decease of his first wife in 1870 to Mrs. Emily Brunk, with whom he now resides in affluent circumstances at Springfield, Ill. Eleven children were born of the first marriage : Turney, Wharton, Josephine, Warren, Marion, John B., Rush, Elisha, Belle and Lindsay, twins, and Sarah. One child of the second marriage, Thomas. Of Warren we have only space to say that he passed his boyhood in Greene County, received a liberal education and subsequently turned his attention to the life of a horseman. In 1867 he was united in marriage to Tempie J. Melton, a daughter of W. J. Melton, a native of Greene County, by whom he has four children: Arabel, Pape, Julia and Turney. Mr. English is the owner of 160 acres of valuable land, and is said to be the best auctioneer in Greene County
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


EVANS TH0MAS E.
EVANS TH0MAS E. Deputy Sheriff of Greene County, was born on the old farm homestead of his parents, William and Eliza E. Evans, near the city of Carrollton, in 1843. Growing to manhood upon the farm he followed agricultural pursuits until 1869, when he proceeded to Carrollton, where he entered the banking establishment of John Long & Co., where he remained a short time, when he resumed operations on the farm, until his departure for St. Louis, where he became bookkeeper in a sale and commission house. Dec. 1873, Mr. Evans was appointed Deputy Clerk under the Hon. L. R. Lakin, in the city of Carrollton. It is well known to the citizens here that no one perhaps in Greene County bears a better reputation than Mr. Evans, as a bookkeeper or expert in accounts, and accordingly, when Mr. Jones entered upon his official duties as Sheriff he appointed Mr. Evans his deputy, who has since officiated in this capacity to the satisfaction of all honest men. Further notice will be given in the historical portion of this volume
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


GILLESPIE DANIEL H
GILLESPIE DANIEL H, proprietor Carrollton Saw Mills; for a period of seventeen years, the above named gentleman has transacted a successful saw-milling business at various points in Greene County. For the past three years has been the successful proprietor of the above named works, within the corporation of Carrollton, where having all modern facilities he is fully prepared to meet all demands that may be made upon him. This mill, in all probability, is better adapted and has better facilities for sawing than any mill of a similar character in Greene County, and the large and constantly increasing trade has been brought about through the energy and reliability of its successful proprietor, who was born in Brown County, Ohio, July 26, 1826, where he grew to manhood, and in the adjoining county of Adams was united in marriage in 1849 to Miss Ann Hoop. In 1856 Mr. G. became a resident of Greene County, where he has since turned his attention to the above business
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


GILSON EDWARD P.
GILSON EDWARD P. attorney and counsellor at law, is a native of Macoupin County, Ill., born in 1853, the oldest son of James W. and Marion Gilson. James Gilson was a grain merchant at Brighton, where the subject of our notice passed his early years. Receiving his prelimmary education in the district schools of his native place, at an early age he entered Blackburn University, where he entered upon a course of classical studies, graduating from this well known institution of learning in 1875; he now proceeded to Chicago, Ill., where he entered the law office of the Honorable Judge Lyman Trumbull, with all the energies of his nature bent upon acquiring a full knowledge of the law. At the expiration of two years he was admitted to practice in all the United States Supreme Courts at Mount Vernon, Ill. For the past year Mr. Gilson has been a resident of Carrollton, where among his many skillful competitors he makes a very fair showing indeed, and we heartily wish him success in the profession for which he seems peculiarly fitted
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


GIMMY ADAM
GIMMY ADAM. Deceased, who during his life was a prominent farmer within the borders of Greene County, was born in the kingdom of Bavaria, Germany, Aug. 25, 1822. But little of his early life can now be learned, and accordingly we enter into a short description relative to his career in America; during the winter of 1848 he worked at his trade, that of a shoemaker, at Cleveland, Ohio. Remaining one year at this city we next find him a resident of St. Louis, where he worked at his trade until his location in Carrollton, where he entered into partnership business with a brother, Frederick Gimmy. For that period of time the firm transacted a successful business. Dissolving partnership in 1853, Mr. Gimmy next turned his attention to farming, continuing in this vocation until resuming business in 1859 at Carrollton, where he conducted a successful merchandise until his decease, which occurred during the Spring of 1877, when all that was mortal of Adam Gimmy was laid at rest in the beautiful cemetery of Carrollton, a handsome monument marking the spot. The survivors of the family are Mrs. Gimmy, Adam, Mary B., Lewis F. and George. Adam, from whom this narration is obtained, embarked in his present business of grocer four years prior to the death of his father, and a more live, energetic business man it would be a hard matter to find; his stock of goods, always of the best, are bought low for cash, which customers will do well to note. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 480; - transcribed by bmt


HENSLER LEWIS
HENSLER LEWIS, manufacturer and dealer in Wagons, Buggies, Plows and Farming Machinery. All kinds of repair work promptly attended to. The subject of this sketch is a native of Indiana; born on the 1st of May. 1850; fifth child of John and Harriet Hensler, natives of Germany and the State of Indiana respectively. Young Hensler grew up in Indiana, where he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith and wagon-maker. On completing his trade Mr. H. proceeded to St. Louis, where he worked nearly a year; finding times hard in St. Louis, he now directed his footsteps to Carrollton, Illinois, where he embarked in the same calling, and through his superiority as a workman, soon began to build up a large trade, and now transacts a large and constantly increasing business. He was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Howard, of Greene
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 481; - transcribed by bmt


HOBSON EDWARD B
HOBSON EDWARD B. asst. cashier, Carrollton bank. Mr. Hobson was born in 1843, on the old farm homestead of his father, Dr. John Hobson, situated near Carrollton. At the age of six his parents located near Alton, where farm property was purchased. Here a residence was made from 1849 until 1855, when the family settled near the village of Buckin, on the Grafton road, where farm property was purchased. Here were passed the last days of Dr. John Hobson, a most worthy gentleman of wealth, whose memory is cherished by many residents of Greene County. The family now consisted of Mrs. Hobson and Edward, an only child. Mrs. H. having relatives at Carrollton, now decided to make her home there, where she now resides. Edward received his preliminary education at Carrollton, which was afterward brought to completion at Shurtleff College, situated at Upper Alton. In 1864, he began the study of medicine under Dr. Armstrong, of Carrollton, in 1867 graduating from Rush Medical College, Chicago. Returning to Carrollton, he entered into the drug business with A. H. Donahue. Two years later the firm disposed of their interest to Fry & Armstrong. Dr. Hobson now turned his attention to farming, in Montgomery county, where he owns 1,000 acres, a magnificent property. In 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Elliott, daughter of Robert Elliot; there are two children : Mary E. and Adele W. During the present year Mr. Hobson became identified with the Carrollton bank, one of the safest institutions in this county
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 481; - transcribed by bmt


HOBSON ROBERT
HOBSON ROBERT, who took a leading position among the merchants of Carrollton, was born in Cumberland Co,, England, May 1st, 1814. Passing by the early years of his life, spent in Great Britain, we follow his fortunes in the new world. It was during the year 1822, that his parents crossed the Atlantic for America, settling in Greene County, near the present city of Carrollton, where Mr. Hobson passed the days of his childhood—early youth, and grew to manhood, and where he followed agricultural pursuits until 1853, when he entered into a general merchandising business, continuing here two years. He then disposing of his stock, turned his attention to the vocation that had been his from boyhood, In 1874, became extensively engaged as a stock dealer and shipper, and during the Autumn of 1875, becoming engaged in the stove line of trade, forming a co-partnership business with O. B. Hardcastle, which was dissolved Feb. 1, 1879
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 481; - transcribed by bmt


HOWARD JORDAN
HOWARD JORDAN, farmer and stock raiser. Sec. 10, P.O. Carrollton. Among the early pioneers of Greene Co. whose hospitality invited and whose generosity partakes of the good old pioneer days of long ago we mention the name of Jordan Howard; a native of New York State, born in the year 1808; he there passed his earlier years. At sixteen he accompanied his parents, Sylvester and Lydia Howard, to the broad prairies of southern Illinois. The family settled permanently in Morgan Co. on a farm. Jordan, from whom this sketch is obtained, settled in Greene County as early as 1826, a period of time when scarcely a cabin stood between Carrollton and Jacksonville; on what is now comprised in the city of Carrollton there stood an old frame building erected for a tannery, and here the youth became instructed in the mysteries of the trade. Remaining for a number of years in this capacity he eventually became a clerk for David Pierson, the well known ex-banker, with him in after years transacting a successful mercantile business. During this time, in 1842, he was united in marriage to Miss Eveline Ryder, a daughter of John Ryder, one of the oldest settlers of Greene County, a native of New York. Two children blessed this union: Charles, who died in early infancy, and Mary, who married Thomas D. Price, the popular editor of the Carrollton Gazette. Since his retirement from mercantile pursuits Mr. Howard has devoted his time and attention to farming, owning 140 acres in one of the best townships of Greene County. Here he quietly rests from his labors, on the well cultivated farm, where he will no doubt spend the remainder of his days. September, 1857, Mrs. Howard, a most estimable lady, passed to that world of spirits to which we all are tending
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 482; - transcribed by bmt


HUITT JOHN W.
HUITT JOHN W. one of the first pioneers within the borders of Greene, is a native of North Carolina, born about the year 1798. His father, John Huitt, a native of Virginia, moved to North Carolina some time after the war of the revolution, where he married Miss Lizzie Radcliff, by whom he had, at the time of his emigration to Illinois, eight children. They setthed in that portion of the northwest now recognized as Madison county. Ill., as early as 1804. Think of it, gentle reader, and let your imagination carry you back to a time when the North American Indians' moccasined feet trod the tall prairie grass where you now behold those evidences of civilization, flourishing cities, towns and villages. St. Louis itself, that magnificent city, on the Father of Waters, a mere trading post, where the daring trapper exchanged his furs to the wily trader, for tobacco, whisky, and in some rare instances, money. In this primitive wilderness the family of Huitts, a hardy, adventurous race, settled down for an existence among the wolves and Indians. A cabin was rented, and the following year one erected. Here the hardy pioneer swung his ax among the timber, or broke prairie for many a year. John Huitt, jr., and now the oldest settler, living in Greene county, grew up among pioneer associations, his education necessarily limited, as the principal studies were a Dillworth spelling book and the New Testament. At the early age of 18, he was united in marriage to Miss Rosanna Hareford, a daughter of James Hareford, of Kentucky. In 1818 he moved to what is now Greene Co., where he made a claim, and when land came into market, purchased it. In the latter years of life Mr. H. became a large property owner. Mr. H., in his eighty-third year, once walked from the town of Kane, to his old homestead near Carrollton. There are few at his age who still have the old-time vigor of youth. Of this marriage there were 13 children, 9 of whom are living: Rowland, Sarah, Nancy, William, Louisa, Katy, Rebecca, Jonathan and Fanny
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 482; - transcribed by bmt


