Welcome to Illinois Genealogy Trails

Jasper County Biographies
from the
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887)
Submitted by Judy Edwards



JOHN WISE, a well-known agriculturist and representative citizen of Jasper County, re. siding on section 30, Wade Township, is a native of Germany. He was born in Hesse Darmstadt, December 17, 1844, and is a son of George and Anna (Yager) Wise, natives of the same country. The father died in Germany during the infancy of our subject. Mrs. Wise survived him for a number of years, and became the wife of Matthew Weymert, with whom she emigrated to the New World in 1849. They crossed the Atlantic to New Orleans, and thence made their way up the Mississippi to St. Louis, where Mr. Yager, an uncle of our subject, met them with teams and took them to Jasper County. Mr. Weymert located upon a farm and is still a resident of that county.

Our subject remained with his mother and stepfather during his boyhood days. He left home to enter the service of his adopted country, enlisting December 16, 1861, in Company E, Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, in which he served until he was discharged at the close of his term of enlistment, in February, 1865. fn the battle at Union City, Tenn., in which he participated, he was taken a prisoner, but the next day was parolled and sent to Benton Barricks, Mo., where he remained until exchanged. He then joined the regiment at Duvall's Bluff, Ark., and participated in the battle of Grand Prairie, where eight companies of the regiment were captured. On the 17th of February, 1865, he was mustered out and returned to his home in Jasper County.

For two years Mr. Wise remained with his stepfather, and then went to St. Louis. After spending a winter in that city, he returned and operated the home farm for one season. We next find him in Newton, where he served a one year's apprenticeship to the wagon-making trade, after which he bought out his employer's shop and carried on a successful business for two years. He then sold out, rented land and engaged in farming for three years, when he bought a farm, which he operated for a year. He then went to Indianapolis, where he engaged in carpentering for four months. On the expiration of that period he returned to Jasper County, and located upon the farm where he now resides, and which he had previously purchased. He first bought two hundred acres of timber land, which he cleared, fenced and improved. He has since bought ten acres additional and his farm is now very highly cultivated and improved with all the accessories and appointments of a model farm. On the 29th of October, 1869, in Olney, Mr. Wise was united in marriage with Miss Nancy A. Knapp. The lady is a native of Portage County, Ohio. Her father, Adam Knapp, was born in Germany, and on emigrating to the New World, located in Ohio, where he spent the remainder of his life. His daughter became a resident of Newton when a maiden of fourteen years. Eight children were born unto our subject and his wife, as follows: John A., who is now clerking in Newton; Anna B., Bertha Clara, Alta, Lora, Eda and Mary Audry. They also lost two children in infancy. Mr. Wise is independent in politics, voting for the man whom he thinks will best fill the office, regardless of party affiliations. Socially, he is a member of the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic fraternity of Newton. His wife holds membership with the Newton Catholic Church. Our subject is widely known in this community, and is highly esteemed for his strict integrity and sterling worth.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 387


THOMAS HUNT, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 13, Wade Township, is too well known throughout Jasper County to need a special introduction to its citizens. His long residence in the community, dating from the year 1849, has gained him a large circle of friends and acquaintances, whose regard he has won by an honorable, upright life. He was born in the town of Day ton, Montgomery County, Ohio, December 14, 1827, and is a grandson of James Hunt, a native of England, and the founder of the family in America. The grandfather was also one of the Revolutionary heroes, and served under Washington in the struggle for independence.

John Hunt, the father of our subject, was a native of Montgomery County, Ohio, and there married Elizabeth Brooks, of the same county. Removing to Rush County, Ind., which was then an almost unbroken wilderness, he began the development of a farm, upon which he spent the remainder of his life, dying in 1870. He was a very prominent and earnest supporter of the Republican party, a stanch Abolitionist and a warm friend of the Union. Mrs. Hunt passed away several years prior to the death of her husband, and both he buried near the old home. In their family were four sons and four daughters. James became one of the pioneers of Jasper County, and here followed agricultural pursuits until his death in 1863; Thomas is the second in order of birth; Martha J. is the wife of Hiram Mitchell, of Wade Township, Jasper County; Amaziah is a merchant and farmer of Falmouth; Rachel became the wife of Andrew J. Cross, and now resides in Indianapolis, Ind.; Milton makes his home in the same city; and Elizabeth is now deceased.

In his youth Thomas Hunt attended the common schools and aided his father in the labors of the home farm, remaining under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. He chose as a companion and helpmate on life's journey Miss Louisa Price, a native of Kentucky, and a daughter of John Price. Their union was celebrated in Rush County, Ind., February 22, 1849, and the following September Mr. Hunt came with his bride to Illinois, making the journey with a team. He purchased eighty acres of land where he now resides, and performed the arduous task of transforming the raw prairie into fertile fields. He experienced all the hardships and privations of frontier life, and lived in a log cabin until 1864, when the pioneer home was replaced by a comfortable frame residence. Good barns and outbuildings have also been erected and other improvements made. The home farm now comprises two hundred and forty acres of rich land, and he owns elsewhere one hundred and sixty acres. He has also given good farms to his children.

Mr. and Mrs. Hunt have a family of two children. John M., the eldest, is a substantial farmer of Jasper County, owning land adjoining that of his father's; Sarah Jane is the wife of Frank Andre, also a farmer of Wade Township. The parents and their children are members of the Christian Church, and the family is one of prominence in the community.

In his political affiliations, Mr. Hunt is a Democrat, but has never been an office-seeker, preferring to devote his time and attention to his business interests, in which he has met with signal success. Although Mr. Hunt began life a poor man, with no capital save a young man's bright hope of the future and a determination to succeed, he has steadily worked his way upward, overcoming the obstacles in his path, until he is now numbered among the extensive landowners and substantial farmers of Jasper County. His prosperity has been but the just reward of his own labors. His honorable, upright career has won him universal confidence, and his many excellencies of character have gained him the esteem of all with whom business or pleasure has brought him in contact.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 391


GEORGE CLARK is a well-known farmer of Jasper County, and resides on section 31, Granville Township, where he has a pleasant home and good farm. Within the boundaries of his farm are comprised one hundred and forty acres of land, under a high state of cultivation and well improved. The rich and fertile fields, so neat in appearance, and the well-kept buildings upon the place, all indicate the thrift and enterprise of the owner.

Mr. Clark is a native of Indiana. He was born near Shelbyville, Shelby County, April 4, 1839, and is one of a family of eight sons and a daughter born unto Henry and Mary J. (Gosnell) Clark. The father was a native of Connecticut, and the mother of Virginia. When a boy he removed with his parents to Indiana, and in Dearborn County, where the family located, grew to manhood. He was married in 1823, and shortly afterward removed with his family to Shelby County, Ind., where he entered a claim of one hundred and sixty acres of land from the Government. There he made his home until 1843. The succeeding eight years of his life were spent in Decatur County, Ind., and in 1851 he took up his residence upon the farm in Granville Township, Jasper County, which is now the home of our subject. From the Government he secured three hundred and twenty acres of land, upon which he made his home until his death, January 13, 1871. He was a preacher of the United Brethren Church, and followed the ministry from 1851 until 1871. His remains were interred in Bethel Cemetery. Thus one of the noble pioneers of this community passed to his rest. His wife, who was a member of the same church, died June 6, 1872, and was laid by the side of her husband.

George Clark was a lad of twelve summers when he came with his parents to Jasper County. With the history of the community he has since been identified. His school privileges were quite limited, in fact he was largely self-educated. He has earned his own livelihood since eighteen years of age, and until the breaking out of the war he was employed as a farm hand. Prompted by patriotic impulses, he responded to the country's call for troops, August 2, 1861, and as a private of Company H, Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, was mustered into service at Springfield. He took part in the battles of Fredericktown (Mo.), Perryville (Ky.), Stone River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and nearly all the engagements from Chattanooga to Atlanta, together with many others of lesser importance. He was very fortunate, in that he was never wounded or taken prisoner, yet he saw much hard service and was always found at his post, faithful to every duty. On the 15th of September, 1864, he was honorably discharged.

The following spring, after his return from the war, Mr. Clark purchased sixty acres of land on section 31, Granville Township, and began farming for himself. He there lived until 1873, when he returned to his father's old homestead, which has since been his place of abode. As a companion and helpmate on life's journey he chose Miss Emily, daughter of Joseph and Caroline Chapman. Their union was celebrated November 13, 1866, and has been blessed with eleven children: William, Amos W., Mai ion F., Joseph H., Samuel, Lyman E., Arthur D., Lennie Etta, Mary A., Martha J. and Luther R. The mother died May 7, 1890, and was laid to rest in Hunt Cemetery, her death being mourned by many friends as well as by her immediate family.

Mr. Clark still keeps up his old war acquaintances through his membership with the Grand Army post. In politics, he has been a stalwart Republican since the organization of the party, and has acceptably filled the position of Commissioner of Highways. He is recognized as a man of sterling worth and is highly respected by all who know him. During his long residence in Jasper County, he has ever borne his part in the work of upbuilding and advancement, and the community recognizes in him a valued citizen.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 394


THE PEOPLE'S BANK, located in Newton, Jasper County, Ill., is the only banking house in Jasper County. O. S. Scott is its proprietor and cashier. The bank was established on the 1st of June, 1875, by John A. Brown, John Mason and Bernard Fuller. It was conducted by these gentlemen until July, 1885, when Mr. Scott became sole proprietor.

The institution does a general banking business, receives deposits, buys and sells exchange, makes collections, etc. The capital represented is $15,000, and its standard is based on the well-known landed and personal possessions of its proprietor, on his high standing as a conservative financier and his well-known integrity.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 399


ADAM A. FRANKE, M. D., a prominent physician and surgeon of Newton, is a native of that city, his birth having there occurred September 13, 1852. He is the eldest surviving son of the late Dr. John G. Franke, a prominent pioneer, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work.

The Doctor, whose name heads this record, was reared to manhood in his native town and attended its public schools, after which he entered upon a course of study in St. Joseph's Diocesan College of Teutopolis. From the time he was old enough to be of any service he assisted his father in the drug store, compounding and preparing medicines, and when he was of sufficient age took entire charge of the business, which he conducted in his own name until 1876. He then retired from the store to take a course of medical lectures. He had previously studied under his father's direction, and in 1876 took a course of lectures at the Louisville Medical College, of Louisville, Ky. Subsequently he pursued a second course in the Kentucky School of Medicine in the same city , whence he was graduated in the Class of '77. The following fall he entered upon the practice of his profession in his native town, and has since carried it on with marked success.

