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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
CROOKED CREEK TOWNSHIP

Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer


ADRIAN F. ATEN, son of Aaron M. and Margaret (Demott) Aten, was born in Preble County, Ohio, on May 25, 1820. The parents were born in Henry County, Ky., and were very early settlers of Preble County, Ohio, but in 1839 the father sold his land and bought a farm in Johnson County, Ind., to which he soon after moved. Our subject attended school in the pioneer schoolhouse and worked on his father's farm during his early youth. He remained on the farm until 1857. On December 26, 1845, he married Catharine, daughter of Henry Byers, of Johnson County, Ind. Ten children were born to them, nine of whom are living, viz.: Aaron M., Elizabeth, Henry B. S, Margaret, Florence, William D., Orion C, J. Franklin and Theodore. In 1857 he sold out and came to Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, and purchased and settled on 328 acres in Section 6, with some improvements. He has now 540 acres in this township, nearly all of which is under cultivation. In 1870 he built a fine frame house. He is a general farmer, and raises some stock. In politics he is a Republican, and he and his wife are both members of the Presbyterian Church. The couple have just returned from the sixty seventh anniversary of the marriage of the wife's brother, who resides in Johnson County, Ind. On this occasion there were gathered together more than 500 of the family connections.

AMOS BARTLEY, son of John P. and Charity (Lawson) Bartley, was born in Adams County, Ohio, on May 16, 1825, and at four years of age moved with his father to Shelby County, Ind., where he worked on a farm. He went to school about three months in the year and labored on a farm the remainder of each year, until, in 1850, he went by the overland route to California, being six months on the road. While there he worked at farming and mining, but in 1853 he returned East and settled in Jasper County, Ill., locating on 160 acres of land in Willow Hill Township, which his father had entered in an early day. While there he was married to Nancy, daughter of Aaron Harlan, of Jasper County. Three children, all deceased, were born to them. His wife also died, in 1861. He was next married on February 3, 1864, to Melinda, daughter of Harris and Margaret (Thompson) Tyner. Mrs. B. has borne her husband three children, two of whom are living, viz.:  Annie and Benjamin F.  After his marriage he located for a short time on his farm near Newton, and, in 1865, he sold out and moved to Crooked Creek Township and purchased 200 acres in Section 26, which farm he has well improved and on which he now resides. In politics he is a Democrat of liberal views. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.

GEORGE D. BRIGGS, son of James H. and Elizabeth (Huddleston) Briggs, was born in North Carolina, April 10, 1837. At the age of two years he was taken by his parents to Tennessee, where he attended school and worked in a tobacco factory until 1852, when his parents died. He then found his way to Coles County, Ill., where he learned carpentering, at which he worked until 1859; he next peddled dry goods until December, 1861, when he enlisted in Company K, Sixty Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. While out foraging he accidentally broke his leg, which led to his discharge in August, 1862, on account of disability. After recovery he worked on a farm until 1864, then came to Jasper County and engaged in the manufacture of tobacco. May 1, 1866, he married Rhua C, daughter of John Rice, of this county. He has seven children living, Charles H., Laura, Bessie, Bert and Pearl (twins), Harrie and Alta. Mr. Briggs built the first house at Hidalgo, of which town his wife was appointed postmistress, September 1, 1879. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Rose Hill Post, No. 158, G. A. R.

NATHAN BROOKS, son of Isaac and Patience (Spencer) Brooks, was born in Rush County, Ind., in August, 1833, and when about six years of age was brought to this township by his father. Here he attended school and worked on the home farm until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted, August 14, 1861, in Company H, Thirty Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Soon after enlistment he was taken ill, and on that account was discharged in 1862, when he returned home, and after his recovery again went to work on the home farm. January 13, 1867, he married Mary E. Cummins, the daughter of John and Eliza (Kibler) Cummins, who came to Crooked Creek Township in 1838. There have been five children born to this union, Emma E., Ida, Laura, John W. and William Daniel. Mr. Brooks owns 120 acres on Section 20, and is a general farmer. In politics he is a Republican.

ROBERT H. BROWN, son of John D. and Elizabeth (Brown) Brown, was born in Shelby County, Ind., September 13, 1844. John D. Brown was a farmer and wagon maker, and when not at school Robert H. worked on the farm or in the shop.   The father died in 1861, and the support of the mother fell to a great extent upon our subject. But the war broke out and he enlisted, October 21, 1862, in the Twenty Second Indiana Volunteer Battery. He was at Kenesaw Mountain, in front of Atlanta, at Franklin and Nashville, and in all the engagements in which his battery took part. He was discharged July 8,1865, and returned to the support of his mother. In 1872 he came to this county, farmed about eight years, and then bought out a general stock of merchandise at Harrisburg, this township, and traded until 1880, when he sold out to take a needed rest. He is still unmarried, and devotes his time and means to the care of his mother. He is a charter member of Rose Hill Post, No. 158, G. A. R., and his mother is a member of the Baptist Church, which he also attends.

MITCHELL T. BRUSTER was born in Grayson County, Ky., March 1, 1829, and is the son of Thomas and Martha (Jeffers) Bruster, natives of Virginia. About 1835 the family moved to Coles County, Ill., where our subject attended a pioneer school, and assisted on the home farm until the spring of 18-17, when he enlisted in Company G, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, for the war with Mexico, and served three years. Next he passed about seven years in and about the lead mines at Mineral Point, Wis., and elsewhere, and then returned to his father's farm. May 1, 1857, he married Eliza J. Baker, who was born in Virginia, December 15, 1833, and came with her parents, Jacob and Mary (Edmon) Baker, to Coles County, this State, in 1852. To their marriage five children were born, Jerome, John W., Martha J., Jacob C. and George C. Of these Martha J. and George C. alone survive. Mr. Bruster remained in Coles County, working at saw milling, until 1868, when he came to this township and purchased eighty acres of land on Section 32, to which he has since added forty acres; he resides in the village of Rose Hill, is the only survivor of Company G, and is thought to be the only survivor of the Mexican War in the county. His grandfather Jeffers was killed in the Revolutionary War, as was his wife's grand uncle, Samuel Edmon. Mr. Bruster is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the United Brethren Church, in which he has served as Steward, Trustee and Sunday school superintendent.