HUNT J. S.
HUNT J. S. livery and boarding stable, S. Main st., Carrollton, III. Over twenty years ago Mr. Hunt commenced a livery business at Carrollton. He was born in the State of New Jersey in 1827. His father, Theodore Hunt, was a farmer in good circumstances, and on the farm young Hunt put in his idle time. He received a liberal education, and at twenty-one, left the parental roof and worked for neighboring farmers. At twenty-five he made his way to Ohio, thence to Iowa, thence to Jersey County, Ill., where he worked at carpenter work. Making his way to Virden, he there opened a livery and transacted a successful business, for a short time, when he moved to Carrollton, where he opened a livery on State st., meeting with success from 1856 until 1860; he then purchased the lot where his handsome, substantial stable now rears its front, said to be one of the best in the State. Prior to this he erected a frame building that was destroyed by fire March 1, 1878. In 1857, Mr. Hunt married Miss Harriet Hartwick, a daughter of John Hartwick; four children living: Nellie, Clara, Mattie and Jacob. In 1862, Mr. H. crossed the prairies for California. His present partner, Mr. J. I. Johnson, was born at Alton, Sinclair county, Ill., October, 1854. When four years old, his parents, James and Zella, moved to Greene county, settling on a farm, where they passed the remainder of life. Young Johnson was then thirteen; he received his education at Blackburn College, Alton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 482-3; - transcribed by bmt


HUSSEY & CO.
HUSSEY & CO., proprietors Carrollton elevator. This building was erected eleven years ago, by Simeon and Thomas C. Hussey, they continuing a successful business in the grain trade until the decease of the elder brother, which occurred in 1872. During this year, John Long, the well-known banker of Carrollton, became an active partner in this important enterprise. This elevator, perhaps the largest in the county, has a storage capacity of 20,000 bushels of grain, and a large trade is transacted. Mr. Hussey, a patron of this work, was born in Ohio, in 1841, a resident until 1861. During this year he came to Carrollton, where he ran a steam thresher, in connection with his brother, Simeon, mentioned above. This was, in all probability, the first steam thresher operated in the county. For two years the brothers transacted a successful business as proprietors of a sawmill. In 1863, Thomas C. Hussey was married to Miss J. Sanderson, a daughter of Joel and Olive Sanderson, a native of Ohio, where the marriage ceremony took place
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 483; - transcribed by bmt


JACKSON AMOS
JACKSON AMOS, blacksmith, carriage and wagon manufacturer, Carrollton, Ill. The above named gentleman is a native of Greene County, born in the year 1832, the youngest of a family of six children. Working on the old farm homestead until his eighteenth year, he then became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith and wagon maker at Greenfield. On serving his time he proceeded to Carrollton, where he worked as journeyman for a short time, and nine years ago embarked in his present enterprise and here has secured a fair share of public patronage through superior workmanship and reliability. In 1853 Mr. J. was united in marriage to Elizabeth D. Jackson, daughter of A. J. Jackson
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 483; - transcribed by bmt


JONES JOHN
JONES JOHN. Among the officers of Greene County none are more worthy special notice than our worthy Sheriff, John Jones, a life long resident of Greene County. He was born on the old homestead of his parents, Josiah and Elizabeth Jones, in 1839. The early years of his life were spent upon the farm situated near Wilmington, where he obtained a liberal education in the district schools of his native place, afterwards attending a graded school situated in the city of Jacksonville. Proceeding to Chicago, he there entered upon a course of classical studies. In the counties of Morgan and Sangamon Mr. Jones for some time followed the vocation of a school teacher. In 1865 he united his fortunes to Miss Minerva E. Patterson, a a daughter of Lemuel J. Patterson, by whom he has five children: Minnie F., Norman L., Lucy M., Howard and Cora M. In 1866 Mr. Jones entered into a copartnership business with L. J. Patterson and James Howard for the transaction of a general merchandise business, the firm name being Jones, Patterson & Co. In 1871 the firm dissolved by mutual consent, the senior member retiring to his farm, there following the duties pertaining to this independent calling until his appointment as County Superintendent of Schools and deputy sheriff. In the separate capacities he proved equal to the duties incumbent thereto, serving two years as deputy sheriff under N. J. Andrews and two years under F. M. Bridges. In 1876 his ability was recognized and he became the popular candidate on the Democratic ticket for the responsible position of sheriff. He was elected by the largest majority ever polled for the sheriff's position, and during the present year, by the earnest wish of his many friends here, he accepted the nomination again to serve in this capacity, being again elected and further notice will be given in the general history of this volume
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 483-4; - transcribed by bmt


KALAHER MICHAEL
KALAHER MICHAEL, restaurant, tobaccos, cigars, etc., etc., south side Square. The subject of our notice, who ranks among the more successful business men of Carrollton; is a native of County Clare, Ireland, and was born in 1845. He was the third child of a family of thirteen children. He was yet a child when his parents, Patrick and Margaret, whose maiden name was Doolan, concluded to better their fortunes in a land devoted to freedom, and accordingly the year 1854 found the family, consisting of father, mother and six children embarked on a sailing vessel for America. Before proceeding further in our narrative we here append a short description of the head of the family, who first represented the name in America. He was born in the County of Clare, Ireland; during his early years following agricultural pursuits, and during the prime of life was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Margaret Doolan, and shortly after sailing for America. We now follow the fortunes of the family in America, more particularly the subject of our notice, who, on arriving in Greene County, in the vicinity of Carrollton, first turned his attention to farming, being quite successful and the owner of valuable farm property. In his twentieth year Mr. K. was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Feely, a native of Ireland, by whom he has eight children. Four years ago Mr. Kalaher embarked in business in Carrollton. In conclusion we may safely state that Mr. K. has become more than ordinarily successful in life, owning valuable city property. Like all of his race his liberality and enterprise in all things worthy is well known
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 484; - transcribed by bmt


KEELEY JESSE
KEELEY JESSE, retired farmer, Carrollton, Ill. Born within thirty-five miles of Philadelphia, May 20, 1808. His father, Coonrad Keeley, married Miss Anna M. Essick, by whom he had nine children; Jesse was the fifth. When seven years of age his parents moved to Somerset, Pa. When Jesse was thirteen he moved to Westmoreland, Pa., where he hired out as a barkeeper, remaining five years. Removing to Somerset he was apprenticed to a blacksmith; on account of his employer's drunken habits he did not remain long before he proceeded to Bedford, Pa., where he served his apprenticeship under Daniel Shuck, whom he remembers with feelings of gratitude to this day. He was married April 17, 1832, to Miss Mary C. Whittaker. In 1836 Mr. Keeley located at Alton, Madison County, remaining one year; he then moved to Scarritt's Prairie; here he opened shop. He remained here two years, and then moved to String Prairie, near Dover, between Carrollton and Greenfield and while residing here his wife died, Sept. 11, 1842, leaving to the care of her husband three children: Daniel S. (a major during the late war), Cyrus H. and Charles W. Jan. 24, 1843, Mr. Keeley was married to Cecilia Curry, by whom he had ten children, three living, Jesse Jr., Jacob and Nancy E. Mr. Keeley took up his residence at Greenfield, where his wife died Oct. 10, 1870. November 1, 1876, Mr. Keeley was married to Mrs. Violetta E. Goodrich, daughter of Ansil Hubbard and relict of Heman Goodrich. We have thus related in a brief manner the life career of one who has won his way to a competence through his own exertions
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 484-5; - transcribed by bmt


KENNEDY CALVIN
KENNEDY CALVIN, retired salesman; residence Maple avenue. Mr. Kennedy is a native of Madison County, born in 1853. Receiving a liberal education he first embarked in business at Hardin, Calhoun County, Ill., where he clerked for S. G. Lewis, late attorney, for many years at Carrollton. Remaining three years where he had part interest, he located at Carrollton, where he officiated as clerk for Oman Pierson, afterwards with Wright & Laning in the capacity of clerk, and on leaving the employ of this firm he embarked in the clothing trade with a winter stock, transacting a successful business until the destruction of the building by fire. Mr. K. is known here as an energetic business man
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 485; - transcribed by bmt


KERGHER CONRAD
KERGHER CONRAD, dealer in furniture, mirrors, caskets, coffins; south side Public Square, Carrollton, Ill. The above named gentleman, one of the most enterprising business men within the borders of Greene County, is a native of Germany, born Sept. 7, 1826. In his twentieth year he determined to make America his future home, and accordingly, without entering into particulars relative to the voyage, the year 1846 found our youthful emigrant a resident of Greene County, with a capital of fifty cents in money, but strong will and energy. He found times somewhat out of joint, and accordingly, although a cabinet maker by trade, hired out as carpenter. About 1851 Mr. K. rented the building owned by John Long, and began the manufacture of furniture. To use his own language Mr. K. had for the first few years a hard row to travel, entering into direct competition with others who had both capital and a trade established, but he eventually won the day, as his superior work soon found its way into the homes of many of the best families, and now, after many years of stubborn toil and manly grit is the owner of the largest, most commodious and solidly built building in Greene County, in which he keeps constantly on hand an elegant assortment of furniture, unequaled for durability and style in the west, and parties contemplating purchasing will do well to bear this in mind, and instead of going to St. Louis to please remember that home industry is worthy of patronage; that all is not gold that glitters; and that the latest styles of furniture can be purchased as cheaply here as elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 485; - transcribed by bmt


KING D. F.
KING D. F. County Superintendent of Public Instruction, is a native of Texas; born in 1853. He was the third child of a family of seven children. Of his parents we enter into a short description: The head of the family, Alexander King, is a native of Greene County, Illinois; for a number of years he became well known as a merchant at Athensville, this county, and in 1859 became a member of the State Legislature, serving through one session. Since his retirement from office, he has followed merchandising and farming, owning some 500 acres in Greene County; for the past fourteen years he has turned his attention strictly to agricultural pursuits, where he takes a leading position as an agriculturist. In his twenty-second year he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Waggoner, of Greene. As further notice will be given relative to the seven members of this family, we now follow the fortunes of him whose name stands at the head of this sketch. Receiving a preliminary education at Athensville and Waverley, in Morgan County, he proceeded to Blackburn University, in Macoupin County, and thence to the Iowa Wesleyan University, where he entered upon a course of classical studies. During the Autumn of 1874, Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss Nancy E. Morrow, a daughter of Jesse Morrow, by whom he has two children, Jesse A. and John B. Nov., 1877. Mr. King was elected to the responsible position of County School Superintendent, filling office to the general satisfaction of all
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 485; - transcribed by bmt