On the 14th of September, 1880, Dr. Franke was united in marriage in Newton with Miss Lizzie Nigh, a native of this city, and a daughter of Fuller Nigh, Esq., a pioneer settler and prominent business man of Newton, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Dr. and Mrs. Franke have two children, a son and a daughter: Clara B., born February 21, 1883; and John Fuller, born December 18, 1892.

The Doctor is a member of Newton Lodge No. 216, A. F. & A. M.; also of Newton Lodge No. 253, K. P. ; and of Newton Camp No. 479, M. W. A. He is physician and surgeon for the Peoria, Decatur & Evansville Railroad Company, and has held that office for four years. He is a member of the National Association of Railway Surgeons, and has met with that body for several years in different parts of the country. Dr. Franke is also the owner of a well-equipped livery stable of Newton, the best in Jasper County, the management of which he directs. He is also proprietor of a fine orchard of seventy-five acres, which lies near the city of Newton, and which is just coming into bearing.

Dr. Frank is so well and widely known among the citizens of Jasper and adjoining counties, that particular mention of his ability and success seems almost superfluous, but as this work is designed to be a permanent record which will outlive the memory of the present generation, it will not be out of place to state that he possesses superior ability, and is thoroughly well read in the line of his profession. He has been eminently successful and has succeeded in building up an extensive and lucrative practice. He is blessed with a genial, kindly disposition and a physique suggestive of. manly vigor and robust health, so that his mere presence in a sick room is cheering and invigorating to his patients. As his and his father's records show, he comes of a family of physicians. His father, his grandfather, his uncles and brothers have been, or arc now, members of that profession.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 399


WALTER PRUET, one of Jasper County's self-made men and highly-respected citizens, carries on agricultural pursuits on section 4, South Muddy Township. As he is widely and favorably known throughout this community, we feel assured that a record of his life will prove of interest to our readers, and therefore gladly insert this sketch. His birth occurred October 30, 1827, in Kenton County, Ky. His father was a native of North Carolina and of English descent, and his mother, Cassandra (Brooks) Pruet, was of both English and German lineage. Our subject is the only living representative of their family of nine children, the others being Mary, Willis. John, Sarah, Adenston, Melinda, Charlotte and Elias.

Walter was the eighth in order of birth. Upon his father's farm he was reared to manhood and in the subscription schools he became familiar with the rudimentary branches of knowledge, but his educational privileges were quite limited. Since fourteen years of age he has made his own way in the world. He began to earn his livelihood by working as a farm hand for twelve and a-half cents per day, but as his usefulness increased his wages were raised to $7 per month. He was thus employed until eighteen years of age, when he began working in a flour and saw mill, where the next four years of his life were passed. On the expiration of that period he made a location in Rome, Ind.. where he resided for a year, and then returned to Kentucky. In his native State he then remained until the autumn of 1853.

On the 26th of June, 1848, Mr. Pruet was joined in wedlock with Miss Missouri Frazier, and they became the parents of eight children: William O. B. (deceased), Ellen F., Sarah C., Robert G., Walter, James M., and Sherman and Jackie both deceased. The mother of this family died in 1883. She was a member of the Baptist Church and a most estimable lady. On the 25th of September, 1884, Mr. Pruet married Laura E. Ray, and two children grace this union, Nye and Armilda.

The autumn of 1853 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Pruet and his family in Jasper County. They had journeyed Westward by team and now located in South Muddy Township, where he entered eighty-nine acres of land from the Government on section 4. His claim is mostly covered with timber. After building a log cabin, 16x18 feet, he began clearing his land, then plowed and planted it, and in course of time rich harvests rewarded his efforts. He and his family bore all the hardships and privations of frontier life and in those early days lived in true pioneer style. As time passed, however, the once raw tract was transformed into rich and fertile fields, and Mr. Pruet is now the owner of a good farm, which yields to him a golden tribute.

Our subject is a member of the Farmers' Alliance, he has served as Supervisor of South Muddy Township for eleven years and was Collector for one year, discharging his duties with a promptness and fidelity that won him the commendation of all concerned. He manifested his loyalty to the Government during the late war by enlisting November 20, 1861, in Company F, Forty-sixth Illinois Infantry. He was mustered in at Camp Butler. Ft. Donelson was the first and last engagement in which he participated, for he was taken sick immediately after the battle and was discharged on account of disability. Mr. Pruet holds membership with the Grand Army of the Republic, and is a faithful member of the Baptist Church, with which he has been connected since fourteen years of age. He is a public-spirited and progressive citizen and does all in his power to advance the best interests of the community. He helped to organize his township into school districts and has been identified with the growth and development of Jasper County during his long residence of forty years within its borders. He is an honored pioneer and well deserves representation in this volume.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 408


JOHN H. LARRABEE, of Newton is a representative business man and the leading furniture dealer and undertaker of Jasper County. Besides carrying a very complete stock of furniture and undertakers' goods, Mr. Larrabee also deals in carpets, pianos, organs and sewing-machines. He established himself in trade in Newton in 1883, and began business on rather a small scale, but as time passed it increased in importance from year to year and he now has a liberal patronage and is numbered among the leading merchants of Newton.

Mr. Larrabee is still a young man and his success has indeed been excellent for one of his years. He has the honor of being a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Crawford County, in 1860. His father, Dr. James Larrabee, is a well-known physician, now residing in Wheeler, Jasper County. He was born in Licking County, Ohio, and after attaining to man's estate was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Henry, a native of Illinois and a daughter of George Henry, who was among the earlier settlers of Crawford County, Ill. Mrs. Larrabee died in August, 1863, since which time the Doctor has been twice married. As before stated, he is a prominent physician and enjoys a large and lucrative practice in the community where he makes his home.

The subject of this sketch is the only living child born of the first marriage of Dr. Larrabee. When John H. was only about ten years of age, his father removed to Effingham County, Ill.Thence the family went to Elliottstown, in the same county, subsequently to Latona, and later to Wheeler. Our subject accompanied his father on his various removals and remained at home until 1880, when he came to Newton. For a number of years previous to engaging in his present business, he was employed as a clerk in the store of J. W. Honey, and thus gained an excellent experience as a business man, so that when he started out for himself he had a good knowledge of how to conduct his enterprise.

The lady who now bears the name of Mrs. Larrabee was in her maidenhood Miss Margaret Wallace. By the union of our subject and his wife has been born a daughter, Anna. The young couple are well known in this community and are held in high esteem by all who know them. Their home is always open for the reception of their friends and the circle which enjoys their hospitality is large. Mr. Larrabee is numbered among the public-spirited and progressive citizens of this community. He manifests a commendable interest in all that pertains to its welfare and ever bears his part in its upbuilding and advancement.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 407


MILTON BROOKS, a well-known agriculturist residing on section 6, Crooked Creek Township, is a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Jasper County. Among those who sought a home in this locality in an early day was Eliphaz Brooks, father of our subject, who located in this county in 1840 and entered land from the Government. From that unbroken tract he developed the farm on which Milton now resides. Eliphaz Brooks was a native of Ohio, and when a child he went with his father, John Brooks, to Indiana, the family locating in Rush County, and in the midst of the wilderness hewed out a farm, upon which the father of our subject was reared to manhood. When a young man he came to Jasper County, Ill. This was in 1840, as before stated. He made a claim in Crooked Creek Township, and after opening up a farm returned to Rush County, Ind., for a wife. He married Rachel Earnest, who was a native of Tennessee, but spent her girlhood days in the Hoosier State. The wife died in this county, after which Mr. Brooks was again married. Many years he spent upon his farm and then removed to Newton, where he lived a retired life until called to his final rest, December 3, 1886.

In the Brooks family were two sons and three daughters who grew to manhood and womanhood. AH are now married, have become heads of families and reside in Jasper County. Milton, the eldest child, was born on the old homestead November 16, 1843, and was reared amid the wild scenes of frontier life. No event of special importance occurred during his boyhood, which was quietly passed on his father's farm. When he had attained to man's estate he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Josephine Nelson, a native of Kentucky and a daughter of W. K. Nelson. Their union was celebrated February 27, 1868, and has been blessed with six children, five yet living. Rachel Olive is the wife of Frank A. Dougherty, of Jasper County; Mary Rosella became the wife of A. J. Rutherman and died June 15, 1892, leaving one child; William E., Henry S., Lizzie and Mamie are still at home.

Mr. and Mrs. Brooks began their domestic life upon a farm in North Muddy Township, Jasper County, where they spent a number of yours. They then removed to Kansas, but after a year spent in farming in Montgomery County, that State, Mr. Brooks returned with his family to this County and purchased one hundred and fifteen acres of land, a part of the old homestead. He has since been successfully engaged in farming. The boundaries of his farm Mr. Brooks has since extended until it now comprises two hundred acres of arable land, all of which is fenced, while the greater part is under a high state of cultivation. Among the improvements there seen are a good, substantial residence, large barn and other necessary outbuildings. In addition to this place our subject owns a forty-acre tract on the river bottom, which is also improved. He is numbered among the substantial and prosperous farmers of the community. Although he has devoted the greater part of his time and attention to his business interests, he has found time to faithfully discharge his duties of citizenship and is a most valued resident of his native county. Since casting his first Presidential vote for Gen. Grant in 1868, he has been a warm advocate of the Republican party, but has never been an aspirant for public office. Almost his entire life has been spent in Jasper County, which he has seen change from a wilderness to one of the best counties in southern Illinois. He has helped to develop and upbuild it, and manifests a commendable interest in everything that pertains to its welfare.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 417


DR. JOHN G. FRANKE, deceased, a pioneer physician and druggist of Newton. Jasper County, was a native of Prussia. He was born in the Province of Munster, March 17, 1817, and was a son of Dr. Adam and Mary Franke. His father was also of Prussian birth, but his mother was a native of Switzerland. Our subject was left an orphan at an early age. He received a liberal education in his native country and. following the custom of his family, entered upon the study of medicine. In 1838, having reached his majority and disliking to be drafted into the military service of his country, he emigrated from Germany to America as a passenger on a sailing vessel. The ship was exposed to various severe storms and barely escaped being wrecked, but finally reached New Orleans after a tempestuous voyage of six mouths. On arriving in that city, Dr. Franke at once entered upon the practice of his profession, and there remained for several years, when he removed to Missouri. While pursuing his profession in that State, he accidentally met with an aunt, also a physician, who induced him to come to Newton, Ill., then only a backwoods hamlet. This was in 1849, and he at once entered into practice in this place.

