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Jasper County Biographies
from the
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887)
Submitted by Judy Edwards



WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON WHARTON resides on section 24, Smallwood Township, Jasper County. Among the leading farmers of this community, he well deserves mention and he also should be represented among the honored pioneers, for he came here at an early day, and has since borne his part in the upbuilding and development of the county, aiding in its progress and advancement. On the 4th of August, 1822, in Clermont County, Ohio, Mr. Wharton was born as the seventh child and only son in a family of nine children. His parents were Henry and Elizabeth (McWilliams) Wharton. His father was born in Delaware in 1786, and was of English descent.

When a boy, he went to Kentucky with his parents, and the family had to live in log forts to protect themselves from the Indians. Henry remained upon the home farm until after he had attained his majority, when he married Miss McWilliams, who was born in Maryland in 1782. He then worked at the carpenter's trade for a short time, when he emigrated to Clermont County, Ohio. He became a warm personal friend of William Henry Harrison, and at the time of the birth of his son the Tippecanoe hero was lecturing in the town, and our subject was thus named for him. Mr. Wharton had served in the War of 1812 under that illustrious hero. His death occurred in Shelby County, Ind., in 1860, and his wife died in Jasper County, Ill., November 19, 1864, at the ripe old age of eighty-two years. She was of Irish extraction.

Mr. Wharton of this sketch has only two sisters now living. Harriet, widow of John Burns, was born March 30, 1815, and makes her home with our subject; and -Matilda is the wife of Thomas Armstrong, of Indiana. Our subject remained at home in the town of Millroy, Clermont County, Ohio, until eighteen years of age, and aided his father in working at the carpenter's trade. He then went to Rush County, Ind., where an important event in his life occurred. He was married July 27, 1848, to Margaret Miller, a native of Harrison County, Ky., born April 17, 1826.

Mrs. Wharton was the second in a family of five sons and four daughters, whose parents were Aaron and Mary (Ravenscroft) Miller. Her father was born in 1789, in Virginia, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. When a young man he went to Kentucky and from there to the Hoosier State. His death occurred in Rush County, Ind., April 19, 1874. His wife was born in Kentucky in 1801, and died in Rush County, June 13, 1877. Her father served for seven years in the Revolutionary War, and won the rank of Captain. Five children graced the union of Mr. and Mrs. Wharton, but two daughters are now deceased. Minerva is the wife of George Manning, an agriculturist of Jasper County; Mandy is the wife of Andy Conway, a farmer of Howard County, Ind.; and Allie is still with her parents.

Upon Mr. Wharton's marriage, he rented land in Indiana, and engaged in its cultivation until 1853, when he came to Jasper County and purchased the farm on which he has since made his home. In those earlier years, he experienced the difficulties and hardships of pioneer life, for this region was then on the frontier and he was the first to settle on the prairie in this locality. In course of time, however, he was surrounded by neighbors. His wild land he transformed into good farms, and he now owns a valuable tract of fifty acres, located about six miles southwest of Newton. Himself and family are members of the Methodist Church. He cast his first Presidential vote for Clay, and was a Whig until the organization of the Republican party, with which he has since affiliated. He has served as Tax Collector and School Treasurer, and has been an efficient School Director for over fifteen years. A representative farmer, a faithful citizen and a man of sterling worth and strict integrity is William Henry Harrison Wharton.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p 304


FULLER NIGH, Justice of the Peace, loan and collection agent of Newton, Ill., is a pioneer settler of Jasper County, who dates his residence here from February, 1855. He was born in Londonville, then Richland County, but now Ashland County, Ohio, July 6, 1831, and is a son of Lawrence and Nancy (McCarl) Nigh. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, and his mother was born on the Emerald Isle. Both are now deceased. In 1844, they removed with their family to Lawrence County, Ill., where they effected a settlement and spent the remainder of their days.

Our subject was but thirteen years of age when he came to this State. He had attended school in his old home but was too young to have acquired much education prior to his removal Westward. In his new home at that early day he found very limited advantages for instruction, yet he attended the district schools for a short time. His father was a saddler and harness-maker and under his direction the son learned that trade. He did not like it, however, and in consequence never followed it as a vocation. His early manhood was largely spent on a farm. When the California "gold fever" of 1849 broke out, he was desirous of joining the first delegation of emigrants for the gold regions of the West, but was unable to get away until the following year. In the spring of 1850, he set out with a small party across the plains. The party consisted of five men and one woman, the wife of one of the company. They were equipped with twenty-five fine horses and a number of wagons, fully supplied with a good lot of provisions, tools and arms, and in fact well fitted out for the trip. They crossed the Missouri River at St. Joseph, Mo., continued their journey by way of Salt Lake, and after one hundred and seventeen days of travel from St. Joseph, they reached the Sacramento River. They traveled mostly by themselves, avoiding the large caravans for the sake of securing better pasture for their stock. They were never molested by the Indians save on one occasion, when Mr. Nigh was herding the horses at a point some four miles distant from the roads and from where his companions were passing the night. He was alone and unarmed except with a heavy stock whip. While reclining on an elevated spot, watching his sleeping horses, his elbow resting on the ground, his head supported by one hand, he was surprised by the whiz of an Indian arrow, which passed his cheek, and by the stampeding of the horses. In the attempt to stop the horses, he missed seeing the Indian, who made good his escape. By the aid of a companion the horses were all recovered the following day, several miles distant. The attack was made about midnight and probably by a single Indian, as one was shot a short time later by another party of emigrants, while he was trying to stampede their

On reaching the gold fields, Mr. Nigh on account of impaired health was unable to engage in placer mining for he could not work in the water, so engaged in trading and contracting to supply wood for the steamboats on the Sacramento River. He hired the wood cut and hauled to the Yuba River, where, after loading it onto small flatboats, the boats were dropped down the Yuba into the Sacramento, where they were picked up by passing steamers, towed to port and the wood transferred to the steamers for which it was intended. Mr. Nigh secured a claim to sonic three hundred and twenty acres of land in the valley of the Sacramento, half of which was timber and half meadow. It has since become quite valuable and a flourishing village is located on one of the tracts that is named Nighville. The town was given that name from the fact of Mr. Nigh having been the earliest settler there.

After spending four years in California, our subject found his health seriously impaired and was advised by his physicians to take a sea voyage. It occurred to him that he could accomplish this by making a trip home, and he decided to visit his friends, after which he expected to return to California and resume business. He took passage from San Francisco to Panama, crossed the Isthmus on mule back and sailed for New York, in due time reaching his home, where he took his friends by surprise. His parents, being advanced in years, were very much opposed to his returning to California, fearing that they would never see him again if he did. He yielded to their persuasions and remained in Illinois. He had left his business in California in the hands of a supposed friend, but through bad management or dishonesty , _this man caused Mr. Nigh the loss of what would, if cared for, have proved a very valuable property. However, he was quite successful in his business while there and brought back with him a fair return for his venture.

In February, 1855, soon after his return, Mr. Nigh came to Newton, where he was employed as a merchant's clerk for several years. In 1866, he engaged in merchandising in Newton and continued in that line until 1878, when he sold out and embarked in farming, still maintaining his home in this place. Mr. Nigh was married in Newton, October 27, 1857, to Miss Sarah M., daughter of Benjamin Harris, an early settler of Jasper County. She was born in this city and was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. Her death occurred on the 19th of May, 1881. Nine children were born of that marriage: Elizabeth, now the wife of Dr. A. A. Franke; William and Rosa, both deceased; Belle, Joseph, Charles, Edward, Frank and Fred.

In politics. Mr. Nigh is a Democrat. His first official duties were in the capacity of Constable. In 1862 he was elected Sheriff and served a term of two years. He was chosen Supervisor, holding the office eight or nine terms. He also served as a member of the School Board and of the Newton City Council, and for eight years has been Justice of the Peace. He is a Knight-Templar Mason, a member of Newton Lodge No. 216, A.F. & A. M.; Newton Chapter No. 109, R. A. M.; and Gorin Commandery No. 14, K. T.

Mr. Nigh is the owner of three farms in Jasper County, aggregating four hundred acres, together with a good coal mine and rock quarry which are successfully operated. His rock quarry is the best in Jasper County. Our subject was actively identified with the building of the first railroad in this county, then the Grayville & Mattoon Railroad, now a part of the Peoria, Decatur & Evansville. The enterprise had been undertaken by others in an early day, but after issuing bonds and contracting for building the road a deadlock occurred, and the people wanted in vain for nearly twenty years for the promised road. In 1874, Mr. Nigh was appointed one of the two County Commissioners appointed to investigate and secure the completion of the road if possible. A meeting was called at Olney, the old bonds were negotiated for, new contracts were let and the road was built from Parkersburg to Mattoon and afterward extended to Toledo. On its completion to Toledo the company failed and Mr. Nigh was appointed receiver. He succeeded in settling up the affairs of the company, and as contractor built the road from Toledo to Mattoon, a distance of nineteen miles, and held his position as director until the present company, the Peoria, Decatur & Evansville, purchased and secured possession of the road.

While serving as Sheriff of Jasper County, Mr. Nigh proved a very efficient and successful officer and displayed superior ability as a detective, especially in hunting down and capturing horse thieves, until his name became a terror to that class of criminals throughout southern Illinois. Mr. Nigh has now been a resident of Newton for nearly forty years and enjoys an extended acquaintance throughout Jasper and adjoining counties, where he has been known for all these years as an upright and influential business man, whose integrity is beyond question and who has always been true to his friends, fair to all, and ever to be relied upon.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 307


WILLIAM C. MILLS, one of the extensive farmers and stock-raisers of Jasper County, living in Grandville Township, is a prominent and influential citizen, and well deserves representation in this volume. His life record is as follows: He was born in Pitt County, N. C., February 8, 1836, and is a son of Churchill and Holland (Dickson) Mills, who were natives of the same State. Their family numbered ten children: Patsy, Thomas, Mac S., William C., Wyatt J., John H., Henry, Asa, Leonard and Owen. The father of this family was a farmer throughout his entire life. He remained in North Carolina until 1840, when he emigrated to Crawford County, Ill., locating in Palestine. He made the trip with one horse and a cart. His wife had to walk part of the way and carry one of the children in her arms. Mr. Mills pre-empted some land near Palestine, and in the midst of the forest built a log cabin, 16x18 feet, and began the development of a farm, upon which he resided for five years. He then entered and pre-empted three hundred and twenty acres of land in Crawford County, within six miles of Robinson, and there made his home until 1870. In that year he took up his residence in Diola, Ill., upon a farm. Six years later he went to Leon, Tex., where he purchased a five hundred acre tract of land, and thereon lived until called to the home beyond. He died December 19, 1892. The day following would have been his eighty-fourth birthday. In politics he was a Republican, and was a man of sterling worth and highly respected. The mother of our subject died in September, 1865, after which Mr. Mills was again married. His second wife is still living. They had five children: Joseph. Sarah, Albert, Allen and Rhoda M.