AMOS P. CALDWELL, son of Andrew and Sena (Sharp) Caldwell, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, was born November 26, 1839, in Clark County, Ill. Three days after his birth his mother died, and at the age of five years he lost his father. He then lived with an aunt, Jane Lowell, who sent him to school until he was sixteen years of age, when she died. He then went to live with his aunt Rebecca Goodman, in Vigo County, Ind., where he worked on a farm until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company H, Eleventh Indiana, three months' service, and fought at Romney, Va. After his discharge he immediately joined Company L, Fifth Illinois Cavalry, for three years' service. He fought at Pilot Knob, Batesville and Helena, Ark., and at Vicksburg. At the last place, he was captured by the enemy, and confined in Libby Prison eight months, when he was exchanged. He was then with Sherman from Vicksburg to Meridian, and was discharged in 1834. He worked at various points awhile and then settled on forty acres, well improved, in this township. May 2, 1867, he married Rebecca J. Hendricks, the daughter of Isaac H. and Nancy (Connor) Hendricks. They have had four children, Albert H., Edwin H., Lula (deceased) and Charles. Mr. Caldwell is a Mason and a member of the G. A. R. Isaac II. Hendricks is the son of Samuel and Mary (Taylor) Hendricks, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, February 22, 1823, married Nancy Connor January 30, 1845, and came to this township in 1857; his wife died September 19, 1881, since when Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell have resided at his house.

JOSEPH COAD, son of Joseph and Mary Coad, was born in England in 1813, was reared on the home farm, and at the death of his father, in 1841, came to America, located in Montgomery County, Ohio, worked in a distillery three years, then went to Greenville Falls, Miami County, and followed the same business. April 5, 1847, he married Mary A. Reisner, born in Augusta County, Va., in 1824, and daughter of John J. and Mary C. Reisner, natives of Germany. In 1850, Mr. Coad brought his family to this township, bought forty acres of wild land, which he afterward increased to 110 acres, and put all under a state of high cultivation. Mrs. Coad was the first to bring currants and other small fruits to this township. Mr. and Mrs. Coad had nine children born to them, viz.: Jane, Emma (deceased), James (deceased), Adie, George (deceased), Freddie, Kattie (deceased), George and Eliza. Both parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WILLIAM CONNER, son of Daniel and Rebecca (Smith) Conner, was born in Fayette County, Ind., on October 31, 1814. His educational advantages were limited. In 1830, he moved with his father to Rush County, Ind., where he attended school in the log schoolhouse during three months in the year, and working the rest of the time on the farm, until 1836, when he commenced life for himself. On March 2, 1837, he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Martin Smith, of Shelby County. He continued farming until 1855, when he came to Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, and purchased some partially improved wild land in Section 6. In 1857, his wife died. He was next married, on March 2, 1858, to Rose Ann Huffcut (a widow with one child, Sylvia), daughter of Isaac and Maria D. (Neely) Hedges, of Cumberland County, Ill. He is still living on the farm he first purchased. His farm has all the modern improvements. Since 1836, Mr. Conner has been a member of the Christian Church. His father died in Shelby County, Ind., on July 8, 1841; his mother in the same county, on December 14, 1847. His wife was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, in 1837; her father died in July, 1846, in Cumberland County, Ill.

GEORGE S. CONNER, son of Daniel and Rebecca (Smith) Conner, was born in Fayette County, Ind., on January 17, 1825. His parents moved to Indiana when it was a territory, in 1812. George attended school some and cleared land, until he was fourteen years old, when his father moved to Shelby County, Ind., where he farmed, and where his father died in 1841, and his mother in 1848. On April 2,1849, he married Jane, daughter of Benjamin Davee, of Shelby County, Ind. To them were born nine children, only one of whom, Alice M., is living. In 1855, he came to Jasper County, Ill., and purchased 120 acres of prairie land, and improved it. His wife dying January 16, 1876, on October 26, 1876, he married for his second wife Ruminta A., daughter of William W. Ballard, of Darke County, Ohio. Four children have been born to them, two of whom, Cora E., and Nellie M., are living. Mr. Conner now owns and occupies a fine farm of 400 acres, and as good a house as there is in the township. He is a general farmer, and deals in stock quite extensively. In politics he is a Republican, and was a true friend to the soldier of the late war. His uncle, John Conner, was a soldier of the Revolution, his grandfather Smith, a minute-man, was killed by the Tories, and his wife's great grandfather, a soldier in the same war. Mr. Conner and wife are both members of the Christian Church, and are very highly esteemed by all who know them.

JONATHAN COWGER, son of Michael and Catherine (Eye) Cowger, of Kentucky, was born in Highland County, Ohio, November 4, 1807. About 1824 the family moved to Rush County, Ind., where, in Christmas week of 1830, our subject married Sarah Birt, daughter of William Birt. He farmed for a time in Crawford and Marion counties, Ind., then came to this county, and in 1853, to this township. He has twice been elected Highway Commissioner, and cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson. He has had born to him fourteen children, John B., James M., Mary A., Elizabeth, William T., Jonathan B., an infant daughter (deceased), Milton S., Martha (deceased), Sarah J., Charlotte (deceased), Phebe, Henry H. and David S. (deceased). Four of the sons served during the late war. Milton S. Cowger was born in Rush County, Ind., March 9, 1844, was reared on his father's farm and was educated in Marion County, Ind., until the family came to this county, where he enlisted in Company K, Twenty First Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He took part in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, and in all the other engagements of his regiment. February 26, 1864, he was discharged, but re-enlisted in the same company and was appointed Sergeant. He was honorably discharged in January, 1866, and in April, 1867, he married Martha J. McDaniel, who bore him three children, Charles H. (deceased), Anna M. and Jonathan E. (deceased). October 9, 1875, Mrs. Cowger died; October 14, 1877, Mr. Cowger married Leonora J. Stebbins, daughter of Dennis and Jane Stebbins, and to this union have been born two children,  Milton O. and Flora J. (deceased). Mr. C. was elected Town Clerk in 1877, and April 12, 1878, was appointed postmaster at Rose Hill, which position he still holds. In 1879, he was made General Agent for the P., D. & E. R. R.. and agent for the Adams and Pacific Express Companies in 1880. He is a Master Mason, is a member of the G. A. R., owns his home in the village and a fine farm in the vicinity.

JOHN B. COWGER, son of Jonathan and Sarah (Birt) Cowger, was born in Rush County, Ind., December 4, 1831, moved with his father to Marion County, Ind., and came with him to this county. He was reared a farmer and was educated in Indiana. September 28, 1856, he married Nancy A. McDaniel, daughter of John and Margaret (Freiks) McDaniel. He has four living children born to this union, Mary A., Jonathan Sherman, Ellen J. and Ollie M. After marriage he settled on his farm on Section 32, taught school in the winter of 1860, and in June, 1861, enlisted in Company K, Twenty First Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He fought at Frederickstown, Corinth, Perryville, Stone River, Dalton, Resaca and Altoona Pass. On account of night blindness and neuralgia, from which he lost the sight of his left eye and almost lost that of the right, he was discharged in September, 1864, at Springfield, Ill., and returned to his home, but is able to do very little work. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church, and in politics he is a Republican.