LAKIN LEANDER R.
LAKIN LEANDER R. County Clerk. Among the more prominent citizens of Greene County, who are worthy of more than a passing notice, we mention the name of Leander R. Lakin, an old resident of Greene County, who was elected to the above responsible position Nov. 6, 1873, officiating in this capacity up to the present time, to the general satisfaction of all. Nov. 28, 1873, Mr. Lakin united his fortunes to Miss Nettie S. Brace, a daughter of Jesse and Emily, whose maiden name was Sayles. There were born of this marriage two children, Leila E., deceased, and Jessie. Prior to entering upon the duties of Clerk of the County, Mr. Lakin took a leading position as an agriculturist, owning the homestead property of his parents, consisting of 286 acres of land, situated in one of the best townships of Greene County. This sketch would be incomplete were we to omit to mention Jordan Lakin, many years ago Sheriff of Greene County. He was born in the State of Ohio in 1817; in 1827 he made his way to Greene County, Ill., where he afterward took a leading position; it was during his pioneer days that he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza A. Myers, by whom he had nine children, the subject of our sketch being the youngest son. Passing by those pioneer days, fraught with no ordinary interest, owing to limited space, we may state that the head of the family was far above the average in ability and force of character. During the late Civil War he organized Co. H., 91st Ill. Infantry, proceeding to the front with the rank of Captain; resigning his commission before the close of the Rebellion, he returned to Greene County, where he became a successful farmer. He passed away August 29, 1869. and was laid at rest in the Hopewell Cemetery, a handsome monument marking the spot. His wife had preceded him to that World of Spirits many years prior, dying in 1860. As an instance of the pluck and energy displayed by him whose name heads this narrative — during the earlier years of his manhood, he gave proof of an ability far beyond his years. His father, fully realizing that his days upon earth were numbered, gave the entire charge of his property into the keeping of his youngest son, believing that by so doing the property that he had battled for so many years would be equitably divided among his family, through the ability of the son. These expectations were fully realized; one by one, the heirs received their just portion of a valuable estate; and to-day Leander Lakin, one of the best men and ablest financiers of Greene County, remains owner of the homestead property, through his ability as a farmer, stock buyer, and manager, and a more live, energetic, or generous citizen than Mr. L., does not dwell within the borders of Greene. Further notice will be given elsewhere in this volume
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 486; - transcribed by bmt


LANGDON WM. O.
LANGDON WM. O. physician and surgeon, east side Square, Carrollton. Dr. Langdon, who is recognized as a skillful physician of Carrollton, was born in Kentucky in 1848. While a youth, his father. Dr. William S. Langdon, moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where he practiced as a physician for many years. When the war broke out, he entered the Confederate service, continuing in this capacity until the close of the Rebellion, when he moved to St. Louis, Mo., where the subject of this notice entered upon a course of study, preparatory to becoming an M. D. His preceptor was Dr. A. Hammer, a noted physician and surgeon and professor of Humboldt College, where he attended his first course of medical lectures. Graduating from the Missouri Medical College in 1870, shortly after he moved to Jersey County, where he practiced for a period of eight years. At first, practice came slowly, many of his competitors having large experience in the medical profession; however, in the course of time, his ability in the profession he had adopted became apparent, and he soon had a large and lucrative practice. At Delhi, Jersey County, he was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Early, a daughter of Mrs. S. A. Lurton, one of the first settlers of Jersey County. December, 1876, Mrs. Langdon was laid at rest, within the borders of Jersey County, leaving to the care of her husband two children, Sarah A. and Susan Y.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 486-7; - transcribed by bmt


LEVY SAMUEL
LEVY SAMUEL, manufacturer and dealer in clothing, east side Square, Carrollton. Among the more successful merchants of Greene County we mention with more than ordinary notice the name of Samuel Levy, a native of Poland. He was born in 1841; the early years of his life were spent in Poland, where he received a liberal education, and at the early age of fifteen proceeding to England, where he became employed as a traveling salesman; remaining in this capacity three years, he crossed the ocean for America, landing in New York City, remaining in the State of New York, following the precarious occupation of traveling salesman. Becoming somewhat tired of the East, he now wended his way to Texas, where he opened a general merchandise store, transacting a successful business until the breaking out of the rebellion, when he was compelled to enter the Rebel service, making trips into old Mexico; and taking up his residence in Texas, he made his way to New York City, and thence to Chicago, where he opened a clothing store, on Clark Street, where he became moderately successful. In 1866 he sought a new field of labor, at Carrollton, Illinois, and removing his stock from the City by the Lake, rented the building owned by Adam Gimmy. Mr. Levy did not at once spring into a successful business career, but step by step his success was assured. It should be stated that he entered into a co-partnership with H. Levy, a former partner. Owing to his constantly increasing trade, Mr. L. was compelled to enlarge his facilities for business, and accordingly purchased and enlarged the building he now occupies. It is needless to add, as the fact is well known here, that Mr. Levy carries a larger line of goods than any other similar establishment in Greene County, and a more live, energetic, capable business man than Mr. L. it would be a hard matter to find. In the short space of twelve years he has built up a trade unequaled in the mercantile line west of New York. A word to the wise is sufficient; all's not gold that glitters; and instead of going to St. Louis, parties will do well to examine his styles and prices
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 487; - transcribed by bmt


LUNNEEN THOMAS
LUNNEEN THOMAS, is a native of the County of Clare, Ireland, and was born in 1843, he was the youngest of a family of four children. At the early age of twelve, in company with relatives, he determined to seek a home in the New World, and accordingly embarked on board the good ship Ironsides that sailed from Liverpool in 1858, landing at the City of New Orleans, after a voyage of some weeks. After witnessing the sights and scenes of the Crescent City he took passage up the Father of Waters to Cairo, Ill., from here voyaging on the Illinois River until he reached Columbiana, Greene County, and from this point wended his way to Carrollton, Ill., where he became employed for several years as a farm hand, teaming, etc. Embarking in the saloon business and subsequently in the grocery business, to follow the career of Mr. Lunneen step by step would be superfluous, as he is well and favorably known to the business community here. In conclusion we may state that few have succeeded better in life than Mr. L. who came to Carrollton minus capital save health and energy; to-day he is the owner of 276 acres in this township and valuable property in the city of Carrollton. At present is engaged as tobacconist and confectioner. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 487; - transcribed by bmt


McFALL DR. A. C.
McFALL DR. A. C. office cor. W. 5th and Main sts., Carrollton. Dr. A. C. McFall, one of Greene County's most skillful physicians, is a native of Trumbull Co., Ohio, and the fifth child of Henry and Mary McFall, who emigrated to Wisconsin during the tenth year of the subject of this sketch, where, in after years, he attended the Plattville academy, where he received a liberal education; from this institution of learning he directed his footsteps to the great metropolitan city of New York, where he began the study of phrenology under Fowler & Wells, and afterward became a graduate of the Phrenological Institute of Fowler & Wells, and became a successful lecturer on Phrenology for a period of four years, and through well-directed energy and keen business tact in speculative matters he accumulated considerable wealth; he now determined to adopt the medical profession for a life work, and proceeding to New York City he entered the office of Dr. George M. Guernsey, the celebrated female physician, and subsequently attended medical lectures in Cleveland, Ohio, and afterward at the city of Chicago he attended lectures and received private and public instruction under the instructions of Prof. Ludlam, now professor of Hahnemann Medical College, where he has been for many years a lecturer on diseases of women and is the author of the well-known work in relation thereto. In closing this biography it may be said of Dr. McFall that he is not only a genial gentleman, but a well read and skillful member of the medical profession, and in the treatment of female complaints ranks second to none. Through adverse speculations and failures of parties formerly occupying positions of wealth, Dr. McFall, in common with so many of our more energetic men who have maintained a proud struggle for wealth, found his gains swept away, as it were, in an instant. He came to Carrollton in 1876, where he has succeeded in building up a large and lucrative practice, and where he enjoys the respect and confidence of his many friends and patrons
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 488; - transcribed by bmt


MILNES JOSEPH
MILNES JOSEPH, stock buyer and shipper; r S. Main St. Joseph Milnes is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born in 1841; he was in his sixth year when his parents crossed the ocean, eventually locating north of the present city of Carrollton, on farm property, where our subject remained until attaining his majority, the Rebellion then breaking out he enlisted in Co. G. 91st Ill. Inft. for three years service. When the war closed Mr. M. returned to Greene Co. where he followed agricultural pursuits on his farm east of Berdan until embarking in his present occupation of stock buyer and shipper. In addition to this branch of business Mr. M. is at the present writing a member of the firm of Lakin & Co.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 488; - transcribed by bmt


MINER EDWARD
MINER EDWARD, Deputy County Clerk, Carrollton, Ill. The subject of our notice is a native of Jersey ville, Jersey Co., Ill. born in 1835; he was the oldest of a family of seven children; some history will here be found necessary of the parents. Nathaniel Miner, the head of the family, was a native of Vermont, born in 1801, a resident of Vermont many years. In an early day he moved to the West, locating in Greene County in 1834, that part afterwards a part of Jersey County; he married at White Hall, Miss Louisa Jackson. As he is still a resident of Jerseyville engaged in agriculture, we now follow the fortunes of the gentleman who heads this sketch; who grew to manhood in Jersey County, where he received a very liberal education; on attaining his majority he proceeded to Carlinville, Macoupin County, where he entered into a mercantile business; this not proving remunerative, at the expiration of two years he abandoned this calling and turned his attention to farming, following this occupation for some time; he again returned to Jerseyville where he assumed the editorial dutiesof the Jerseyville Republican, as local editor he conducted this enterprise with marked ability. During the Spring of 1874 Mr. Miner concluded to cast his lot among the people of Carrollton and took possession of the Carrollton Patriot, its, former proprietor having signally failed to bring the paper up to any thing like a general circulation. To the trying task of resuscitating this waning sheet Mr. M. bent all the energies of his nature; that he succeeded admirably is well known to the people of the county. As further notice in reference to Mr. Miner's editorial duties we now state that he disposed of his interest to Mr. C. L. Clapp, the present proprietor of this live western paper. During the year '77, when Mr. L. R. Lakin was re-elected Clerk of the County Mr. Miner became his able deputy. In 1861 he united his fortunes to Miss Ella VanArsdale, a daughter of W. H. VanArsdale, by whom he has four children : James E., Nettie S., Willie and Lucy
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 488-9; - transcribed by bmt