We now take up the personal history of our subject, who was about four years old when he came with his parents to Illinois. He was reared in Crawford County, and in the subscription schools of the neighborhood acquired his education. He remained with his father until he had attained his majority, and then started out in life for himself. His father gave him twenty acres of land, and with this as a nucleus he has built up his present fortune. He began working as a farm hand during the summer months and in the winter season chopped wood and split rails. He was thus employed until the breaking out of the war.

In April, 1861, Mr. Mills gallantly responded to the call for troops, and joined the boys in blue of Company I, Twenty-first Illinois Infantry. He was mustered in as a private at Mattoon, and took part in his first active engagement at Fredericktown, Mo. This was followed by the battles of Perryville, Ky., Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, where he was taken prisoner September 20, 1863. He was first put in a stockade at Atlanta, but after a short time was taken to Belle Isle, where he lay for nine days, after which he was sent to Richmond, where he was held as a prisoner for two months. He was then taken to Danville, Va., and incarcerated in a tobacco house during the winter. Later he was sent to Andersonville, where he was held as a captive from April until the following March. He was released in April. 1865, after a prison life of over eighteen months. He then received an honorable discharge from the service. His army career was one of hardship, for those who languished in Southern prisons often had more severe suffering to endure than those who met wounds on the field of battle.

On being mustered out, Mr. Mills returned to his home in Crawford County. On the 17th of January, 1867, he married Miss Rhoda A., daughter of Randall and Caroline (Bargher) Haddock. Unto them were born thirteen children, as follows: Herman H., Mitchell E., Sarah A. C., Letitia M., Victor O., Virgil (deceased), William C., Noah O., Rhoda A., Luke F., Grace E., Mary O. and Goldie L. F.

Mr. Mills has followed farming throughout his entire life. He devoted his energies to the cultivation of his land in Crawford County until 1868, when he purchased a farm near Diana, Cumberland County and there made his home until April, 1876. That year witnessed his arrival in Jasper County. He first purchased three hundred acres of partially improved land on section 7, Granville Township, and engaged in its cultivation until 1881, when he removed to the farm which is still his home. He now owns six hundred acres of good land, and is extensively engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He is a man of excellent business ability, as will be seen by the success that has attended his efforts. Through his enterprise, industry and good management, he has gained a handsome competence, which makes him one of the wealthy citizens of Jasper County.

In his political views, Mr. Mills is a stanch advocate of Republican principles, but has never been an aspirant for official honors, preferring to devote his time and attention to business interests, in which he has met with signal success. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and is a most estimable lady. The family is widely and favorably known in the community. Mr. Mills is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, who manifests a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 310


MARTIN F. COWMAN, who carries on general farming on section 4, Wade Township, in Jasper County, is a native of the Hoosier State. He was born in Putnam County, Ind., May 25, 1856, and is a son of Samuel and Margaret (Westbrook) Cowman. The Cowman family is of German descent and was founded in America by the grandfather of our subject, John Cowman, who became one of the pioneer settlers of Highland County, Ohio. He located in the wilderness and cleared and developed a farm, on which he reared his family. His son Samuel was born in Ohio, and after attaining to mature years married Margaret Westbrook, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Martin Westbrook, who was also born in the Keystone State and became one of the early settlers of Highland County, Ohio. Their marriage was celebrated in Putnam County, Ind., where they located when it was almost a wilderness. They afterward removed to Stark County, where Mr. Cowman engaged in farming for a few years, and then came to Illinois. After a residence in Cumberland County, he returned to Stark County, Ind., and in 1860 he removed to Edgar County, Ill., and from there came to Jasper County in 1865. A few years later he purchased a tract of prairie land and began the development of a farm, upon which our subject now resides. It was then in its primitive condition, but he improved and cultivated it until it became one of the finest farms of this locality. Mr. Cowman continued to engage in agricultural pursuits until his labors of life were ended. He passed away December 31, 1877, respected by all who knew him. His wife died on the 10th of the same month, and they were laid side by side in Brick Cemetery, where a marble slab marks their last resting-place.

Of their family, two sons and two daughters grew to mature years. The eldest, Harriet E., is now the wife of Nathan Thomas, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. Emily Jane is the wife of Ira Scott, of Jewell County, Kan. Martin is the next younger. George M. is a farmer residing in Olney, Richland County.

Our subject spent the first nine years of his life in the State of his nativity, and then came with his parents to Illinois, where he grew to manhood. He received good school privileges, being educated in the common schools and the Newton Select School. He remained at home until after the death of his parents, when he took charge of the home farm and bought out the interest of the other heirs, so that he is now the owner of the old homestead, a valuable and desirable place, which is considered one of the finest farms in the township.

On the 4th of September, 1878, Mr. Cowman was united in marriage with Miss Anna M. Harris, who was born in Adams County, Ohio, September 28, 1849. Her father, G. D. Harris was of English descent, born at Newport, Campbell County, Ky., May 4, 1818. His father, Thomas Harris, served as a soldier in the War of 1812. He married Nancy Ann Wollen, by whom he reared a large family. December 6, 1847, G. D. Harris was joined in marriage with Miss Melinda Baird, a native of Adams County, Ohio, born September 23, 1816, a daughter of Robert and Margaret W. (Davis) Baird, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Mr. Harris was a carpenter and builder by trade. His marriage took place in Adams County, Ohio, after which he returned to Kentucky with his young bride, where they resided until about 1859, when they removed to Ohio, settling in Adams County. They were the parents of four children, only two of whom grew to maturity, Mrs. Cowman, and Mary R., who is the wife of J. W. Morgan, of Henderson, Ky. Mr. Harris died at his home in Ohio, May 25, 1877, and Mrs. Harris' death occurred at the home of her daughter in Jasper County, Ill., July 20, 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Cowman have four children: Edith F., Florence E., Ada M. and Nellie. Mrs. Cowman was for several years a successful teacher, having taught in Kentucky and Ohio before coming to Illinois, and she taught two terms in Jasper County after her arrival here in 1877. The Cowman household is the abode of hospitality and the parents are well-known people of this community, highly esteemed for their sterling worth.

Mr. Cowman has spent nearly his entire life in Jasper County and has witnessed much of its growth and development. He is a faithful citizen and takes a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community and its upbuilding. In politics he is a stanch Republican, warmly advocating the principles of that party, and has supported each of its Presidential nominees since casting his first vote for Gen. James A. Gar
field.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 321


JACOB WEAVER is engaged in general farming and stock-raising on section 17, Fox Township, Jasper County, and has resided upon his present farm for the past twenty years. He was born on the 9th of February, 1839, in Ohio County, Ind., and is a son of Abraham and Catherine (Gibson) Weaver. His father was a native of Ohio, and comes of an old German family. Throughout his entire life he was engaged in agricultural pursuits. With his wife and children he came to Illinois in 1852, and took up his residence in Jasper County. He is still living in Smallwood Township. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Weaver were born nine children, as follows: George, James, Jacob, Sarah, John, Margaret, William, Abraham and Catherine.

Jacob Weaver was a lad of about thirteen years when the family came to Illinois. He bore all the experiences of frontier life, and was early inured to the hard labors of the farm. He was a young man when the late war broke out. He had watched with interest the progress of events prior to the struggle, and in June, 1861, he offered his services to his country, enlisting in Company K, Twenty-first Illinois Infantry. After being mustered in at Springfield, he at once went to the South and participated in the battles of Fredericktown, Crab Orchard, Stone River and Corinth. He was wounded December 30, 1862, in the battle of Stone River, receiving a buckshot wound in the knee and also in the left arm. He did not recover from these injuries for some time, and on account of the disability thus occasioned he was honorably discharged in May, 1863.

On account of his wounds Mr. Weaver was forced to remain at home two years after his return from the South, but as soon as possible he began business for himself, and was employed in a flouring-mill in Mason, Ill., until 1869, when with the capital he had secured by his industry and enterprise he purchased a sawmill. This he operated until 1873, when he sold out and began farming.

Mr. Weaver was married April 15, 1869, the lady of his choice being Miss Jennie, daughter of Christopher and Catherine (Wolf) Rexroad. The lady was born in this State December 22, 1844. Ten children were born of their union, namely: Nova D., who died July 28, 1888; Cortland, who died September 2, 1873; Curtis S., born December 6, 1 873; Katie B., born September 22, 1875; Claude, born December 12, 1877; Gertrude, who died August 22, 1880; Maude D., born April 3, 1882; Eugene, born August 25, 1884; and Leo and Leona, twins, born July 30, 1888.

Mr. Weaver has led a quiet and unassuming life, devoting himself to his business interests, yet the community finds in him a valued citizen and one highly respected for his sterling worth and many excellencies of character. Socially, he is connected with the Grand Army of the Republic, and he belongs to the Society of Friends. In politics he is a supporter of Republican principles.


HON. ISAAC M. SHUP, an honored veteran of the late war and an ex-member of the Illinois Legislature, is a native of the Buckeye State. He was born in Highland County, September 6, 1837, and is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Harvey) Shup. His parents were born in Greene County, Pa. The father's birth occurred in 1787, and he died in Ohio September 11, 1839, at the age of fifty-two years. In 1849 Mrs. Shup removed to Hancock County, Ind., will) her children, and resided in that State until 1853, when she brought her family to Jasper County, Ill., and here spent the remainder of her days. She died September 12, 1858.

Isaac M. Shup accompanied his mother on her removal to this county, and in the usual manner of farmer lads spent his boyhood days, at work upon the farm and in attendance at the district school, where he acquired his education. On reaching manhood, he engaged in farming for himself until the breaking out of the late war. Prompt by patriotic impulses, and anxious to strike a blow for the preservation of the Union, he was among the first to enlist. On the 11th of May, 1861, he became a member of Company K, of the famous Twenty-first Illinois Infantry, which was commanded by Col. U. S. Grant, when that famous warrior first entered the service in which he was destined to win such great glory and distinction and to render his country such valuable service.