JAMES CUMMINS was born in Edgar County, Ill., August 19, , and is the son of Robert and Edith (Price) Cummins, born in Harrison County, Ky. They came to Edgar County, Ill., in about the year 1830, and entered land on which he farmed; but in 1838 he moved to Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, and settled on Section 34, where he died in 1844. James went to school in the primitive log schoolhouse, in the winter, and worked on the farm in the summer seasons of his early youth. On the old farm, on January 2, 1853, he married Rebecca, daughter of Alexander White, of Cumberland County, Ill. To this union were born twelve children; three sets of twins in succession, viz.: Joseph A., George J., Rosetta B. (deceased), Martha R., Robert R., Edith S-, Ada A. and Emma L. (twins), John F. and Francis M. (twins), James F. and William W. (twins). After his marriage he located on a fine farm of 340 acres (a portion of the old home farm), in Section 34, and in 1878 built a fine house and out-buildings. He is a general farmer, and deals largely in stock. Mr. Cummins has resided in this township forty five years, and is well and favorably known throughout the county, of which he was Supervisor for five consecutive terms. He is a Master Mason of the Newton Lodge, No. 216; takes a deep interest in the church and Sabbath school and is at the present actively engaged in building a church, the means for which being mostly furnished by him. His wife is a member of the United Brethren Church; he attends. Mr. C's good old mother died on September 28, 1882.

JOHN CUMMINS, son of Daniel and Dolly (Johnson) Cummins, was born in North Carolina in 1807. He worked on the home farm until fourteen years old, when his father died. He then managed the place for his mother. In 1827 he married Mary Morgan, who bore him two children, Sidney and Cenia. In 1830 he moved to Henry County, Ind., where his wife died a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. About 1832 he married Eliza Kibler, who became the mother of eleven children,  Jacob, William Daniel, Sarah L. (deceased), John F., Eva M., Reuben (who, with one of his children, was killed by lightning while returning home from the harvest field in 1883), Mary E., Susan, Emma, Charles and Richard W.

William Daniel was born in Henry County, Ind., November 19, 1837, and was brought to this county by his father in 1838. In June, 1853, he married Elizabeth Strong, who bore him four children, all now deceased. Mr. C. was legally separated from his wife, and in 1860 married Sarah J. McGahan, who has borne one child, now dead. At the breaking out of the war Mr. C. enlisted in the Ninety Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, but soon after going to the front was taken ill and was discharged. He has served as Constable twelve years and has been a School Director. He is a Master Mason, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a Democrat. He is now a clerk in a general store, and also keeps the only house of public entertainment in the village of Rose Hill. Mrs. C is a member of the United Brethren Church.


JOHN F. CUMMINS, the third son of John and Eliza Cummins, was born in Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, Ill., March, 11, 1840, attended the Christman school in winter, and when but a mere youth was employed in breaking prairie, driving four yoke of oxen. At the age of twenty he went to Coles County to farm. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Ninety Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, but, as he was quite delicate, was unable to bear the fatigues of a soldier's life, and was discharged from the hospital at Memphis after a short service. In August, 1863, he married Henrietta A. Fawcett, daughter of John H Fawcett, an early settler of Vigo County, lad., and settled down to farming in Crooked Creek. To his union have born born seven children, Mary A., William M. (deceased), Emery V., Claibourne R, Frank M., John B. (deceased) and Eva E. (deceased). In 1880 he served as Census Enumerator for this township, and he is now the special agent for the Rockford (Ill.) Fire Insurance Co. He resides upon his farm of seventy acres, but his health is too poor to admit of his performing farm labor. He and his family are all members of the United Brethren Church, of which he has been steward, class leader, Sunday school superintendent and trustee.

CAPT. ROBERT S. CUMMINS was born in Kentucky, February 10, 1845, and is the son of Moses and Rebecca A. (Scott) Cummins, also natives of Kentucky. He was reared on his father's farm until the breaking out of the late war. In 1862 he entered Company I, Ninth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, Confederate States of America, and was commissioned Captain. At the battle of Hartsville, Tenn., he was wounded in the left thigh and side, and at Chickamauga was badly injured in the head and neck. After his recovery he rejoined his command, remained with it until Johnston's surrender, then came to Illinois, where, December 31, 1865, he married Lena Cummins, daughter of John Cummins, of Edgar County. He then returned to his old Kentucky home, and in 1876 came back to Edgar County. Three years later he settled on Sections 28 and 29, this township, on a fine farm of 140 acres. He was elected Township Collector for 1882, is a Master Mason of Stratton Lodge No. 408, and a Democrat. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church, and parents of four children, John W., Dora L., Lillie M. and Moses S.

JAMES H. DAVISON was born in Clermont County, Ohio, December 15, 1806, and is the son of Robert and Florence (Hamilton) Davison. Robert Davison was born in Ireland, but was brought to America when only six months old, was reared in Pennsylvania and there married Miss F. Hamilton, a native of that State. James H. Davison was educated in the old fashioned log schoolhouse, and worked on the home farm until September 20,1827, when he married Elizabeth Davison, daughter of John and Isabel (Hamilton) Davison. He learned coopering, and worked at that trade in and near Milford, Ohio, until 1845; then moved to Indiana, where he farmed until 1850; then sold out and came to this township where he purchased 160 acres in Section 1, where he carries on general farming: and raises some stock. He became the father of eleven children, of whom five are living, Isabel, Robert H, James F, John and Hester L. Mr. Davison and family are all members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics he is a Republican. His son, Robert H. Davison, was a soldier in Company E, Ninety Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and after taking part in all the battles of his regiment was honorably discharged in July, 1865. He is now at the home of his parents, and is acting as general agent, teacher and examiner for Prof. G. S. Rice's Lightning International Music Teaching System, with a branch office at Hidalgo.

DR. JAMES F. DAVISON, son of James H. Davison, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, July 12, 1840, attended the county school and after coming to Illinois, worked on the home farm until eighteen years old. He then read medicine with Dr. F. Tevis, of Lawrence County, Ill. He also taught school in Cumberland County, at the same time keeping up his studies with Dr. T. At twenty two, he commenced practice, having graduated from the Kansas Eclectic Medical Examining Board, under Surgeon General Winans, and being endorsed by the Illinois State Board of Health. October 13, 1861, he married Helen M. Tevis, daughter of Dr. Fletcher and Lucy S. (Day) Tevis, and to his union were born eight children, Alice F., Charles E., Lillie May, John F., Albert, Robert O., Francis M. and George N. The doctor farms forty acres in this township, on Section 1, and has an extensive practice in his profession.