MORRIS LORENZO D.
MORRIS LORENZO D. retired farmer, residence Carrollton; was born in Virginia in 1805; growing to manhood on the old homestead, he received a liberal education; in 1826 he worked in the lead mines of Galena; in 1831 he became a permanent resident of Greene County; November 3d of same year, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Witt, a daughter of Ely Witt, one of the earliest settlers of Greene County, Mr. Morris had purchased a tract of 80 acres, on which he built a log cabin. This 80 is now included in the magnificent property of Mr. Morris comprising 500 acres. Mrs. Morris was born in East Tennessee, March 28,1812, and departed this life March 28, 1842, leaving to the care of her husband four children, John, George, Martha G. and Ely. Dec. 21, 1842, Mr. Morris was married to Miss Mahala Conlee, by whom he had 12 children, five living: Wellington, James, Edward S., Henrietta, and Mary E. Mrs. Morris was born November 23, 1823, and died in 1872. July 21, 1873, Mr. Morris was united in marriage to Mrs. Sarah Ann Witt, relict of Harrison Witt, and daughter of Nathaniel Scroggins. We now draw to a close in this brief outline of a life not devoid of interest. We have endeavored to show what energy, pluck and enterprise can accomplish. Mr. Morris has witnessed many vast changes in the West, and now, after many years of usefulness, has retired from active labor
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 489; - transcribed by bmt


NULTON COL. J. B.
NULTON COL. J. B. retired grain buyer, is a native of Washington County, Ohio; born in 1835. Of his parents it will be well to enter into a short description: Jacob Nulton, the father df our subject, was born in Pennsylvania, where he followed agricultural pursuits. In an early day he moved to Ohio, where he also engaged in farming, and while here a resident, formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Parmelia Cheedle, by whom he had 11 children, of whom Col. N. was the youngest, whose fortunes we now follow. In early life he followed agricultural pursuits, while a resident of Greene County, the family having emigrated here in 1843. When the war of the Rebellion came on, Col. Nulton disposed of his farm property, and was commissioned by Gov. Richard Yates Captain of Co. G, 61st Illinois Infantry. Marching from Illinois into Missouri, a temporary halt was made at St. Louis, from which city the company proceeded to Pittsburg Landing; assigned to Gen. Prentice's division; this company was the first under fire from the enemy. Col. Nulton became the participant in many important battles, and received the promotion of Major after the engagement of Little Rock, and when the noted battle of Murphreesboro drew to a close, through meritorious conduct, Col. Nulton was promoted Colonel of the 61st regiment, succeeding Col. Jacob Fry, mustered out. At the close of the war he returned to Greene County, locating at Carrollton, where he received the appointment of Deputy Revenue Assessor. Serving in this capacity two years, he entered into partnership with R. H. Davis, in the transaction of a grain business, controlling a larger trade than any other similar firm in the county. During this time, date 1872, Col. N. was elected to the House of Representatives, 39th District, serving one term. On his return from the Legislature he again entered the grain trade, but discontinued this in 1875. September, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta Sieverling a daughter of H. C. Sieverling, whose biography appears elsewhere. Of this marriage two children were born, Guy, deceased, and Nettie
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 489-90; - transcribed by bmt


ORR WILLIAM L.
ORR WILLIAM L. abstract expert, residence North Main Street, east of Square. W. L. Orr is a native of Washington County, Pa., and was born in 1832. In an early day he moved to Wheeling, West Virginia, where our subject passed his early years, and received a liberal education, by diligent study in the public schools. On leaving the school room he looked about him for a profession or trade that would prove a source of income. Proceeding to Sligo, in his native State of Pennsylvania, he became apprenticed to the trade of machinist and engineer. For this vocation he developed an aptitude that marked his entire subsequent career; as a mechanic earning the reputation of acquiring a better knowledge of mechanics than the general run of aspirants, and on serving his apprenticeship secured employment as engineer on the steamer Josephine, plying between Pittsburg and Cincinnati. For nine years his home was on the Mississippi River, where he served through all the grades of engineering, to a high position. On quitting the river packets he made his way to St. Louis, where he became employed in various establishments, subsequently proceeding to Beardstown and Alton. While quietly pursuing his vocation here the war of the Rebellion came on, when he took an active part in the transferring of arms to the State Arsenal at Springfield; afterwards tendering his services to the Navy Department, he was assigned to duty as a commissioned engineer on board the gunboats Tyler and Pittsburg. Remaining in the service of Uncle Sam until 1866, he returned to Alton, where he remained until his removal to Carrollton, in 1867, where he engaged, first as clerk, and subsequently embarked in the mercantile business. As a Mason Mr. Orr takes a leading position, ranking as an officer in the Grand Chapter. He is well known for his kindly disposition, liberality, and his temperate habits of life tend to a hearty vigor that has made him a great lover of field sports, in which he has developed a skill that has made his name a familiar one in Southern Illinois
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 490; - transcribed by bmt


OSBORNE M. L. MRS.
OSBORNE M. L. MRS. Among the many enterprises that have sprung into existence in the city of Carrollton, is the New York Store, conducted by Mrs. M. L. Osborne; but a few months ago Mrs. Osborne became established in business here, but during this brief time has built a large and constantly increasing trade in millinery and fancy goods, ribbons, flowers, feathers, gloves, ladies' furnishing goods, etc., etc.; west of Square. A notable feature of this already well and favorably known establishment is the five cent department, where a variety of articles are retailed for the small sum of five cents that anywhere else would be retailed for from 25 cents to one dollar. A visit to Mrs. Osborne's will well repay the customer, who can not complain of either styles or prices. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 490-91; - transcribed by bmt


PIERSON DAVID
PIERSON DAVID, the pioneer banker, was born in Cazenovia, Madison Co., N. Y., July 9, 1806, and when young received the rudiments of a common school education, but at the age of thirteen removed with his parents, Josiah and Naomi Pierson, to the then far West, arriving at St. Louis on the 3d of June, 1820, and after a short sojourn there moved across into Illinois, near Collinsville, in Madison County. In 1821 his father, Josiah Pierson, died of bilious fever, after an illness of only five days, leaving his widow and a family of five children, three sons and two daughters, in a strange land and among strangers, in rather destitute circumstances; but that God who cares for the widow and the fatherless watched over them, and they found kind, sympathizing friends among those with whom their lot had been cast. After the death of Mr. Pierson the family removed into Greene County, locating two and one half miles north of Carrollton, about the close of the year 1821. In the Spring of 1822 the subject of this sketch was taken sick with chills and fever, which finally terminated in a rheumatic affection and lasted, with more or less severity, for over three years; yet he continued to do such labor as he was able, in clearing up and improving the farm on which they resided, until his health became firm and he was able to do a large amount of labor. In the Spring of 1827, after having got a portion of the farm into a good state of cultivation, he rented it out and went with others to the lead mines near Galena, and engaged in mining, but returned to the farm in the Fall of 1828. living with his mother on the farm until her death, which occurred in September, 1829, and on the 25th day of August, 1830, was married to Miss Eliza Jane Norton (daughter of David Norton, an early settler of Illinois, from Herkimer Co., N. Y.), who has continued the faithful, trusting partner of his joys and sorrows for almost fifty years. Mr. Pierson continued to reside on his farm until the beginning of 1834, when he sold his farm and moved into the village (now City of Carrollton) and commenced merchandising, with a capital of less than $2,000, coming into competition with several experienced merchants, some of whom were worth more than ten times as much as he was, and all of them failed during the hard times from 1838 to 1843, which were the times that tried men's souls as well as their purses. One other firm, that commenced business some two years later than Mr. Pierson (also without a large capital), and himself being the only merchants in the place that went through the great revulsion, that broke ninety per cent of the merchants and nearly all of the State banks in the United States, unscathed —thus illustrating the value of integrity of character. Mr. Pierson has always held that death was preferable to dishonor; has always had decided opinions on all questions where morals was concerned, and been outspoken in their defense. In politics he was from early youth a Clay Whig, advocating protection to the laborer, mechanic and manufacturer; after the disruption of the Whig party he became a Republican, and acted with the Union party during the war of the Rebellion. After the return of prosperity to the country, dating with the high tariff of 1843, Mr. Pierson extended his business operations largely, purchasing hogs, cattle, and grain, sometimes on a large scale; was from 1848 to 1854 the owner of the capital and the leading member in the firm of Mark Pierson & Co. of Alton, who, in addition to a large dry goods trade, did a large business in the purchase and shipment of grain. About the commencement of the year 1854, Mr. Pierson, having an eye on the banking business, closed his connection with the firm of Mark Pierson & Co , and commenced doing a banking business in connection with the dry goods trade. In 1855 his banking business had increased so much that he had procured a new safe, happily just before the night of the third of April, 1855, when a gang of robbers from Calhoun Co. broke into the store, probably hoping to obtain a large amount of gold belonging to the sheriff of the county; but fortunately they were not able to force the safe, and escaped with only about $280, which they found in the desk. Mr. Pierson, after a careful examination of all the facts and circumstances, raised a company of ten men of his true and tried friends, crossed over into Calhoun, and captured the whole gang, five in number, all of which were finally convicted and landed in the penitentiary. It was said by the State's Attorney that he manifested a large amount of skill, not only in capturing the robbers, but in getting them convicted. Mr. Pierson continued his dry goods business, and his miscellaneous trading until the first of January, 1858, when he disposed of the dry goods, and turned his attention exclusively to banking, and in 1859 erected the large and commodious house, which has been occupied by the bank up to the present time; in 1860, having got established in his new and commodious quarters, he advertised his business more largely, and in 1861, notwithstanding nearly every bank in the State failed, he daily received the deposits of merchants and others, carrying his customers safely through the critical period without the loss to them of a single dollar, although at the end of the year the hundreds of thousands of dollars received on deposit, would not have been worth fifty cents to the dollar to the depositors had they kept their own money; and while all, or nearly all, the individual bankers in the country paid off their depositors at a discount, he continued to pay dollar for dollar, and as the broken bank money disappeared and national bank and treasury notes came into use, confidence succeeded the gloom and depression that had overspread the land, his business increased largely, having the confidence of not only the community in which he had so long resided, but that of the merchants and bankers in the neighboring cities, as well as that of the Treasurer of the United States; was appointed special agent for the sale of United States bonds during the time the Government was borrowing money to crush out the rebellion; and while many, who sympathized with the South, opposed and ridiculed the idea of loaning money to the Government to "coerce our Southern brethren," Mr. Pierson succeeded in selling about six hundred thousand dollars in bonds of the different issues, to the citizens of the county, which speaks volumes in his favor, when the large opposition element in the county is taken into view. He was collector of internal revenue for several years, and paid more taxes for the poor than his profits from the office. Remembering the time, when a penniless boy, he worked for one and a half bushels of corn per day, when 20 cents per bushel was the highest price that could be got in trade or store goods for it, and common calico was 37 1/2 cents, and thin domestic 25 cents per yard, salt $2 50 per bushel, sugar 20 cents, and coffee 50 cents per pound, and remembering how long and patiently he had to work before getting a start, he has ever been the friend and helper of the industrious poor. In 1862, Mr. Pierson purchased the Carrollton flouring mill, which he ran with great success for some years, clearing over $22,000 in less than four years; but others (hearing probably of his success) built mills in the city and county, until the competition became so great that nearly every miller in the county, except him, failed, some of them for a large amount. He still owns the mill, which has been quite successful for the last few years. His flour ranks first in market. In 1862-3 he aided in building a woolen factory, which was destroyed by fire (the work of incendiaries), in the Fall of 1872, causing a loss to Mr. Pierson of over $25,000. In May, 1830, Mr. Pierson organized the first total abstinence society (so far as known) in the State of Illinois, with only thirteen members, which prospered amidst the most bitter opposition for over ten years, having over six hundred members, when the " Washingtonians " came into the field and took the place of the first organization. In 1832, Mr. Pierson and wife became members of the Baptist church, and he has rarely been absent from his seat at any of its regular meetings, either on the Sabbath or week days, for nearly forty-seven years, and has always been foremost in his contributions for the support of the minister and other church expenses; and for many years was superintendent of the Sabbath school, and always a constant laborer, and has had the pleasure of seeing near one hundred of the scholars connected with the school make a profession of religion, and some of them have become eminent divines. During his superintendance of the school he made it a point to be punctual in his attendance, and more than five years have elapsed without his missing a single Sunday. When the church was weak, he bore the largest share of the expenses of keep-it up himself; has been noted for his generous and liberal impulses; has contributed liberally for benevolent enterprises or those of a moral or religious character. He aided liberally in the establishment of the Langston school at Holly Springs, Mississippi, for educating the freed men in that State, and in 1872 met, in the National Republican Convention that met in Philadelphia, three freed men who were slaves until freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of the President, and when freed did not know a letter in the alphabet, but after had acquired a good, solid, practical education; and one of them, James Hill has since been Secretary of State in Mississippi, being elected by both parties, and by both whites and blacks. Over 2,000 scholars have been educated at that school, which is still prosperous. In early life Mr. Pierson resolved so to live that no man could truthfully complain of any act of his; and that he would never stoop to contradict a slanders, to which resolves he has adhered through life. In a long life of extensive business transaction, and as president of a bank, doing the largest business of any in the county, it would be indeed a miracle if some offences were not given; and yet he is assured of the respect and confidence of the good men that know him best. And now, taking into view the poor pioneer boy, shivering with chills and fever, in the rough log cabin, partaking of the humble fare of the backwoodsman more than fifty-five years ago, and what he accomplished in life, it can but raise in the estimation of all good men the straightforward principle that has actuated his career as a business man through life. Mr. Pierson's strong traits of character are a steady perseverance in business, honesty of purpose, will and energy in carrying out his aims, generous and liberal in his impulses, always sympathizing with those in trouble, and often making large sacrifices to aid others, in trouble. Such in brief is the narrative of the life and career of one of the oldest citizens of Greene County. By his genial and kind manner he has won the respect and esteem of those who have acted with him in the growth and development of the county for over fifty years. He is ostensibly a self-made man, and needs no eulogy at our hands, as the work of his life speaks, more eloquently for itself
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 491-93; - transcribed by bmt