Mr. Shup was promoted to be First Sergeant, and subsequently was unanimously elected by his company to a First Lieutenancy, but being disabled and forced to lie in the hospital until the close of the war, he was never commissioned. Sergt. Shup took part in the following battles and in numerous minor engagements: Fredericktown (Mo.), the siege of Corinth, and the battle of Stone River, where he received a gunshot wound in the left leg. He was previously in the hard-fought battle of Perryville (Ky.), and later at Chickamauga. His regiment was in the Fourth Army Corps, in the siege and capture of Atlanta, Ga., involving numerous battles, and also took part in the battles of Lovejoy, Jonesboro, Spring Hill, and the battle of Franklin (Tenn.). At the battle of Nashville, Tenn., on the 15th of December, 1864, he was seriously wounded by a gunshot in the left arm above the elbow, which tore away the muscles and flesh from the arm, permanently disabling it. He was carried from the field and was in the hospital under treatment until discharged, August 31, 1865, nearly four months after the war ended. Although discharged from the service, his wound was not fully healed for two years after it was received. His discharge was received at Camp Butler, in Springfield, Ill.

On the 5th of October, 1867, Mr. Shup was united in marriage in Newton, Ill., with Miss Annie, daughter of John and Mary (Barrett) Brooks. She was born in Hancock County, Ind., and came to Jasper County in childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Shup became the parents of six children, but only three are now living. John E., the eldest, died in infancy; Clarence L., at the age of nine years; and Harry E., aged eight years. The younger and surviving children are Gertrude L., May and Carl B.

In politics, Mr. Shup is a Democrat and has held various public offices. In July, 1867, he was appointed by President Johnson as Postmaster of Newton, and served until January 1, 1870. The following spring he was elected Justice of the Peace and filled that office until December, 1884, when he resigned to take his seat as a member of the Thirty-fourth General Assembly of Illinois, to which he had been elected the preceding fall. He served one term and was appointed to membership on some important committees. He has served five years as Alderman in the Common Council of Newton, and in the spring of 1893 was chosen Justice of the Peace once more.

Mr. and Mrs. Shup are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which Mr. Shup has been Steward and Trustee for eight years. He is a Royal Arch Mason, holding membership with Newton Lodge No. 216, A. F. & A. M., and Newton Chapter No. 109, R. A. M. He is also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and of Newton Camp No. 479, M. W. A. About 1879, Mr. Shup, in company with his nephew, Frank L. Shup, purchased the Newton Press, with which he was connected for about three years, when he withdrew. The paper is now owned and conducted by Frank L. Shup. The subject of this sketch is one of the well-known old settlers of Jasper County. He was a brave soldier, whose crippled arm bears testimony to his gallant conduct on the field of battle. As a public officer he has always been found capable and faithful to duty, and as a citizen upright, patriotic and reliable.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 325


J. E. O. CLARKE, editor and proprietor of the Newton Mentor, and Postmaster of Newton, was born near New Harmony, Posey County, Ind., December 17, 1848, and is a son of J. E. and Angelina Harrison (Tillitt) Clarke. His father was a native of Maine, and his mother of Kentucky. With their family they emigrated to Illinois in 1858, locating in Grayville, White County, where the mother still resides. The father died at that place in 1867.

The subject of this sketch began his school life in his native county, but his opportunities were quite limited. He was a lad of ten years when his parents removed to Illinois. His father was a newspaper man and published the Grayville Idependent, which paper is still in existence, being now published by a brother and nephew of our subject. At the age of eleven years J. K. O. Clarke began learning the printer's trade in his father's office, where he was employed until he had attained his majority. Here he was largely educated, gaining a practical and useful knowledge. When he had arrived at man's estate he went to Evansville, Ind., and was employed in the office of the Evansville Daily Journal for seven years, or until his father's death, when he returned to Grayville. During the twelve succeeding years he was in partnership with his brother in the publication of the Independent. On the expiration of that period he went to Kansas, and for a time was employed in the line of his trade in Newton, of that State, on the Newton Kansan. In February, 1888, he arrived in Newton, Ill., and purchased the office and business of the Newton Mentor, which he has since conducted with marked success.

Mr. Clarke was married in Evansville, Ind., in February, 1872, the lady of his choice being Miss Mary S. Price, who was born in Estill County, Ky., a daughter of Morton M. and Fanny Price. Their union was blessed with a family of four children, a son and three daughters, namely: Mabel, Helen, Ernest M. and Fanny A. Mrs. Clarke was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a most estimable lady. Her death occurred May 2, 1888, and was mourned by a large circle of friends.

In politics Mr. Clarke is a radical Republican. He cast his first vote for Gen. Grant at his second election and has since been a stalwart advocate of Republican principles, doing all in his power for the promotion of his party's interests. On the 30th of January, 1890, Mr. Clarke was appointed Postmaster of Newton, which position he holds at this writing. He is a member of Newton Lodge No. 161, I. O. O. F., and of Opal Encampment No. 109, of that order. He has represented his lodge and encampment in the grand bodies of that fraternity, and has been an active and influential member for many years.

The Newton Mentor, of which Mr. Clarke is editor and proprietor, was founded in the fall of 1882 by Charles M. Davis, who issued the first number of that paper on the 3d of November. In 1888 Mr. Clarke became proprietor, and has since conducted it with marked success. The paper is a five-column quarto, one side of which is auxiliary print. It is neatly printed, ably edited and is reliably Republican on the political questions of the day. In fact, it is a wide-awake Republican journal and the only one published in the interests of that party in Jasper County. The office of the Mentor is well appointed and our subject enjoys a liberal patronage in the line of job work. As a Postmaster, Mr. Clarke is very efficient and popular, and by his fellow-citizens he is held in high esteem.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 326


HENRY G. ROBINSON, who owns and operates one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 12, Granville Township, has the honor of being a native of this State. He was born near Lawrenceville, in Lawrence County, his birth occurring April 30, 1824. His parents, John and Sophia (Cable) Robinson, were both natives of Kentucky. About 1820, they left their native State, and making the journey by team removed to Lawrence County, Ill., where Mr. Robinson entered land from the Government and began farming. He there lived until his death, which occurred in 1862. His wife passed away several years previous, dying in 1844. They had a family of fourteen children: Mary A., Samuel J., Jeremiah, George K., William, Catherine, Sophia, Henry G., Cauthorn, John T. Richard H., Nancy, Marion, and one who died in infancy.

In the usual manner of farmer lads, Henry Robinson spent the days of his boyhood and youth. He acquired his education in a subscription school, which was held in a log schoolhouse, and is familiar with all the experiences and trials of frontier life. To his father he gave the benefit of his services until twenty years of age, when, wishing to earn his own livelihood, he began working on a farm for $8 per month. In that manner he was employed until the spring when he attained his majority. He then went to Galena, Ill., where he was employed during the summer months in the lead mines and engaged in chopping wood during the winter season.

Mr. Robinson spent his time in that manner until 1847, when he enlisted as a private in Company I, First Regiment United States Infantry, for the Mexican War. He was stationed at the fort in Vera Cruz for eight months, and then went to the city of Mexico, where he was stationed for about three weeks under Gen. Scott. After four years spent in Cuanavaca, he returned to the city of Mexico, where he was detailed to act as city police, which office he held for four months. On the expiration of that period he started on the march for Vera Cruz, but while on the way received a sunstroke. With his regiment he then went to New Orleans and then to Pensacola Bay, Fla., where he was discharged July 20, 1848.

On returning to his old home, Mr. Robinson again engaged in farming near Lawrenceville until the spring of 1849, when he came to Jasper County, and located a land warrant that secured him the farm upon which he now resides. It comprises one hundred and sixty acres of land, which are under a high state of cultivation and well improved. It has now been his home continuously since 1849, with the exception of the years of 1859 and 1860, which he spent at Pike's Peak, Colo. On the 6th of September, 1850, Mr. Robinson was united in marriage with Miss Amelia Leach, and four children graced their union: James W., John P. , Annie M. and Austin. The mother of this family died in 1860, and the following year Mr. Robinson wedded Miss Cornelia Thorn. They have seven children, as follows: Lizzie R., Henry C., Mary J., Charles H., Ida, George L. and Armilda.

Mr. Robinson has led a busy life, yet has found time to devote to public interests and has frequently been called by his fellow-townsmen to public offices of honor and trust. He has filled the positions of Justice of the Peace, Constable, Township Collector and School Director, and has ever discharged his duties with promptness and fidelity. In politics, he is a supporter of the Democracy, and religiously is a member of the Christian Church. For forty-three years he has made his home in Jasper County, and well deserves to be ranked among its honored pioneers.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 329

STACY B. YOUNGMAN, M. D., who is successfully engaged in the practice of the medical profession in West Liberty, claims Kentucky as the State of his nativity, his birth having occurred in Mason County, August 24, 1813. The family is of English extraction, and the father of our subject, Jesse Youngman, was a native of West Virginia. He married Amy Dicks, and unto them were born seven children: George, who died in 1868; the Doctor; Sallie, who died when a small girl; Rebecca, who died in 1874; Elizabeth, wife of Allen G. Parris, a boot and shoe maker of Indiana; Serelda, wife of Ephraim Adams, of Fillmore, Hid.; and Samantha, twin sister of Serelda, who became the wife of Stephen Wood, and is now deceased. Throughout nearly his entire life, the father of this family engaged in school teaching. He died at the age of seventy years, and his wife passed away when sixty-eight years of age.

We now take up the personal history of Dr. Youngman, who spent the days of his boyhood and youth upon a farm. His primary education was acquired in the district schools and supplemented by private study and reading. Under the parental roof he remained until twenty-one years of age, but he did not wish to follow farming. His taste led him to enter the medical profession. He had studied medicine under the preceptorship of Drs. H. E. and T. W. Cowgill, at Greencastle, Ind., and in 1852 entered the Louisville (Ky.) Medical College. On completing his course he returned to his home in Greencastle, Ind., and then went to Cloverdale, that State, where he engaged in practice until 1859. His next field of labor was in Greencastle, and later he went to New Lebanon, Ind., where he remained until June, 1861. At that time he came to Jasper County, Ill., and purchased a small farm in what is now Fox Township, but immediately entered upon the practice of his profession. He there remained until 1880, when he came to West Liberty and opened a drug store, which he now carries on.

The lady who bears the name of Mrs. Youngman was in her maidenhood Miss Lurana B. Mark. Their union was celebrated November 18, 1834. and unto them have been born eleven children: Eliza J., George C., James T., Harriet E.. John M., Josephine C., Mary A., Lurana F., Emma D., Eddie M. and Elmer. The family is widely and favorably known in this community, and its members rank high in social circles.