JOHN DAVISON, son of James H. Davison, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, February 3, 1842; moved with his father's family to Indiana, and to this township in 1850. He was here reared until about seventeen, when he went to Mattoon, where he worked in a cooper shop. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E., Ninety Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and took part in the following battles: Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Port Gibson, Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, and Fort Blakely, and was stationed at different posts until his discharge July 29, 1865. On his return, he went to cultivating his farm of one hundred acres, on Section 1, this township, October 3, 1871, he married Beersheba Bailey, daughter of James and Emily (Bartlett) Bailey, of Madison County, Ind. Two children were born to their union,  Florinda (deceased) and Alfarata. Mr. Davison is a Republican in politics, is a member of Rose Hill Post, No. 158. G. A. R., and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HENRY H. ELDER was born in Rush County, Ind., February , 1839, and is the son of Andrew and Mary (Little) Elder, natives respectively of Tennessee and Long Island, N. Y. These parents were among the first settlers of Rush County, and the patent to the land they there entered, bears the signature of President Jackson. At the age of twenty two, Henry H. Elder moved to Shelby County, Ind., became a barber, married Mary E. Poss, a widow with one child , Emma, and had born to him two children, Harry A. and Katie J. He resided in Shelby County about twelve years, then in Effingham about a year, and then came to Rose Hill, where he built the first dwelling ever erected in the village, and for a time worked in the stave factory. In 1883, he and Silas Little started the only cabinet and furniture store in Rose Hill. Mr. Elder is a member of the I. O. O.F.., and of the Order of Red Men, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. In politics, he is a Democrat.

DAVID HAMMER (deceased) was the son of F. J. Hammer, and was born in Preble County, Ohio, January 23, 1822. In 1838, he came to this township with his father, who was a millwright, and put up the first mill built in Crooked Creek. At this mill and on the form, our subject was employed until May 11,1845, when he married Rebecca J., daughter of David and Adaline (Cooper) Fawcett, of Virginia. Her father joined the conference of the United Brethren Church, in 1837, was a traveling preacher, and died, October 4,1845. Her mother died in Indiana, December 5, 1836. After his marriage, David Hammer settled in this township on a farm. He had five children born to him, viz.: Albert, Mary (deceased), John C., Emma, (deceased) and Eva, and departed this life, September 25, 1859, leaving his family well provided for. His widow was married, October 3,1872, to Rev. Ephraim Shuey, a widower with seven children, James F., Louisa A., (now deceased) Ephraim E., John R., (deceased) Martha A., William H. and Walton S. Mr. Shuey was born in Virginia, January 8, 1814, and is the son of John and Catherine (Funkhouser) Shuey. John Shuey died in Vigo County, Ind., September 29,1853, a consistent member of the United Brethren Church since boyhood. His widow, a member of the same church for over fifty years, died January 31, 1866. Ephraim Shuey united with the United Brethren Church when sixteen years old, and began to preach while living in Vigo County. In 1848, he moved to Clark County, HI., and in 1852, to Cumberland County, where his wife died September 16, 1871, and after his marriage to Mrs. Hammer, settled on her fine farm on Section 28, this township. His sons, James F. and Ephraim E., were members of the One Hundred and Twenty Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Mr. Shuey continues to preach, and he is also a skillful farmer.

WILLIAM W. HAYS was born March 23, 1833, in Logan County, Ohio, and is the son of James and Rebecca J. (Smith) Hays, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Virginia, and early settlers of Logan County. In the fall of 1840, the family came to this township, bought land, and William was set to work breaking up sod with a wooden mold-board plow. He was educated in a log school-house, the first built in the township, and reared on the farm. In April, 1865, he married Sarah Kellar, daughter of David Kellar, who bore him two children, George E. and John W., and died in 1868. In March, 1871, he married Amanda Helen, a widow with one child , Charles F. She died in April, 1877, and February 20,1879, he married Mahala J. Gunning, a widow with one child, Lola M. To this last marriage have been born three children, of whom two are living, Elmer and Ezra E. Mr. Hays is a Democrat, and has served as School Director, Trustee, Township Treasurer, Collector, and in 1880, was again elected School Trustee.

ELIJAH R. HEATH was born in Hunterdon County, N. J., March 12, 1835, and is the son of George D. and Mary (Heath) Heath, also natives of Hunterdon Comity. Elijah R. Heath attended school nine months in the year, until eighteen, studied a year at the university at Lewisburgh, Penn., taught school about a year in New Jer sey, and in 1855, moved to Montgomery County, Ohio, where he taught for twelve years. April 3, 1860, he married Louisa W. Ballard, daughter of William W. Ballard, of Ithaca, Ohio. Two children, Belle and Lillie, have been born to their union. In 1867, Mr. Heath moved to Indiana; was in a flouring-mill until 1869, then came to this township and farmed on land he had previously purchased in Section 4, sold, and purchased a farm in Cumberland County, on which he lived eleven years, and then rented out and came to Hidalgo, where he is now keeping a general store. He is station agent for the P., D. & E. R. R., agent for the Adams and Pacific Express Companies, buys and ships grain, and has handled as many as thirty five wagon loads of wheat in one day. He is a Mason, an Odd Fellow, a Republican, and has been a School Trustee. His grandfather Richard Heath, was a private, his grand-uncle, John Heath, a Captain, and his great grand-uncle, William Heath, a Brigadier General in the Revolutionary War.

WILLIAM HUNT, son of Stephanius and Elizabeth (Coffin) Hunt, was born in Fayette County, Ohio, on March 4, 1818. He received a common school education in a pioneer schoolhouse, worked on a farm at intervals, and in his father's blacksmith and carpenter shop, until March 13, 1836, when he was married to Margaret, daughter of John and Tebetha (Morgan) Timmons, They have had ten children, four of whom are living, viz.; Nathan S., Uriah E., Mary D., and Sarah A. In 1838, he, with his father, and all of the Hunt family, the Hutsons, the Cummins, the Vannattas, the Hammers, and others, formed a colony, and settled in what is now Crooked Creek Township.   
    They came here on September 24, 1838, entered and cleared land, and commenced the life of pioneer farmers of the then far West. Our subject, after enduring all the trials, and hardships, and privations of a pioneer life, until, on September 26,1852, he died, very highly esteemed by all. He lost three sons in the Union Army, viz.: Francis, of Company G, Fifty Fourth Illinois Infantry, deceased; Albert, died from disease contracted in the army, of Company G, Forty Ninth Illinois Infantry, and James, a soldier in the regular army, died in Texas. Mr. Hunt left about 400 acres of good farm land to his widow, who is still living on the old home farm. Her granddaughter, Luzena Hunt, has the charge and management of the house for the good old lady in her declining years.        


