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Jasper County Biographies
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Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887)
Submitted by Judy Edwards



WILLIAM LAYTON, proprietor of a livery and feed stable in Wheeler, Jasper County, and at present Justice of the Peace, is a native of the Buckeye State. He was born near Piketon, Pike County, Ohio, August 27, 1818, and is one of a family of nine children, five sons and four daughters, whose parents were Asher and Rebecca (Davis) Layton. The father was a native of Kentucky, but during his boyhood went to Ohio with his father, Elias Layton. The grandfather of our subject became a farmer of that State, where he lived until called to his final rest at the age of sixty years. Asher served as a soldier in the War of 1812. He was married in the Buckeye State to Miss Davis, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of William Davis, who was born in Ireland, and emigrated to America in the latter part of the eighteenth century, locating in Pennsylvania, where he died at an advanced age. In 1842, Asher Layton came with his family to Illinois and spent the remainder of his life in Knox County, on Spoon River. He died in September, 1843, when fifty-eight years of age. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Church. After the death of Mr. Layton, the latter became the wife of John Gafney, who died in Knox County. Subsequently she removed to Effingham County and resided with her son William until called to the home beyond, in 1859.

We now take up the personal history of our subject, who spent the days of his boyhood and youth in the usual manner of farmer lads upon his father's farm. His education was acquired in the public schools of Pike and Highland Counties. After attaining to mature years he led to the marriage altar on the 6th of March, 1840,

Miss Mary Jenkins, by their union were born nine children, namely: John D., Theodore, Allen, Asher, Branson, Jackson, James E., Rebecca Ann, and a daughter who died in infancy. All are now deceased with the exception of John, Theodore, Branson and Jackson. The first-named married Miss Jane Fleming and resides in Moultrie County with their three children, Kittle, William and Edith. Theodore, who wedded Mary Fleming, by whom he had eight children, Dora, Drucilla Anna, Franklin, Claude, Grace, Cleveland and Delia, is living near Cole's Station, Moultrie County. Branson married Miss Emma Hamilton, and with their children, Maud and Jessie, resides in Urbana, Ill. Jackson is now engaged in farming in Dakota. He was there married and has six children: William, Frederick, Theodore H., John, Anna and an infant. Allen was joined in wedlock with Miss Libbie Funk, and died in 1887, leaving five children: Calvin, John, Emma, Myrtie and Ora. Mrs. Mary Lay ton was called to her final rest in 1869. Our subject was again married, in 1872, his second union being with Mrs. Anna Layton, widow of Perry Layton, his cousin. They had one child but it died in infancy. By her first union Mrs. Layton had two sons: Elias, who died in infancy; and William Commodore, a hotelkeeper of Dietrich, Ill. The latter married Miss Eliza Wilson, and they have three children: Lena V., Grover Cleveland and Ella.

In March, 1882, Mr. Layton removed from Effingham County to Wheeler, which at that time contained only two houses. He served as section boss on the Indiana & Illinois Southern Railroad for a time, and was then for two years engaged in the livery business. After an interval he again embarked in the livery business, which he now carries on. In the meantime he carried mail for "Uncle Sam" for four and a-half years.

In 1862, Mr. Layton enlisted in the Sixty -second Illinois Infantry as Regiment Wagon-master, and was uniformed and sent out to recruit. He was then detailed to take charge of the horses, and served in that capacity until early in 1865, when he was placed in charge of one hundred and three men, whom he took to Little Rock, Ark. Of this number fifty-five were placed under the command of Capt. Richardson, and the remainder under Mr. Layton, and were engaged in loading and unloading supplies from the boats. After a few weeks Mr. Layton was made wharf-master and served in that capacity until the close of the war. In his political affiliations our subject is a Democrat, and is now holding the office of Justice of the Peace, which position he has acceptably filled for eight years. Socially, he is a member of Newton Lodge No. 16, A. F. & A. M., of Newton, Ill. Himself and wife are members of the Christian Church. They have a good home in Wheeler, which is the abode of hospitality. The latchstring always hangs out, and their many friends are always sure of a hearty welcome. Mr. Lay ton is a man of sterling worth, and in the years of Ins residence here he has won the high regard of all with whom business or social relations have brought him in contact.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 484

HON. JAMES W. GIBSON is the senior member of the firm of Gibson & Johnson, of Newton. This is the leading law firm of Jasper County, and as a jurist Mr. Gibson occupies a front rank at the county Bar. He is also numbered among the prominent and influential citizens of this community, and as such well deserves representation in this volume.

Mr. Gibson claims Michigan as the State of his nativity, his birth having occurred in Detroit, October 26, 1845. His father, William Gibson, was born in the North of Ireland, and emigrated to America in early life. The mother was a native of New York. On crossing the Atlantic, William Gibson first settled in Canada, but subsequently removed to Oakland County, Mich., and later went to Detroit. He entered the United States service for the Mexican War as a member of the Third United States Dragoons, and was killed in a cavalry skirmish in Mexico in 1848. His widow still survives him and is now a resident of Grand Rapids, Mich.

The subject of this sketch spent the days of his youth in Oakland, Mich., where he attended the public schools until fifteen years of age, when he came to Illinois. This was in 1861, and he located in Olney, Richland County, and there again pursued his studies until his arrival in Newton, Jasper County, in 1863. It became his desire to make the practice of law his life work, and to fit himself for the legal profession he began studying under the preceptorship of his uncle, Isaac Gibson. Having been admitted to the Bar in October, 1867, he at once entered upon the practice of his profession in Newton. After ten years' private practice he was elected in the autumn of 1877 to the position of County Judge of Jasper County, and was re-elected and held that office for nine years.

On the 19th of November, 1870, Judge Gibson was united in marriage in Newton with Miss Vindia C. Brooks, a daughter of John and Mary Brooks. Her father is now deceased, but her mother is still living and is a resident of this place. Mrs. Gibson was born in Hancock County, Ind., and came to Jasper County with her parents in childhood. She is a most estimable lady and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Three children were born unto the Judge and his wife, but only two are now living, Lela and Ralph. Launce, the eldest, died at the age of thirteen months.

In politics, Judge Gibson is a Democrat, and in company with Frank L. Shup published the Newton Press, the leading Democratic paper of the county, in which he was half-owner from 1886 until March, 1893, when Mr. Shup purchased his interest, becoming sole proprietor.

On the 1st of January, 1882, he formed the existing partnership with Hale Johnson, they doing a law, real-estate, loan and collection business. While comparatively a young man, the Judge is an experienced and successful lawyer, and one of the oldest in years of practice at the Jasper County Bar. His course as County Judge was distinguished by promptness, ability and fidelity in the discharge of his duties. As a lawyer he has built up a large and successful practice, and takes rank among the ablest in the profession in southern Illinois. The firm of which he is a member always gets a large share of the important cases on the calendar at each term of court, and enjoys an extensive practice. Judge Gibson is peculiarly strong as a trial lawyer in the examination of witnesses, and in the presentation and management of cases in court he has no superior in this section of the State. He possesses excellent ability as a writer, both in prose and verse, and for some years contributed liberally to the columns of the New York Weekly, Literary Mirror, and Cincinnati Enquirer, and later to the Newton Press, while he was associate editor of that paper.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 485

G. K. GOSNELL, who for more than forty years has been a resident of Jasper County, now follows agricultural pursuits on section 17, Wade Township. He dates his residence here from 1852. He was born in Harrison County, Ky., April 10, 1829, and is a son of William and Susan (King) Gosnell, both of whom were natives of Virginia. They were married in their native State, and thence removed to Kentucky, where Mr. Gosnell cleared and developed a farm. In 1839, accompanied by his family, he went to Rush County, Ind., where he again opened up a large farm, and there spent the last years of his life. His home was then on the frontier, and he engaged in some of the Indian wars.
George Gosnell, whose name heads this sketch, was a lad of ten years when he went to Rush County, Ind., where he grew to manhood. Under the parental roof he remained until he reached his majority. In February, 1852, in Rush County, he was united in marriage with Sarah Campbell, a native of that county, and a daughter of John and Nancy Campbell, The wedding tour of the young couple consisted of a trip to Illinois. They arrived in Jasper County on the 1st of October, 1852, and Mr. Gosnell entered a tract of one hundred and sixty acres, where he now resides, and also a timbered tract, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres. The land was in its primitive condition, not a furrow having been turned or an improvement made, but with characteristic energy he began its development. He plowed and planted, and in course of time rich and fertile fields yielded to him abundant harvests. He built a good hewed log house, and lived in true pioneer style, for Jasper County was then on the frontier. All kinds of wild game could be had in abundance, and deer were frequently seen in great droves. There were also many wolves. As the years passed, however, civilization changed all this, and with the onward march of progress Mr. Gosnell kept pace until he had transformed his wild land into one of the best farms of the community. The log cabin has long since given place to a comfortable frame residence, and other substantial improvements have been added.