Since his boyhood Dr. Youngman has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and his life has been in harmony with his professions, winning him the confidence and regard of all with whom business or pleasure has brought him in contact. Socially he is connected with the Masonic fraternity. He cast his first Presidential vote for Gen. W. H. Harrison, and since the organization of the Republican party has been one of its stanch supporters. While in Indiana, he held the office of Magistrate. He has served as Notary Public for four years, and as Deputy Postmaster for a year and a-half. He is doing a good business in West Liberty, and is one of the respected citizens of the community, honored by all who know him.


SYLVANUS S. FARLEY, who is numbered among the early settlers of Jasper County, and is now engaged in general farming on section 6, Granville Township, was born on the old Farley homestead in that township, January 27, 1853, and has spent his entire life in this locality. He is a son of Forrest and Sarah J. Farley, pioneers of Jasper County, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. The days of his boyhood and youth were passed in the usual manner of farmer lads. As soon as he could handle a plow he began work in the fields, and in the summer months devoted his energies to farm labors. In the winter season he attended the district schools and therein acquired a fair business education. He remained at home with his parents until after he had attained his majority.

On the 1st of October, 1873, Mr. Farley was united in marriage with Miss Sarah J. Virtue, who died on the 20th of August, 1875. On the 8th of March, 1877, he was again married, his second union being with Miss Isabel, daughter of David and Amanda Clark. Five children were born of this union, but one died in infancy. The four who are still living are: Eva, Jason, Orville and Leveta. They are still under the parental roof.

On starting out in life for himself, Mr. Farley embarked in the pursuit to which he had been reared. For the first year he rented a farm, but on the expiration of a twelvemonth with the capital he had acquired through his own labors, he purchased eighty acres of land on section 6, Granville Township. This was in the fall of 1874, and since that time it has been his home. The boundaries of his farm, however, he has extended until it now comprises one hundred and sixty acres of good land, which yields to him a golden tribute in return for his care and cultivation. His farm is a valuable one and well improved. In connection with general farming he carries on stock-raising.

In his political affiliations, Mr. Farley is a Republican. He takes quite an active interest in political affairs and is a stanch advocate of the principles of the party, which he has supported since becoming a voter. He has served his township as Road Commissioner, but has never been an office seeker. Socially, he is a member of the Sons of Veterans, and holds membership with the United Brethren Church. He always gives his support to all public enterprises calculated to prove of general benefit, and is regarded as one of the leading citizens of the community in which he has spent his entire life.

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FORREST FARLEY, who owns a fine farm of two hundred and thirty -three acres on sections 29 and 31, Granville Township, Jasper County, is one of the self-made men of this community, who by his own efforts has gained a handsome competency, and deserves to be ranked among the substantial citizens of this locality. His career of industry and enterprise is one worthy of emulation. He was born in Virginia, August 24, 1827, and is a son of John J. Farley. His father was a native of Kentucky, and was of English extraction. After attaining his majority, he married Rebecca McClancy, a lady of Scotch-Irish descent. They became the parents of six children: Lucinda, who died in 1860; James M., who is living in Cass County, Ind., where he practices medicine; Mary A., wife of James Fears, a farmer of Coles County, Ill.; Forrest, of this sketch; Jacob, who owns a harness shop in Terre Haute, Ind.; and Nancy A., who died in 1832. John J. Farley removed from his home in Virginia to Kentucky and died in that State in 1830. He was a millwright and carpenter by trade. About 1831, after the death of her husband, Mrs. Farley came with her family to Illinois, locating near Grand View, Edgar County. She was a member of the Methodist Church, and was called to the home prepared for the righteous in 1877.

Our subject was about four years of age when with his mother he came to Illinois. Upon the home farm his boyhood days were passed, and in the common schools he acquired his education. He remained with his mother until nineteen years of age, when he began working as a farm hand, receiving the munificent sum of $6 per month in compensation for his services. The year 1847 witnessed his arrival in Jasper County, and saw him located in Granville Township, where he entered eighty acres of Government land on section 29. The succeeding three years of his life were spent in developing and improving that farm, when he purchased the farm which has since been his home. Only a few acres had been broken and a small log cabin constituted the entire improvements upon the place. He first bought only eighty acres, but as his financial resources have increased, he has extended the boundaries of his farm from time to time, until now two hundred and thirty-three acres of highly improved land pay to him a golden tribute in return for his care and cultivation. He also successfully carries on stock-raising to a considerable extent.

In 1851, Mr. Farley was united in marriage with Miss Sarah J. demons, daughter of Warden and Rachel Clemons. Unto them were born fourteen children, as follows: Sylvanus S., William S. (deceased), Isadora F., Virginia A. (deceased), Cynthia J., John C., Jacob (deceased), Marietta, Minnie M., Thomas A., James D. (deceased), Noah M., Orrilla and Leona, both deceased.

Mr. Farley manifested his loyalty to the Government during the late war by offering his services as a soldier in 1862, and becoming a member of Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-third Infantry. He was mustered in at Mattoon, Ill., and took part in many battles, including the engagements at Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga and Farmington. He served until June 18, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. He was in the hospital at Jeffersonville, Ind., but with the exception of the period spent there, he was never off duty, but was always found at his post. He enlisted as a private, but soon afterwards was made Corporal.

The fidelity with which Mr. Farley served as a soldier has characterized his entire career; he is true to every trust reposed in him, and in consequence has the confidence and esteem of the entire community. In politics he has been a Republican since the organization of the party. He has served his township as Road Commissioner and School Trustee, and has been School Director for the long period of twenty years. For forty-four years he has been a member of the Methodist Church, and is a faithful worker in the Master's vineyard. A life well and worthily spent is that which Forrest Farley has led.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 338

RICHARD H. VANDERHOOF is a well-known business man of Newton, who has spent his entire life in this county. With his brother, G. V., he forms the firm of G. V. & R. H. Vanderhoof, dealers in agricultural implements of Newton, Ill. He is also a grower of and dealer in Vanderhoof's Ivory Dent Corn for seed, and a breeder of pure-blooded Poland-China hogs. His business relations have brought him in contact with many, and by his wide circle of acquaintances he is held in high esteem as a man of sterling worth and strict integrity.

Mr. Vanderhoof was born in St. Marie, Jasper County, August 13. 1846, and is a son of Henry and Mary Vanderhoof, who were among the earliest settlers of this county. A sketch of the father is given elsewhere in this work. Our subject was reared on a farm and was educated in the public schools of his native county. In the spring of 1864, he, however, left the farm and went to the aid of his country, enlisting for the late war in Company I, One Hundred and Forty-third Illinois Infantry, among the three-months men. He served, however, for live months, and on being discharged on the expiration of that period he reenlisted in February, 1865, as a member of Company B, Fifty-fifth Regiment, Illinois Infantry. He was appointed Corporal and served until September, 1865, when he was mustered out.

On his return from the army, Mr. Vanderhoof engaged in farming and school teaching, being employed on a farm in the summer and in the school in the winter. On the 24th of December, 1870, he was united in marriage in Newton with Miss Eliza Adams, a native of Illinois, and a daughter of William Adams. Three children, all sons, graced their union: Edwin H., Fuller E. and Gustin, but the last-named died in infancy. The mother of this family died in May, 1876, and on the 22d of October following, Mr. Vanderhoof was again married, near Newton, his second union being with Miss Elizabeth Beach. She was born in Washington County, Ohio, and is a daughter of Asa Beach.

The subject of this sketch has won an enviable reputation as the originator of the famous Vanderhoof Ivory Dent Corn, which has gained the first premium at county fairs for fifteen years, and the first premium and sweepstakes at the Illinois State Fair in 1889, in competition with fifteen entries in the class and seventeen in sweepstakes. He entered his corn at the World's Fair in Paris in 1889, and won the grand prize for the same in competition with sixty-seven exhibitors. He grows seed corn of this variety and supplies the market over a wide range of country. He is also extensively engaged in breeding pure-blooded Poland-China pigs for stock purposes, having nothing but registered stock of the finest kind. Mr. Vanderhoof has a fine farm of forty acres, and ninety acres in Wade Township, which are operated under his personal management. Another business interest which occupies his attention is his store in Newton. In the spring of 1892 he formed a partnership with his brother, G. V., and since that time they have dealt in farm implements.

Mr. Vanderhoof is a member of the Farmers' Mutual Benefit Association, and is a stockholder of the Jasper County Joint Stock Company, of which he is Secretary; he is also a member of the Newton County Fire and Lightning Insurance Company, which was organized in 1890. He has been Secretary of that company since its organization. In politics, he is a Republican, and in his religious views is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His wife holds membership with the old school Presbyterian Church.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 342

CAPT. SAMUEL JARRETT, who carries on general farming on section 31, Granville Township, is an honored veteran of the late war and his army record is one of which he may well be proud. He was an able and valiant defender of the old Stars and Stripes, which now float so proudly over the united Nation, and as one of the brave boys in blue we gladly give him a place in this history.

Capt. Jarrett was born in Meade County, Ky. March 1, 1837. His father, Wilson Jarrett, was a native of Virginia, and married Catherine Dowell. They became parents of ten children, of whom Betsy, Molly, William H., Francis and Emily are now deceased. Those living are Samuel; John, a veteran of the late war and a United States claim agent, living in Kentucky; Junius, who also was a soldier; Louisa, wife of Elias Smith, a general merchant of Kentucky; and James, who is engaged in hotel-keeping in that State. There were five brothers in the Jarrett family and four of the number aided in the struggle to preserve the Union. The father engaged in merchandising during the greater part of his life. He died August 29, 1881, and his wife's death occurred in 1862.

Capt. Jarrett lived upon the farm until his seventeenth year, and then removed to Stephensport, Ky., where he began working at the carpenter's trade, which he followed in connection with boatbuilding until the breaking out of the Rebellion in 1861. He enlisted as a private in Company K, Third Kentucky Cavalry, and was mustered into service in Calhoun, Ky. He remained with that regiment for about two years, and then raised a company for the Forty-eighth Kentucky Mounted Infantry, which was mustered in as Company K, and of which he was commissioned Captain. The next day he took part in his first engagement. He led his troops in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Stone River and Hopkinsville, and many more engagements of lesser importance. He carries three scars as the result of a buckshot wound. In 1865, he was detailed with two companies under his command to fight the bushwhackers, and encountered in several engagements the troops of Taylor, Wheeler and Forrest. While stationed at Bowling Green, Ky., he received his discharge, December 17, 1865.