ELIHU HUTSON, son of William and Sarah (Hunt) Hutson, was born December 31, 1834, in Madison County, Ohio, the native county of his parents. In the fall of 1838, the family came to this county, and here Elihu Hutson was reared to farming. June 19, 1856, he married Elizabeth, daughter of David Kellar, and had born to him live children, Sarah J. (deceased), John W., Lydia A., William D. and Andrew T. In 1861, Mr., Hutson moved to Coles County, Ill., farmed there until 1867, then returned to this township, and here his wife died October 11, 1878, a member of the New Light Church. October 12, 1879, he married Sarah Carr, daughter of E. Brooks and a widow with four children, John C, Reuben E., Laura M. and Luella. To this last marriage have been born two children , Anna M. and Sarah O. Mr. Hutson's father was one of the earliest settlers of Crooked Creek, and was for several years & Justice of the Peace, He died June 7, 1883; his wife died February 15, 1838. The father had been a member of the New Light Church for over fifty years.

OLIVER R. JACKSON is a native of Hardin County, Ky., was born January 23, 1822, and is a son of John and Sarah (Price) Jackson. He attended the pioneer schools of the time, and in 1839 moved with his father's family to Crawford County, Ill., and afterward moved to Washington, Ind., where he learned the trade of a plasterer. Subsequently, he married Lucinda Elswae, who died September 13, 1851, having borne one child, now deceased. Mr. Jackson thereafter returned to Crawford County, Ill., where he followed his trade for a livelihood, and February 16, 1855, wedded Lovina Stamm, which marriage produced ten children, of which number five are living, Alvin L., Rosa B., Franklin, Lyman E. and Stephen. In 1857, Mr. Jackson removed to Saint Marie Township, Jasper County, and later, in 1869, to Crooked Creek Township, where he purchased eighty acres of timber land and cleared the same, which is now in good cultivation. He is engaged in general farming and working at his trade. Mr. Jackson is a valuable and esteemed citizen, and Mrs. Jackson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


JOHN F. KIBLER, son of Reuben and Susan (Cummins) Kibler, was born in Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, Ill., on December 29, 1847. In his early youth, he attended the common schools and worked on a farm. On November 6, 1870, he married Isadora, daughter of Reuben and Mary (Creamer) Carr, who was born in Crooked Creek Township on October 6, 1852. They have had six children, viz.: Eda Rozilla, born November 15, 1871 (now in her twelfth year, and weighs 182 pounds); Mary C., born April 19, 1873; Lydia S., November 10, 1874; John F., May 18, 1876; Reuben A., January 7, 1878, and Laura M., February 22, 1881. After his marriage he settled on eighty acres in Section 15, Crooked Creek Township, and now owns 282, the most of which being under cultivation. He occupies a very fine two story frame house, which is considered one of the best in the township. Besides farming, he deals largely in stock. He is a member of the United Brethren, his wife of the .New Light Church.    In politics he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM T. KIBLER, brother of John F., was born in Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, Ill., on June 20,1850. He received his education at the common schools, and worked on a farm during his youth. On December 20,1877,. he married Nancy, daughter of Daniel Davis., of Lawrence County, Ill. She was born on January 5, 1857, and she has borne her husband two children, viz.: William J.. born October 8, 1878, and Edward M., born November 26, 1881. In Section 16 he has a good farm of 165 acres, all well improved, and occupies a fine house. Besides being a general farmer, he deals largely in cattle. The Kiblers are descendants of some of the first families that settled in this county, and are well liked and highly esteemed by all their acquaintances. William is a Democrat politically. He and his wife are both members of the United Brethren Church, he being a steward of the same. He gives with a liberal hand to all charitable and benevolent enterprises.

HARRISON KILBURN was the son of Benjamin C and Priscilla  (Farr)   Kilburn, the father born in Kentucky, the mother in Pennsylvania. The  father was a  farmer, an early settler in Vigo County, Ind., and helped to build the first house ever erected in the town of Terre Haute, Ind. Harrison was born on December 6,1840, and went to school and worked on a farm until the year 1851, when his father  moved  to Jasper County, Ill., and engaged in farming. On  August 2, 1861, our  subject enlisted  in Company H, Thirty Eighth Illinois Infantry. He participated in the battles of Fredericktown,   Mo.. Corinth,   Perryville,  Stone  River, Knob Gap, and others. On October 22,1853, he was transferred to the Signal Corps. He was then at the battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, Rocky Face, Atlanta, and had the honor of carrying the flag of truce demanding the surrender of Charleston; was also at the Grand Review at Washington. D. C. He was discharged at Saint Louis, Mo., on September 7, 1860.  While at home, on May 2, 1854, he was married to Nancy McCormick, daughter of Elijah McCormick, of Jasper County, III.    One child has been born to them, viz.:  Benjamin   C. (deceased).    After  his   discharge  he  settled in Clark County, Ill., and engaged  in   farming until  1881, when  he came to Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, purchased a home in the town of Rose Hill, where he is now living, being engaged in the fruit tree business.  Mr. Kilburn  has been Township Collector and Assessor.    He is a member of the G- A. R., and in politics is a Democrat.  His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

DR. WILLIAM M. KING was born in Harrison County, Ind., December 11, 1808, and is the son of Daniel and Elizabeth A. (Bruce) King, also natives of Indiana. He attended a subscription school three months in the year and worked on the home farm until 1868, when the family came to this county. He attended the Normal School at Newton, and at the age of twenty read medicine with Dr. William O. Denman, studying for thirteen months, and then entered the Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati; studied three terms, and on his graduating stood at 91.9 per cent. He located at Rose Hill, and now has an extensive and lucrative practice. April 16,1882, he married Mary Hunt, daughter of Amaziah and Elizabeth (Gates) Hunt. He has permanently settled in Rose Hill, where he has purchased a home.

ANDREW J. LAKE, son of Lewis and Mary (Irvin) Lake, was born in Licking County, Ohio, on January 26. 1836, and during about three months in each year of his youth he attended school, being the remainder of the time employed on a farm. When a young man, and while on a visit to Indiana, he enlisted in Company D, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry, and served until the close of the late war. He participated in the battles of Perryville, Stone River,. Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Mission Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin and Nashville. At the latter place he was discharged in January, 1866. when he returned to Ohio, and in the autumn of the same year came to Jasper County, Ill., and opened a general merchandise store, in the town of Harrisburg, Crooked Creek Township. On September 30, 1867, he married Lucinda, the widowed daughter of William Stroble. Two children have been born to them, viz.: Rebecca and Hattie E. In 1871,. he sold his store and purchased a farm of 160 acres in Section 9 where he is now living, as a general farmer and stock raiser. In politics he is a Republican. He and his wife are both members of the Presbyterian Church. Over his right eye he has a scar, from a slight wound he received while in the army.