By the union of our subject and his wife six children were born, and are now all married and heads of families. William C. and John are both farmers of this county; Nancy is the wife of George Matheney, of Jasper County; Zelda is the wife of Charles Mann; Mary is the wife of Jackson Dumont; and Richard is a farmer of this community. There are also twenty-four living grandchildren. The mother of this family died in 1885, and Mr. Gosnell has since wedded Mrs. Caroline Burgund, a widow, who was born in this county, and is a daughter of Robert Polys. The marriage was celebrated January 4, 1889. The lady has one daughter by her former marriage, Julia M. Burgund.

In early life Mr. Gosnell was an old-line Whig, and cast his first vote for William Henry Harrison. Since the organization of the Republican party, he has been a stanch advocate of its principles. Our subject is a friend to all educational, social and moral interests calculated to benefit the community, and is a prominent and influential citizen, widely and favorably known in this locality. His wife is a member of the Christian Church. For forty-one long years Mr. Gosnell has been a witness of the growth and development of Jasper County, and has aided greatly in its progress. He is well numbered among its honored pioneers, and justly deserves representation in its history.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 486

GEORGE SPELBRING, who is engaged in general farming on section 4, Wade Township, was born on the 6th of June, 1834, in Wayne County, Ind., and is a son of George Spelbring, Sr. His father was a native of Germany, who grew to manhood and was married there. About 1832 he crossed the Atlantic to America and located on a farm in Wayne County, Ind., but afterward removed to Owen County, where he opened up a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. He and his wife both spent their last days in that locality.

Our subject grew to manhood ill Owen County, and in his youth attended the common schools of the neighborhood, which afforded him his educational privileges. After his father's death he remained with his mother until he had attained his majority. He was married in Owen County December 26, 1855, when twenty-one years of age, the lady of his choice being Miss Elizabeth, daughter of John Emerich, one of the early settlers of Clay County, Ind., where the daughter was born. The young couple began their domestic life upon a farm, and for a number of years resided either in Owen or Clay County. It was in 1874 that they came to Illinois and took up their residence in Grove Township, Jasper County. Mr. Spelbring purchased a small farm, which was but slightly improved, and also rented a large farm, which he operated for three years. On the expiration of that time he sold out and removed to Arkansas. Buying a small, improved place in Clay County, he began farming, but after raising two crops he sold out and took a trip through Missouri and northern Arkansas; after a few weeks he returned to Illinois and again settled in Grove Township, Jasper County. Once more he purchased a small, improved farm, which he operated for a number of years. In the autumn of 1886, he purchased his present homestead, a tract of eighty acres, located about three miles from Newton. The improvements were indeed few, and the residence was a log cabin, but it has been replaced by a neat and substantial dwelling, and this improvement has been supplemented by others in the shape of good barns and outbuildings. Mr. Spelbring commenced life for himself a poor man, empty-handed, but by his own labor, enterprise and industry, and by the assistance of his estimable wife, he has acquired a good home and valuable farm, and is to-day classed among the well-to-do agriculturists of the community.

Ten children have graced the union of Mr. and Mrs. Spelbring. William is married and follows farming in Indiana; Edwin is married and follows the same pursuit in Jasper County; John is also married and operates a farm adjoining his father's; Louis is married and follows farming in Piatt County, Ill.; Daniel is married and engages in agricultural pursuits in this county; Charles is married and engages in the manufacture of lumber in Grove Township, Jasper County; and the others are Thomas, Cora Ellen, Clementine and Albert.

In politics Mr. Spelbring is a supporter of the Democratic party, and has voted for each of the Presidential candidates of that party since casting his first ballot for James Buchanan in 1856. He has never sought or desired the honors or emoluments of public office, preferring to devote his entire time and attention to his business interests. The community in which he lives regards Mr. Spelbring as a valued citizen, and he is a prominent and influential man, who always does his part in aiding in public enterprises.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 486

DRURY R. LOVE, an enterprising and representative farmer residing on section 12, Wade Township, has the honor of being a native of Jasper County, his birth having occurred on the old homestead where he now resides, January 21, 1862. His father, John M. Love, was born in Boone County, Ky., September 4, 1819, and his grandfather, Samuel Love, was also a native of that county. The great-grandfather, John Love, was born in Pennsylvania, where the family was founded at an early day by ancestors who came from their native Ireland to America prior to the Revolution. John M. Love removed with his parents to Indiana in childhood and grew to manhood in Shelby County. He received a good education and was a successful teacher in his younger years. He was married May 24, 1855, to Harriet Robinson, who was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, and was a daughter of William C. Robinson. Soon after, Mr. Love removed with his young wife to Illinois and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of raw prairie land and one hundred and sixty acres of timberland in Jasper County. Building a substantial log house, he began life here in true pioneer style. He commenced fencing and breaking the land, and in course of time had a good farm, but in those first years the family suffered many of the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life.

Later, as his financial resources increased, Mr. Love built a substantial and commodious residence, together with good barns and other outbuildings. He was a successful agriculturist and soon had his farm in good shape, he later purchased more land, until his possessions were nearly five hundred acres. His business ability and his industrious efforts won him a well-merited success. He took quite an active part in political affairs and held a number of offices of honor and trust. He served as Deputy County Surveyor and was afterward elected Surveyor of Jasper County. In whatever position he was called upon to fill he proved a faithful and efficient officer. In politics he was a stanch Republican and always supported the men and measures of that party, and socially, he was a member of the Masonic lodge of Newton. He died while in Peoria, September 28, 1892, and his remains were interred in Newton Cemetery. At his death the county lost a valued and prominent citizen and one of its leading agriculturists. His upright character and sterling worth had won him high regard, and his loss was Dee[mourned. His wife still survives him and resides on the old homestead with our subject. She is an estimable lady and has many warm friends in this community.
Drury Love, whose name heads this record, is the only surviving son of John M. and Harriet Love. His boyhood and youth were spent upon the farm where he yet resides. In fact, he has known no other home. He acquired a good education in the public schools of Jasper County, and for five terms successfully engaged in teaching.

On the 26th of December, 1888, Mr. Love was united in marriage with Miss Cora Vest, a native of Clay County, Ind., who came to Jasper County when a maiden of twelve summers with her father, Joseph E. -Vest, who now resides at Willow Hill.

Her education was acquired in the public schools, and in the Newton High School, from which she was graduated in the Class of '86. The union of our subject and his wife has been blessed with one daughter, Ada Clarissa, a bright little girl, who is the joy and pet of the household.

Mr. Love cast his first Presidential vote for Hon. James G. Blaine, and is a warm advocate of the principles of the Republican party, but has never been an aspirant for public office. In his social relations he is a Mason, belonging to Newton Lodge No. 216, A. F. & A. M., of which he is now Master, serving the second year in this position. In the county of his nativity he has a wide acquaintance, and his upright career and well spent life have won him the high regard of a large circle of friends. The Love household is the abode of hospitality, and its members rank high in social circles.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 492

F. L. SHUP, editor and publisher of the Newton Press, was born in Wade Township, Jasper County, Ill., one mile northwest of Newton, July 4, 1854, and is a son of William and Emily (Coffin) Shup. His father was born in Pennsylvania, and was united in marriage with Miss Coffin in Hancock County, Ind., thence removing to Jasper County, Ill., in 1852.

Mr. Shup, Sr., was a soldier in the Mexican War. After coming to this State he served one term as Sheriff of Jasper County, filling the office from 1860 to 1862. He has also held various other local offices. His present residence is in Newton. His wife is of English descent, and the common ancestry of the Coffin family, now so numerous and influential, emigrated to America early in the seventeenth century, and settled in the Massachusetts Colony. A branch of the family removed to the Island of Nantucket, and thence to North Carolina. Mrs. Shup was born in North Carolina, near Guilford Court House, celebrated in the Revolutionary and American Civil Wars, and is descended from that branch of the family. She removed with her parents to Wayne County, and afterward to Hancock County, Ind. Several members of the Coffin family with which she is connected are prominent in the banking and railway circles of the county.