PRANT H. A.
PRANT H. A. grocer and tobacconist, north side of Square, Carrollton, Illinois. H. A. Prant is a native of Germany, and was born in 1837; at an early age he developed marked energy of character and accordingly at the age of twelve years he embarked on board a sailing vessel bound for New Orleans. On arriving here, the yellow fever then prevailing, made it incumbent upon the authorities of the city to prevent the departure of any and all passengers, and accordingly the subject of our notice remained there until the quarantine was removed, when he made his way to Memphis, Tenn. Having learned the trade of a tobacconist in Germany he now worked at his trade for a number of years. On leaving Memphis he proceeded to St. Louis where he worked as a journeyman and subsequently as foreman for a manufacturing firm. While a resident here he was united in marriage to Miss Theresa Groffe, a daughter of John Groffe, of Prussia. On leaving St. Louis he went to work at Jacksonville, Morgan County, where he was foreman for a tobacco firm four years, when he took his line of departure for Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill., where he embarked in business for himself; for a period of three years here he prospered, until his property was destroyed by fire in 1863; about 1865 he located at Carrollton, where he at first ventured in the tobacco trade, subsequently adding a stock of groceries. By strict attention to business and honorable dealing he now has a large and increasing trade. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 493-4; - transcribed by bmt


PRINDEBLE & GREEN
PRINDEBLE & GREEN, dealers in clothing and gent's furnishing goods, hats, caps, boots, shoes, trunks, valises, etc., also merchant tailors, Carrollton, Illinois. The above named enterprising firm became established in business one year age for the transaction of a clothing business, and during this short time have built up a reputation for honesty in their dealings that has brought success. The senior member, Mr, Green, is a native of Germany; at the early age of 17 he left Germany for England, where he transacted a successful business in the city of Birmingham; in 1859 he crossed the Atlantic for America; transacting business for some time in Texas; on arriving in Carrollton he entered into the present business with Samuel Levy. J. P. Prindeble, the junior member of this firm, was born in Missouri, in 1854, and became a resident of Greene County, where he grew up on the old farm homestead of his parents, Patrick and Mary Prindeble. John continued agricultural pursuits until entering into a co-partnership business with Mr. Green. Further notice will be given in the other department of this work
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 494; - transcribed by bmt


PRINDEBLE PATRICK
PRINDEBLE PATRICK, farmer and stock raiser, r Maple Av. Patrick Prindeble is a native of Ireland and was born in 1818. Growing to manhood in Ireland he followed farming for many years, and at the age of 35, having met with many reverses of fortune, he concluded to better his condition in America. Landing in New York, he remained here a short time, when he made his way to Albany, thence to Troy. It should be stated that Mr. Prindeble was twice married in Ireland; his first wife was Miss Bridget Kelly, by whom he had two children; this lady died in Ireland. His second wife was Miss Mary Caton, by whom he had ten children. Twenty-five years ago Mr. Prindeble located in Greene County where he purchased farm property, and here his second wife died, in 1877. During the present year our subject was united in marriage to Mrs. Ellen Devier, whose maiden name was Danworth. Mr. Prindeble has been a very successful farmer and is the owner of 300 acres of valuable land.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 494; - transcribed by bmt


RATNEY JOHN
RATNEY JOHN, real estate dealer, Carrollton, Illinois, was born in Lexington, Ken., July 15, 1825; his father, Wm. C. Rainey, a native of Penn. emigrated to Kentucky in an early day, where he married at Lexington Miss Susan Clay, by whom he had eight children; John, the second child, a patron of this work, grew to manhood in Carrollton, where he received a liberal education; September 9, 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Kate Thomas, youngest daughter of the late Hon. Samuel Thomas, whose name is mentioned in the historical portion of this volume. There are three children : Henry Thos., a graduate of the high school of Carrollton and a promising student of the Knox College of Galesburg, lllinois; the younger members of the family are William C. and Susie E. Mr. Rainey owns a valuable city property at Carrollton and a farm of 226 acres three miles from the city limits. For the space of two years he held the position of alderman of Carrolton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 494-5; - transcribed by bmt


RICE S. A.
RICE S. A. photographer, r West Third St., is a native of Pennsylvania, born September 13, 1839. When quite young his parents moved to Louisiana, Mo., where the head of the family followed the occupation of a cabinet maker, and of him we make mention as far as our limited space will permit; he was a native of Philadelphia, Pa. and there married Miss Margaret Clifford; he received a liberal education, and developed a decided taste in mechanics, and on his removal to Louisiana became the inventor of a valuable gas retort and other patents of note. When the war broke out he received his commission as Captain of State Militia under command of Major General Henderson; he is still living, a resident of Louisiana. The subject of our notice passed his early years in Louisiana, proceeding to Chicago he there entered the photographic establishment of C. Shaw, a leading photographer. Remaining here for some time, he proceeded to Sterling, Illinois, where he opened a gallery, conducting a successful business here for two years when he again moved to Louisiana, Mo., where he established a reputation for workmanship that gained for him a large share of public patronage; locating at Perry, Pike County, Illinois, he was united in marriage to Miss Mamie Hovey, a daughter of Sylvester Hovey, by whom he has one child, Everet In 1874 Mr. R. concluded to embark in business as a traveling photographer, and two years ago located at Carrollton, where he is already well known as a reliable and skillful workman
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 495; - transcribed by bmt


ROBERTS J. E.
ROBERTS J. E. pastor First Baptist Church, Carrollton, Illinois, is a native of the State of Ohio, and was born in 1853. In Michigan, where his parents, William S. (a Baptist) and Henrietta E. afterwards removed, he passed the early years of his life. Receiving a preliminary education in the district schools of his native place, in his 17th year, for the purpose of acquiring a liberal education he proceeded to Alton, where he entered Shurtleff College; after two years spent in the preparatory, the next four years were occupied in classic studies; at the expiration of this time two years were spent in the theological department. Graduating from this noted place of learning June, 1878, he became ordained to the ministry and during the Autumn of the present year entered upon the pastorate of the first Baptist church of this city. In September, 1878, Mr. Roberts was united in marriage to Miss Frances L. Bulkley, a daughter of Dr. J. Bulkley, D.D., of Alton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 495; - transcribed by bmt


ROBERTS & LAVERY
ROBERTS & LAVERY. Among the notable features of inventions, we mention the manifest improvements that Messrs. F. M. Roberts and William Lavery have made in the recording of abstracts of title. For years the above mentioned parties have worked faithfully and patiently to bring before the property owners of Greene County a form of abstract that for simplicity and reliability in the way of finding with little loss of time all abstracts of title made, remains unexcelled. In the past agricultural men are well aware of the difficulties that have been met with in searching the records in order to trace to a definite source the changes that have transpired incidental to sales of real estate. All have now an opportunity of acquiring a valuable fund of information at slight cost
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 495; - transcribed by bmt


ROOT & GARDNER
ROOT & GARDNER, lawyers. Among the law firms of Carrollton who have but lately entered upon a professional career here, we mention the law firm of Messrs. Root & Gardner, who occupy an office over the drug store of S. A. Vedder. The senior member, Mr. H. T. Root, is a gentleman of scholarly attainments and genial manners. He was born in the State of Michigan, November 5, 1853. At an early age his parents moved to New York State, where he remained until he had attained his 14th year, when he directed his footsteps to Illinois. At Shurtleff College, Madison County, he took a preparatory course; in 1872 proceeding to Princeton, New Jersey, he there entered the noted Princeton College, taking a classical course of study, and two years after graduating, having conferred upon him the degree of A. B., taking the degree of A. M. three years later; entering upon a course of study at the Columbia Law Institute, graduating from this famous seat of learning with the honorary title of L. L. B.; admitted to the bar in the City of New York, June 1, 1877, Mr. Root entered the law office of Thomas C. Pinckney as partner, continuing with this well known attorney until his decease, which occurred during the Winter of 1877. Digressing a little from the direct line of narrative, for one year Mr. Root taught in the High School of Carrollton, thereby gaining an extensive acquaintance here, and in his profession as attorney will no doubt reach a success in a profession open to all who have the necessary ability. Of Mr. Gardner it may be said, that he is a native of Nantucket, Mass.; born January 31, 1856. Receiving his preliminary education at Boston, in 1875, attending Columbia College Law School, becoming a graduate in 1877, he was admitted to practice in all the Supreme Courts, practicing in New York for a period of 18 months. In conclusion, we wish the new law firm a hearty success in their practice at Carrollton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 495-6; - transcribed by bmt