On the 18th of August, 1850, the Doctor was here married to Miss Gertrude Fischer, a daughter of John and Margaret (Eunick) Fischer. She was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, April 16, 1829, came to America with an uncle when fifteen years of age, and has since lived in Newton. Ten children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Franke. Charles, who was born July 1, 1851, died on the 1st of September, following; Adam A., born September 13, 1852, was married September 14, 1880, to Miss Lizzie Nigh, and is a leading physician of Newton, being represented elsewhere in this work. John C., born September 12, 1854, is a physician and resides in Colorado; Peter, born February 22, 1856, was married June 8, 1884, to Miss Mary Bushong, and is a druggist of Newton; Gerhard, born June 27, 1857, died September 24, of the same year; Mary T., born March 13, 1860, died August 11, 1860; Emma J., born September 23, 1861, became the wife of O. S. Scott, the only banker of Newton April 28, 1883; Margaret, born August 3, 1862, died June 17, 1866; George E., born July 30, 1865 is a dentist of Newton; William E., the youngest, born August 15, 1869, is now a practicing physician of Newton.

Dr. Franke established a drug store in Newton soon after locating here, which he conducted in connection with his profession. He soon built up a large practice but found it hard in those pioneer days to get cash for his fees and medicine. Times were hard and money scarce, so the Doctor often obliged to accept such things as the early settlers could part with in payment of their accounts, taking hay, provisions and sometimes young horses. It finally became a custom of the Doctor's life to collect together a bunch of horses at certain periods and drive them to St. Louis, where he sold them and bought drugs and medicines, with which he would stock up his store. He prospered in business and built up a large and lucrative practice. At his death he left to his family a drug store, three farms and the homestead, which includes the residence, several lots and a business building. Dr. Franke was the first physician of Newton, and in 1849 opened the first drug store in this place, which he kept until his death, March 15, 1883. His son Peter then succeeded to the business, which he has since conducted successfully. Another son, William, received his medical education at Rush Medical College and at the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was graduated from the last-named institution March 15, 1892, and has since been in practice in his native town. The Doctor's three elder sons all attended St. Joseph's Diocesan College, of Teutopolis, and he strove to afford them good educational advantages.

In politics, Dr. Franke was a Democrat, but never sought political preferment. He was an able, successful physician and had the patronage of many of the best families of Jasper and adjoining counties. In the early days of his practice he was subjected to much hardship, driving often without roads or bridges, and exposed to blizzards and severe storms, where there was no chance to secure shelter. He was an indefatigable worker and earnest and faithful in discharge of his professional duty toward his patients. He was a man of warm and kindly impulses, devoted to his wife and children. A good husband, a good parent, a good physician and a good citizen, his memory will long be green in the hearts of his old neighbors and friends. He is well represented in the profession and in business circles by his sons, who are, in their particular fields, winning the good-will and respect of the community in their native city. His good wife, a faithful helpmate for so many years and a devoted mother, survives her husband and still resides on the old home. She and her three younger children are members of the Catholic Church.

Dr. Franke was a Mason, a member of Newton Lodge No 216, A. F. & A. M., and was generous and fraternal with his fellow-men, regardless of the ties of Masonry. Many were the poor patients, whose circumstances were such that the payment of a Doctor's fee was a hardship, who were told to keep their money to purchase necessaries for their families and had their accounts canceled by him.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 421

WILLIAM W. CHAPMAN, a well-known farmer of Granville Township, Jasper County, residing on section 12, has lived upon his present farm for a quarter of a century. When he located thereon, it was entirely destitute of improvement, in fact much of it was covered with a heavy growth of timber. Erecting a log cabin, he began life in frontier style. He commenced the development of the farm, and day after day saw the cleared tract increase. All was placed under the plow, and in course of time where once stood a forest were seen waving fields of grain. In connection with general farming, he now carries on stock-raising.

The life record of Mr. Chapman is as follows: He was born near Bloomfield, Edgar County, Ill., September 24, 1840, and is a son of Robert and Ruth (Hurst) Chapman. Their family numbered twelve children, of whom our subject is the eldest. The others were Thomas, Henry, Mary A. (deceased). George, Louisa, Joseph, Hiram, Emily, Jane, Robert and Edward. The father of our subject, who was a native of Kentucky, came to Edgar County, Ill., when a boy with his father. The trip was made by team. In 1818 he became a resident of Jasper County, and located in Crooked Creek Township, where he still makes his home.

William Chapman spent the first eight years of his life in the county of his nativity and then accompanied his parents on their removal hither. He attended the subscription schools, which were held in a log cabin, three miles from his home, which distance he walked. On attaining his majority, he left the parental roof and began life for himself. He farmed on shares until August, 1862, when, feeling that his country needed his services, he enlisted for three years in Company E, Ninety-seventh Illinois Infantry, and was mustered in at Camp Butler. He participated in the first attack on Vicksburg, but was ill with the measles during the greater part of that siege. He was then sent to St. Louis, where he remained in the hospital from June until October, when he rejoined his regiment and participated in the battles of New Orleans and Sabine Pass. Later he took part in the engagement at Ft. Blakely and in many others of lesser importance. He was very fortunate, in that he was never wounded or taken prisoner, and with the exception of the time spent in the hospital, he was always found at his post of duty. On the 18th of August, 1865, he received an honorable discharge.

Ere leaving for the war, Mr. Chapman was married, in 1861, to Miss Hannah M. Roberts, and the following children graced their union: Ida, who died in 1873; Alice, deceased; Annie; William, deceased; Mary, Stella, Victor, Emily, Essie and Josiah.

At the close of the war, Mr. Chapman returned to his family and for three years engaged in operating a rented farm. He then purchased eighty acres of land and began the development of a farm, on which he has since made his borne, he has been called upon to serve in the position of Township Assessor, and three different terms has served as Township Collector, discharging his duties with a commendable promptness and fidelity. He takes considerable interest in political affairs and since attaining his majority has been a supporter of the Republican party. Socially, he is connected with the Grand Anny of the Republic. His own industry and enterprise have brought him the success of his life, and his honorable and upright career has gained for him the high regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 422


PRIOR R. LEWIS, who is engaged in general farming and stock-raising on section 31, Granville Township, Jasper County, was born in Rush County, Ind., January 28, 1839, and comes of a family of Welsh and Irish ancestry. His father, Adam C. Lewis, was a native of Ohio, and his mother was born in Tennessee. She bore the maiden name of Nancy Rigdon. On leaving his native State, Adam Lewis went to Indiana, making the journey by boats and teams, and in 1819 located in Rush County, Ind., before it was organized. He there carried on agricultural pursuits until 1850, when he took up his residence in Willow Hill Township, Jasper County, and entered from the Government forty acres of raw land, upon which he built a log cabin. The remainder of his life was spent upon the farm which he there developed, and on the 14th of March, 1866, he passed to his final rest, his remains being interred in Brockville Cemetery. He was a Primitive Baptist minister, and the upright life which he lived won him the respect of all with whom he came in contact. In politics he was an old-line Whig until the dissolution of that party, when he joined the Democracy. His widow is still living in this county at the advanced age of eighty-four years. The twelve children of the Lewis family were William T., Mary A., James P. , Melinda , 1., Prior H.; Stephen, who died in 1886, Nancy in 1858, and Emily M. in 1885; Delilah C.; Rachel M., who died in 1853; Sarah M.; and John M., who died in 1867.

Our subject spent the first eleven years of his life in the State of his nativity, and then with his parents came to Illinois. He remained under the parental roof until he had attained his majority, when he started out in life empty-handed to seek his fortune. He began working by the month as a farm hand, and his fidelity to the interests of his employer is shown by the fact that he remained with one man for five years. On the expiration of that period, with the capital he had acquired through industry and economy, he purchased eighty acres of partially improved land on section 10, Crooked Creek Township, and devoted his energies to its cultivation from 1865 to 1868, when he took up his residence upon the farm which he has since made his home. He first bought only sixty acres, but now owns two hundred and ten acres of well-improved and valuable land. His time and attention he devotes to general farming and stock-raising, and his industry and enterprise, and fair and honest dealings have been crowned with a good degree of success.

In 1864 Mr. Lewis chose as a companion and helpmate on life's journey Sarah J., daughter of William M. and Frances A. (Wicoff) Jones. By their union have been born twelve children: Barbara A., an attendant in the Insane Hospital of Indianapolis, Ind.; Marion L., at home; Cora A., wife of Calvin O. Jones, a farmer of Jasper County; Ida E., wife of John Boy d, an agriculturist of Granville Township; William I., of Rockford, Ill.; Minnie J., at home; Prior R., who died in 1876; Myrtie, Adam C. and Ralph W. Two children died in infancy.

Mr. Lewis takes quite an active interest in political affairs, keeps well informed on the issues of the day and votes with the Democratic party, but has never been an office-seeker. Socially, he is a member of Hunt City Lodge No. 623, 1. 0. O. F., and himself and wife are faithful members of the United Brethren Church. Mr. Lewis possesses literary ability of a high order, and has considerable poetical talent. He has been a correspondent of the local papers for a number of years, and for about five years has been the correspondent for the Cincinnati Enquirer. A man of keen judgment, a close observer, and possessing a ready flow of language, he is, therefore, a good writer.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 428


AARON MONFORT LIST, one of the representative and well-known farmers of Wade Township, Jasper County, resides on section 30. He is also numbered among the early settlers of the community, having here made his home since 1856. He has therefore been a witness to much of the growth and development of the county, and has seen the transformation that has changed it from a wild and unimproved region to one of prosperity and progress.

Mr. List was born in the town of Linden, Montgomery County, Ind., June 21, 1849, and is a son of William W. List. His father was a native of Kentucky 7 , in which State he spent his boyhood and married Hannah, daughter of Aaron Aton, who became one of the early settlers of the Hoosier State. After his marriage, Mr. List engaged in farming for a number of years in Montgomery County, but at length bought a home in Illinois, removing in 185(5 to Cumberland County, from where he later came to Jasper County. Here he settled on land which he had previously entered from the Government, and which was in its primitive condition, not a furrow having been turned or an improvement made, but his labors transformed it into a rich and valuable farm. Mr. List is now living a retired life at his home in North Muddy Township, at the age of seventy-five years. His wife died in March, 1882.