The subject of this sketch passed his childhood and youth on his father's farm, and attended the district school in his boyhood, after which he spent two or three terms in a private Normal School. On starting out in life for himself, he took up educational work, and engaged in teaching several terms of school. His political sympathies led him into the Democratic camp, where he has since been at home. Yielding to the solicitation of friends, he submitted to the unanimous wish of his fellow-citizens, regardless of party, and was elected without opposition the first Village Clerk of Newton. He wore his official honors with becoming modesty, performed the arduous duties of his office with ability and fidelity, and retired to private life in the spirit in which he was elected namely, by the unanimous consent of his constituents. Since that one eventful occasion he has never exhibited any weakness in the desire for political distinction. He will probably always look back to that episode in his career as a youthful indiscretion.

When twenty-two years of age, Mr. Shup entered upon the study of law under the preceptorship of Brown & Gibson, a prominent law firm of Newton, and was admitted to practice in 1880, at Springfield, Ill. In June of that year he went to Kingman, Kan., where he entered upon the prosecution of his chosen profession, and also became associate editor of the Kingman Citizen. While there he likewise served as a member of the Board of School Examiners, by the appointment of the County Commissioners. In June, 1882, he returned to Newton and assumed editorial charge of the Newton Press, with which he has been connected ever since as editor and part owner. He is now serving his third term as Master in Chancery of the Circuit Court of Jasper County.

On the 3d of May, 1887, Mr. Shup was married in Wade Township to Miss Nannie Richardson, who was born in Ohio, and is a daughter of Frank D. and Esther A. (Weer) Richardson. Her parents are represented elsewhere in this work. Our subject and his wife are well known in the community, and hold an enviable position in social circles.

Mr. Shup is an able journalist. As a writer he is bright and witty, and always keeps a weather eye open for the local interests of his city and county. He is thorough and sound in his Democracy, and always makes the Press a potent factor in campaign work. A genial, whole-souled companionable man, he has hosts of friends among his fellow-citizens.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 493

JOSEPH LITZELMANN, deceased, the pioneer hotel-keeper of Newton and one of the earliest settlers of Jasper County, came here in 1840, locating first in St. Marie. From that time until the day of his death he was recognized as an influential and prominent citizen, for he ever bore an active part in the upbuilding and development of the county and the promotion of its best interests. Mr. Litzelmann was born in Alsace, France, in what is now Germany, in 1820. His father, Mathias Litzelmann, was also a native of that country. The family emigrated to America in 1840, and after landing in this country came directly to Jasper County, Ill., taking up their residence in St. Marie.

The subject of this sketch was a trader and dealer in live stock and also engaged in farming. In 1815 he was married in St. Marie to Miss Barbara Ostheimer, who was also a native of Alsace, France, and who emigrated from Europe to America about the same time as her husband. They lived upon a farm for a time, but in 1855 Mr. Litzelmann purchased the American House at Newton, now the property of his son Joseph, and engaged in hotel-keeping there. He improved and enlarged this hotel, which he continued to carry on until his death, on the 27th of March, 1874. Mrs. Litzelmann died a number of years previous, passing away in 1850 in St. Marie.

Five children were born to this worthy couple, but only two are now living. Maggie, the eldest, became the wife of Joseph Boos, but is now deceased; Mary died in childhood; Joseph and Mathias were twins. The former married Sarah Frances Thompson and is the present proprietor of the American House. He is represented on another page of this work. Sophia, the youngest of the family, is the widow of Joseph Geoppner and resides in Newton.

In politics, Mr. Litzelmann was a supporter of the Democratic party and he and his wife were Catholics in their religious belief. Our subject was an industrious and upright man and by his well-directed efforts along the lines of business accumulated considerable property. He was not active in public affairs but was highly respected by all who knew him.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 495

JOHN ELLIOTT, proprietor of a livery, feed and sale stable of Olney, is a native-born citizen of that town, or rather of the territory comprised within its limits, for his birth, which occurred November 3, 1831, antedates the organization of Richland County and the township and city of Olney. Within the limits of what is now the city of Olney, his father purchased a squatter's claim in 1824, and subsequently entered the land at a Government sale, and paid for it the Government price of $1.25 per acre. It was then a part of Lawrence County. A portion of that tract is still in the possession of our subject, and has always been his home. John Elliott is the only surviving child of William and Elizabeth (Shidler) Elliott. His father was a native of North Carolina, and was numbered among the very earliest settlers of what is now Richland Comity. He came here with his father, James Elliott, in 1824. A sketch of this worthy pioneer is given elsewhere in this volume. John Elliott was reared and educated in his native county, receiving such school privileges as were to be found on the frontier. He was brought up to agricultural pursuits, and having attained his majority, he was married on the 12th of December, 1853, in Richland County, to Miss Ann Maria Truitt, who was born in Maryland, February 14, 1836, and was a daughter of Lemuel and Clarissa (Broughton) Truitt. Her death occurred April 12, 1863. Three children were born of this marriage, a daughter and two sons. Jeannette, born February 25, 1855, is the wife of F. T. Phillips, of Olney; Ira Gilbert was born October 24, 1860, and died July 20, 1880; Harry F., born March 16, 1862, was killed on the railroad, November 22, 1889. On the 27th of April, 1865, Mr. Elliott married for his second wife Miss Evalena B. Grass, who was born in Lawrence County, Ill., July 3, 1838, and was a daughter of Alfred H. and Susan (Snyder) Grass. She became the mother of four children, and died August 29, 1873. James Harvey, the eldest child, was born January 26, 1866, married Nellie Hensley, and is a resident of Olney Township; William, who was born July 16, 1868, is at home; Robert, who was born September 18, 1869, is now in St. Louis; and John, who was born September 12, 1870, died March 8, 1871.

Soon after his first marriage, Mr. Elliott removed to a farm near what is now the town of Noble, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits a few years. He then returned to the old homestead in Olney, where he has since resided. On the 9th of December, 1875, he was again married, the lady of his choice being Mrs. Mary A. Zook, widow of Gamin Zook, and a daughter of Jacob and Martha (Dunbar) Willhour. She was born in Berks County, Pa., October 16, 1828, and by her former marriage had one daughter, Nettie, now Mrs. Seeders, a resident of Fairbury, Ill. One child was born of the third marriage, Walter, who was born February 23, 1876, and died January 15, 1877. Mrs. Elliott died September 1, 1885. On the 10th of November, 1886, Mr. Elliott was united in marriage with his present wife, who was at that time Mrs. Amanda J. Adams, widow of Eli Adams, and a daughter of Benjamin and Phoebe (Johnson) Palmateer. Her father, Dr. Benjamin La Palmateer, was born in Ulster County, N. Y., of French ancestry. He became a physician, and removed to Guernsey County, Ohio, where he married Miss Phoebe Johnson, a native of that county. The same year they came to Illinois and settled in Crawford County. There Dr. Palmateer, besides practicing his profession, engaged in farming, and became a Methodist minister. He and his wife are now deceased. Their daughter, Amanda J., was married June 20, 1869, to Eli Adams, and they made their home in Olney. Mr. Adams, who was a merchant and postal clerk, died March 10, 1883, leaving one daughter, Flora May, who resides with her mother and stepfather. Mrs. Elliott was born in Cumberland, Guernsey County, Ohio.

Mr. Elliott continued in his original vocation, that of farming and stock-raising, until 1888, when he went to Chicago and engaged in business, but after two years returned to his home in Olney. In February, 1892, he bought the livery business which he has since carried on. He has a large and well-equipped barn, where he keeps constantly on hand a large number of fine horses and carriages. He has a fine farm of one hundred and twenty-one acres in Olney Township, which he recently deeded to his son, and has another of sixty acres lying partly within the city of Olney, and which is very valuable. Besides this, he has a tract of three acres in the city, the site of his residence. He platted twenty-five acres of the old homestead farm, and this was made an addition to Olney. In it he still owns several valuable lots.

In politics, Mr. Elliott is a Democrat, and for ten years has represented the First Ward as Alderman in the City Council. In his religious views he is a Swedenborgian, and is an active and influential member of that society. His wife holds membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Mr. Elliott is esteemed one of the enterprising and influential citizens of Olney, and has by his strict integrity and upright course in life won the confidence and esteem of his fellow-citizens.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 496

JOSEPH BOOS was one of the well-known pioneers of Jasper County. He settled here in June, 1840, and from that time until his death was prominently connected with the upbuilding of the community and with its best interests, so that he well deserves mention in this volume. He was born in Alsace, then a province of France, but now belonging to Germany, in 1807, and there spent the days of his youth and early manhood, enjoying superior educational advantages. On attaining to man's estate he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Feleger, who was also a native of that country. In 1840 they emigrated with their family, consisting of two sons, to the United States, the ocean voyage occupying about three months. On arriving they made their way directly to Illinois and located in Jasper County. They settled in what is now Fox Township, but was then a part of the township of St. Marie. There Mr. Boos bought a tract of land and engaged in farming, which honorable occupation he followed for the long period of twenty-four years. He and his wife endured patiently the many privations and hardships incident to pioneer life, and by dint of perseverance and industry eventually reached the goal of success. Mr. Boos was an excellent farmer, energetic and enterprising, and carefully attended to all the details of his business. Aided by his frugal wife and industrious sons, he was eminently prosperous, and acquired a handsome competence as the reward of their united labors.