ROSE C. C.
ROSE C. C. boot and shoe maker, west side Square, Carrollton, Ill. Charles C. Rose is a native of Germany; born in 1840, and was but five years of age when his parents crossed the Atlantic for America, locating in the west at Cape Girardeau, Mo. At the early age of 16, possessed of an adventurous disposition, the subject of our sketch departed from the parental roof for Pike County, Ill., where he became apprenticed to the trade of a shoemaker, becoming a journeyman workman. He now launched out in business on his own account, afterward proceeding to Beardstown, He there embarked in business for a period of three years; and while here a resident formed the acquaintance of and married Miss Catherine Dan, of Calhoun County, a daughter of Michael Dan, one of the oldest settlers of said county. Nearly two years went by and Mr. Rose took up his line of departure for Greene County, locating at Carrollton, where he has since conducted a successful business for the past twelve years. Of the marriage above referred to two children were born, Ella and Harry
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 496; - transcribed by bmt


RUMRILL GEORGE
RUMRILL GEORGE & SON, blacksmiths and wagon manufacturers. Locust and Fourth Sts., Carrollton, Ill. Among the many skilled mechanics of Carrollton, none are more favorably known to the public than the reliable firm above mentioned. The senior member, George Rumrill, is a native of Massachusetts; born in 1821. Ten years later the parents of our subject moved to Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, where George, growing to maturity, became regularly apprenticed to the trade of carriage and wagon making, in after years receiving a diploma for superior workmanship. In 1845 Mr. Rumrill was married to Miss Lois Williams, in the State of Ohio, by whom he has four children living, four children having passed to that world of spirits to which we all are tending
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 496; - transcribed by bmt


SAUER AUG. JOS.
SAUER AUG. JOS. Catholic clergyman of Carrollton; born 1848 in Germany, grandduchy of Baden, emigrated to New York City in his third year; educated at the Christian Brother Schools of that city, and subsequently returned to Germany, where, in the year 1871, he received holy orders, after finishing the academic course at the Royal Academy at Munster, Westphalia; sent to Carrollton by the Bishop of Alton, Sept., 1877
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 496; - transcribed by bmt


SCHAFER FREDRICK
SCHAFER FREDRICK, farmer and slock raiser, Sec. 23, P.O. Carrollton. The above named gentleman, who ranks among the more successful farmers of Greene County, is a native of Bavaria, Germany, born in 1823. At an early age he received a liberal education; at fourteen accompanying his parents across the broad waters of the Atlantic for the new world, landing in New Orleans; they took passage up the Mississippi to St. Louis, where they remained but a short time, when a permanent settlement was made in Calhoun County, where the subject of our notice passed his earlier years and grew to a vigorous manhood that paved the way for future success. At the early age of twenty- three, in 1846, Mr. Schafer was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Byrd, a native of Missouri, by whom he had three children: Roswell, Perry, and Jane. Mrs. Schafer died in 1855; during the Winter of the year mentioned Mr. S. united his fortunes to Miss Jane Byrd, by whom he has four children : Steven, Amos, Charles, and Minnie. In 1872 occurred the death of Mr. Schafer's second wife, who found a last resting place in the beautiful cemetery of Carrollton. In 1876, Mr. S. again launched upon the sea of matrimony, the lady in question being Mrs. Egelhoff, of Jerseyville. From a small beginning, Mr. Schafer has worked his way rapidly forward to a proud position in life, a leading agriculturist in Greene, the owner of over 500 acres of valuable farming land in the counties of Greene and Calhoun; in the latter Mr. S. officiated in the capacity of sheriff two terms, for four years holding the position of county treasurer, and for a period of eight years justice of the peace.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 497; - transcribed by bmt


SCOTT TH0MAS, JR.
SCOTT TH0MAS, JR. manufacturer of stoves and tinware and dealer in stamped and japanned ware. West Fifth St. Thomas Scott was born in 1830, in the City of London, England. In his third year his parents moved to Liverpool, England, where at the age of 14 our subject was apprenticed to the trade of a tinsmith, at which he worked faithfully five years, when he sailed for America, landing at New Orleans. During the Winter of 1849 he secured employment. The weather now becoming sultry, he proceeded west to Cinicinnati, Ohio, thence to Louisville, Kentucky, and thence to St. Louis, where he worked at his trade for a short time, when he made his way to Carrollton, arriving in 1852. He first entered into the employ of his brother, with whom he afterward entered into a co-partnership business in the tinware trade, conducting a small trade at first. In 1861 he moved to Reach's Corner, where he remained until 1868, when he built the store in which he now does a prosperous business. In 1865 Mr. Scott obtained letters patent on a heating stove, which is acknowledged by all to be the best heating stove in the State and presents a handsome appearance. The stoves not only command a large sale in Illinois but are sold extensively in many Western States, notably Kansas and Missouri. Mr. Scott is not only an extensive dealer in stamped and japanned ware but also carries a full stock of very superior quality of graniteware, and makes a specialty of family goods for tin weddings. We know of no more reliable house than that of Thomas Scott, who transacts a large business to-day through strict attention to business and honorable dealing
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 497; - transcribed by bmt


SCRUBY THOMAS
SCRUBY THOMAS, who began business as butcher in the city of Carrollton, some ten years ago, was born in Cambridgeshire, England, November 8, 1834. At the early age of 15 Thomas, possessed of an adventurous disposition, crossed the ocean for America, landing in New York City, where he remained a short time, subsequently proceeding to Sheboygan, Wis. Remaining here a short time, he went to Fond du Lac, where he first worked as a gardener; subsequently followed the calling of butcher, some six years; and during this time united his fortunes to Miss Elinor Pepper, by whom he has seven children : | Charles E., Annie E., Minnie, Maggie, Harry, Archie, and Nellie. At Sparta, Wisconsin, Mr. S. transacted a successful business until his removal to Owatonna, Minnesota, thence to Springfield, Missouri, and thence to Carrollton, Illinois, where his business qualifications and genial manners have won for him a liberal patronronage. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 497-8; - transcribed by bmt


SHARON BROTHERS
SHARON BROTHERS, dealers in dry goods, groceries, boots, shoes, hats, caps, etc., etc. The above named enterprising firm became established in their present business as early as 1857, with the exception of the younger brother. As this is one among the older establishments in the city of Carrollton, we here append more than a passing notice. Nearly half a century ago, Wm. Pegram solicited the trade of the few inhabitants then in Greene Co., he being superseded by David Pierson, the well known banker, who conducted a successful business many years, when Dr. J. K. Sharon, deceased, and William Sharon, now senator from Nevada, and the well known California millionaire, entered into a co-partnership business, when Wm. Sharon retired, he was succeeded by Thomas L. Hudson. The present members of the firm are now, J. K., J. J. & C. C. Sharon, who have transacted a successful business for the past ten years
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498; - transcribed by bmt


SHORT JAMES H.
SHORT JAMES H. circuit clerk, is a native of Greene County; born in 1839; the fifth of a family of eleven children. His early years were spent in agricultural pursuits; he received a liberal education in the common schools of his native place. In 1863, he united his fortunes to Miss Lenora Ferguson; a daughter of G. B. and Mary Ferguson, whose maiden name was Mabery, who were among the early settlers of Greene County. Mr. Short became a successful farmer, owning 157 acres in township 9, range 12. Two years ago he moved to Carrollton, where he purchased town property, and at the November election of 1876, he was elected circuit clerk, retaining the position at the present writing. Note : Mr. Short received the election above given, prior to his removal to Carrollton
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498; - transcribed by bmt


SIEVERLING H. C.
SIEVERLING H. C. wagon and buggy manufacturer, Carrollton, Ill. For over twenty years Mr. Sieverling has transacted a successful business in the above line, and machinery, and his very superior workmanship is recognized, and brings him a large patronage. Mr. S. was born in Brunswick, Germany, in 1828. At thirteen he became apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith and machinist, serving four and a half years. He was recognised even at this youthful age a first-class workman. He was then in his eighteenth year. Three years later he emigrated to America, locating in New Orleans; where he entered the employ of Henry Kage, a wagon maker. Here he worked three months, and then entered the employ of the Ponchartrain R. R. Co. Returning to New Orleans in 1851, he became a superintendent for the construction of canal locks. In 1853, he was attacked with yellow fever, and on recovering resumed work on the locks. These brought to completeness he proceeded to Baton Rouge, La., where he was united in marriage to Mrs. Ellinor Helmbold, by whom he had four children; three are living. Mrs. S. had two children by first marriage. In 1858, Mr. Sieverling, after a short residence in St. Louis, Mo., and Keokuk, Iowa, came to Woodville, Greene Co., Ill, where he transacted a large business for eight years. In 1866, he came to Carrollton, where he purchased the property owned by J. C. Kelly, including residence and wagon shop. Mr. S. is well and favorably known to our business men, and the farming community, who know him for his honesty and very superior workmanship
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498; - transcribed by bmt


SIMPSON DR. J. F.
SIMPSON DR. J. F. proprietor Occidental Hotel, S. Main St., Carrollton, Ill. Dr. J. F. Simpson is a native of Virginia; born in Rapahannock Co., Oct. 10, 1814. His father was Hendley Simpson, who was born in Loudoun Co., Virginia, growing to manhood with wealth and a position in society second to none. He married in Culpepper Co., Miss Elizabeth Farrow, a daughter of John and Margaret Farrow. James, whose fortunes we now follow, passed his early years in Virginia, where he entered upon the study of materia medica. In 1835, his parents moved from Virginia to the central part of Illinois, Macoupin Co., Medora, where he completed his medical studies under Dr. Farrow. In due course of time he became a practicing physician. In 1837, he moved to Carrollton, where he opened up a general merchandise store, where he continued several years. In 1840, he purchased the drug store of Buel G. Wheeler, and for eight years conducted a successful drug trade. Disposing of his interest, he now turned his attention to the practice of his profession. Since this date his honorable career here, where he has practiced as a physician for a period of thirty-five years, is well known. He has always been a warm advocate of temperance, and his unselfish devotion to the poor and oppressed, have made him an honored name. For twenty years he has been identified as an officer of the county's poor. In 1872, his name was put forward for the office of Penitentiary Com., on the Prohibition ticket; in 1874, he became the nominee for State Treasurer, and in 1876, his name was put forward for Governor of the State; a member of the Sons of Temperance, in 1860, he held, during one term, the position of Grand Worthy Patriarch of the division. As proprietor of the Occidental Hotel, of this city, his urbane manners and well known energy have brought him the patronage of the commercial and business public, who appreciate the kind attention vouchsafed by the Dr. and his excellent lady
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 498-9; - transcribed by bmt