When the country no longer needed his services, Capt. Jarrett returned home, but as soon as he could make arrangements to do so, he brought his family to Jasper County, Ill., and located on the farm in Granville Township which is yet his home. It was then an unimproved tract of one hundred and sixty acres, only a very small portion having been placed under the plow, while the log cabin constituted the only building. With characteristic energy, he began its development and soon the wild tract was transformed into rich and fertile fields. In connection with general farming, he is now engaged in stock-raising and makes a specialty of the breeding of Percheron horses. He has been quite successful in this line of business and has some fine stock upon his farm.

The Captain has been twice married. On the 8th of July, 1862, he wedded Martha, daughter of Joseph Grant, and unto them were born three children, Georgia L., Edith and Maggie. The mother died September 7, 1872, and Mr. Jarrett was again married, December 2, 1875, his second union being with Miss Caroline Watt, daughter of Fideller and Henrietta (Capps) Watt, natives of Warren County, Ky. Of the five children born of their union, the eldest died in infancy, and Finley H. and Maud are also deceased. Clyde and Nellie are still at home.

Capt. Jarrett and his wife are both members of the Methodist Church. Socially, he is connected with the Odd Fellows' lodge and the Grand Army post, and in politics he is a stalwart advocate of the Republican party, but has never been an office seeker, preferring to devote his energies to his business interests, in which he has met with good success. His possessions have all been acquired through his own efforts, and he may truly be called a self-made man. With the same fidelity with which he served his country in her hour of need, he discharges his duties of citizenship, and is therefore an important factor in this community.

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JOSEPH LITZELMANN is the proprietor of the American House, of Newton, Jasper County, and is one of the most prominent and influential citizens of this community.

He has ever borne his part in promoting the best interests of this his native county, and wherever he is known he is held in high regard as a man of sterling worth. He well deserves representation in this volume. His birth occurred at St. Marie, on the 28th of March, 1849. His parents, Joseph and Barbara (Ostheimer) Litzelmann, are numbered among the pioneer settlers of Jasper County and are represented elsewhere in this volume.

Our subject came with his parents to Newton in 1855, when but five years of age, acquiring his education in the schools of this place, and when old enough to be of service he aided his father, who was then landlord of the American House. No event of special importance occurred during his boyhood, but after attaining to years of maturity he was married on the 28th of November, 1871, to Miss Sarah Frances Thompson. Their union was celebrated in this place. The lady was born in Macon County, Mo., and is a daughter of John Thompson. She came to Newton, however, from Brownsville, Tenn. By the union of our subject and his wife were born ten children, of whom seven are now living, the other three having died in infancy. Those who still survive are St. Clair, Charleane, Nellie, Helene, Joseph, Harry and Maurice.

Mr. Litzelmann was reared as a Catholic and is now a member of St. Thomas Church. By his ballot he supports the Democratic party and warmly advocates its principles. A number of public offices have been filled by him with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. He has served as School Director for ten years, as Alderman for eight years, and is now serving his second term as Mayor of Newton. In April, 1889, he was first elected to that office for a term of two years, and with such promptness did he discharge his duties that ho was re-elected in April, 1891, With such a man as Mr. Litzelmann at the bead, the interests of Newton will never suffer. He displayed his loyalty to the country during the late war by enlisting on the 4th of May, 1864, as a member of Company I, One Hundred and Forty-third Illinois Infantry, for the one hundred days' service. He served in the Western Army for five months and was on duty in Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas, guarding bridges and doing garrison duty. He received his discharge in Mattoon, Ill., in 1864.

Mr. Litzelmann inherited the American House and succeeded his father as its proprietor. Since coming into possession of the same he has enlarged and improved it and has made it the best hotel in Jasper County. It contains sleeping rooms and sample rooms, and is a most convenient and comfortable hotel, being conducted successfully and to the satisfaction of the traveling public. Our subject is a thorough business man and has accumulated a valuable property. Besides his hotel he is the owner of six business houses on the square, three brick structures on the east side and three wooden buildings on the north side. All are leased and are producing good interest on the investment. He also owns one hundred and eighty-one acres of land in Jasper County, ninety -six acres of which are located in Willow Hill Township and the remainder in Newton Township. Mr. Litzelmann is recognized as one of the wealthiest and most influential citizens of Newton and is highly respected. His entire life has been passed in this county, and it has been one of such uprightness that he has gained universal confidence.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 345


GEORGE VALENTINE VANDERHOOF, a member of the firm of G. V. & R. H. Vanderhoof, dealers in agricultural implements of Newton, Ill., is a native of this city, his birth having occurred February 14, 1840. With the exception of a few years spent in the military service of his country in the late war for the Union, he has always made Newton his home. The common schools afforded him his educational privileges, and he remained upon the home farm until he had almost attained his majority, when he began learning the blacksmith's trade. In the summer of 1861, he quit the forge, and on the 12th of August of that year offered his services to the Government and joined the boys in blue. He became a member of the Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, was assigned to Company K, and with his regiment joined the Army of the Cumberland. He was in active service in the hottest of the struggle and took part in more than sixty different engagements and battles. Among the most important may be named the battles of Fredericktown (Mo.), Corinth and Iuka (Miss.) Stone River, Tullahoma, Hoover's Gap, Liberty Gap and Chickamauga (Tenn.), Resaca, Marietta, Peach Tree Creek, the siege of Atlanta and Lovejoy, Ga., and the capture of Nashville, Tenn., when that city was defended by the Confederate general, Hood. He sustained a serious injury at Chickamauga on the 19th of September, 1863, being run over in a charge of rebel cavalry. His injury resulted in a permanent lameness of the left leg. However, he continued in the service and was promoted to the rank of First Sergeant. He veteranized on the 29th of February, 1864, and was retained in the service until March 20, 1866, nearly a year after the cessation of hostilities.

On his return from the army, Mr. Vanderhoof resumed the trade of blacksmithing in Newton, where he continued to make his home until 1879. He then embarked in the farm-implement business, and followed that line of trade until 1886, when he received an appointment as keeper of the penitentiary located in Chester, Ill. This position he filled creditably until the spring of 1892, when he returned to Newton and formed the existing business with his brother, R. H.

On the 1st of October, 1869, Mr. Vanderhoof was united in marriage in Wade Township, Jasper County, with Miss Nannie Thomas, a daughter of Elihu Thomas, and a native of Richmond, Ind. She came to Jasper County with her parents in childhood. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Vanderhoof, a son and a daughter, but both died in infancy.

In politics, our subject is a Republican, having supported that party since he attained his majority. Socially, he is a member of Jacob E. Reed Post No. 550, G. A. R,; and Newton Lodge No. 123, A. O. U. W. During the late war, he displayed his loyalty to the country by inarching to the front. He is alike true to every duty of citizenship, and the community finds in him one of its valued and representative members.

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WILLIAM H. PARRENT is engaged in farming on section 19, Wade Township, Jasper County, where he owns and operates a good farm of eighty acres, pleasantly situated about four miles northeast of Newton. The Parrent family has long been identified with the history of this community, for they located here more than, half a century ago. Our subject is a native of Indiana, born near La Fayette, Tippecanoe County, May 22, 1836. His father, David Parrent, was born in Illinois, but was reared in Indiana, and there married Emily, daughter of Samuel Parker, and a native of Kentucky. It was in 1840 that Mr. Parrent came with his family to Jasper County, and made a settlement in Wade Township. He entered land from the Government and at once began the work of transforming the raw prairie into rich and fertile fields. This task was at length accomplished, and upon the farm which he there developed he spent the remainder of his life, dying in September, 1858. His wife survived him for a few years, her death occurring February 18, 1870.

Of the seven children of the Parrent family, Maria, the eldest, is the wife of John Flint, of Lawrence County, Ohio; James R. resides in Missouri; William H. is the next younger; Margaret Ann is now deceased; John is a farmer of Jasper County; George is deceased; and Mrs. Emily J. Hastings completes the family.

Our subject was a lad of four years when he came with the family to Jasper County. No event of special importance occurred during his boyhood and youth, which were quietly passed upon the home farm. As soon as old enough he began working in the fields, and after his father's death he took charge of the homestead for his mother. After operating it for a few years, he purchased eighty acres of raw land, the same upon which he now resides, and began the development of a farm. It was unfenced and unbroken land, but he plowed and planted it, set out a good orchard, built fences, erected a substantial residence and has made other valuable and desirable improvements.

On the 1st of January, 1865, in Jasper County, Mr. Parrent married Miss Barbara, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Bowers. By their union they have had a family of seven children, namely: Mahala, Isabel, William H. and Willis E. (twins), James H., Barbara J. and Martha E. The family is one well known in the community, and its members rank high in social circles.

Mr. Parrent has spent almost his entire life in Jasper County, and has been an eye-witness of its growth and progress. He has also largely aided in its development and upbuilding, and has ever faithfully performed his duties of citizenship. In politics he is a stanch Republican and warmly advocates the principles of that party, although he has never sought or desired the honors or emoluments of public office. Mr. Parrent may truly be called a self-made man, for his success in life is due entirely to his own well-directed efforts. His enterprise and industry have stood him instead of capital, and he has steadily worked his way upward.

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DANIEL P. SMITH, of Newton, is a well-known early settler of Jasper County. He dates his permanent residence in the county from 1850. though he at first arrived within its borders in the fall of 1849, and prepared the way for the settlement which he made the following spring. Mr. Smith was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, in the year 1822, and is of German descent. His father, David Smith, was born in Germany, and emigrating to America became one of the pioneers of Muskingum County. His death occurred during the childhood of Daniel P. , so that our subject has no remembrance of his father. The maiden name of the wife and mother was Nancy Lynch. She was a native of Pennsylvania, and survived her husband many years, but is now deceased. This worthy couple had a family of eight children who grew to manhood and womanhood, and five of that number, three brothers and two sisters, are still living at this writing, in the spring of 1893. Only the subject of this sketch and his brother, Dr. Lewis W. Smith, ever became permanent residents of Illinois. The third surviving brother, George, resides in Brazil, Ind.

Being deprived of a father's care early in life, Daniel Smith was thrown upon his own resources at an early age and forced to earn his own livelihood. When a youth of fifteen summers, he went to Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., where he served an apprenticeship to the trade of a tailor. He worked at the business of tailoring for about five years, when, his health having become impaired, he relinquished that pursuit and turned his attention to farming, which he followed near Terre Haute.