After nearly a quarter of a century spent upon the old homestead, Mr. and Mrs. Boos left the farm in charge of their sons, and with their younger children removed to the village of St. Marie, where the former spent the remainder of his days. Our subject was called to his final rest December 6, 1865. The family remained in St. Marie for eight years after the death of the father, and then removed to Newton, where the mother died in August, 1886, at the advanced age of seventy-seven years.

Mr. and Mrs. Boos were the parents of eight children, who grew to mature years, two sons and six daughters. Aloyous, the eldest of the family, was for several years a successful farmer, and in company with his brother dealt extensively in livestock, being the largest shipper of cattle in the county. In 1870 he opened a general store in Newton, continuing in the mercantile business until his death, which occurred May 16, 1880. He was also largely interested in other important business enterprises. The large flouring mill at Newton was built in 1877 by him, his brother and the late Bernhardt Faller. Joseph, the second of the family, is a merchant and grain buyer at Boos Station, on the Peoria, Decatur & Evansville Railroad, and is also engaged in farming, being a large land-owner. He has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Maggie Litzelmann, a daughter of Joseph Litzelmann, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. She died March 14, 1875, leaving two children, Frances and Joseph. Mr. Boos later married Hellena Horn, by whom he has had six children, four of whom are living at this writing, two having died in infancy; Josephine, the eldest daughter, became" the wife of Anthony Litzelmann, and died September 29, 1877, leaving seven children; Elizabeth is the wife of Xavier Faller, and they reside in Chicago, Ill.; Lena is the next in order of birth; Frances is a nun in a convent in St. Louis; Louisa married Aloyous Florie, and died in 1884, leaving one child; Mary is the youngest, and with her sister Lena resides at the old homestead in Newton.

Mr. Boos was possessed of a very liberal education, and was always a friend to schools. In his religious belief he was a Roman Catholic, and in the early struggles to establish a place of worship in St. Marie he contributed liberally of his time and means. He was ever forward in promoting the best interests of the church to which he and his family belonged, and his efforts resulted in much good. As a citizen, he was highly esteemed for his upright dealings with all, and for his progressive and public spirit. The good example of this worthy man has not been lost sight of by his family, for they too have contributed largely to the advancement and upbuilding of the community in which they were all reared. A handsome large business block in Newton, containing three stores, stands as a witness to their enterprise and business sagacity. To religion and education they have also devoted much of their means, as they were the most liberal contributors in the building of St. Thomas' Church at Newton, which is an imposing structure. The convent is the work of Sister Frances, who, assisted by the other members of the family, built and donated it to the church. Much credit is due this honored pioneer and his descendants for the manner in which they have borne their parts, and it is with pleasure we have recorded a few of their many acts of charity and kindness.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 497

THOMAS PRICE is a well-known agriculturist of Jasper County, residing on section 16, Wade Township. Indiana has furnished a number of worthy citizens to this community, among whom is our subject. He was born in Vigo County, of the Hoosier State, March 6, 1839. His father, John Price, was a native of Harrison County, Ky., and there grew to manhood and married Mary Becket, who was born in the same State. Accompanied by his family, he removed to Indiana, and in 1842 he emigrated to Edgar County, Ill., becoming one of the pioneer settlers. There he secured land and developed and improved a farm, upon which he lived during the remainder of his life, passing away in 1873. He was twice married. His last wife survived him a few years but is now deceased.

Thomas Price is the youngest of four sons. He was but three years old at the time of the removal to Edgar County, where the days of his boyhood and youth were passed. His educational privileges were quite meagre, but his training in the line of farm labor was not so limited. As a companion and helpmate on life's journey he chose Miss Bethehana Clarke, a native of Edgar County, and a daughter of Philip Clarke. Their union was celebrated in the county of her nativity in 1860, and after their marriage Mr. Price rented land there for seventeen years. It was in 1877 that they came to Jasper County and purchased a farm of eighty-five acres in Crooked Creek Township. A few acres had been broken, and a rough log house constituted the only improvement upon the place, but with characteristic energy Mr. Price began its development. He cleared the land, fenced it, planted his crops, and soon rich and fertile fields had taken the place of the barren tract. Mr. Price also erected a neat residence, good barns and outbuildings, planted an orchard and made the farm one of the best in that locality. He operated it successfully for about thirteen years, and then, in 1889, took charge of the Poor Farm, which at that time was very much run down. The fences and buildings were all going to decay and the whole place presented a very dilapidated appearance. Since taking possession, Mr. Price has almost fenced the entire place, repaired the buildings, erected a new house at a cost of $1,000, and otherwise greatly improved the place. When he took charge of the farm there were eighty-nine inmates, but the number now varies from nine to twenty-three. They are well fed and comfortably clothed and have neat and well-kept quarters. No more efficient person for the position could have been secured than Mr. Price, and he has won high commendation from all concerned.

Since casting his first Presidential vote for Hon. Stephen A. Douglas in 1860, Mr. Price has been identified with the Democratic party. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church, in which Mr. Price is an officer. This worthy couple have one son, who is married and carries on the home farm. The son and his wife are also members of the same church. They have one child, Alpha, a babe of a few months. Our subject is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he is now filling the office of Master, and is a member of Rose Hill Lodge, I. O. O. F. In all the relations of life, Mr. Price has been found straightforward and honorable, true to every trust reposed in him, and has the confidence and high regard of a large circle of friends and acquaintances.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 499

AMOS H. BEALS, who follows farming on section 13, Wade Township, has the honor of being a native of Illinois and is one of the early settlers of Jasper County. As such, he deserves representation in this volume and with pleasure we record his sketch. He was born in Cumberland County, Ill., December 13, 1839. His father, Bennett Beals, was a native of Vermont, and the grandfather, Caleb L. Beals, was also born in New England. The great-grandfather of our subject, a native of England, was the founder of the family in America. Caleb left the East, removing to Kentucky and from there to Indiana, where he remained for a few years. He then became one of the pioneer settlers of Cumberland County, Ill., and spent the remainder of his life in that locality.

After attaining his majority, Bennett Beals married Eunice, daughter of William Barrows, who removed from Kentucky to Indiana, where the mother of our subject was born. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Beals removed to Cumberland County, Ill., where he opened up a farm and reared his family. The year 1857 witnessed his arrival in Jasper County, where he spent his remaining days, being called to the home beyond in 1868, He had served in the Illinois State Militia during the early days, held a number of local official positions of honor and trust, and served as Justice of the Peace for a number of terms, both in Cumberland and Jasper Counties. Mrs. Beals survived her husband for several years and died in 1887.

The subject of this sketch is one of a family of five sons and four daughters, but he and a brother are now the only survivors. When a young man of eighteen years became with his father to Jasper County, where he arrived on the 4th of March. Under the parental roof he remained until twenty-four years of age, when, on the 5th of June, 1864, he was united in marriage with Miss Rhoda Ellen Wall, one of Jasper County's fair daughters.

Mrs. Beals' parents were Francis and Frances Jane (Brooks) Wall, and both were natives of Virginia, Mrs. Wall's father being an Englishman and her mother Irish. Mr. and Mrs. Wall had a family of twelve children born unto them, of whom two died in childhood and ten grew to maturity, but at this writing only seven are living. Mr. Wall died December 19, 1870, and Mrs. Wall just a week later. Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Her father, Francis Wall, was numbered among the honored pioneers of this county, whither he removed from Indiana, having resided there a few years after leaving Virginia, his native State.