JOHN T. LAND, son of William H. and Jance C. (Warren) Land, was born in Kentucky, January 15, 1832, and when four years of age was taken by his father to Decatur County, Ind., where he attended school and helped clear away the heavy timber until 1850, when his father sold the farm and entered land in this township. September 29, 1853, he married Nancy A., daughter of John and Sarah (Admire) Ellis, and to their union have been born eight children, six now living: Francis, Sarah J., Abraham J., Jennie B., William F. and Alfretta. After his marriage he lived on his father's farm until 1855, when he moved to Missouri, where he was appointed a Justice of the Peace, and afterward elected for four years, but at the breaking out of the war resigned and returned to this county, where he enlisted in August, 1862, in Company E, Ninety Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was in battle at Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Big Black River and Champion Hills. In 1863 he was transferred to Company E, Ninth United States Invalid Corps, and was mustered out June 27, 1865. He heard Lincoln make his last public speech and was in Washington when he was assassinated. In the spring of 1877 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and was re-elected in 1881. He is a Democrat, a member of Rose Hill Post, No. 158, G. A. R., and he and wife are members of the Universalist Church.

JOHN W. LEE, son of Abbott and Belinda (Purcell) Lee, was born in Crooked Creek Township, May 6, 1838. Abbott Lee was born in Butler County, Ohio, came to Illinois in 1818, located in Lawrence County, where he was married, and soon after came to this county and engaged in farming. John W. Lee attended school and assisted on the home farm until June, 1861, when he enlisted in Company K, Twenty First Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was at the fight at Perryville, and at Stone River, in December, 186z, was wounded in the right leg, in consequence of which he received his discharge at Louisville in May, 1863. In October, 1864, he married Alice Stout, daughter of James Stout, of this county. Seven children have been born to him, Louisa, Laura, Perry, John W., Albert, Martha J. and an infant girl not named. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Lee, settled on a farm of 180 acres, on Section 30, this township: this he has increased to 200 acres, and furnished with fine improvements. He is a Master Mason and a member of the G. A. R., and in politics is a Democrat. His mother died about the year 1842, and his father December 15, 1863.

WILLIAM H. McCOMAS was born January 3, 1842, and is the son of Henry C and Mary (Kibler) McComas, who were born in Virginia, were married in Rush County, Ind., and who came to this township in 1837, entered land in Section 19, and there resided until their respective deaths in 1855 and 1873. William H. McComas was educated at a subscription school taught in a log house, and was reared a farmer, having begun at the age of six. May 30, 1869, he married Eliza E. Carr, born in Ohio, February 6, 1844. and the daughter of Reuben and Mary (Creamer) Carr, formerly of Virginia but latterly of Ohio. Mr. McComas began housekeeping in a log house on part of his father's farm, but in 1875, put up a comfortable frame dwelling. He owns 108 acres of the old homestead and does general farming and deals in cattle.    His children are three in number, Laura A., Mary A. and William E. In 1881, Mr. McComas was elected school trustee by the Republicans. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and the Methodist Episcopal Church; his wife is a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. McComas' father died in 1871, and her mother in 1875, both church members.

THOMAS McDANIEL was born in Johnson County, Ind., January 1, 1834, and is the son of John and Margaret (Freiks) McDaniel, natives of Kentucky and early settlers in the county named above. Thomas McDaniel was reared on a farm, and in 1852 came to this county. August 30, 1851, he married Alice Z. Robinson, daughter of William C and Frances (Walton) Robinson, and to his marriage were born six children, Jeremy E., Frances L., Henry, Zenetta (deceased), Minnie A. and an infant boy, deceased. Mr. McDaniel soon after marriage purchased a farm of nearly 200 acres, which he worked until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company H, Thirty Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He participated in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Resaca, Atlanta, Nashville and all others in which his regiment was engaged, and served until August, 1864, when he resumed farming. Mr. McD. lost his mother February 11, 1856, and his father died the day Grant was elected President, in 1868; Mrs. Mc D.'s father was accidentally killed in October, 1854, by a wagon upsetting and throwing a saw-log upon him, and her mother died in 1878.


EGBERT W. MOORE was born in Rush County, Ind., March 12, 1854, and is the son of Elijah T. and Mary E. Moore, natives respectively of Kentucky and Maryland, and early settlers in Indiana. The parents came to this township when Robert was but eighteen months old, and the father started a general store in Plain-field. Robert attended school until about fourteen, then learned harness making, and then worked at farming until he had saved money enough to farm on his own account. April 5, 1872, he married Sarah C-, daughter of Ezekiel Everman, of Cumberland County, Ill., and to this union six children have been born, viz.: Lawrence (deceased), twin boys (deceased), Daisy, Elijah and Charles E. At the age of twenty one he lost his father, and the support of his mother then devolved upon him. The father had served as post-master at Rose Hill, and hud been twice elected Justice of the Peace, in which office he died. In 1877, our subject purchased a blacksmith and wagon shop in Rose Hill, which he still continues to conduct, it being the only one in the village. He is a Master Mason and a member of the I. O. G. T.; his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

CORNELIUS MURPHY, son of John and Judah (Sullivan) Murphy, was born in Ireland on September 8, 1826. He attended school until he was about fifteen years old, then worked on his fathers farm until he attained his majority. He then worked for himself as a day laborer, saved his money, and in 1849 he set sail for America. After his arrival he located for a short time in the East, then came to Ohio, where he engaged in farming. On April 19, 1852, he married Elenora Curl, of Champaign County, Ohio, and two children have been born to them, viz.: Elva and Estella. In 1854, he came to Edgar County, Ill. Here he farmed until August, 1862, when he enlisted in the Eighteenth Indiana Battery. He was in seventy two hard fought battles, among which were Hoover's Gap, Tullahoma, Chattanooga, Chickamauga, Knoxville and others. On  January 25, 1865, while he was at the front, his wife died. In June, 1865, he was discharged, when he came home to his farm in Edgar County. Here he married, for his second wife, Nancy, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Bricley. One child has been born to them, viz.: Isaac C. In. 1871, Mr. Murphy sold his farm, and came to Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County. Here he purchased a farm, the house thereon being, it is said, the first one ever built on the prairie in this township. He now owns 237 acres of well improved land, and besides being a general farmer, he deals in fine stock.   In politics he is a Republican. He is a claim agent for the collection of soldiers' pensions. He and his wife and son are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Murphy was raised in the Roman Catholic faith, but was converted to Protestantism soon after he emigrated to America.