The subject of this sketch is the third in order of birth in a family of four sons and four daughters. Jacob, the eldest, was one of the boys in blue during the late war, and laid down his life in defense of the Union; Margaret is also deceased; Aaron is the next younger; Martha J. has also passed away; John died in February, 1884; Mary is the widow of John Kibler; Abram L. resides in Denver, Colo.; and Alma, who is also deceased, completed the family.

Our subject came to Illinois when a lad of about six years and under the parental roof was reared to manhood on the old homestead in Jasper County. He remained with his father until he had attained his majority, and in his youth aided in the labors of the farm and to a limited extent attended the common schools. On reaching man's estate he started out in life for himself as a farmer. As a companion and helpmate on life's journey he chose Miss Charity Dougherty, a native of Indiana. Her earlier girlhood days were spent in that State and in Iowa, and at the age of fourteen she went with her father, John Dougherty, to Cumberland County, Ill., where their marriage was celebrated, March 17, 1873. Their union has been blessed with six children: Lennis, William Arnold, Minnie, Bertha, Leroy and Goldie.

After his marriage, Mr. List operated a rented farm for two years, and then purchased eighty acres of raw prairie land, which he at once began to develop and improve. As his financial resources increased he added to that from time to time, until he now owns three hundred acres of arable land. The rich and fertile fields yield a golden tribute to the care and cultivation of the owner, and the neat appearance of the place, with its many improvements, including a comfortable residence, good barns and other outbuildings, indicates the enterprise and progressive spirit of the owner.

Mr. List has led a busy and useful life, yet has found time to faithfully discharge his duties of citizenship and bear his part in the public progress. Education finds in him a warm friend, and during his several years' service as a member of the School Board, he has done much in its interest. In politics he has been a stalwart Republican since casting his first Presidential vote for Gen. Grant in 1872. In regard to his business career, Mr. List has certainly had a successful one, but his prosperity is all the result of his own well-directed efforts, his good management and business ability. Thus have we given a brief sketch of the life work of one of Jasper County's most influential and prominent farmers.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 432

JOHN SHAMHART is the owner of one of the valuable farms of Wade Township, Jasper County. It is situated on section 18, and comprises one hundred and eighty-six acres of good land. A glance at this place, which is very neat and tasty in appearance, indicates the thrift and enterprise of the owner. The fields are well tilled and many improvements stand as monuments to his progressive spirit, including a pleasant home, good barns and all other necessary outbuildings.

Mr. Shamhart has been a resident of this county since April, 1864. He was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, October 28, 1827, and is of English descent. His grandfather was born in London, England, and crossing the Atlantic became one of the early settlers of Baltimore, Md. He died when Henry Shamhart, the father of our subject, was a small boy. The latter grew to manhood in Baltimore and served as a soldier in the War of 1812, in the cavalry service. Emigrating Westward, he became one of the pioneers of Guernsey County, Ohio, and there married Katie Overly. His wife was a native of Pennsylvania. Mr. Shamhart entered land and cleared and developed a farm, on which he made his home throughout the remainder of his life. He died in December, 1857, and was buried on Christmas Day in St. John's Lutheran Cemetery. His wife now resides with her daughter and is enjoying good health, her eighty-six years resting lightly upon her.

Our subject was the fourth in order of birth in their family of sixteen children, six of whom are deceased. Of those living at this time (April, 1893), Dr. George is a retired physician of Jasper County; Lavina is the widow of George Long and lives in Guernsey County, Ohio; Martha is the wife of Joseph Day, of Guernsey County; John is the next younger; Elizabeth is the widow of George Hillard; Caroline is the wife of Asbury Knouff, a resident of Guernsey County, Ohio; Mary is the wife of William James, of Guernsey County; Ephraim resides in Kansas; Amanda is the wife of George W. Boulton, of Kansas; and Luther, a resident of West Liberty, Ill., completes the family.

No event of special importance occurred during the boyhood of our subject, which was spent upon his father's farm in the usual manner of farmer lads. In 1853 he went to California by the Nicaragua route and spent three years in the gold mines on the Pacific Slope, returning to his home by way of Aspinwall in 1856. The following year he took up a farm in connection with his brother-in-law. Mr. Shamhart was married in Guernsey County, Ohio. April 26, 1857, to Miss Mary C. Brill, who was born in that county and was reared in the same neighborhood as her husband. Her father, Samuel A. Brill, was born in Loudoun County, Va., June 1, 1803, and was one of the early settlers of Guernsey County. His death occurred in Jasper County, Ill., August 14, 1879. Mrs. Shamhart's mother's maiden name was Amanda Melvina Smith. She was born in the city of Washington in 1814 and died May 20, 1854. Unto our subject and his wife have been born four children, as follows: Columbia C., wife of Henry Klier, a farmer of Jasper County; Rosetta J., wife of John Foster, of the same county; Anna May, the wife of John Etzell, who is engaged in farming in Jasper County; and Dora Belle.

After his marriage, Mr. Shamhart rented a farm in the county of his nativity, and after a year purchased land. He carried on agricultural pursuits in that locality until 1864, which year witnessed his arrival in Jasper County, Ill. He rented land the first year but has since bought and sold several different farms. He removed to his present farm February 13, 1870. At that time only a few acres had been cleared, and the home was an old log cabin with a puncheon floor, with no windows, a clapboard roof and a mud and stick chimney. Mr. Shamhart deserves great credit for his success in life, as he started out for himself with no capital and nothing to depend upon except his own resources. He and his wife suffered many of the hardships and trials of pioneer life during their early residence in this county, but they labored on together and success has at length rewarded their efforts. Our subject is a man of good business ability, which characteristic, combined with his industry and enterprise, has won him a well-merited success. Socially, he is a member of the Odd Fellows' society. He is regarded as a public-spirited and progressive citizen, is one of the valued residents of this community, and well deserves representation in the history of his adopted county.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 434

ANDREW J. KOONTZ, a well-known agriculturist residing on section 5, Wade Township, is numbered among the early settlers of Jasper County of 1853. For forty years, therefore, he has not only been a witness of, but has been identified with, the growth and upbuilding of the county. To the pioneers the community owes a debt of gratitude which can never be repaid for what those worthy men and women did towards developing the county's best interests.

A native of Virginia, Mr. Koontz was born in Page County, October 3, 1831, and is a son of David B. and Catherine (Foltz) Koontz, who were born in the Old Dominion. The father was a farmer by occupation and followed that business in Page County throughout his entire life. His death occurred in 1875, at the ripe old age of seventy-four years, and his wife was called to her final home in 1872.

Our subject spent the days of his boyhood and youth quietly in his parents' home and became familiar with the occupation which he has followed as his life work. When a young man of twenty-two, he determined to seek a home in the new and rapidly growing West, and chose Illinois as the scene of his future labors. In 1853, he reached Coles County, where he spent about eighteen months, and then came to Jasper County, locating on the farm where he has since resided. He came into possession at that time of a raw tract of prairie land, which bore little resemblance to the cultivated farm which we now see to-day, with its rich and fertile fields yielding abundant harvests, its comfortable residence, good barns and outbuildings and other accessories of a model farm. These improvements show that Mr. Koontz has led a busy and useful life. In addition to his own property, he also owns another tract of eighty-five acres, well improved.

On the 9th of April, 1857, in Jasper County, Mr. Koontz led to the marriage altar Miss Julia Kibler, a native of Page County, Va., and a daughter of George Kibler, who came here in 1851, and is therefore numbered among the pioneers. Nine children have graced this union. David, George and John are all married and reside in Kansas. Mollie is the wife of Reuben Isley, a farmer of Jasper County. Ida is the wife of T. J. Foust, of Jasper County. Isaac L. follows farming in this county. Lillie A., Dora and Clinton S. are at home.

In his political affiliations, Mr. Koontz is a Democrat. In 1856, he cast his first vote for James Buchanan, and has supported each Presidential nominee of the party since that time. Mrs. Koontz and her children are members of the Lutheran Church, which our subject also attends, contributing liberally to its support. In all public enterprises, our subject bears his part, taking an active interest in anything that pertains to the welfare of the community. During his long residence in this community, he has won many warm friends and acquaintances and is held in the highest regard by all who know him.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 445


JOHN CHESTNUT carries on general farming in South Muddy Township, Jasper County, where he owns two hundred and a five acres of valuable land, the greater part of which is under a high state of cultivation. The place of his birth is near Fayetteville, Lawrence County, Ind., and the date of that event was December 26, 1829. His father, John Chestnut, was of English lineage and was a native of Kentucky. In the family were seven children: Louisa J., Benjamin H., Charity, Mahala and Ed win, all deceased; John, of this sketch; and Ziby, who has also passed away. In 1841, when our subject was two years of age, John Chestnut, Sr., came with his family to South Muddy Township and entered land from the Government, developing a farm, upon which he lived until his death, September 20, 1844. His wife survived him until January 10, 1849, when she too passed away. They were people of many excellencies of character and held membership with the Methodist Church.

Since his third year the subject of this record has been a resident of Jasper County. In his youth he attended the subscription schools to a limited extent, but his education has been mostly acquired through observation and experience. Soon after his mother's death he was bound out to William H. Lewis, with whom he was to remain until he had attained his majority, but he left him at the age of twenty and began life for himself by farming on shares. After two seasons he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land, on which he could make a payment of only $34. The tract was almost entirely undeveloped, the only improvement upon the place being a log cabin, and his stock consisted only of a two-year old colt.

Mr. Chestnut abandoned his farming operations on the 12th of August, 1861, to enlist in the service of his country. He joined the boys in blue of Company K, Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, and after being mustered in at Springfield went to the front. He participated in the battles of Fredericktown (Mo.), Perryville (Ky.), the siege of Corinth, and the battles of Stone River, Liberty Gap and Chickamauga, where he was taken prisoner September 20, 1863. For about three months he was incarcerated in Libby Prison and was then taken to Danville, Va., where he remained about the same length of time. Until the following September, he was then imprisoned in Andersonville, after which he was held in Charleston, S. C., for two weeks, and then sent to Florence, S. C., where he remained until February following. After being held as a prisoner of war for seventeen months and six days, he was paroled in February, 1865, and on the 12th of April was honorably discharged. At the battle of Stone River he was made Corporal. He did faithful service in defense of the Old Flag and when not a captive of the Southern forces was always found at his post of duty.

Returning to Jasper County, Mr. Chestnut located upon the land which he had previously purchased and began farming. He was married February 15, 1866, to Miss Mary A. Etchison, and unto them were born two children, one of whom died in infancy. The mother was called to her final rest March 22. 1868, and the following November Mr. Chestnut married Miss Charity Etchison, by whom he had four children: Benjamin H., John M. and James H., who are living, and Mary E.. twin sister of John, now deceased.