SMITH, MOORE & CO
SMITH, MOORE & CO. dealers in boots and shoes, ne cor. Square, Carrollton, Ill. Of Messrs. Smith, Moore & Co.whocontrol one of the largest establishment of its kind in the West, we mention, with more than ordinary notice: In 1872, Samuel O, Smith and Harry S. Moore opened up shop, so to speak, in their present quarters, at first in an humble way, compared to their present extensive business. On entering this large establishment, one beholds an array of fine boots and shoes, that for quality, durability and style to suit the most fastidious, are unequaled in the West, or indeed, anywhere else. Three superior workmen are kept in constant employ making boots and shoes, from strictly French stock, which are sold at surprisingly low rates, considering the material of which they are composed. In addition to their boot and shoe department the firm are prepared to meet all demands of trade in their furnishing department, and parties contemplating purchasing will do well to remember that all's not gold that glitters, and instead of a trip to St. Louis in the purchase of goods, one and all will find that they can do equally as well at home
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 499; - transcribed by bmt


STEELE JOSEPH
STEELE JOSEPH, proprietor Headrick House, Carrollton. The subject of this sketch was born in Balman Co., Ohio, on the 11th of December, 1821. When he was four years old his parents, Joseph and Nancy Steele, moved to Muskingum Co., Ohio, where our subject grew to manhood, and where he was united in marriage to Miss Ann Puff, of Ohio, a daughter of Henry and Sophia Puff, of Maryland, Alleghany Co., by whom he has four children, William R., Jacob H., Reasoner, and Sophia D. Mr. Steele followed farming until his location in Greene County in 1852, and first followed farming in Tp. 10, R. 12. Two years ago Mr. Steele came to Carrollton where he has established for the past two years a first-class boarding house, where permanent or transient boarders will find a satisfactory table and neat, clean, comfortable beds, opposite the Methodist Church, southeast of the Square; also stable accommodations and feed for horses
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 499; - transcribed by bmt


TANDY W. S.
TANDY W. S. photographer, Carrollton, was born in the State of Kentucky, December, 1843. During the same month and year, his parents, Willis and Martha H. Tandy, emigrated from the State of Kentucky to southern Illinois, settling in the vicinity of Jacksonville, on farm property. Jacksonville was then but a village, where the grandfather of the subject of this sketch owned a large tract of land, extending from what is now College Hill to the Mauvaisterre. On the old homestead young Tandy passed the days of his youth, until the death of his father, when he became apprenticed to the trade of a carpenter, and becoming in due course of time a journeyman workman. During the war in 1862, Mr. Tandy turned his attention to photography, in the city of Jacksonville, where he conducted a successful business, with a younger brother, until his location at Carrollton in 1865, where he has since resided, and where his skill as a photographer is well known. May 5, 1859, Mr. Tandy was united in marriage to Miss Eliza J. Johnson, by whom he had three children: Ella, Ida A., and Mattie. Mrs. Tandy passed away in the year 1870. In 1872, Mr. Tandy was united in marriage to Miss Julia Freer, by whom he has three children: Maud, Lulu, and W. Scott
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 500; - transcribed by bmt


TURNER DR. W. D.
TURNER DR. W. D. physician and surgeon, Carrollton, was born in London, England, June 21, 1843; left an orphan at five, when eight years old he was placed in charge of a family, who crossed the Atlantic for America. In due course of time the little waif became a resident of Pike Co., Ill., where he received a liberal education. When the war broke out he enlisted in Co. E, 50th Ill. Inf., becoming a participant in the following battles: Pittsburg Landing, where he received a severe scalp wound, Corinth, siege of Atlanta, and battle of Nashville, etc., etc.; elected First Lieutenant by a large majority, owing to his youth he did not accept; afterward he received the appointment and served as Sergeant Major. Honorably discharged, he returned to Pike County, where he began the study of medicine, under G. C. Pitzer, now Professor American Medical College and editor American Medical Journal, St. Louis; remaining one year he then attended three courses of study at the Cincinnati, Ohio, Eclectic College, and two clinical courses at Commercial Hospital; on leaving the college he went to Waynesville, Dewitt Co., Ill, where he obtained a large practice. In 1871 he came to Carrollton, where he has a large and constantly growing practice; Oct. 1st, 1868 he was united in marriage to Miss S. J. Peebles; two children, Walter P. and Frank
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 500; - transcribed by bmt


UNDERWOOD J. H.
UNDERWOOD J. H. book -seller and dealer in stationery, picture frames and miscellaneous articles, west side Square, Carrollton. Mr. Underwood was born in Harrison Co., Kentucky, July 31, 1825; he was but eight years of age when his parents immigrated to the West, settling in Sangamon Co., Ill., in 1833, where the subject of our sketch passed the days of his youth and grew to manhood. Receiving a liberal education in Schuyler Co., he was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Smith, a daughter of James Smith, by whom he has seven children. For one year Mr. Underwood became a resident of Mt. Sterling, Brown Co., where he taught the public school of this enterprising town; in 1862 he moved to Jacksonville, Morgan Co., where he became engaged in the drug business for a period of three years, when he moved to Carrollton, where he began, in a small way, the business mentioned above; slowly but surely, however, success attended his energetic efforts, and today he has the only regular establishment of its kind on a permanent basis in Greene Co., and a look through his well-stocked store, by those intending to purchase, will well repay the visit
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 500-01; - transcribed by bmt


UNDERWOOD WILLIAM
UNDERWOOD WILLIAM, manufacturer and dealer in the celebrated Underwood Spring Mattress, is a native of Harrison Co., Kentucky, born in 1826, where he remained a resident until he arrived at the age of thirteen years, when he accompanied his parents, Francis and Margaret Underwood, to Greene Co., date 1839, and locating near Woodville, where our subject was early instructed in the rudiments of hard work upon the farm homestead, receiving his education principally during the winter season. April 11th, 1850, when the California excitement ran high, he crossed the plains for Placerville, arriving Aug. 31, 1850, where he entered upon the rough life of a miner, but at this critical period he was taken ill, and his success as a miner was in consequence seriously impaired. Remaining four years on the Pacific coast, on the 16th of March, 1854, he again became a resident of Greene Co., going back to the old homestead farm. The following year, Oct. 22d, he united his fortunes to Miss Angeline Varble, a daughter of Henry and Sarah Varble. Of this lady, who subsequently became the inventor of the above mentioned mattress—a Spring Dress Pillow and Clod Pulverizer, of which a description is given elsewhere—it may be said that she is a native of Greene Co., born March 26, 1838; she early manifested a taste for mechanics, that marked a successful era of invention in after years. And now, as our narrative draws to a close, we may here state that Mr. Underwood became a farmer of prominence in Greene Co., who met with misfortune through the liberality that was an inherent part of his nature. Three years ago he moved to Carrollton, where for a period of time he entered into the grocery trade, embarking in above business but a short time ago. In this success is not far distant when the merits of important inventions are readily recognized. There were born of the marriage above referred to seven children; Edward B., deceased, Robert, Alice C, Eunice, Mary, Ida, Amy J. and William A., deceased
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 501; - transcribed by bmt


VIVELL FRANK
VIVELL FRANK, baker, confection, er, and dealer in fancy groceries and notions, Carrollton, Ill. Among the live business men who have contributed very much toward the present prosperous condition of Greene Co., the above enterprising gentleman is worthy of more than a passing notice. Frank Vivell is a native of Baden, Germany, born in 1830; passing his earlier years in his native land, where he early learned the trade of a baker; attaining his majority he concluded to better his fortunes in the New World, and accordingly he embarked on board a sailing- vessel in 1852; after a tedious voyage of some weeks duration he landed in the great metropolitan city of New York. Remaining but a short time, viewing the sights and scenes of the city, he made his way to Philadelphia, and taking passage on the Erie Canal in a crowded canal-boat to Pittsburg, for he was then in very straitened circumstances. During the passage by canal-boat the cholera became a sweeping epidemic; of twenty-eight passengers twenty-five died from cholera. At Canalton, Indiana, he was detained a short time, and now determined to make his way to St. Louis. A little incident here is worthy of note: taking passage on a mail boat down the "Father of Waters" for St. Louis, it touched at various points; at one of them our subject jumped off and laid in a small supply of provisions; hastening to the wharf, he was just in time to see the vessel gliding away for St. Louis. Discouraged he sat down and awaited the arrival of another boat. A stern-wheeler hove in sight; having no money, he however stepped on board and was soon on his way down the river; but here commenced an act of cruelty unparalleled; he was given instiuctions to attend to the pump until relieved; taking his station here, morning fled away and no breakfast, noon and no dinner, night and no supper; he began to feel rather lonesome. A clerk on board being a German, he now made a bolt for the cabin to procure something to eat, but was dragged back by the mate, suffering untold misfortunes. He determined when the vessel touched at St. Louis to make his escape, and accordingly jumped from the vessel when it landed and made his way into the city, in a ridiculous fashion. In St. Louis he became fourth cook and bootblack at the American hotel. Here a laughable episode occurred - a drunken man sauntered in for the purpose of handing Mr. Vivell his whip; he made several staggering attempts to do so. It occurred to our subject, who understood little English, that to suffer innumerable misfortunes on his passage down the river and now to be horse-whipped, to use his own language, was " too thin." His whole nature rose up in rebellion against this outrage, and making one desperate spring for his victim, subjected him to a pommeling that he remembered for many a day. Owing to limited space we cannot follow step by step, as we would wish to, many interesting passages in the life of Mr. Vivell. At Jacksonville and other points he worked as pastry cook. In May, 1856, he made his way to Carrollton, where he entered into business as baker and confectioner, and dealer in fancy groceries. Through indomitable energy he soon entered upon a prosperous career, and now to-day, after many years of hardship and self-denial, he has built up a trade unequaled in the West; the owner of magnificent property in Carrollton, and the finest residence in Greene Co. And in conclusion we may safely state that a more live, energetic man than Mr. V. it would be a hard matter to find
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 501-2; - transcribed by bmt