The young couple began wedded life in Newton, where Mr. Beals engaged in the manufacture of native lumber and operated a sawmill for about ten years. During that period he purchased a good residence property and greatly improved it, making it a comfortable and pleasant home. In 1872, he removed to his farm. He first purchased forty acres of land, upon which were only a few improvements, but he cleared and fenced the tract, has built a commodious and substantial residence, also good barns and other outbuildings, and now has one of the best farms in the locality. Its boundaries he also extended by the purchase of an additional sixty acres. He has also purchased one hundred and thirty acres of bottom lands, which he has cleared and improved. After farming for four years, Mr. Beals returned to Newton and again engaged in the manufacture of lumber for about a year, but in 1877 he again took up his residence upon the farm and has since devoted his time and attention to agricultural pursuits. For several years he has also engaged in the breeding of standard-bred horses. He owns an imported English Shire stallion, the best in the county.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Beals have been born four children, who are yet living: Stephen O., who is married and follows farming in Jasper County; Allard I., who married Miss Zella Babbs, March 16, 1893, and is a farmer of Wade Township; Charles H. and Burton A. They lost a daughter, Dora, who died at the age of seven months. Mrs. Beals is a member of the Protestant Methodist Church. Although not a member of any church organization, Mr. Beals attends and gives his support to the different churches in this locality. He is a member of, and one of the principal stockholders in, the Jasper County Fair Association, of which he is also a Director. His first Presidential vote was cast for Gen. George B. McClellan in 1864, and he has voted for each Presidential nominee of the Democratic party since that time.

Our subject has spent his entire life in Illinois, and has resided in Jasper County thirty-six years, during which time he has witnessed its growth and development and been identified with its progress and upbuilding. He is one of its most enterprising and public-spirited citizens and is known throughout Jasper and the adjoining counties as a man of sterling worth and strict integrity, who has the confidence and esteem of all with whom business or social relations have brought him in contact.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 494

JOHN BYRD, who carries on general farming on section 7, Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, dates his residence in this community from 1850, and has therefore been an eye-witness of the growth and upbuilding of the community for forty-three years. He is a native of the Hoosier State. His birth occurred in Rush County on the 22d of January, 1847. His father, Abram Byrd, was also born in Indiana, and, on attaining to man's estate, he married Jane Andrews, a native of Rush County. In 1850, accompanied by his family, he removed to Illinois and chose Jasper County as the scene of his future labors. Entering land in Crooked Creek Township, he began the development of a farm, but was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, his death occurring soon after. Mrs. Byrd survives her husband and has reared her family. She is now living with her daughter, and, although she has reached the age of seventy, she is still well preserved.

John Byrd, of this sketch, was the only son in a family of seven children. The sisters all grew to womanhood, but only two are now living. He spent the days of his boyhood and youth upon his mother's farm, and, being an only son, much of the labor of cultivating the land devolved upon him. His educational privileges were very limited in fact, he is almost self-educated. After he had arrived at man's estate he chose as a companion and helpmate on life's journey Miss Phoebe Brooks, a native of Jasper County, and a daughter of Eliphez Brooks, one of the honored pioneer settlers of this community. After his marriage Mr. Byrd removed to Moultrie County, Ill., where he rented land and engaged in farming. There he carried on agricultural pursuits for eighteen years, and was quite successful in his undertakings. At length he returned to Jasper County, in October, 1887, and bought the farm on which he has now resided for six years. The place had no improvements upon it, but with characteristic energy he began its development. He has erected a pleasant and substantial home, good barns and other necessary outbuildings, has planted an orchard, and now has the place well supplied with all the accessories of a model farm.

Mr. and Mrs. Byrd have a family of seven children, as follows: Vienna, wife of William Duoit, of Moultrie County; Rosanna, wife of Ross Cummins, of Jasper County 1; Lulu, Ada, William, Etta and Rachel. The eldest child of their family, a daughter, died in infancy. Mr. Byrd deserves great credit for his success in life, which is entirely the result of his own well-directed efforts. Pimply-handed he started out in life, but the obstacles and difficulties in his path he has overcome by determined effort and has acquired for himself a comfortable competence. In his political affiliations he is a Republican, and has supported each Presidential nominee of that party since casting his first vote for Gen. U. S. Grant.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 505

WILLIAM H. THOMAS, who owns and operates one hundred and sixty-seven acres of arable land on section 14, Wade Township, is one of the well-to-do and respected farmers of Jasper County. He claims Virginia as the State of his nativity, his birth having occurred in Shenandoah County, March 2, 1841. He is a son of Abram and Mary (Riffey) Thomas, both of whom were born in the Old Dominion, as were the grandfathers of our subject, Gabriel Thomas and John Riffey. After his marriage, Abram Thomas engaged in farming for a few years in his native Slate, and in 1844 emigrated Westward with his family until he reached Illinois. He came to Jasper County when Newton had but one store and a few small dwellings. Mr. Thomas was a carpenter by trade and followed that business here until his death, which occurred in August, 1845. Mrs. Thomas still survives her husband and is living with her son. She is still well preserved and her eighty-two years rest lightly upon her.

After the death of his father, William H. Thomas, whose name heads this record, went to live with Christley McCall, with whom he remained until he had attained his majority. He had few privileges, educational or otherwise, having to spend all his time at farm work. On arriving at man's estate, he rented land and engaged in farming for himself. Through industry and good management, he acquired a small capital and soon purchased a forty-acre tract of timberland, which he cleared, plowed and planted, transforming it into a good farm. Success attended his efforts in this direction, and as his financial resources have increased he has made additional purchases from time to time until he now owns one hundred and sixty-seven acres of valuable land. His farm is well improved and the rich and fertile fields yield to him a golden tribute in return for his care and labor.

Mr. Thomas has been three times married. In April, 1862, he wedded Miss Nancy Miller, who died the following year, leaving a daughter, Mary, now the wife of Levi Bird, of Richland County. In 1870 Mr. Thomas was united in marriage with Miss Mary Daniels, who at her death left a son, John A., who is married and follows farming in Jasper County. On Christmas Day of 1873 was celebrated the union of Mr. Thomas and Miss Melinda Jane Smith, a native of Shelby County, Ill., and a daughter of Joseph Smith, who died when Mrs. Thomas was a child of three years. By this union six children have been born, namely: Cora F., Margaret H., William Perry, Effie M., Kye E., and Ada M.

Mr. Thomas is a public-spirited and progressive citizen and has ever borne his part in upbuilding those enterprises calculated to prove of public benefit. He follows in the political footsteps of his ancestors, being a stanch supporter of the Democracy. Socially, he is a member of Newton Lodge of Red Men. His success in life has been the result of his own efforts. Empty-handed he started out for himself, but by industry and enterprise he overcame the difficulties in his path and has steadily worked his way upward to a position among the substantial farmers of this community. Mr. Thomas is also numbered among the honored pioneers of Jasper county, almost half a century having passed since he here located. He has seen the progress and development which have transformed it from a sterile or swampy place into rich farms and prosperous homes. He has seen towns and villages spring up and the work of civilization carried forward, until the county of today bears no resemblance to that of fifty years ago.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 509

MILTON MATTHEWS is engaged in farming on section 25, Wade Township, Jasper County, and is also the proprietor of a meat-market in Newton. He does a good business and is one of the well-known citizens of this community. He was born in Morgan County, Ind., September 9, 1846, and is a son of James Matthews, who was born in Ohio and went to Indiana when a young man with his father, George Matthews. The grandfather opened up a farm in Morgan County in the midst of the forest, and there spent the remainder of his days. James grew to manhood in Morgan County and married Miss Ann Noble, a native of Ohio. He was a farmer by occupation, and followed that business throughout his entire life. In the early days he made several trips to New Orleans on flatboats. He died in 1852, at the age of forty-three years, while the grandfather of our subject reached the advanced age of eighty-two. Mrs. James Matthews survived her husband and was a second time married. She died in Wade Township, Jasper County, March 15, 1889, and her remains were taken to Morgan County, Ind., for interment.

The Matthews family numbered seven children, who grew to mature years. Wiley was a soldier of the late war, and is now a merchant, Postmaster and farmer of Dickens, Lincoln County, Neb; Alfred was a soldier and died in the service in 1864, from the effects of a wound received while defending the union; Milton is the next younger; Miles, twin brother of Milton, was also in the Union army, and is now a contractor and builder in Indianapolis, Ind.; James resides in Missouri; Emily, who is now deceased, was twice married, becoming the wife of Mr. Fulkerson, and after his death marrying Mr. Kerns; and Margaret is the wife of Henry Garrett, of Morgan County, Ind.

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood in Morgan County, Ind. When a young man of only seventeen, he responded to his country's call for troops, enlisting April 27, 1864, in Coles County, Ill., as a member of Company E, Fifth Illinois Cavalry. He joined the regiment at Vicksburg and participated in a number of raids and skirmishes. At the close of the war he was mustered out, and received his discharge in Springfield in October, 1865. When the country no longer needed his services he returned to Morgan County, Ind., and began working on a farm. In the fall of 1867 he came to Illinois and located at Diona, on the county line between Coles and Cumberland Counties, and there engaged in merchandising for three years.