Since the organization of the Republican party, Mr. Chestnut has been one of its stanch supporters. He has held the offices of Collector and Road Commissioner, Pathmaster and School Director, faithfully discharging the duties of those positions. He is a member of the Christian Church, and also belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and the Masonic fraternity. He performed the arduous task of developing a new farm and has been an earnest worker through life, his competency having all been acquired through his own efforts. He certainly deserves great credit for his success and his example is well worthy of emulation.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 445

URIAH WARFEL is numbered among the substantial and intelligent farmers of Jasper County. He resides on section 30, where he owns and operates one hundred and sixty acres of land. He is a native of the Keystone State, his birth having occurred in Huntingdon County, November 4, 1846. His parents, Henry and Mary Ann (Dougherty) Warfel, were also natives of Pennsylvania and were there married. About 1850, they emigrated to Montgomery County, Ohio, which at that time was an almost unbroken wilderness, the work of progress and civilization having been scarcely begun. He purchased raw land, which he transformed into a good farm, making it his home until 1865. That year witnessed his arrival in Jasper County, but he was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, his death occurring after two years, in March, 1867. His wife is still living at the age of seventy-three in Hidalgo, Ill.

This worthy couple had a family of four sons and four daughters, of whom seven are yet living: John D., a farmer of Jasper County; Philip, who was a soldier of the late war and died in the service of his country in Washington, D. C.; Uriah, of this sketch; Minerva J., wife of John Bowers, a farmer of Jasper County; William, of Colorado; Maggie, wife of William Graves, a lawyer of Denver, Colo.; Cassie, wife of Dr. Arthur Goodwin, of Charleston, ID.; and Loretta, wife of James Brown, of Clark County, Ill.

Uriah Warfel grew to manhood in Ohio and spent his youth upon the farm. His school privileges were limited and his education has been mostly acquired through his own efforts since attaining man's estate. He enlisted for the late war in September, 1864, and joined Company K, Seventy-first Ohio Infantry, in which he served until May, 1865, when, the war having ended, he received his discharge at Camp Dennison, Ohio. He participated in the engagement at Atlanta, Ga., and the battles of Franklin and Nashville, Tenn., where he was wounded December 16, receiving a gunshot wound in the left thigh, which permanently disabled him. After his discharge he returned to Ohio, and in the fall of the same year came to Illinois with his father.

Soon after coming to Jasper County, Mr. Warfel began working as a farm hand by the month, and was thus employed several years. He was united in marriage in Cumberland County, Ill., April 2, 1873, to Miss Minerva Dougherty, who was born in Montgomery County, Ohio. Her father, John A. Dougherty, removed from Indiana to Illinois about 1867, settling in Cumberland County. The young couple began their domestic life upon a rented farm, which Mr. Warfel operated until he had acquired sufficient capital to purchase land. In 1876, he bought one hundred and twenty acres of raw prairie, which he broke and fenced, and in course of time-placed the entire amount under the plow, so that the once sterile tract was made to bloom and blossom as the rose. The boundaries of his farm he has also extended, until it now comprises one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land. In March, 1853, Mr. Warfel bought an additional one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 30, adjoining his home farm. He has just completed a large and pleasant residence, and has also built good barns and has a thrifty young orchard. In fact, all the appointments of a model farm may there be found.

A family of ten children has been born unto our subject and his wife, as follows: Henry Everett, a successful school teacher of Jasper County; Ivan Edward, who aids his father in carrying on the home farm; Annie May, Myrtle, Anthony Logan, Stella, Walter A., Harry, Omer and Frankie. The parents are both members of the Christian Church, and Mr. Warfel is a member of the Grand Army post of Newton and the Farmers' Mutual Benefit Association. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Republican party, with which he has affiliated since casting his first Presidential vote for Gen. Grant in 1868. Although he takes an active interest in political affairs and the success of his party, he has never been an aspirant for office. The cause of education finds in him a warm friend and for a number of years he has served as a member of the Board of School Directors. A public-spirited and progressive citizen, he manifests a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community, and ever bears his part in promoting the enterprises which are calculated to prove of public benefit.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 451


JESSE P. STANLEY, a prominent farmer, stock dealer and shipper, residing on section 8, Wade Township, is one of the well-known citizens of Jasper County, and is numbered among its pioneer settlers, having been a resident of southern Illinois for nearly half a century. A native of Kentucky, he was born in Hardin County, April 2, 1836. His grandfather, Jesse Stanley, Sr., removed with his family to that State at an early day. The father of our subject, H. B. Stanley, was born in North Carolina, and his wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Turner, was also a native of that State. For a number of years Mr. Stanley followed farming in Hardin County, and in 1846 emigrated to Richland County, Ill. This locality was then in a state of wildness, the work of progress and civilization having been scarcely begun. The father of our subject rented several hundred acres of land and opened up several good farms. He was successful in his business career, became well-to-do and was one of the prominent and influential citizens of Richland County. He was three times married and became the father of twenty-one children, seventeen of whom are living at this writing. His death occurred in the summer of 1886. His last wife survives him.

Jesse P. Stanley was reared to manhood amid the wild scenes of frontier life and was inured to its hardships and privations. His privileges, educational and otherwise, were quite limited, but his training at farm labor was not so meagre, for as soon as old enough to follow the plow he began work in the Gelds. He remained at home until eighteen years of age and then started out in life for himself. He was united in marriage in Richland County, in his twentieth year, with Miss Jane Chandler, a native of Washington County, Ill., and a daughter of Martin Chandler, also one of the pioneer settlers of this community. After their marriage, which was celebrated July 3, 1856, Mr. Stanley rented land and began farming. When he had acquired a sufficient capital he purchased a small farm, which he sold in 1876, coming to Jasper County. At that time he bought land in Smallwood Township, an improved place. Since that time he has purchased and disposed of several farms. In January, 1887, he bought his present home, comprising one hundred acres of rich land. He has just erected a commodious and substantial residence; he has also built good barns, other outbuildings, fenced the entire place and put the land under a high state of cultivation. In fact, the place is complete in all its appointments, and it is desirably located, and is one of the best farms of Wade Township. In addition to the cultivation of his land Mr. Stanley engages quite extensively in stock-dealing. He has purchased stock throughout all the surrounding counties, and during the past year has shipped one hundred and thirty carloads. He is one of the most extensive dealers and shippers in Jasper County.

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley had a family of eight children. George W. is married and resides in Ottumwa, Iowa, where he holds a responsible position. Lizzie is the wife of George Q. Hinds, a farmer of Jasper County Frankie became the wife of Dr. John W. Hankins, but both she and her husband are deceased. They left three children, two of whom reside with the grandparents. Albert, a marble-cutter, is married and makes his home in Robinson, Ill. Charles E. is at home. Laura is the wife of Charles Strole, a farmer of Jasper County. J. Pearl aids his father in carrying on the home farm; and Martin is attending school.

In politics Mr. Stanley was formerly a Republican, but now votes with the Prohibition party. Almost his entire life has been spent in southern Illinois, and he has a wide acquaintance throughout Jasper and adjoining counties. Our subject is truly a self-made man, for he started out in life with no capital, and by enterprise and industry has steadily worked his way upward. He possesses excellent business ability, and his career has always been characterized by honorable dealings, while his good management and well-directed efforts have gained for him a handsome property.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 454

WILLIAM HARRISON BROOKS, who is engaged in general farming on section 7, Crooked Creek Township, and is numbered among the pioneer settlers of Jasper County of 1843, claims Indiana as the State of his nativity. He was born in Rush County, on the 16th of January, 1841, and is a son of Isaac and Patience (Spencer) Brooks. His father was born in Maryland but was reared in the Buckeye State, and after arriving at years of maturity he there married Miss Spencer, a native of New York. Subsequently they removed to Rush County, Ind., and a few years later, in the spring of 1843, came to Jasper County, Ill. Here Mr. Brooks made a claim of Government land and from the raw prairie developed a farm, upon which he reared his family and spent the remainder of his life. He was a leading agriculturist of the community and a highly-respected citizen. His death occurred February 23, 1877. His wife had been called to her final home several years previous.

We now take up the personal history of our subject, who was only two years old when his parents came to Jasper County. Upon the old homestead farm the days of his boyhood and youth were passed, while in the common schools of his neighborhood he acquired a good education in the English branches. The occupation to which he was reared he has followed as a life work. During the late war, however, he left home to enter the service of his country. He enlisted in May, 1864. for one hundred days and joined Company I, One Hundred and Forty-third Illinois Infantry, with which he remained until discharged in the following September. He went with his regiment to Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas, and participated in a number of skirmishes.

After being mustered out, Mr. Brooks returned to Jasper County, and the following year operated the home farm. In October, 1865, he was united in marriage with Miss Martha Angeline Conner, a native of Rush County, Ind. She has, however, resided in this county since her early childhood. The young couple began their domestic life upon a part of the old homestead, and our subject has since engaged in farming in his own interest. He now owns one hundred acres of good, arable land, which he has placed under a high state of cultivation, and which in consequence yields to him a golden tribute. It is also improved with good buildings, and its neat appearance indicates the enterprise of the owner.

In 1881, Mr. Brooks was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 4th of May, leaving three children: Sarah, now the wife of Oliver Dougherty, of Jasper County; John and Isaac D., at home. On the 20th of October, 1884, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Brooks and Miss Jerusha Ellen Davis, who was born in Rush County, Ind., but spent her girlhood days in Clay and Jasper Counties, Ill. Three children grace this union, William, Everett and Elza. Mr. Brooks is a member of the Christian Church and his wife holds membership with the Baptist Church. In politics he is a stanch supporter of Republican principles, having advocated its measures since he cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. Socially, he is a member of Rose Hill Grand Army Post. Almost his entire life has he passed in Jasper County, and has helped to make it what it is to-day. He is a well-known citizen and is considered as a man of upright character and sterling worth.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 459


JOSEPH SHOEMAKER, one of the honored veterans of the late war, is now numbered among the prominent citizens of South Muddy Township, Jasper County. He resides on section 33, and carries on agricultural pursuits and stock-raising. His farm comprises two hundred acres of rich land, and its neat and thrifty appearance and the many improvements upon the place indicate the enterprise and progressive spirit of the owner.