WARD J. R.
WARD J. R., State's attorney, west side Square, Carrollton, Ill. James R.Ward, is a native of Illinois, born in Madison County. At the early age of thirteen he began a course of higher classical studies, and also at sixteen he began a course of law studies under many leading attorneys, prominent among them being Philem-an Bliss, formerly Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Missouri, where the subject of our notice was admitted to the bar at St. Louis by the Supreme Court of Missouri; licensed to practice in the courts of Illinois June 5, 1874, by the State Supreme Court; was elected State's attorney in 1876 by over 1,600 majority over his opponent; has acquired a large and profitable law practice under serious difficulties, and is a very able lawyer
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 502; - transcribed by bmt


WHEELER L. F.
WHEELER L. F., the present Mayor of the flourishing city of Carrollton, is a native of Westfield, Hampden County, Mass.; born in 1818, the fifth of a family of seven children. The days of his early youth were spent upon the old farm homestead. At seventeen, so to speak, he branched out, and thenceforward relied upon his own resources. Entering the employ of a company who had numerous agents to transact their business, that of selling silverware, jewelry, etc., in the State of New York, Mr. W. first began operations and continued them in the State of Ohio, remaining one year, and the following year, 1838, concluded to cast his fortunes in the far west, and accordingly made his way to Greene County, where he first turned his attention to farming, continuing in this capacity several years. In 1846 he proceeded to Alton, where he entered a small store for the transaction of a general merchandising business; here he remained for a period of five years, gaining an extensive trade. In 1851 he moved to Carrollton, his old home, where he entered into a general merchandising business with William P. Barr. The new firm conducted a successful business for a term of four years, when the firm dissolved partnership by mutual consent, Mr. Wheeler now branching off into the lumber trade, and here also he continued a prosperous business until the close of the rebellion, when on account of ill health he was compelled to relinquish all active business. In 1867 he was elected Police Magistrate, acting in this capacity two years. In 1878 Mr. Wheeler was requested by his many friends in the city of Carrollton to allow his name to be used in connection with the mayoralty, it being well known that he was a strict advocate of temperance. Although he had many difficulties to contend against, King Alcohol holding full power for many a year, he was elected by a large majority, when we take into consideration the fact that never before perhaps had a strictly temperance candidate been elected. In 1850 Mr. W. was married to Miss Mary L. Eldred, a daughter of Elon Eldred, by whom he had three children : Adah, Marietta and Elon E.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 502-3; - transcribed by bmt


WITHERS HON. HENRY C
WITHERS HON. HENRY C, attorney at law, Carrollton, was born in Girard County, Ky., on the 10th of January, 1839. His father, William Withers, was the son of Abij'.h Withers, whose father, William Withers, removed from Virginia to Kentucky at an early period, where the family thereafter resided. His parental ancestry were originally natives of England and Scotland; came to America and settled in Virginia prior to the revolution. His mother, Elizabeth Withers, was the daughter of the Hon. Horatio Bruce, a distinguished politician of the Democratic party of Kentucky, and Elizabeth Beasely of Ohio. Mr. Bruce was one of the first men of Kentucky of any prominence to advocate a repeal of the laws imprisoning for debt, and it was mainly through his influence and exertion while a member of the legislature that it was successfully accomplished. He was born in Virginia and at an early age moved to Kentucky. His father, John Bruce, and eight sons, older brothers of Horatio, served through the war for independence under General Washington, and also served during the war of 1812. He was a cousin of Henry Clay, and an uncle of the present Judge Horatio W. Bruce, of Louisville, Ky. The Bruces are of Scotch origin and claim kinship to King Robert, the founder of the Stuart dynasty. His grandfather Bruce had eight brothers who were lawyers, four of whom were legislators and some of them especially distinguished, and admiration for his character influenced more than any other, our subject to choose the profession of the law. In 1846 his parents left Kentucky and settled in Greene County. There he attended the common school during the winter months only, working on the farm the remainder of the year. But so great was his zeal and ambition that his progress in learning was equal to that of his classmates who attended throughout the entire year. At seventeen he entered the Berean College, at Jacksonville, Ill., at which he commenced a classical course of study. After two years he became proficient in the Greek, Latin and German languages and mathematics. Lack of means on the part of his parents made a further prosecution of the collegiate course impossible. He subsequently taught a common school near Alexander Station, Morgan County. In the Summer of 1858 he worked as a farm laborer in Greene County, making a full hand at all kinds of farm work during the season. The following winter he began the study of law under Hon. James W. English at Carrollton, where he permanently settled in 1867. He formed a copartnership with Hon. David M. Woodson, deceased, who for sixteen years served in the capacity of Circuit Judge. In 1860 he became an active supporter of Stephen A. Douglas for the Presidency, and acquired, during that campaign, some reputation as a speaker. In 1865-6 he edited in an able manner the Carrollton Democrat. In 1872 he was a delegate to the Baltimore Convention and indorsed the platform there made in 1866. At the age of twenty-seven he was elected to the House of Representatives from Greene County, and in Aug. 1874, was elected as an independent candidate to the office of State's attorney, March 18, 1863, he was married to Fanny, only daughter of the late David M. Woodson, one of the most upright men that founded a home within the borders of Greene County. Two sons were born of this marriage: Meade W. and William H.
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 503-4; - transcribed by bmt


WOOD BLATCHLEY C. REV.
WOOD BLATCHLEY C. REV., M. D. Carrollton. Blatchley Wood is a native of Truedell County, North Carolina; was born on the 5th of November, 1797, and is the eldest son of Miller Wood and Malinda M. Campbell, the former a native of Long Island, N. Y., and the latter of Culpepper County, Va. The family was first represented in America by his paternal grandfather and brothers, who emigrated from England about 1690, and settled on what is called Wood's Neck, on Long Island. About the same time Dr. Ebenezer Blatchley, one of his paternal great-grandfathers, emigrated from Scotland and settled in the same place. He was a Presbyterian, and left his native land that he might enjoy civil and religious liberty, a motive which prompted Adam Campbell, also the maternal grandfather of our subject, who settled in Culpepper County, Va., and there married Elizabeth Morgan, and reared a large family. While the subject of our notice was yet an infant his parents moved to Warren County, Ky., where his father was for many years a planter, in good circumstances. He was a man of excellent character, upright and true, and used every means for the moral development of his family. Blatchley passed his early life in agricultural pursuits, and imbibed there those habits of industry and frugality that have marked his entire subsequent career. His educational advantages however, were meager, there being few schools in Kentucky at that time; but being an apt and careful student, he availed himself of every opportunity of acquiring knowledge, and thus, largely by his own private study, gained a good English education. His life has always been pure and exemplary. In his own words: " I do not recollect of ever swearing an oath in my life, yet conscious of the prevalence of passion from my earliest recollection, of a heart disposed to wickedness, so that, notwithstanding the restraint by which I was kept within the bounds of respectable morality, my heart was not right in the sight of God." In 1817 he united with the M. E. Church, having been baptised in infancy; his mind was directed toward the ministry. Following the promptings of duty he began preparing for his work, and was greatly aided in his studies by both Presbyterian and Methodist ministers. After learning the Hebrew alphabet from the 116th psalm, he was compelled to await further progress in the study until he could procure a book. He read theology under the direction of Rev. John K. Daly, of Marion County, Ky., and in September, 1822, was ordained to the ministry, and during the next nine years preached in Kentucky and Tennessee,traveling over ten large counties in his circuit, many of his stations being from ten to twenty miles apart. Owing to the scarcity of physicians and the great suffering which he encountered in his travels, it occurred to him that to combine the practice of medicine with his ministerial duties would be to greatly enhance his power for good. Accordingly he began the study of medicine under the direction of Dr. J. E. Cook, of Kentucky, and later studied with Dr. J. Brady, of Tennessee, and in 1829 began his practice, prescribing for the sick whenever he found time, in his circuit. In 1834 he removed to Greene County, Ill., where for fourteen years he was engaged in the practice of his profession, and at the expiration of that time, resumed the ministry, in which he continued until 1878, when he was placed upon the superanuated list. In all he has devoted over twenty years to the practice of medicine, and thirty years to the ministry. He has preached in Jersey, Morgan, Madison, Bond, Montgomery and other counties, and has at different times been pastor at Jacksonville, Alton, Greenfield, Hillsboio, Exeter, Manchester, and Carrollton. Though not a classical scholar, Dr. Wood gained a good knowledge of the Hebrew language. As a preacher he was clear and logical; large-hearted and self-denying, his humanity was touched with sympathy for all. He was married, in 1822, in Pulaski County, Ky., to Miss Nancy McCaw, daughter of David Mc- Caw, a native of Ireland. Dr. Wood is a man of decided principles and a true friend of progress, and has ever given to temperance and education a hearty support. His life has been one of loyalty to noble purposes, and now, as his record approaches its close, and he nears the morning land, its gray light beams upon his pathway, betokening to him the happy dawn of a new and brighter day
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 504-5; - transcribed by bmt


WRIGHT GEO.
WRIGHT GEO. retired merchant, Carrollton, Greene County, Ill., was born at Yorkshire, England, in 1808; bound seven years to the trade of a carpenter; before his time expired he purchased his indentures. At 21 he had acquired a liberal education, and now turned his attention to the New World. Crossing the ocean in a sailing vessel, date 1830, he landed in New York, where he remained but a short time, when he made his way to Greene County, Ill., where he first worked at his trade and farming. In 1836 he made his way to Carrollton, where he began life as a merchant on a very small scale indeed. For a period of twenty years Mr. Wright, who was slowly climbing to a front position as a merchant,bought his goods in St. Louis. Year by year he went steadily forward to a successful mercantile career. His indomitable will, great industry and honesty brought its reward, and the statement is to-day given, on good authority, that George Wright was the most successful dry goods merchant in Greene County, Mr. Wright has been twice married. In 1844 he was united in marriage to Miss Anna Turnstall, a danghter of John Turnstall, ex-mayor of Louisville, Ky. Mrs. Wright died in 1856. There were four children born of this marriage; three are living: Warrick, Harry and Lenette; January, 1860, Mr. Wright was married to Mrs. Lattimer, a sister of his former wife, by whom he has two children: Sidney and Arthur. Mr. Wright was a participant in the Black Hawk war
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 505; - transcribed by bmt


WRIGHT H. W.
WRIGHT H. W. dealer in boots, shoes, hats, caps, and gents' furnishing goods, north side Square, Carrollton, Ill. For the past eight years Mr. Wright has been well and favorably known to the business community here. In the different departments are found a very superior article of goods, bought in the cities of Chicago and St. Louis, and many points in the Eastern States noted for their superior line of goods. Purchases made mostly for cash and rent low, enables Mr. Wright to compete with any and all similar establishments, and parties desirous of purchasing will do well to call and examine styles and prices before purchasing elsewhere. See business card elsewhere
Source: "History of Greene County Illinois"; Chicago: Donnelley, Gassette & Loyd, Publishers, 1879, page 505; - transcribed by bmt

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