Mr. Matthews was married in Coles County February 18, 1869, to Miss Minta, a daughter of G. S. Fulkerson. The father and daughter were both natives of Virginia, and the family came to Illinois when Mrs. Matthews was a maiden of about eight summers. The young couple began their domestic life in Diona, and in 1870 Mr. Matthews sold out his mercantile business and located on a farm in Cumberland County, Ill. A short time afterward, however, he went to Jasper County, Mo., and a year later took up a claim in Wilson County, Kan. A year's residence in that State sufficed, and he returned to the old home stead in Indiana, which he operated for two year On the expiration of that period he again went to Diona, where he engaged in clerking for several years. In 1883 we find him in Morgan County ( Ind., engaged in the operation of the old home stead for his mother. There he spent three year and in 1886 came to Jasper County. He purchased the farm on which he now resides, and has since devoted his energies to its cultivation. He has built a pleasant residence and made many other desirable improvements, which stand as monuments to his thrift and enterprise. The home is pleasantly located within two miles of Newton.

Mr. and Mrs. Matthews have a family of eight children, the eldest of whom, Lindley, is now married and carries on a part of the home farm; Luther is now living in Morgan County, Ind.: Christa is at home; James is a resident of North Dakota; Clarence, Roger, Oscar and George are still under the parental roof.

Mr. Matthews is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Newton Grand Army Post. His wife is a member of the Falmouth Protestant Methodist Church. In politics he is a Republican and warmly advocates the principles of that party. He is to-day one of the prosperous and well-to-do farmers of Jasper County, a position he has attained through his own efforts. He has good business ability, is energetic and enterprising, and in the legitimate channels of business he has gained a good property.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 510

BERNARD FALLER was an honored pioneer and influential business man of Jasper County, Ill. He was born in the town of Barr, Alsace. France, now a province of Germany, on the 12th of August, 1822, and was a son of Florence and Helena (Mercien) Faller. Our subject was educated in his native country, and at the age of sixteen years emigrated to America in company with three of his brothers and his aunt, Mary Ann Mercien. The brothers who accompanied him were Edward, Isadore and Florence. The first-named is now Rector of St. Mary's Catholic Church, of New Albany, Ind. The second was drowned in the Embarras River, in Jasper County, at the age of sixteen; and Florence died two years after coming to this country.

A few months after their arrival here the brothers were joined by other members of the family, including Francis, who settled in Jasper County, and died in 1888; Xavier, who came in 1853, and is now engaged in the tanning and leather business in Chicago; and Rev. Father Clement, a member of the Jesuit order. The latter never took up his residence in the United States, and is now a missionary stationed in Brazil, South America.

On coming to this country, Bernard Faller located in St. Marie, a French and German Catholic settlement in Jasper county, where he resided three years. He then removed to Vincennes, Ind., where he spent one year, and then went to Evansville, of the same State. _Six months later he returned to St. Marie, hut after a brief period removed to Chicago, where he engaged in milling and merchandising. The great World's Fair City was then but a small straggling town of a few thousand people, noted more for its streets of seemingly bottomless mud, wherein the old Prink & Walker stages and the prairie-schooner wagons from Indiana and southern Illinois were mired daily, than for anything else. There were no railroads running into Chicago then. Steamboats from the Lower Lakes and the stages constituted the only means of conveyance. In 1849, when the famous gold discoveries in California created such excitement, Mr. Faller's adventurous spirit prompted him to join a party of gold-seekers and start across the plains for the Pacific Coast. Their wagons were drawn by cattle, but Mr. Faller had a horse, which he rode a part of the way. They were several months making the trip and met with some hostile Indians, but were not attacked in force.

On reaching the gold fields, our subject engaged in placer-mining, as was the custom in those days, and was very successful. To amuse himself he planted a little garden near his cabin, probably not exceeding a square rod in extent, which he watered from the river on which he was mining. In this garden he raised a fine lot of vegetables, and selling those not needed for himself, made a good profit. He sold everything, including potatoes, melons, etc., at $1 per pound, and one melon weighing eight pounds brought him $8 in gold dust. He continued in California four years, and then, having accumulated quite a fortune, returned to the States by way of the ocean and Isthmus route. He landed at New Orleans, where he converted his gold dust into coined gold, which he brought home with him.

At St. Marie Mr. Faller made the acquaintance of a beautiful young girl of fifteen, Miss Elizabeth, daughter of James and Margaret (Mallet) Theriac, who captivated the miner's heart, and to whom he was married at Vincennes, Ind., on the 13th of April, 1853. She was born in Vincennes October 22, 1838. Her parents were also natives of that city and were of French descent, her grandparents having been natives of Paris, France, and pioneer settlers of Vincennes. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Faller settled in Newton, and engaged in the grocery business for a short time. He then removed his girl wife to a farm in the woods, three and a-half miles west of Newton, in Wade Township. At the time of her marriage, Mrs. Faller was just from school. Her mother had kept her close at her studies and had probably deferred her training in the line of practical housekeeping until she should have finished her education. The consequence was, she found herself at the head of a home almost entirely ignorant of household duties. Right here the practical knowledge of her bachelor husband in the way of cooking and housekeeping, acquired in his California experience, came into good play. He taught his wife to make bread, the first essential, and to cook meats and vegetables. She proved an apt scholar, and her womanly instincts soon led her to improve on her husband's methods, until in a short time she became the good cook and housewife which she is now so well known to be.

After eleven years spent on the farm, Mr. Faller returned with his family to Newton and built a steam gristmill. He had previously bought the watermills in Newton, both grist and sawmills in one building, which he had leased. He continued to operate the steam mill for ten years and then operated the watermills, which he had improved. On the 17th of February, 1887, these mills were destroyed by fire, and, the insurance having expired without renewal a few days previous, the fire caused a total loss of the property. Immediately after the fire, Mr. Faller formed a partnership with Joseph Boos, and the company erected the present large and well-appointed mills known as the Newton Water Mills, of which Boos & Faller are proprietors. The structure is of brick and is furnished with the latest and most improved machinery for manufacturing flour by the roller process, having a daily capacity of one hundred and thirty barrels. About the lime of the rebuilding of the mill, Mr. Faller erected three brick business houses on the east side of the public square near the southeast corner, which together are known as the Faller Block, and which are still owned by the family.

On returning to Newton, Mr. Faller made his home on La Fayette Street until 1879, when, on the 10th of March of that year, during the absence of the family, the house with its contents was consumed by fire. In this case also the insurance had expired a few days previous to the fire and had not been renewed. The house was well furnished, and contained besides many valuable relics and heirlooms. The building and its contents, including the clothing of the family, proved a total loss. For the succeeding five years the family resided in a frame house on the site of the present business buildings, after which our subject erected the present brick residence near the old mill.

Mr. and Mrs. Faller were blessed with a large family, numbering fourteen children. Anthony Bernard, the eldest, born on the 13th of January, 1854, a successful and popular physician of Newton, married Cornelia Edson, and died July 22, 1883; James Edward, born August 13, 1855, resides in Newton; Francis Xavier, born January 8, 1857, died on the 12th of February following; Henry Ambrose, born March 1, 1858, married Nellie Lewis, and is a carpenter of Newton and a captain of militia; Thomas Flaget, born May 8, 1860, wedded Sallie Glynn, and is engaged in milling in Newton; Florent, born February 8, 1862. married Tillie Schackman, and is a miller of Newton; Louis, torn February 6, 1864, is also a miller of Newton; Francis Valentine, born February 6, 1867, is employed with an uncle in Chicago; Josephine Frances is at home; Helena Caroline is attending St. Mary's Institute, near Terre Haute, Ind.; Charles Albert Noel, born December 18, 1872, Bernard Hubert, March 27, 1875, and Mary Estella and Herbeth Augustine, March 16, 1881, are at home.

Mr. Faller was actively engaged in business up to his last illness, in the spring of 1889. His death occurred on the 18th of March, at the age of sixty-six years, seven months and six days. He was buried in the Catholic Cemetery at Newton, where a fine marble statue of the Angel Gabriel marks his last resting-place. The monument, which is an elegant and costly one, was made in Paris, France, and presented to Mrs. Faller by her sister, Miss Josephina Theriac. Mr. Faller was a Democrat in politics and held various local offices. While in Wade Township he served as Assessor one term, while in Newton was Justice of the Peace, and for several terms was a member of the Board of Trustees and City Council of this city. He was also foremost in the organization of the People's Bank, the first bank established here.