Mr. Shoemaker is one of the worthy citizens that the Buckeye State has furnished to this county. He was born in Jackson County, Ohio, in April, 1831, and is of German descent on the father's side, and of Irish lineage on the mother's side. His parents were John and Mary (Burnsides) Shoemaker, the former a native of Maryland and the latter of Virginia. They had eight children: Jacob S., John B., Nathaniel, Joseph, Catherine, Susan, Elizabeth and Jane. All are yet living, are married and are now heads of families. John Shoemaker, the father, died in September, 1890, and the mother passed away a little later.

The history of any farmer's son is parallel to the boyhood of our subject in its outlines, though, of course, differing somewhat as to details. He was reared upon the farm, and during about three months of the year he pursued his studies in a district school, to which he had to walk a distance of three miles. On attaining his majority he began operating a part of the old homestead and carried on that work until July 5, 1863, when he abandoned the plow for the musket and the soldier's garb. As a private of Company H, First Ohio Heavy Artillery, he was mustered into service at Covington, Ky., from where he was sent to Camp Nelson and on to Knoxville. His regiment was principally engaged in guarding railroads, towns, bridges and other Government property, and they also took part in a number of small engagements. In 1865 our subject received an honorable discharge at Camp Dennison, Ohio, for the war was drawing to a close and his services were no longer needed. Although he did not take part in as many battles as some others, his service was an arduous one and to it he was ever faithful.

Returning to his home in Ohio, Mr. Shoemaker operated the old farm until 1871, when he determined to change his place of abode to Jasper County. Purchasing eighty acres of timberland on section 33, South Muddy Township, he located upon a farm where he has since lived. He erected the residence upon it, built barns and other outbuildings, and has made all the necessary improvements which go to make up a model farm.

The lady who bears the name of Mrs. Shoemaker was in her maidenhood Margaret S. Horton. The wedding ceremony was performed February 25, 1856, and eleven children blessed their union, eight of whom are living: Sophia, Sarah, Mary, Grant, Jimmie, John, Ada and Josephine. Oscar, the eldest, Fremont, the third child, and Joseph, the youngest of the family, are now deceased.

Mr. Shoemaker is a prominent and influential citizen of this community, and by his fellow townsmen he has been three times called upon to serve in the position of Road Commissioner. He has also been School Director for many years, and the cause of education finds in him a warm friend. Of the Republican party he has been a stalwart supporter since its organization. With the Grand Army of the Republic he holds membership. We see in Mr. Shoemaker a self-made man, who by his own efforts has achieved the success of his life. His industry and good management have gained for him a comfortable competence and made him one of Jasper County's substantial farmers. His life has been well and worthily spent and his honorable career is deserving of emulation.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 460


FRANK J. SCHACKMANN has the honor of being a native of Jasper County, and is now numbered among its representative farmers. He resides on section 33, Wade Township, and was born upon that farm on the 9th of February, 1845. He is a son of George and Mary (Bower) Schackmann, both of whom were natives of Prussia. The father, was a stone-cutter by trade. Determining to seek a home in the New World, he left his native land, and on the 7th of April, 1836, the vessel in which he took passage sailed from the port of Havre. It was nearly four months before it reached its destination, but at length, on the 19th of August, it dropped anchor in the harbor of New York. Mr. Schaickmann worked at his trade in the Eastern and Southern States for about five years, and in 1841 came to Jasper County, Ill., where he entered land and opened up the farm on which his son Frank J. now resides. He died April 7, 1874, just thirty-eight years after he set sail for America. His wife passed away December 22, 1857.

Frank Schackmann is the youngest of two sons and a daughter, survivors of a family of eight children. John is a substantial farmer of Jasper County, and is represented elsewhere in this work; Mary, widow of Edward Richardson, is living in Willow Hill Township, Jasper County. Our subject spent the days of his boyhood and youth upon the old homestead farm. His education was acquired in the common schools, which he attended only a short time. As soon as old enough, he began work in the fields, and from that time he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He remained with his father until he had attained his majority and then operated a part of the home farm. After his father's death he purchased a portion of the old homestead and now owns the greater part of it. He has also bought other lands, and his possessions now aggregate three hundred and twenty acres, of which two hundred acres are fenced and highly improved. On his home farm he has a comfortable residence and good barns and outbuildings, an orchard and all the other accessories of a model farm of the nineteenth century.

Mr. Schackmann was married in Jasper County, April 21, 1868, to Elizabeth Brier, a native of Ohio, and a daughter of Gerhard Brier, who died when Mrs. Schackmann was only three years old. The mother is still living and now resides with her daughter at the age of eighty-seven. Unto our subject and his wife were born five children, but two died in early childhood. The others are Mary Elizabeth, John Edward and Mary Anna.

Mr. Schackmann and his wife are members of the Newton Catholic Church. For nine years he has faithfully served as a member of the School Board, and the cause of education finds in him a warm friend. Since casting his first Presidential vote for Hon. Samuel J. Tilden, he has been identified with the Democratic party and is one of its warm advocates. He was elected and served as Highway Commissioner of Wade Township, but has never been an office-seeker, preferring to devote his energies to his business interests. He is a well-known citizen, public-spirited and progressive, and it is with pleasure that we present this record of his life to our readers.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 464


NICHOLAS MICHL, who owns and operates one hundred and forty-six acres of land on section 28, Wade Township, is one of the enterprising and prosperous farmers of Jasper County, and is numbered among its honored pioneers, he dating his residence here from the autumn of 1847. As he is widely and favorably known, we feel assured that this record of his life will prove of interest to many of our readers. A native of Germany, he was born in Bavaria, December 6, 1830. His father, John Michl, and his mother, whose maiden name was Catherine Gisbeck, were also natives of Bavaria. The former, while emigrating with his family to the New World, died ere reaching his destination. He was taken sick and passed away on the Erie Canal, while en route for the West. His widow came on to Illinois, joining her son, the subject of this sketch.

Nicholas Michl spent the first sixteen years of his life in the Fatherland, and acquired a good education. He then determined to try his fortune in America, and in 1846 crossed the broad Atlantic with a friend, Mr. Shettlebower. Together they came west to Chicago, then a small village, and after a month made their way southward to Jasper County. Mr. Shettlebower settled in St. Marie, and our subject remained with and worked for him about four years. In 1850, Mr. Michl was joined by a brother who had just come from the Old Country, and they too rented land and engaged in farming for themselves during the summer. In the fall of 1851, they purchased one hundred and twenty acres of timberland, which they cleared and improved, making a good farm. Their home was a small log house with a puncheon floor, clapboard roof and mud and stick chimney. Their furniture was also very primitive in character, being mostly made by themselves. They had to endure many of the privations of frontier life, but they were young men, full of vigor, and they prospered in this pioneer life. The brothers continued to carry on business in partnership for about three years, when Nicholas bought out the other's interest.

Since that time our subject has purchased more land, and he still retains a good large farm, although he has given a considerable amount to his children. In 1861, he replaced the log cabin with a substantial frame residence; he has recently built a large barn, added other outbuildings, planted an orchard, and now has one of the valuable and desirable farms of the township. Mr. Michl not only commenced life empty-handed, but was in debt for his transportation to the New World. He paid off this obligation with two or three years of hard work upon the farm, and has since climbed steadily upward, overcoming the obstacles and difficulties in his path. He is to-day one of the prosperous and substantial farmers of Jasper County.

On the 8th of June, 1852, Mr. Michl wedded Louisa Kinsel, who was born in Buffalo, N. Y., and is a daughter of Charles Kinsel, one of the pioneers of Jasper County. Four children have blessed this union. The sons, Charles, Frank and William, are all substantial farmers residing near the old homestead, and Mary is the wife of Albert Doran, who is also an agriculturist.

Mr. Michl and his wife are members of the Newton Catholic Church, and in politics he is a stalwart Democrat. He has never had any inclination, however, to seek public office, preferring to devote his time and attention to his business interests, in which he has met with signal success. Mr. Michl has lead a busy and useful life, and his honorable and upright career has won him universal confidence and well-merited esteem.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 466

LA FAYETTE P. FOLTZ is a farmer of Wade Township, residing on section 18, whose life record we greatly desire to add to the history of Jasper, his native county. He has passed his entire life in this community, having first opened his eyes to the light of day in Wade Township, September 18, 1808. His parents were James and Mary A. (Ginivan) Foltz, natives of Virginia. After their marriage they removed to Ohio, and a few years later, about 1852, came to Illinois, locating in Jasper County. They became early settlers of Wade Township, when this locality was an almost unbroken wilderness. Mr. Foltz purchased raw land, and turning the first furrows upon the same he developed it into a good farm, which is now the home of our subject. He cleared and improved one hundred and twenty acres of land, upon which he made his home until called to his final rest, February 6, 1876. Mrs. Foltz still survives her husband and is now living on the old homestead, a well-preserved lady of seventy-two years. The father of our subject was quite prominent in public affairs, took an active part in local politics and served in a number of official positions of honor and trust. He filled the office of Constable and was Deputy Sheriff for fourteen years. With the Lutheran Church he held membership. In his death the county lost one of its best citizens and the community a valued man.

The Foltz family numbered six sons, who grew to mature years. Solomon died at the age of twenty-five; Ferdinand is married and follows farming in Jasper County; L. Dow is a farmer of Wade Township; Berzilius follows the same pursuit in Jasper County; La Fayette is the fifth in order of birth; and Ezra is a farmer of this county.

Mr. Foltz of this sketch has spent his entire life in the county of his birth. He remained with his mother until arriving at man's estate and in the common schools acquired a good English education. After reaching maturity he rented land and carried on farming for himself for several years. An important event in his life occurred in Olney, Ill., December 23, 1886, when was celebrated his marriage with Emma J., daughter of Jacob Cunefare. The lady was born in Richland County, but came with her parents to Jasper County when ten years old. Two children have been born unto them, Earl and Bessie, and they have lost one son, Roy, who died at the age of five months.

Mr. Foltz made his first purchase of land in 1885, and in the same year bought a portable mill and embarked in the manufacture of lumber, which business he has since continued. He located upon his present farm in March, 1888, he first buying eighty acres, but slightly improved. Since that time he has extended the boundaries of his farm by the purchase of forty acres additional. His land is under a good state of cultivation and well improved. In addition to this Mr. Foltz also has one hundred and twenty acres of timberland in Wade Township. In 1888 he bought a steam thresher and during the season engages in threshing, at the same time carrying on his other business interests. Our subject is a man of indomitable energy and has led a busy and useful life, which has resulted in bringing him in a handsome competency.