Mr. Smith was married in that State to Miss Mary Isabel Eagleton. Soon afterwards he came to Jasper County, Ill., and settled upon a farm in Grove Township. He obtained his land from the Government, and upon the farm made his home for thirty-five years. When he came into possession of it it was in a wild and unimproved state, but he immediately began its development and had it under a high state of cultivation, so that the rich and fertile fields yielded to him a golden tribute. On the 28th of August, 1887, Mr. Smith was bereft of his wife by death. She was born in Terre Haute, Ind., in 1833, and was a daughter of Alexander Eagleton, formerly of the State of Tennessee. Her excellencies of character won her many friends and her death was widely mourned. Mr. and Mrs. Smith were blessed with a family of ten children, nine of whom are living, one son having died in infancy. With the exception of the eldest child, all were born on the old home farm in Grove Township, and all are yet residents Of Jasper County, with the exception of Orpheus W., who is now living in Decatur, Ill.

Mr. Smith has been prominently identified with the growth and development of Jasper County for nearly forty-five years. In 1873 he was elected to the office of County Treasurer, and was twice reelected, serving nine years in that capacity. It may be inferred that great confidence is imposed in his ability 7 and integrity by his fellow-citizens, from the fact that though he has ever been a stanch Republican, and the county strongly Democratic, yet he was three times called to the most important county office by popular vote. After the death of his wife, with whom he had traveled life's journey for nearly forty years, Mr. Smith retired from the more active duties of business, and now resides with his brother, Dr. Lewis W. Smith, in the village of Newton. He has ever been a valued resident of the community, and his upright and honorable career has won him universal confidence and esteem.

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JOHN BROWN, who carries on general farming on section 9, Smallwood Township, Jasper County, was born in Dundee, Scotland, April 21, 1810. He is the only child of John and Margaret Brown, of Dundee. In that city his father owned quite a large factory, which he operated successfully until 1820, when he disposed of his business there and emigrated to America. Going to Jefferson County, Ind., he entered a tract of heavily timbered land from the Government. Soon the woodman's axe awakened the echoes of the forest, and after the trees had been cleared away he plowed and planted his land and soon had a good farm. In later years he ran a distillery in connection with farming. His death occurred May 1, 1837.

Our subject was deprived of a mother's tender care when very young. He was only ten years of age when with his father he came to the United States. His boyhood days were spent upon the old homestead in the labors of the farm. When he had reached his majority he was married to Miss Elizabeth Jackson, who was born in Tennessee, March 10, 1812. Their union was celebrated May 13, 1830, and was blessed by the birth of thirteen children, nine sons and four daughters, of whom nine are yet living: Nancy Ann, wife of Peter Chandler; Thomas; George; Harrison; Matilda, widow of Archie Hamilton; Nelson; Joseph; Stephen A.; and Melinda, wife of James Bridges. The sons are all farmers of Smallwood Township, and the sons-in-law follow the same pursuit.

Mrs. Brown, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Jackson, was a daughter of Thomas and Anna Jackson, who were both natives of Tennessee. She was a woman possessing many excellent traits of character, a devout Christian and a true helpmate to her husband, with whom she traveled life's journey for upwards of sixty years. She died January 27, 1892.

After his marriage Mr. Brown rented a farm in Indiana, and after four years he entered Government land. The tract was covered with timber, but he cleared and improved it and engaged in its cultivation for seventeen years. On the expiration of that period he sold out and came to Jasper County, Ill. This was in 1851. Here he again entered land from the Government, and the wild and unbroken tract he transformed into the excellent farm upon which he has since made his home. He now owns five hundred acres of valuable land in Smallwood Township, and has given to his children a considerable amount. He also owns some real estate in Newton and' West Liberty. He is energetic and industrious, and his progressive spirit and well-directed efforts have gained for him a handsome competence. He began life empty-handed, but step by step he worked his way upward to a position of wealth and affluence. His success in his business affairs now enables him to live a retired life, resting in the enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil.

Mr. Brown and all of his sons are stanch Democrats. He has represented his township as Supervisor for a number of years, has also served as Assessor, and for a great many years has been School Director, discharging his official duties with a commendable promptness and fidelity. He has always taken a deep interest in the advancement of those public enterprises calculated to benefit the community, and is liberal in his support of any enterprise tending to promote the welfare of his town or county.

Mr. Brown has led a busy and useful life, yet he had not worked for his own interest alone. For forty-five years he has been a local minister of the Baptist Church, and has preached throughout Jasper, Richland, Clay and Cumberland Counties, he has been an earnest worker in the Master's vineyard, and both by precept and example has led others to walk in the higher life. Probably no man in the community is more widely known than Mr. Brown throughout southern Illinois, and certainly none are held in higher regard, for he has the confidence and esteem of all with whom his life work has brought him in contact.

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ALBERT S. ROBINS, a well-known and leading farmer of Fox Township, Jasper County, who owns and operates ninety acres of land on sections 9 and 15, is a native of the Hoosier State. He was born in Shelby County, Ind., May 28, 1847, and comes of a family of Scotch origin. His grandfather was a soldier in the Mexican War. His father, Regin Robins, was a native of Ohio, and wedded Mary A. Wingate. Previously he had been married, his first wife having been Harriet Boyd. By that union were born two children: Emily, who died in 1860, and Samuel K., who died in November, 1875. The children born unto the parents of our subject were Albert S.; James B., a farmer residing on the old homestead in Fox Township; Martha K., wife of Thomas Cohill, a farmer of Fox Township; and Elisha F., who carries on agricultural pursuits in the same locality. The father of this family removed from Ohio to Indiana in 1822, and became one of the early settlers of Shelby County, where he made his home until 1857. He then came to Jasper County, and took up his residence in what was then St. Marie Township, but is now Fox Township. Here he purchased an unimproved tract of land on section 14. There were only five families in the neighborhood, and the entire county was yet largely undeveloped and unimproved. Mr. Robins was called to his final home February 13, 1876, and his remains were interred in Bethel Cemetery. He was a member of the Protestant Methodist Church. His widow still survives him and makes her home in Jasper County.

No event of special importance occurred during the boyhood and youth of our subject, which were passed under the parental roof in the usual manner of farmer lads. He came with the family to Illinois when ten years of age, and in order to acquire an education he had to walk three and a-half miles to and from school. This community furnished many soldiers for the late war, and among the brave boys in blue was our subject, who, at the age of eighteen, enlisted February 14, 1865, as a private of Company E, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry. He was mustered into service at Camp Butler, and from there sent to Tennessee. On the 18th of September, following, he was mustered out at Nashville, and, going to Springfield, there received an honorable discharge

When the war was over, Mr. Robins returned to his home and remained with his parents until he had attained to man's estate. For several years after starting out in life for himself, he rented land. In 1870, he took charge of the home farm, which he operated for a few years, and then again rented in 1881. In that year he purchased property in West Liberty, where he made his home from 1881 until 1886. Coming into possession, by purchase, of fifty acres of land on section 15, Fox Township, he located upon the farm which has since been his home, and began its further development. He now has ninety acres of rich land, well improved and highly cultivated.

Mr. Robins has been twice married. On Christmas Day of 1867, Emily F. Brothers became his wife, and unto them was born one child, Etta M., now the wife of George Mosgrove, a farmer of Fox Township. The mother died August 31, 1870, and on the 4th of April, 1874, Mr. Robins wedded Miss Sarah A. Brothers, a sister of his first wife. Five children grace their union, two sons and three daughters: Oscar, Ollie, Orin, Fannie and Martha.

Since attaining his majority, Mr. Robins has been a supporter of the Republican party and its principles. He manifests considerable interest in political affairs, but has never been an aspirant for public offices. He holds membership with the Grand Army of the Republic and also belongs to the Methodist Church. Public-spirited and progressive, he takes an active interest in all public affairs, and gives his support to those enterprises which are calculated to benefit the community and aid in its upbuilding. In this locality he and his family arc widely known and highly respected.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887)


PETER FRANKE is proprietor of the pioneer drug store of Newton and is a representative of one of the pioneer families of Jasper County. He is widely known, and as a progressive and valued citizen of the community deserves mention in this volume. He is a native of the town which is still his home, having first opened his eyes to the light of day February 22, 1856. His father was Dr. John G. Franke. His mother bore the maiden name of Gertrude Fischer. The former was the pioneer physician and druggist of Newton, and our subject has followed in his footsteps.

Peter Franke spent the days of his boyhood under the parental roof and acquired his primary education in the public schools of Newton, after which he attended St. Joseph's Diocesan College of Teutopolis. He also began the study of medicine and took a course of lectures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, of Keokuk, Iowa. While a youth he was employed in his father's drug store in Newton during his vacations and leisure hours and has there continued. From 1877 he was in charge of the store, and after his father's death in 1883 he succeeded to the business as proprietor. His actual experience as a pharmacist, not counting his term of apprenticeship, covers a period of sixteen years.

On the 8th of June, 1877, Mr. Franke led to the marriage altar Miss Mary Bushong, a daughter of Adam and Lizzie Bushong. She is a native of Maxburg, Richland County, Ill. Their marriage was celebrated in Newton, and two children have been born of their union, a son and a daughter. The latter, Lola May, is now aged seven years, and the former, George Edward, is a little lad of three summers. Our subject and his wife are well-known people of this community, their home is the abode of hospitality, and they hold a high position in social circles. Their friends are very numerous.

In politics Mr. Franke is independent. In addition to his other interests, he is the owner of a good farm of eighty acres, situated about one and a-half miles east of the city of Newton. In his business career he has been eminently successful. He is enterprising and energetic, and by his upright dealing and courteous treatment of his customers he has secured a liberal patronage, which he well merits.


Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887)

R. STEPHEN STEVENS, SR., a retired physician now residing on section 18, Granville Township, Jasper County, was born in the County of Leeds, Province of Ontario, on the 2d of December, 1807, and is a son of Uriah and Myrhana (Gilbert) Stevens. His father was a native of Vermont, and was of English descent. In the family were five children, who grew to manhood and womanhood, the eldest being our subject. The others are Harmon, Uriah G., Myrhana and Eunice. The father of this family was a doctor by profession. His death occurred in the year 1849, and his wife passed away in 1871. Only two of the family are now living, Stephen and Eunice.

Dr. Stevens, whose name heads this record, spent the days of his boyhood and youth upon a farm, and attended the district schools. Being imbued with a desire to enter the medical profession, he studied with his father, and entered upon his practice when twenty-three years of age. However, he remained at home with his parents until 1835, and in connection with his practice also carried on farming. He remained in Canada until 1817, when he went to Harrison County, Ky., with his parents, making that place his home until January, 1836, when he emigrated to Illinois. He took up his residence in Champaign County, near Homer. The trip Westward was made by team. On reaching his destination, he purchased a farm of eighty acres of improved land and began its cultivation, carrying on agricultural pursuits in connection with his medical practice.