Mr. Faller led a busy and useful life, was enterprising and energetic, and exercised most excellent judgment in his investments and the management of his business affairs. He prospered and accumulated a large property, which at his death would have been much greater had it not been for the heavy loss he sustained in the burning of his mill and residence. He was socially disposed and very hospitable, was very domestic in his habits and devoted to his wife and children. His integrity was beyond question, and in business matters his word was as good as the bond of other men. His estimable wife survives him and still resides with her children at the old home in Newton. Mr. Faller was an earnest Catholic and was liberal in the support of his church. His wife was reared in the same faith and has brought up her children in that way. Hers is one of the influential Catholic families of the county and one highly respected in the community where they reside.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 515

HON. WILLIAM G. WILLIAMS, D. S., who is engaged in the practice of dental surgery in Newton, claims Ohio as the State of his nativity, his birth having occurred in Coshocton County, on the 16th of November, 1840. He is a son of William G. and Margaret (Knoff) Williams. His father was a native of Virginia, or, as it is now, West Virginia, having been born near Wheeling on the 1st of January, 1801. He removed to Coshocton County, Ohio, and there spent much of his life. For twelve years he served as Treasurer of that county, and was a prominent and influential citizen, highly respected by all who knew him. His death occurred in March, 1856. The mother of our subject was born in Sussex County, N. J., in 1800, and having survived her husband for about three years, was called to her final rest in April, 1859.

William G. Williams, whose name heads this record, acquired his education in the public schools of his native State, and in the Wesleyan University of Ohio. He was a young man of nineteen years when he came to Illinois. He first located in Jasper County, but soon afterward went to Fayette County and studied dentistry in Vandalia. He also engaged in practice at that place, and was there married on the 30th of October, 1865, the lady of his choice being Miss Mary A. Capps, a daughter of Ebenezer Capps, and a native of the city in which their wedding was celebrated. Two children have been born of their union: Claudia and Paul.

It was in 1870 that Mr. Williams came to Newton, where he has since made his home. Soon after his arrival he entered the store of Mr. Nigh as clerk and thus served for about three months, when he was appointed Deputy Circuit Clerk under Ogdon Monell. In April, 1874, he was elected to fill that office, and at the expiration of the two years term was re-elected, and in 1880 was made Circuit Clerk, holding the position until 1884. Altogether he has served in that office for eight years. In 1888, he was nominated and elected as Representative to the Thirty-sixth General Assembly of the Illinois Legislature, and while a member of the House served on several important committees. While in Vandalia, he served as Collector of his township.

In his social relations, Mr. Williams is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. In the spring of 1891, he resumed the practice of his profession, which he had suspended while in public office, and is now engaged in the practice of dentistry. Mr. Williams proved himself a capable and efficient officer in every position he was called upon to fill. His long-continued service in the office of Circuit Clerk is a high testimonial to his fidelity and faithful performance of duty. His public and private life are alike above reproach. He has always labored for the best interests of the community in which he resides, and is a valued and worthy citizen.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 516


REV. P. J. VIRNICH, whose portrait appears upon another page, is the very efficient pastor of St. Marie's Church. His work in St. Marie has been highly satisfactory to his people and to the community in general.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 516

JOHN SCHACKMANN, who follows agricultural pursuits on section 21, Wade Township, is one of the honored pioneers of Jasper County, whose residence here covers a period of fifty-two years. The date of his arrival in the county is January, 1840. Mr. Schackmann has therefore witnessed the growth and development of the county since the days of its early infancy. He has seen its wild lands transformed into beautiful homes and farms, its hamlets grow into thriving towns, and has watched the progress of civilization and the development that has made the county one of the best in southern Illinois. The pioneer settlers were the founders of the county, and to them is due a debt of gratitude for what they have done in its behalf.

Our subject was born in Prussia, Germany, January 5, 1830, and is a son of George and Mary (Bower) Schackmann, natives of France. His father was a stone-cutter and mason in the Old Country. In 1836 he came alone to America, and for a time worked at his trade in different States. At length he located in Jasper County, Ill., and in 1841 sent for his family, who joined him in January of the following year. The father purchased forty acres of land and opened up a little farm, to which he added from time to time until at his death he owned two hundred and forty acres of valuable land, highly improved. His first wife passed away on the 22d of December, 1857, and after her death he wedded Mrs. Rosa McDermott, by whom he had two children: John Philip, who resides in Missouri; and George Edward, who died when two years of age. Mr. Schackmann died April 7, 1874, but Mrs. Schackmann is still living and resides with her son in Missouri.

Mr. Schackmann's family by his first wife numbered eight children, four of whom were born in the Old Country. John was the eldest, and came to America when a lad of ten years. He grew to manhood in Jasper County, and in his youth aided his father in the labors of the home farm. He remained under the parental roof until twenty-two years of age, when he started out in life for himself, and as a companion and helpmate on life's journey he chose Miss Rosella Kinsel, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Charles Kinsel, who was of French descent. Their union was celebrated in this county January 13, 1852, and nine children were born unto them, the two eldest dying in infancy. Those living are: Frank J., now a merchant of Newton; George Henry, who is in partnership with his brother; Mary Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Gender, a blacksmith of Newton; Susan Philomena, wife of S. Longle, of Newton; Charles S., who follows farming in Wade Township, Jasper County; Matilda C., wife of F. Fowler, also of Newton; and Josephine P. The mother of this family was called to her final rest November 5, 1886, and on the 5th of June, 1888, Mr. Schackmann married Mrs. Catherine Hipp, a widow, and a daughter of Ignatius Moschenross. By her first marriage she had three children: Joseph J., Frank X. and Mary. Two children have been born of the last union: John Harman Joseph and Mary Rosella Catherine.

After his first marriage Mr. Schackmann operated the home farm for a year, and then located upon the land where he now lives. He had previously purchased eighty acres, upon which he built a log cabin with a mud and stick chimney. The land he plowed and planted, and in the course of time he had it under a fine state of cultivation. Prosperity rewarded his efforts, and as his financial resources increased he extended the boundaries of his farm from time to time, until it now comprises two hundred and twenty 1 acres, of which one hundred and thirty acres are all fenced and broken and under a high state of cultivation. He also has forty acres of bottom land, well improved and cultivated. The log cabin has long since been replaced by a comfortable and commodious dwelling, and large barns and other outbuildings have been erected, and the Schackmann homestead is to-day one of the finest farms in Wade Township. Our subject certainly deserves great credit for his success, as he started in life a poor man, dependent entirely upon his own exertions. He possesses good business ability, is energetic and enterprising, and by his well-directed efforts he has achieved signal success, becoming one of the prosperous agriculturists of the community.

In politics, on all questions of national importance, Mr. Schackmann is a Democrat, but in local elections he votes for the man whom he thinks best qualified for the office. He has never been an aspirant for public office, but was honored with an election to the position of Town Supervisor and County Supervisor. He has also served as a member of the School Board and as Highway Commissioner, and in all these offices his prompt and faithful discharge of duty has won for him high commendation. Himself and wife are members of the Newton Catholic Church, and in the community in which they live they are held in high regard. As an honored pioneer of the county Mr. Schackmann well deserves representation in this volume.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 527

WILLIAM EDWARD BARRETT, an intelligent and highly respected farmer, residing on section 24, North Muddy Township, Jasper County, claims Indiana as the State of his nativity. He was born in Rush County, near the Soldiers' and Orphans' Home, at Knightstown, March 10, 1833, and on both the paternal and maternal sides is descended from families noted for longevity. His grandfather Barrett was more than a centenarian at the time of his death. His grandfather, William McOmas, followed farming throughout his entire life in Virginia, and there died in 1818. His wife reached the advanced age of ninety-eight years. The parents of our subject, Samuel and Clarissa B. (McOmas) Barrett, were both natives of West Virginia. The former was of Irish descent, his father having emigrated from the Emerald Isle about 1750. He was on his way to the West Indies, but was shipwrecked and became a resident of the United States. Unto Samuel Barrett and his wife were born seventeen children, eight sons and nine daughters, of whom eleven are still living. With the exception of one who died at the age of eighteen, all grew to mature years and were married. The names of the children were: Armilda, Cynthia Ann, Dicy, Charles Addison, Valeria, John M., Harvey B., Caroline, William E., Lucinda, Sarah E., Samuel D., Augustus E., Samantha A., Clarissa, Joseph H. and Simpson K.