Mr. and Mrs. Foltz are members of the United Brethren Church and in politics he is a Democrat. He warmly advocates the principles of that party and has voted for each of its Presidential candidates since casting his first vote for Hon. S. J. Tilden. Mr. Foltz has spent his entire life in this county and is not only widely but favorably known. The acquaintances of his boyhood arc numbered among his warmest friends, a fact which indicates an honorable and upright life. The esteem of his fellow-citizens is well deserved, as is the confidence universally reposed in him.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 469

JOHN H. HOWARD, who carries on general farming on section 33, Wade Township, Jasper County, is one of the honored pioneers of this locality, having here resided since 1854. As he is widely and favorably known, we feel assured that his life record will prove of interest to many of our readers. He was born in Bartholomew County, Ind., September 3, 1841, and is a son of Jacob Howard, who was born in Decatur County, Ind. The father after attaining to mature years wedded Jane Waddle, who was born in Kentucky, but when a child came to Indiana with her father, John Waddle. He settled in Ripley County, but afterwards removed to Bartholomew County for a few years. The year 1854 witnessed his arrival in Jasper County, Ill. He entered land in Wade Township but was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, his death occurring in September, 1855. Mrs. Howard reared her children and afterwards married Benjamin Kruzan, a farmer of Jasper County, who died six months later.

Our subject is the eldest and is the only son in a family of four children who grew to mature years. He was a lad of thirteen when he came to this county. He remained with his mother until he had attained his majority and aided her in the care of the farm. His school privileges were quite limited, but by experience, observation and reading in later years he has become a well-informed man. During the late war he donned the blue in August, 1862, as a. member of Company I, Ninety-eighth Illinois Infantry, and served until February, 1863, when he was discharged on account of disability. On regaining his health, he again enlisted, October 24, 1863, as a member of Company E, Sixth Illinois Cavalry. He joined his regiment at Germantown, Tenn.,. and with it remained until the close of the war, participating in the battles of Nashville and Franklin and many others of less importance. He was mustered out at Selma, Ala., November 5, 1865, and honorably discharged at Springfield.

When the country no longer needed his services, Mr. Howard returned to his home in Jasper County and the next year located upon the farm where he now resides. It was then a wild and unimproved tract, hut with characteristic energy he began its development. He now owns one hundred and ten acres, highly improved and cultivated, with a comfortable home and all the accessories of a model farm. Many of the improvements thereon stand as monuments to his thrift and enterprise. He is also a carpenter, and many of the residences in the neighborhood, together with some of the dwellings and public buildings of Newton, are monuments to his handiwork.

Mr. Howard was united in marriage September 8, 1878, to Miss Elizabeth Deming, a native of Indiana, who came to Jasper County with her father, Frederick Deming, at an early day. Six children grace their union: Harriet G., Bertha D., Emory E., Frederick, Margaret J. and Olive E. The circle yet remains unbroken.

Mr. Howard is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, who takes an active interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community. The cause of education finds in him a warm friend, and during his service on the School Board he has done much towards securing and maintaining excellent schools.

Our subject, his wife and mother are members of the Protestant Methodist Church. Socially, he is a member of Newton Post No. 550, G. A. R., and Centennial Lodge of the Knights of Honor, of Newton. Since casting his first Presidential vote for Gen. U. S. Grant he has been an ardent supporter of the Republican party and its principles, although he has never sought or desired the honors or emoluments of public office. By his fellow-townsmen he is regarded as a man of upright character and he has their confidence and esteem in a high degree.


WILLIAM M. BABBS, who is engaged in general farming on section 18, Wade Township, Jasper County, is one of the veterans of the late war, and is a representative citizen of this community. In the years of his residence in southern Illinois, he has formed a wide acquaintance, and has gained the respect and confidence of a large circle of friends. He was born near Rising Sun, Ohio County, Ind., April 11, 1835. His father, William Babbs, Sr., was a native of the Buckeye State, and when a young man emigrated Westward, becoming one of the first settlers of Ohio County, he there married Rhoda, daughter of John Dickinson. In the midst of the forest he hewed out a farm, on which he reared his family, he spent the last years of his life at the home of his son in Effingham County, his death occurring in 1876. The Babbs family numbered seven sons and six daughters, who grew to mature years, were married and had families of their own. Seven of the number are yet living.

No event of special importance occurred during the boyhood of our subject, which was spent in attendance at the common schools during the winter months, and in working in the fields during-the summer. When a young man he went to Jefferson County, Ind., and learned the cooper's trade, at which he worked for a number of years. The marriage of Mr. Babbs was there celebrated in August, 1854, Miss Cornelia C. Hensley becoming his wife. Her parents, Walter and Eliza Hensley, were pioneers of that County. The young couple began their domestic life in Jefferson County, but after three years came to Illinois, locating in South Muddy Township, Jasper County. They bore all the hardships and trials of frontier life, and in a log cabin they lived in true pioneer style, but as the years passed prosperity rewarded their labors.

In August, 1861, Mr. Babbs responded to his country's call for troops and donned the blue as a member of Company K, Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, in which he served until the expiration of his three-years term, in 1864. He participated in the battles of Fredericktown (Mo.), Corinth, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Resaca. He was mustered out at Chattanooga with the regiment, which was disbanded at Louisville, Ky., September 22, 1864. He was a faithful soldier of the late war, always found at his post of duty.

After his discharge, Mr. Babbs returned to his family in Jasper County, and the following year removed to Effingham County, where he opened up a fine farm on sections 25 and 26, Lucas Township, where for several years he successfully carried on agricultural pursuits. In 1884, he sold out and returned to Jasper County, purchasing the farm on which he now resides. He has since planted a fine orchard, containing five hundred apple trees, and a good vineyard, and made other valuable and desirable improvements, which indicate the thrift and progressive spirit of the owner.

Mr. and Mrs. Babbs have a family of eight children, as follows: Eliza, wife of Samuel Whistler, of Kokomo, Ind.; William W., who is married and is now engaged in raining in California; Elizabeth, wife of Charles Foltz, of Clay County, Ill.; Herman E. and Samuel, who carry on the home farm; Zella, Jesse and Edwin.

The parents are members of the Protestant Methodist Church of Falmouth. Mr. Babbs is a Master Mason and has served as Treasurer of his lodge. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Democratic party, with which he has voted since attaining his majority. He was a faithful soldier of the late war, and is alike true to his duties of citizenship in times of peace, taking a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community and its upbuilding.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 470


PHILIP MASON is engaged in farming and stock-raising on section 15, North Muddy Township, Jasper County. His farm comprises two hundred and eighty acres of valuable land, which is under a high state of cultivation and well improved. It is pleasantly situated about a-half mile north of Wheeler, and is one of the fine farms of the township. The owner is one of the well-known citizens of this community. He was born in Edwards County, Ill., near Albion, February 6, 1860, and on both the paternal and maternal sides is descended from families that were founded in this country during Colonial days. His parents were John and Catherine J. (Hay) Mason, the former a native of Illinois, and the latter of Blair County, Pa. John Mason was twice married. His first union was with Miss Julia A. Bond, January 25, 1849, by whom he had five children, a son and four daughters, of whom four are yet living. He was for many years a farmer of Edwards County, Ill., but in 1865 he removed to Moultrie County, where he spent a year. The succeeding year of his life was passed in Coles County, this State, and on the 12th of January, 1867, he came to Jasper County. Purchasing ninety acres of land on section 4, North Muddy

Township, he there resided until 1871, when he sold his farm to Alexander Wilson and purchased one-half of section 9, of the same township. This he improved and from time to time he extended its boundaries until it comprised twelve hundred acres. The entire amount was placed under cultivation, and at the time of his death was all occupied by his sons. He died November 22, 1889, in Nashville, Tenn., having been taken sick while making a tour through the South. He was then sixty years, six months and eighteen days of age.

Mr. Mason was a prominent and influential citizen, and held the high regard of all with whom he was brought in contact. He served as Supervisor of North Muddy Township for several terms, and was tendered the nomination of Representative from his district, but declined the honor. In former years he had served as Deputy Sheriff of Edwards County during the trying times of the war. Socially, he was a member of Newton Lodge No. 216, A. F. & A. M., and was buried with the rites and honors of the Masonic fraternity. His wife, who was a faithful member of the Methodist Church, died January 10, 1876. Her mother is still living in Anderson County, Kan., having reached the age of seventy-three years.

The subject of this sketch is one of a family of seven children, four sons and three daughters, and is the first in order of birth. Ephraim married Miss Nancy A. Crews, and is living a mile north of Wheeler; Gilbert, who wedded Miss Lucy E. Caldwell, follows farming about four miles from Wheeler; Nannie A. is the wife of R. I. Madden, of Grayville, Ill.; Thomas, Edith and Emily are the other members of the family.

Philip Mason, whose name heads this record, spent the first five years of his life in Edwards County, and then accompanied his parents on their removals until their arrival in Jasper County in 1867, where he has now resided for about twenty-six years. His education was acquired in the district schools, and under the parental roof he remained until he had attained his majority. He was reared to the occupation of farming, and has made that pursuit his life work. On the 10th of October, 1883, he was united in marriage with Miss Missouri C. Caldwell, and their union has been blessed with a daughter, Bertha. Mrs. Mason is the daughter of Albert G. and Rebecca J. (Wagle) Caldwell, the former a native of Indiana, and the latter of Kentucky. They were early settlers of Grove Township. The father died April 23, 1880, at the age of fifty-six years, and the mother passed away March 19, 1890, when sixty-three years of age.

Mr. and Mrs. Mason began their domestic life upon the farm which is still their home. He received one hundred and sixty acres of his land from his father's estate, of which he was administrator. Although his father's business was widely scattered over a number of States, our subject settled up the entire affair at the expense of only $45. As before stated, his farm comprises two hundred and eighty acres. The rich and fertile fields indicate his enterprise, and the neat appearance of the place attests his practical and progressive spirit. He is also engaged quite extensively in stock-dealing. Socially, Mr. Mason is a member of Newton Lodge No. 216, A. F. & A. M.; Newton Lodge No. 109, R. A. M.; and of Wheeler Lodge No. 130, I. O. O. F.; also of Effingham Encampment No. 134. In his political affiliations he is a Democrat, but has never been an office-seeker, preferring to devote his time and attention to his business interests, in which he has met with signal success.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 474


JAMES LARRABEE, M. D., one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Jasper County, is now successfully engaged in practice in Wheeler, where he has resided since 1887. He is descended from good old Revolutionary stock and comes from one of the old Colonial families. The family is of French descent. The grandfather, John Larrabee, when seventeen years of age enlisted for the Revolutionary War, and valiantly aided the Colonies in their struggle for independence. He was afterward a Virginian farmer and in 1801 he removed to Ohio, where he followed the same pursuit until his death in 1846, at the age of eighty-seven years.