ENOCH K. NELSON, son of William K and Mary (Edmonson) Nelson, was born in Grant County, Ky., on July 20,1844. In 1855, he moved with his father to Acton, Marion County, Ind., and went to school and worked on a farm until July 22, 1862, when he enlisted in Company G., Seventieth Indiana Infantry. His regiment for some time was guarding a railroad, but was finally put into active service. He participated in the battles of Resaca, Dallas, Chattanooga, Atlanta, with Sherman in his "March to the Sea" at Raleigh, N. C., at the grand review at Washington, D. C, and then, in June, 1865, received his honorable discharge. On arriving home he resumed farming. In 1866, he came to Jasper County, Ill., and engaged in farming. On August 20, 1818, he married Emily Harris (a widow), daughter of William Helms. She has borne her husband six children, viz.: William H., Margaret L., Laura B., Emily J., James F. and Sarah J. Mr. Nelson is now living on eighty acres of land, leased, in Section 36, Crooked Creek Township, where he is engaged in general farming. He is a member of the G. A. R., Post No. 158, Department of Illinois. He and his wife are regular attendants at church.

DANIEL PERRINE was born January 22, 1813, and is the son of William and Catherine (Miller) Perrine, natives of New Jersey and Virginia, and early settlers in Butler County, Ohio. He was reared to farming and also learned shoe-making, and in December, 1832, married Mary, daughter of William Huls, of New Jersey. To this union were born ten children, of whom four are still living, Joseph, David, Lewis D. and Catherine. After marriage he started a shoe shop, and while conducting this educated himself. Under the administration of President Taylor he was appointed postmaster at Westchester, Ohio, and held the office for many years. In 1855 he moved to Crawford County, Ill., and in 1861 to Richland County, where he bought a farm. January 3, 1863, his wife died, and the same year he married Hannah Akers, a widow with two children; she died in Ohio, when he returned to Crawford County and married Mary C. Delzell, a widow with one child, and to this marriage were born two children, Daniel (deceased) and Louisa. After this marriage he came to this township and here lost his wife by death. He next married Isabel Benefield, who also died, and he then married Sarah A. McKinney. While residing in Crawford County he was a postmaster under Grant; in 1860 he voted for Douglas and in 1864 for Lincoln; since then he has been a Democrat. He was a volunteer nurse in the hospital at Camp Butler, Ill., during the war; he is a Past Master Mason of Newton Lodge, No. 216, and was a charter member of Robinson Lodge of Crawford County, and filled the chairs of Senior Warden and Master. He resides in his own house in Rose Hill, and at the age of seventy one is strong and active, giving daily attention to running a threshing machine. He attends the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WILLIAM A. POWELL, son of Hezekiah and Lucy (Ealer) Powell, was born in Boone County, Ky., in 1827, and at the age of six lost his father. His mother then did the plowing while he rode the horse, until he became old enough to take the plow himself. At the age of fifteen his mother died; he then went to live on the farm of a cousin until twenty one. He then went to Shelby County, Ind., where he was married, in 1849, to Julia A. Avey (a daughter of Peter Avey), who bore him nine children, of whom four are yet living, Abraham, Nicholas, Sarah and Edward. Soon after marriage he purchased forty acres of improved land, which he farmed until 1858, when he sold and bought 160 acres in this township. In 1861 he enlisted in Company H, Thirty Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and took part in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Resaca, Atlanta, Nashville and others, serving until 1864, when he re-enlisted in the same company and served until the close of the war. Mr. Powell is a charter member of the Rose Hill Post, G. A. R., No. 158, and in politics is a Republican.

GEORGE W. SUTTON is the son of Israel and Susannah (Spaulding) Sutton, and was born in Monroe County, Ohio, October 28, 1844, and at the age of seven was taken to Bartholomew County by his father, who died two years later; George then came to this county, was bound out to a farmer but ran away and enlisted in September, 1861, in Company K, Thirty Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He fought at Frederickstown, Mo., Perryville. Ky., Stone River, Chickamauga and in other battles., but was taken sick and confined in hospital at Bridgeport, and was discharged at Quincy, Ill., in April, 1864, for total disability. He returned home, recovered, and again enlisted February 18. 1865, this time in Company D, Fourth United States Veteran Volunteer Infantry, and served on guard duty at various points until his discharge at Columbus, Ohio, February 19, 1866. November 16 1871, he married Viola, daughter of Robert and Harriet Ross. He has had born to him six children, of whom five are now living, Hattie A., Ida P.. Charles P.. Florence and Edgar Roscoe. In 1872 he purchased his farm on Section 30, this township, and has put it under a fine state of cultivation. He is a charter member of Rose Hill Post, No. 158. G. A. R.. and in politics he is a Republican.

KINESON VANATTA was born in Crooked Creek Township November 6, 1853, and is the son of Isaac and Amanda (Kellar) Vanatta, who came from Ohio to this township in 1835, and were here married. The father died in 1854 and the mother in 1877 August 5. 1875, Kineson Vanatta married Almira Cowger, daughter of William F. and America A. (Ward) Cowger, of this county. To this marriage have been born three children, William I., Charles M. and Levi C. Mr. Vanatta is a general farmer, rears some stock and has a fine farm on Section 18 a portion of it left him by his father and the balance purchased by himself, on which he built, in 1881, as comfortable a one and a half story frame house as there is in the township. Mr. V. and wife are members of the New Light Church.

JOHN VANATTA was born in Jasper County, Ill, October , 1846, and is the son of Aaron and Jane (Ray) Vanatta, whose grandparents were early settlers in Lawrence County, where Aaron and Jane were born. John Vanatta was reared on the home farm, and was educated at the old fashioned pioneer log schoolhouse. April 3, 1872, he married Jane Coad, the daughter of Joseph and Mary A. (Reisner) Coad, and born September 5, 1845. After marriage he settled on his father's farm and became a general farmer and stock dealer. In 1872 he purchased forty acres on Section 24, this township, with money saved by himself and wife; she had been granted a teacher's certificate and began teaching at the age of nineteen, and when she was married had accumulated $1,000; they have now a large farm with a good frame dwelling and outbuildings. There have been born to them three children, Florence, June 5, 1874, died September 2o, 1875; Henry, born February 14, 1877, and Lizzie, December 29, 1881. Mr. V. is a Democrat of liberal views, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. V.'s father died February 21, 1881, and his mother July 4, 1871, members of the Christian Church.