The year previous to his arrival in Illinois, Dr. Stevens was married to Miss Elizabeth Ann Wheeler, a daughter of Zedock and Saphora (Scofield) Wheeler. She was a native of Maryland, born on the 1st of August, 1810. The Doctor and his wife became the parents of nine children, five of whom reached years of maturity. Violet is now deceased; Elizabeth A. is the next in order of birth; Stephen is engaged in merchandising in the village of Yale; Myrhana is deceased; and Zeporah completes the family.

In 1838 the Doctor removed with his family to Edgar County, Ill., where he resided until 1851, when he came to Jasper County, and took up his residence in the old village of Granville, Granville Township. He first purchased some town property, but soon after bought a farm of one hundred acres of unimproved land on section 18, where he still resides. The boundaries of his farm he has extended until it now comprises one hundred and sixteen acres of valuable land, all under a high state of cultivation and well improved. On locating here he also embarked in the practice of his profession, which he followed successfully until 1890, when, at the age of eighty-three years, he abandoned it on account of his eye-sight. He possessed skill and ability, and had a large and lucrative practice, coining from the country all around. In politics, the Doctor has been a supporter of the Republican party since its organization. He held the office of Township Supervisor in an early day, and for four years was Postmaster of the village of Granville. He has ever been a public-spirited and progressive citizen, and has taken an active interest in everything that pertains to the welfare of the Community and its upbuilding. The Doctor is now living retired, enjoying a well-earned rest after a busy life

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SQUIRE JAMES LEAMON, an extensive farmer and stock-raiser of Granville Township, Jasper County, residing on section 9, is a native of the Buckeye State. He was born in Licking County, near Columbus. February 21, 1824. His father, John Leamon, was a native of Virginia, and was of Scotch descent. The grandfather of our subject came to America in the British army during the Revolutionary War. He was then only sixteen years old. During the struggle he was captured by the American soldiers and for some time was held a prisoner. By trade he was a weaver. The father of our subject was a school teacher in his younger days, but followed farming the greater part of his life. On leaving the Old Dominion in 1818, he went to Licking County, Ohio, making the trip by wagon. He purchased a tract of school land a few years afterwards, and at it was covered with a heavy growth of timber, he began clearing away the trees, preparatory to developing a farm. He built a small log house, and that cabin continued to be his home until his death, at the age of fifty years. In politics, he was originally a Whig, and on the organization of the Republican party joined its ranks. He held the office of Constable and Justice of the Peace, and was also Township Trustee. His wife bore the maiden name of Hannah Postlewait, and died in 1848. They had ten children: Jacob, who died in August, 1891; William, who died in December, 1890; Silas, who died in 1830; Sarah, wife of Elijah Clark, of Bell Air, Ill.; James, of this sketch; Nancy, who is the widow of John Weaver, and resides in Iowa; Mary, who died in April, 1890; Lizzie, wife of George F. Jennewin, of Greenup, Ill.; Isaac, who is a hotel-keeper of Ft. Dodge, Iowa; and Sylvester, an attorney-at-law of Hartford. Ohio.

Mr. Leamon, whose name heads this record, passed his boyhood days quietly upon his father's farm. His education was acquired in the subscription schools, which convened in a log schoolhouse. He attended about three months in the winter season, and during the remainder of the year aided in the labors of the farm. To his father he gave the benefit of his services until about twenty-four years of age, when he started out in life for himself. He went first to Louisiana, where he lived for two years, chopping wood by the cord most of the time. On the expiration of that period he returned to his old home, where he worked as a farm hand by the month for a year. He then rented land until 1852, when he came to Jasper County, Ill. He had previously here purchased a tract of one hundred and twenty acres on section 9, Granville Township. The place was almost entirely unimproved. There was a small log house and a few acres had been placed under the plow. Mr. Leamon still owns his original purchase, and as his financial resources have increased he has added to it from time to time, until his landed possessions now aggregate three hundred acres. This is valuable land and under a high state of cultivation. In addition to the improvement of his farm, he also carries on stock-raising to a considerable extent, and has a good grade of horses and cattle upon his place.

Mr. Leamon has been twice married. In 1851, he married Miss Martha Holt, whose death occurred the following year. In 1853, he was joined in marriage with Miss Catherine Wheeler, and the following children have been born of their union, all of whom are yet living: Mary, Louisa, Albert, Oscar, Arthur, Clarence, Adrain and Burton.

Mr. Leamon has led a busy and useful life, yet has found time to devote to public interests. He has served his fellow-townsmen as Justice of the Peace since 1856, with the exception of four years. He was Township Treasurer for fifteen years, was Supervisor for four years, also served as School Trustee, and has been School Director for the past fifteen years. The prompt and able manner with which he ever discharges his duties has led to his long retention in office, and won him the commendation of all concerned. He is upright and honorable in all things, and has the confidence and esteem of all who know him. In politics, he has been a stanch supporter of the Republican party since the time when he cast his first Presidential vote for John C. Fremont.

Mr. Leamon has been the architect of his own fortune. Whatever success he has achieved in life is due entirely to his own efforts. During the first nine years after his arrival here he engaged in school teaching during the winter season, and in the summer months engaged in breaking prairie. He has labored long and earnestly, and as the result of his indefatigable industry, his good management and business ability, he has acquired a handsome competence, and is numbered among the substantial citizens of the community. For over forty-one years he has made his home in this locality, and well deserves representation in the history of the county, in whose growth and development he has ever borne his part.

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ORLANDO S. SCOTT is proprietor and cashier of the People's Bank of Newton, Ill., mention of which is made on another page of this book. In presenting this sketch to our readers, we record the life work of one who is prominently connected with the business interests of the community, and is a valued and progressive citizen of Jasper County. He has the honor of being a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Wayne County on the 22d of September, 1855. He is a son of Robert J. and Carrie Jane (Gray) Scott. His father was born in Carroll County, Ohio, and is now residing in Wayne County, Ill. His mother died in October, 1888. Mr. Scott, of this sketch, spent the days of his childhood with his parents in the county of his nativity, and in its public schools acquired his education. Starting out in life for himself, he secured a position as merchant's clerk and also followed various other occupations. At length he came to Newton, reaching this place on the 28th of July 1880. In the following autumn he entered the People's Bank as book-keeper, and in 1885 succeeded by purchase to the business of which he has since been proprietor and manager. He seems to possess special aptitude for the business in which he is engaged and has therefore done well in this line.

On the 21st of April, 1883, Mr. Scott was joined in wedlock with Miss Emma Franke, their wedding being celebrated in Newton. The lady was born in Newton and is a daughter of the late Dr. John G. Franke, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this book. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have two sons, Orlando Frank and Robert Edward.

Mr. Scott is owner of four farms in Jasper County, aggregating four hundred and ten acres of land. He has a new orchard of one hundred and ten acres set out in apples, and a forty-acre orchard of bearing trees, probably the best one of its size in this part of the State. He was one of the original agitators of the orchard business in this part of the county and planted the first orchard here of importance. He has made an earnest effort to rouse public opinion to the importance of taking advantage of the marked natural advantages of this region in soil and climate as a fruit-producing country, and the people are now rapidly extending the area of planted trees, with promising prospects of success. Our subject is a progressive and public-spirited man, and has done and is doing much for the best interests of the community in which he makes his home.

Mr. Scott exercises his right of franchise in support of the Republican party. He is connected, socially, with the Masonic fraternity, being a Knight-Templar Mason. He belongs to Newton Lodge No. 216, A. F. & A. M.; Newton Chapter No. 109, R. A. M.; and Gorin Commandery No. 14, K. T. He is an energetic and successful business man, cordial in manner, enterprising, yet conservative, prompt and exact in his business methods, and enjoys the confidence and good-will of his patrons and the general public in a marked degree.

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WILLIAM A. GIFFORD, one of the prominent and influential citizens of Jasper county, who resides on a good farm on section 6, Granville Township, well deserves representation in this volume, for he has a wide acquaintance and we feel assured that his many friends will be glad to receive this record of his life work.

Born in Clinton County. Ind., November 14, 1839, he is a son of Levi and Margaret (Freeman) Gifford, natives of North Carolina. The family is of English descent. The father followed farming throughout his entire life. About 1824 he removed with his parents from North Carolina to Indiana, making the journey by team, and locating in Orange County before its organization. In fact, the grandfather of our subject helped to organize and name the county, where he and his wife resided until 1828, when they removed to Johnson County. There he entered Government land, but after a few years he went to Clinton County. The father of our subject made his home in Johnson County for about two years after his marriage, then moved to Clinton County, where he resided until 1840, which year witnessed his emigration to Coles County, Ill., where he spent two years. In 1842 he came to Jasper County, and entered one hundred and sixty acres of land on sections 1 and 12 Granville Township. On the former section he erected a small cabin. The family endured all the hardships and privations of pioneer life. They did their trading at Terre Haute and Palestine and had to go long distances to mill. Levi Gifford died November 24, 1846, and his remains were interred in Cummins' Cemetery. He was a very active member of the United Brethren Church, and the upright life which he lived made his death mourned by many friends. The mother of our subject went from North Carolina to Johnson County, Ind., in 1827, and four years later became the wife of Levi Gifford. She was a member of the Methodist Church, and died in the Hoosier State May 20, 1854.

In the Gifford family were seven children: Elizabeth M., wife of David Clark, of Jasper County; Maria J., wife of C. L. McCommiss, of Jasper County; William A.; Sarah M., who was the wife of W. W. Kibler, and died in 1881; Charity, widow of J. W. Clark, and a resident of Bloomington, Ill.; Levi, who died in 1877; and one child who died in infancy.

Our subject was only three years of age when he came with his parents to Jasper County. After his father's death, in 1846, the family returned to Johnson County, Ind., where he lived with his mother until her death. He acquired a limited education in the subscription and the district schools, which has been largely supplemented by reading, observation and experience in later years until he is now a well-informed man. He lived in Indiana until 1854, when he returned to Jasper County and went to live with an uncle, with whom he remained four years.

Mr. Gilford was then married, October 3, 1858, to Miss Emily Clark, and they began domestic life upon his share of the old homestead. Their union was blessed with four children: Oliver T., who is Principal of the Hunt City Public Schools; Sirena F., who died October 10, 1865; Lillie M., wife of H. Merrick, of Jasper County; and Elsie A., wife of John C. Farley, a farmer of Granville Township.