John Larrabee, the father of the Doctor, was born in Virginia, went with his parents to Ohio, and in that State followed farming until Octobers, 1852, when he removed to Crawford County, Ill. He there entered three hundred and twenty acres of land from the Government, purchased one hundred and sixty acres of timberland, and developed a fine farm. He married Mary Edwards, a native of Virginia, and a daughter of James Edwards, who was born in Wales. In the early part of the eighteenth century three of the Ed wards brothers came to this country. After their arrival they separated, Hayden and John removing with their families to Virginia. The other brother, Robert, owned property in New York City, which he leased for ninety-nine years. This is now in litigation, the property being estimated to be worth $400,000,000. The maternal grandfather of our subject is a direct descendant of these brothers. He died in Ohio at an advanced age. John Larrabee, father of the Doctor, resided in Licking County, Ohio, for fifty years and then, coming to Illinois, spent twenty-one years in Crawford County, where he died in 1873, at the age of seventy-four y ears. His wife passed away about a month previous, at the age of seventy-three. This worthy couple were the parents of seven sons and a daughter: David, Margaret, James and John (twins), William and Hiram (twins), Isaac and Oliver. James, Hiram and Isaac are the only ones now living. John was a member of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry during the late war and died in the service at Tullahoma, Tenn. Hiram is living on a farm in Crawford County, near Oblong and is the oldest stock-shipper in that vicinity. Isaac follows farming in Texas. William, who was in the same regiment as his brother John during the late war, died in 1873 from smallpox.

Dr. Larrabee spent the days of his boyhood and youth in the usual manner of farmer lads, and remained with his parents until after he had attained his majority. His literary education was acquired in the public schools of Licking County, Ohio, and subsequently he became a student in Vanderbilt College, of Nashville, Tenn. After pursuing a two years course of medicine and surgery, he was graduated from that institution on the 1st of March, 1878. He had, however, previously practiced medicine, having entered the profession in 1865, in Crawford County, Ill. In 1869 he removed to Effingham County, where he practiced for a number of years; later he went to Elliottstown, in the same county, and on the 14th of March, 1873, removed to Latona, where he engaged Hi practice for fourteen years. Since 1887 he has been the leading physician of Wheeler.

The Doctor was married February 22, 1855, to Miss Elizabeth Ann, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Rearick) Henry, who were natives of Pennsylvania. Four children were born unto them, but Mary A., Laura and an infant son are deceased. John H., the second child, is the only one now living. He is engaged in the furniture business in Newton. He married Miss Margaret Wallace, of Parson City, Kan., and they have a daughter, Anna. Mrs. Larrabee died August 16, 1863, and the Doctor was again married, March 23, 1865, his second union being with Miss Isabel Trimble, of Crawford County, Ill., who died in March, 1873. They had three children, but all are now deceased. On the 16th of June, 1875, in North Muddy Township, Dr. Larrabee led to the marriage altar Miss Mary A. Jayne. Her parents, Alexander and Sophrona (Highfill) Jayne, were both natives of Kentucky. Unto the Doctor and his wife were born three children, Charles G., Docie G. and Hallie James, but only the last-named is now living.

Socially, Dr. Larrabee is a member of Wheeler Lodge No. 130, I. O. O. F., and has been connected with this fraternity for thirty-nine years. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Democratic party, and although he has never been an office-seeker was elected to represent the Forty-fifth Senatorial District in the Thirty-fifth General Assembly of Illinois. He is a member of the Christian Church, and is a progressive and public-spirited citizen, who manifests a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community. All educational, social and moral enterprises find in him a warm friend. In the line of his profession he is well versed. He is a thorough student of the science and keeps abreast with all discoveries and methods concerning the same. Justly has he won a foremost rank among the medical practitioners of the county, and the large and lucrative practice which he receives is well merited.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 475

WILLIAM M. JONES, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 8, Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, is one of the honored pioneers of this locality, who has witnessed almost the entire growth and development of this region. A native of Ohio, he was born in Brown County March 7, 1816, and comes of a family of English origin, which at an early day in the history of this country was founded in Virginia. Lewis Jones, the father of our subject, was born in Culpeper County, Va., and after attaining to mature years wedded Nancy Boston, who was also a native of the Old Dominion. In an early day they removed to Ohio, locating in Brown County. In 1829 they went to Indiana, settling in Shelby County when it was almost an unbroken wilderness. In the midst of the forest the father hewed out a farm, clearing the land of the timber, fencing it and making many good improvements. His death there occurred in 1845. His wife survived him for a number of years, and with her son came to Illinois, spending her last days in Jasper County, where she died in February, 1858.

William M. Jones is the tenth in order of birth in a family of twelve children who grew to mature years. There were six sons and six daughters, and with the exception of one sister, all married and became heads of families, but our subject is now the only survivor. The record of his life is as follows: He spent the days of his boyhood and youth in Shelby County, Ind., and in his early life no event of special importance occurred. He received a good education in the common schools, and later engaged in teaching, following that profession for ten years during the winter season. On the 18th of July, 1839, Mr. Jones was united
in marriage in Shelby County, Ind., with Miss Frances A. Wycoff, who was born in Kendall County, Ky., and was a daughter of John and Margaret Wycoff. Her parents were both natives of Virginia, but became very early settlers of Kendall County, Ky. Mr. and Mrs. Jones began their domestic life upon a farm. For some time after their marriage, he engaged in the cultivation of his land during the summer months, and in the winter season was employed in teaching school in the neighborhood where he made his home. In 1849 he determined to seek a home in Illinois. Carrying out his plan, he became a resident of Jasper County, entered a tract of two hundred acres of land and located upon the farm which has since been his home. It was an unimproved tract, but he plowed and planted it and in course of time the raw prairie was transformed into rich and fertile fields. His first home was a log cabin with a clapboard roof and a mud and stick chimney. They suffered many of the inconveniences of pioneer life, but the land was then new and rich and yielded abundant harvests, so that their financial resources were increased and they were able to add many comforts and luxuries to their home. Mr. Jones has also extended the boundaries of his farm from time to time, until it now comprises six hundred acres under a high state of cultivation, and well improved with all the accessories of a model farm, including a large and substantial residence, good barns and outbuildings, an orchard, etc.

In politics, Mr. Jones has been identified with the Democratic party for a number of years. Originally, he was an old-line Whig, and cast his first vote for William Henry Harrison. Later, he voted for Franklin Pierce and has since supported the men and measures of the Democracy, except on one occasion, when he refused to vote for Horace Greeley. Mr. Jones has held a number of local positions of honor and trust. He was appointed Township Treasurer and served for six consecutive years, and was elected Justice of the Peace, but after one year resigned. He was next elected County Treasurer and Assessor, was re-elected, and served in that capacity for six years. He also filled the office of Circuit Clerk of Jasper County for eight consecutive years. In whatever position he has been called upon to fill, Mr. Jones has proved a most faithful and efficient officer and won the commendation of all concerned by his prompt discharge of duty.

In 1886 Mr. Jones was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 17th of December, at the age of seventy. She was a most estimable lady, and had proved a true and faithful helpmate to her husband for forty-seven years. Five children who grew to mature years were born of that union: Sarah J., wife of Byron Lewis, a farmer of Jasper County; Frances A., widow of James Freeman; Minerva Ellen; Mary E., wife of Albert Martin, of Jasper County; and Thaddeus D., who was married and reared a family, but died in August, 1887, at the age of forty-five years. Four children died in infancy.

Mr. Jones was for several years connected with the Masonic fraternity. For forty-four years he has been a resident of this county, and has not only seen its growth and development, but has aided in its progress and advancement. He has ever borne his part as a faithful citizen, and the honorable, upright life he has led has won him universal confidence and esteem.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 476


EPHRAIM MASON, one of the representative and progressive citizens of North Muddy Township, Jasper County, is engaged in farming on section 10. As he is widely and favorably known in this community, we feel assured that this record of his life will prove of interest to many of our readers. He has the honor of being a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Edwards County, October 30, 1861. His parents, John and Catherine Mason, are mentioned in the sketch of Philip Mason on another page of this work.

No event of special importance occurred during the childhood and youth of our subject, which were passed in attendance at the district schools during the winter season and in farm work during the summer months. He was early inured to the hard labors of the farm, and in consequence when he began life for himself was well acquainted with the pursuit which he has since followed.

On the 6th of October, 1886, a marriage ceremony was performed which united the destinies of Mr. Mason and Miss Lucy A. Crews, a daughter of James L. and Mary A. (Green) Crews, the former a native of Indiana, and the latter of Ohio. Her parents are numbered among the pioneer settlers of Jasper County, having here located at an early day. Her mother died February 5, 1883, but her father is still living on the old homestead in Grove Township, and is one of the honored and respected citizens of the county. He is well advanced in years but still manages his farm and looks after his business interests. Three children graced the union of our subject and his wife, a son and two daughters, but Mabel, their second child, died when three months old. John, Chester and Nellie are still living and are the light and life of the parents' home.

In his social relations, Mr. Mason is an Odd Fellow, belonging to Wheeler Lodge No. 130, I. O. O. F. His wife is a member of the Episcopal Church. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Democratic party, but takes no active part in political affairs. However, he has served for some years as School Director, and is now filling that office.

Mr. Mason is engaged in operating three hundred and twenty acres of land, a part of the old homestead. It is all well improved with a commodious and substantial residence, good barns and other outbuildings found upon a model farm. His land is all well fenced and drained, and the rich and fertile fields yield to him a golden tribute. In connection with this properly he also owns one hundred and sixty acres of good prairie land in Grove Township, and forty acres of timberland in North Muddy Township. Besides his farming, he deals in stock, raising horses, cattle and hogs to quite an extent. He also raises fine poultry and expects to carry on that line of business on an extensive scale. By good management and well-directed efforts, Mr. Mason has won a handsome competence and is numbered among the substantial citizens of Jasper County. His home is pleasantly situated about a mile and a-half north of Wheeler, and he and his estimable wife have made it the abode of hospitality.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 476


Return to the Main Index Page for Jasper County
©2008 Genealogy Trails