JOSEPH E. VEST was born in Floyd County, Va., March 1, 1841, is the son of Rowland and Delilah Vest, and was taken, when quite an infant, to Ohio by his parents. His mother died shortly after her arrival, and his father moved to Indiana when Joseph was about thirteen. Our subject was educated in Ohio and at Indianapolis, afterward learned shoemaking, worked at the trade until July, 1861, and then enlisted in Company I), Eleventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, was appointed Corporal and took part at Shiloh, Port Gibson, Champion Hills, Vicksburg, Harper's Ferry, Winchester, and at many other points, and was mustered out at Indianapolis in 1864. He then started a boot and shoe store at Staunton, Ind. June 14, 1816, he married Laura Carter, daughter of Colin Carter, and to his union have been born five children, Flora (deceased), Cora, Alice, Louis (deceased) and Audra. He next moved to Brazil, kept a shoe store about ten years, and then came to Rose Hill, established a general store and took charge of a stave factory in the interest of his mother-in-law. This factory, the only one in the township, he subsequently purchased, and now employs about fifteen persons. Mr. Vest is a Mason, a member of the G. A. R.. and in politics is independent.

REV. JOHN T. WARREN, son of John and Tabetha (Vincent) Warren, was born on May 7, 1817, in Madison County, Ky. The father settled in Madison County in 1800. Our subject attended school but little in the primitive schoolhouse, and labored on a farm in his early youth. In 1833, he came to Decatur County, Ind., and on February 2, 1834, he married Mary, daughter of James Arsmith, of Kentucky. She died on May 13, 1834. On September 29, 1836, he married for his second wife, Lucinda, daughter of Pleasant Martin, of Kentucky. Their children are. Pleasant W., Sarah C (deceased), James P., Thomas J., Martha J. (deceased), and John (deceased). While Mr. Warren worked on a farm he studied for the Baptist ministry, and in 1 840 was ordained as a preacher in the Missionary Baptist Church, and assumed charge of the Rock Creek Baptist Church, until in 1850, he came to Crooked Creek Township, and entered 160 acres of land. In the meantime he, with others, organized what is called the Bethany Church, of which he had charge for twenty nine years. After a brief absence, he was re-called, and is now its pastor. On July 4, 1877. his second wife departed this life. On May 29, 1882, he married, for his third wife, Nancy J. Lipscomb (a widow), daughter of Jeremiah Jones. Mr. Warren now has charge of three churches, Bethany, Mount Gilead and Salem. His son, James P. Warren, was born in. Indiana on September 25, 1842, and in 1850, came with the family to Jasper County, Ill. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company D. Ninety Seventh Illinois Infantry, and participated in the battles of Vicksburg, May 18 to July 4, 1862; Jackson, Miss.. July 10 to 20, 1862, Fort Blakely. and others. At the end of three years service he was honorably discharged at Houston, Texas; came home, and went to farming. In October, 1867, he married Mary A., daughter of Robert and Ruth Chapman. Two children, both infants, deceased, were born to them. His wife died on July o, 1869. On August 24, 1870, he was next married to Rebecca, daughter of Elias and Rebecca (Irons) Lefevre. Four children have ;been born to them, viz.: Clementine A., born April 30, 1871; Lucinda, May 16, 1872; John, September 24, 1873, and Cyrus V., May 11, 1880. Our subject has a fine farm of 170 acres. In politics he is a Democrat; has been a Constable and a Highway Commissioner. The family are members of the Baptist Church.

SOLOMON S. WHITE, son of William and Amy (Woods) White, was born in Orange County, Ind., December 28, 1825, and was taken to Coles County in 1830, by his father, who was a farmer. He attended a pioneer subscription school, but was early put to the plow, as his father was in feeble health. He continued to aid in the support of the family until his marriage, December 4,1851, to Mary C Kingery, daughter of John and Sophia (Carter) Kingery, and born in Ohio, November 5, 1832. To this marriage have been born nine children, of whom seven are living, Lillie E., William B., Samuel S., Lucinda G., Virginia B., Leonora O. and Charles W. Mr. White farmed in Coles County until 1843, when he sold his for in and came to this township and bought a place on Section 2. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church, of which, for thirty years, past, he has been a class leader, steward, trustee, etc. In politics he is a Democrat.

REZIN WILKINS, son of Ozian and Matilda (Hines) Wilkins, was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, on December 10, 1829. The father was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, on December 22, 1802, the mother in Pennsylvania, on December 24, 1805, they being married in Guernsey County in 1822. The father was a farmer and stone-mason. Our subject went to school in the pioneer schoolhouse and labored on a farm until he was eighteen years old, when he moved to Indiana, where he worked on a farm for different persons, sometimes at a compensation of only ten cents per day. He saved some money, however, and when twenty one he purchased eighty acres of land. Until he was twenty five years of age he was an engineer in a saw-mill, after which he went to Hancock County, Ind., and worked there in a saw-mill. On June 17, 1855, he married Angeline, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Taylor) Hendricks. Twelve children were born to them, eight of whom are living, viz.: Samuel L., Mary E., William E., Alice M., Emma J., Sarah C., Nettie and Frank. In 1857, he came to Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, Ill., and bought 200 acres in Section 10, of wild land, which he has well improved, and on which he has built a fine house and commodious barn. After an illness of three years, his wife died on August 12, 1883. She was a consistent member of the Christian Church, as is also Mr. Wilkins. In politics he is a Democrat; has been a Township Collector. He is a Master Mason of Hazel Dell Lodge, No. 580.

ISAAC C WORDEN, son of Andrew and Amanda (Timpany) Worden, was born in Connecticut on August 24, 1829.  He went to school till he was nineteen years old, then worked at farming until his marriage, which occurred on December 26, 1852, to Sarah, daughter of David  and  Harriet (Beach) Duryea, of Connecticut. Two children were born to them, viz.: David A. and William C.  In 1856, he moved to Franklin County, Ind., where he engaged  in farming till August 11, 1862, when he enlisted in Company C, Sixty Eighth Indiana Infantry, as First Sergeant. He was captured at the battle of Munfordville, Ky., but  was paroled, and soon after exchanged. He participated in the battles of Hoosier Gap, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Dal ton, Nashville, and others. He was. discharged on June 20, 1865.  Returning home he engaged in farming until 1869, when he traded his farm for eighty six acres of improved land in Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, Ill., where he has been engaged in farming up to the present time. In politics he is an active Republican, and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, he being an elder in the same. He is also a member of the Hazel Dell Masonic Lodge, No. 580.

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