In 1861, Mr. Gifford sold his interest in the old homestead and rented land until the following year, when he enlisted in the late war, as a private of Company E, One Hundred Twenty-third Illinois Infantry. After the battle of Perryville, in which he participated, he was sent with his regiment in pursuit of Morgan and took part in several skirmishes near Murfreesboro. The troops then went to Hoover's Gap, and from there to Chattanooga, where his brigade was the first to shell that place. After taking part in the battle of Chickamauga, they returned to Murfreesboro, later took part in the battles of Shelbyville and Farmington, and went with Sherman on the celebrated Atlanta campaign. The following spring Mr. Gifford participated in the Wilson raid through Alabama to Selma, where a hard battle occurred, and then went to Macon, Ga. He received his discharge at Camp Butler, in Springfield, Ill., July 6, 1865. He had been promoted to Corporal in 1863.

On returning home Mr. Gifford rented land in Jasper County for a year, and in 1867 removed to the farm which has since been his home. He now owns one hundred and eighty-one acres of highly cultivated land and in connection with general farming he carries on stock-raising, making a specialty of the breeding of horses. In his business career he has been very successful and as the result of his well-directed efforts has achieved prosperity.

Mr. Gifford takes a warm interest in political affairs and has teen a stanch advocate of Republican principles since the organization of that party. Frequently he has been called upon to serve in public positions of honor and trust. He was Commissioner of Highways in his township for six years, is the present Supervisor of his township and Chairman of the Board. He has been a delegate to the Republican State Convention on two different occasions and last summer was chairman of the delegation that elected Hon. E. Callahan. He has also many times been a delegate to the Republican county conventions. Mr. Gifford is a leader of his party in this community and has done effective service in its interests. He has also proven a faithful and competent officer whenever called upon to serve in positions of public trust. Himself and wife are members of the United Brethren Church. He has held many of the church offices and was a lay delegate to the annual conference. Mr. Gifford has been the architect of his own fortune and has builded well.

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THOMAS JEFFERSON MARTIN. In the record of early settlers and prominent citizens of Jasper County, Ill., there is no one more deserving of favorable mention than the late T. J. Martin, of Newton, who for nearly forty years was recognized as the foremost merchant and general business man of Jasper County. Our subject was a native of Kentucky, and was born on the Big Sandy, in Floyd County, February 8, 1823, being a son of George and Levina (French) Martin. The father was of Irish descent, but the mother was an American.

At the age of fourteen T. J. Martin started out in life for himself. Going to Missouri, he found employment in a tobacco factory and continued there until in his eighteenth year, when he enlisted for the Mexican War. He served as Wagon-master, and while in discharge of that duty was quite severely wounded in the side by an Indian arrow.

After the war closed, he removed to Paris, Edgar County, Ill., where he engaged in the dry-goods business with the Booths, with whom he carried on a successful trade.

On the 9th of August, 1848, Mr. Martin married Miss Elizabeth Blackburn, daughter of Col. James M. Blackburn, one of the oldest and wealthiest citizens of Edgar County. In 1849 our subject removed to Newton, Jasper County, and engaged in the dry -goods business with Bebee Booth, of Terre Haute, Ind., as an equal partner. The genial manner and thorough business methods of the young merchant soon won for him the good-will and confidence of his fellow-citizens and secured for the house an increasing trade.

On the 10th of April, 1855, Mr. Martin was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, whose death left him with four young children to care for. All were sons and are now deceased. Henry Woodson died at the age of sixteen years; James Blackburn, at the age of twenty-four; John Widner, at thirty; and William, the youngest, died in infancy, only a few weeks after the death of his mother. On the 17th of November, 1855, Mr. Martin was married in Williston, Vt., to Miss Mary A. Chittenden, of that place. She was born in Williston, and is a daughter of Truman A. and

Betsy (Rhodes) Chittenden. Her father was the eldest son of Gov. Martin Chittenden, of that State, who was first elected to that office in 1813, and was subsequently a Member of Congress, being a contemporary of Henry Clay. Mrs. Martin's great-grandfather, Thomas Chittenden, was the first Governor of the Green Mountain State. The family is one of the oldest and most prominent in New England. One member of the family, Ex-Gov. Chittenden, has been recently elected to the United States Senate from the Old Granite State.

Truman A. Chittenden was born in Vermont, in January, 1796, and was prominent in the local affairs of his town. His death occurred February 7, 1870, at the age of seventy-four years. His wife, the mother of Mrs. Martin, was born in New Hampshire in 1795, and was a member of one of the oldest New England families. Her people, the Rhodes, were originally from Rhode Island, and settled in New Hampshire in an early day. Her death occurred in Williston, Vt., in August, 1892, at the advanced age of ninety-seven years. Mrs. Martin was reared and educated in her native State and was engaged in educational work until 1854, when in September of that year she came to Illinois, accompanying her mother's sister, Mrs. Fuller, who was a resident of this State and had been visiting in New England. On coming to Illinois, Miss Chittenden accepted a position as teacher of the school in Knoxville, but returned to her home in the following summer, and in November, as previously stated, became the wife of Mr. Martin, with whom she returned to Newton. Six children were born of this marriage. Elizabeth and Willie Chittenden were twins. The former died at the age of three years. The latter is married and is the senior partner of the firm of Martin Sons, merchants, successors to T. J. Martin. They are mentioned elsewhere in this work. Mary Anne is the wife of Hon. George W. Fithian, the present Member of Congress from the Newton district, and a prominent lawyer of Newton. Thomas Jefferson and Lizzie were twins. The latter died when a year old, and the former at the age of fourteen. Edward Truman, the youngest, a prominent business man of Newton, is the junior partner of the firm of T. J. Martin's Sons.

Thomas J. Martin was prominently identified with the business interests of Jasper County for nearly forty years, and his name is familiar in almost every household. His rapid advancement in business after his introduction to the village soon put him in the lead of the business men, and old residents can easily recall the fact that thirty years ago no citizen was more popular at every feast and gathering. A man endowed with rare physical grace and beauty, he won the hearts of old and young alike, yet had the good judgment not to be injured by the possession of these qualities, for enemy and friend united in the acknowledgment of his business ability. About twelve years after he established himself in business in Newton, he bought out his partner, Mr. Booth, and in less than ten years more he was worth $50,000 no small fortune to have accumulated in an inland village of a few hundred inhabitants before the modern methods of speculation in stocks, Boards of Trade, etc., had been legitimatized as honorable business methods leading to fortune, but as often to failure. In 1870, however, financial disaster overtook him through his wool trade.

At this time his son James began to fail and premonitory symptoms of consumption bade him seek Colorado in 1872, where the father and son united their efforts in restoring health and fortune. The health of the son improved to such a degree that in 1875 Mr. Martin went to Philadelphia for a few months and thence home, to be confronted by a telegram announcing the death of his son from hemorrhage at Trinidad. The shock and disappointment in this loss of his son and business partner made him seriously ill and developed the first symptoms of disorder that bereft him of his life.

Circumstances and will soon again put Mr. Martin into the business arena, bravely determined to ascend the hill of fortune a second time, although perhaps with a less buoyant step than of old. After a year on commission, he embarked for himself again, and gradually ascended with steady but even step the prosperous way. On the 25th of September, 1883, upon the receipt of the announcement of the death of Col. Blackburn, of Paris, Mr. Martin became unusually depressed and the following month was a second time taken with paralysis, after which he was never again able to walk without assistance. During these years of half-invalidism his wife and dutiful sons were his constant companions wherever he chose to be driven or carried.

Dickens says, "The hardest and best borne trials are those which are never chronicled in any earthly record and are suffered every day." The proud spirit of this man was not broken by financial reverses, but when fate touched him with physical decay the mantle of humility fell about him and he sat in the shadow overcome by his sorrow. But through his patient, noble and heroic wife, he soon looked out beyond the shadow, and the sun still shone for him. In these last years the true beauty and helpfulness of marriage had a marvelous exemplification in this household. The end came on the early morning of May 20, 1886, in the season of flowers, and at his funeral his many friends remembered his partiality for those sweet and cheering ornaments of Nature. Mr. Martin was never an active worker with any particular Christian sect, but his testimony often given in meetings with Methodists and Presbyterians gave token of his earnest desire for the success of true religion, and his acknowledgment of the good influences emanating from such organizations was emphasized by generous contributions to their support.

Mr. Martin was always enterprising and public-spirited and being a shrewd business man realized the advantages of railway communication with the world and was the first to make a movement toward the organization of a company for the purpose of building a line through Newton to connect with the great through lines of the State. Accordingly, he was active in the formation of the Grayville & Mattoon Railroad Company, was chosen a member of its Board of Directors, and accomplished an immense amount of work in securing the right of way and the granting of city and county bonds for its construction. The Board of Directors were unfortunate in making a contract for construction with apparently responsible parties in the East, into whose hands the bonds passed as a basis of construction. The bonds were hypothecated by the contractors, but the road was not built. For nearly twenty years Mr. Martin was foremost in the struggle to force the building of the road, spending much time and money, but finally retiring in disgust. Subsequently the road was built and became a part of the present Peoria, Decatur & Evansville Railroad, the most important road through Jasper County. The preliminary work done by Mr. Martin and his co-laborers bore good fruit, but not one of the projectors realized a dollar from the investment and their arduous labor.

Mr. Martin was an enthusiast on the subject of temperance as applied to intoxicating liquors, and strongly reflected the sentiment that has governed Newton for many years. In politics, he was a Whig in early life and an admirer of Henry Clay. On the disruption of the old Whig party he became a Democrat, and was ever afterward a supporter of the Democracy. He was generous and warm-hearted and many a needy one has reason to remember his open-handed liberality. Socially, he was an earnest Mason, an honored member of Newton Lodge No. 216, A. F. & A. M.; Newton Chapter No. 109, R. A. M.; and of Gorin Commandery No. 14, K. T. of Olney. He was a charter member of Newton Lodge No. 161, I. O. O. F., with which he maintained membership until his death. He possessed superior executive ability and indefatigable energy in the direction of business enterprises, and his integrity and business methods were above criticism. He enjoyed in a marked degree the confidence, respect and esteem of his fellow-citizens and of all with whom he had business or social relations. While his financial reverses above alluded to impaired the large fortune which he would otherwise have left his children, he still left his wife and family in comfortable circumstances, and, what is better still than wealth, he left his sons the powerful influence of his good name and business prestige, on which they are building so solidly that the name will be perpetuated with honor in future years. Mr. Martin always took an active and efficient interest in the schools and did much to advance the cause of education. His influence was always strong in support of the great moral, religious and educational forces that are essential to human happiness and the advancement of a higher civilization.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 384

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