The father of this family was a farmer and also was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church for forty-five years. He served as a volunteer soldier under Gen. Harrison in the War of 1812. It was in Cabell County, Va., that he started out in life for himself. There in connection with agricultural pursuits he had charge of salt works for some years. At length, selling his farm, he removed to Rush County, Ind., in 1829, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. He also engaged in teaching school for a time. He became a prominent and influential citizen, and in 1842 was elected a member of the State Legislature. He died on his farm near Knightstown, at the age of seventy years. His wife survived him thirty years, passing away January 23, 1892, at the age of ninety years and seven days. She was a faithful member of the Methodist Church from her fifteenth year, and although she lived to such an advanced age she could read her Bible without glasses up to the time of her death. The descendants of Mr. Barrett's parents numbered two hundred and six at the time of his mother's death, embracing five generations. There were seventeen children, sixty-seven grandchildren, one hundred and seventeen great grandchildren, and five great-great-grandchildren.

William E. Barrett, whose name heads this record, remained on his father's farm until after he had attained his majority. His education was acquired in the district schools, and at the age of eighteen he began teaching, which profession he has followed for thirty -one terms. As a helpmate and companion on life's journey he chose Miss Mary A. Wyrick, daughter of William and Rebecca (Ruby) Wyrick. Her father was a native of North Carolina, and her mother of Virginia. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Barrett, which was celebrated near Dayton, Ohio, August 12, 1856, has been blessed with six children. Roselder H., the eldest, married Etta Perine, of Newton, and follows farming near Wheeler. Dora A. is the wife of John B. Smith, a farmer near Wheeler, and they have four children: Harry O., Nora May, Nellie Pearl and Goldie Isabel. Ida M. is the wife of Francis M. Miller, who follows farming near Lis, Jasper County, and by whom she has three children: Alva B., Lulu Ethel and Stella May. Laura B. is the wife of George S. Batman, County Superintendent of Schools. They reside in Newton and have three living children: Delbert E., Okal and Lora Belle. Beula died at the age of two years. Mary L. and Rosa Emma, the youngest members of the Barrett family, are still at home.

On the 25th of September, 1857, Mr. Barrett reached Jasper County, Ill., and located in North Muddy Township, upon the farm which has since been his home. He purchased one hundred and forty acres of land and began the development of a farm. The prairie around was all covered with wild grass, which grew higher than the horses' heads. Mr. Barrett plowed and planted his land, and transformed it into one of the finest farms of the township. He also extended its boundaries by additional purchases, until two hundred and forty acres yield to him a golden tribute in return for his labors. He has also given considerable attention to stock-raising, and has handled horses, cattle, hogs and sheep on a large scale. He now makes a specialty of the raising of fine cattle.

Mr. Barrett has been crop reporter to the State Department for fifteen years; he also reports to the National Board, and has been reporter for the Farmers' Review during the entire existence of that paper. He has also been Secretary and President of the Jasper County Fair Association, of which he was really the founder. In politics, he is a stanch advocate of Republican principles, and has continuously supported that party since he cast

his first Presidential vote for John C. Fremont, its first candidate. He has never been an office-seeker, yet was twice induced by his fellow-townsmen to accept the nomination for County Judge. Himself and wife are faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for a quarter of a century he has been County President of the Sunday-school Association, which position he held until within a year, when he resigned. Mr. Barrett has led a busy life and as the result of his energy and enterprise has gained a comfortable competence. He has also led a useful one, and his influence for good has been strongly marked in the community where he has so long made his home.

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WILLIAM KELLOGG, who carries on agricultural pursuits on section 15, near Wheeler, North Muddy Township, Jasper County, is a native of the old Bay State. He was born in South Hadley, January 6, 1829, and is one of a family of twelve children born of the union of Elijah and Ruth (Church) Kellogg, who were also natives of Massachusetts. Of their nine sons and three daughters nil grew to mature years, but only two are now living, William and Otis. The latter now resides on the old homestead of his grandfather in Massachusetts. The father of this family followed farming near South Hadley, and there spent his entire life, his death occurring in 1836, at the age of forty years. He belonged to a military company and was a man of prominence in that community. His wife survived him for about four years. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church.

When our subject was quite young he was bound out to Jonathan Terry, a farmer of Enfield, Hartford County, Conn., with whom he spent his boyhood and youth. He obtained his education in the schools of Enfield and by studying in the evenings by the light of a tallow candle. He wished to win success in life, and embraced every opportunity to aid him in the course he had marked out. When a young man, he and his brother Hawley engaged in business in Hartford, Conn., on the corner of Mill and Main Streets, for about a year. William then removed to New York City, where for a time he engaged in clerking in a furniture store. Later he carried on a butter and spice store, where he did business for himself until 1861. In the early part of that year he sold out and went to Ohio, where he worked on a farm for Joel Blackmail.

On the 9th of May, following, Mr. Kellogg was united in marriage with Maria O. Blackman, the daughter of his employer. Her parents were both Connecticut people. Her father is still living at the age of ninety years. Her mother, who bore the maiden name of Wealthy Tilden, is now deceased. Four children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg. Charles, the eldest, was twice married. He wedded Miss Rosa Twaddle, and afterwards married a lady of Cleveland, Ohio, where he is now studying medicine and working at the printer's trade. Fred was united in marriage with Miss Dora Zimmerman, and resides in Ashland, Ohio, where he is employed as bookkeeper with Myers & Bros., manufacturers of farming implements. They have two children, Annie and Florence. Willie is married and resides on a farm near Wheeler. Florence, the only daughter by the first wife of Mr. Kellogg, is living with her grandparents at Norwalk, Ohio, and is a teacher. In 1868, Mr. Kellogg came to Illinois and four years later his wife died after a lingering illness. Three months before her death she went to her parents' home in Norwalk, Ohio, where she passed away. On the 26th of March, 1872, Mr. Kellogg led to the marriage altar Miss Edith Ellis, daughter of Freeman and Merinda (Denman) Ellis, the former a native of Ohio, and the latter of New York. They had three children, George O., Bertha M. and Fannie R.

As before stated, Mr. Kellogg came to Jasper County in 1868, and purchased six hundred acres of land on section 15, North Muddy Township. One-half of this afterwards went in payment of a debt. Subsequently he sold eighty acres, and has since purchased three other eighty-acre tracts. He and his son Willie now own two hundred and forty acres of land in addition to a number of valuable town lots in Wheeler. Mr. Kellogg was the first settler on section 15, and still lives in the house which was first his home. In connection with farming he also carries on stock-raising, breeding horses, cattle and hogs. He is a man of good business ability, and by his good management and well-directed efforts be has achieved the competence which he now possesses. Mr. Kellogg now holds the office of Township Clerk and has also filled the position of School Director for a number of years. In politics he is a Democrat and is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, who manifests a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of this community. Himself and wife were members of the Congregational Church while residing at Wakeman, Ohio, but as there is no church of that denomination in this vicinity, they now attend the Methodist Church in Wheeler.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 543

GILBERT MASON is one of the representative and prominent farmers and stockraisers of Grove Township, and resides on section 29. He is also one of the extensive landowners of Jasper County, having besides his homestead farm in Grove Township a tract of land of three hundred and twenty acres about a mile north of Wheeler. A native of Illinois, Mr. Mason was born in Edwards County on the 3d of January, 1864, and is a son of John and Catherine Mason, who are mentioned in the sketch of Philip Mason on another page of this work. The father of our subject was among the first settlers of this neighborhood, and is therefore numbered among the pioneers.

Gilbert Mason spent the days of his boyhood and youth in the usual manner of farmer lads. He was reared upon his father's farm and remained under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. His time was spent at work in the fields and in attendance at the district schools of North Muddy Township, where his education was acquired. Throughout his entire life he has been connected with agricultural pursuits, and the experience of his boyhood well fitted him for his business career in the future.

On the 10th of September, 1889, Mr. Mason was united in marriage with Miss Lucy E. Caldwell, daughter of Albert G. and Rebecca J. Caldwell. Her father is also numbered among the honored pioneers of Jasper County, where he took up his residence almost half a century ago. By the union of our subject and his wife have been born two interesting boys, Harrell C. and Dell.

Mr. Mason's father acquired a very large landed estate, and to his son Gilbert he gave a tract of three hundred and twenty acres, located a mile north of Wheeler, the same which we before mentioned. It is still in his possession and yields him a good income. Mrs. Mason also received from her father two hundred acres of land, and upon this farm our subject and his estimable wife now make their home. He also owns other property, including eighty acres of land in the grove southwest of their home, fifty acres of which are on section 32, Grove Township, and the remaining thirty acres on section 12, North Muddy Township. His landed possessions aggregate six hundred acres altogether, and with the exception of the eighty acres of timberland just mentioned, the entire amount is under a high state of cultivation and well improved.

The home place has a large and handsome residence, together with substantial barns and sheds, the latent improved machinery and all other accessories of a model farm. The fertile fields yield to the owner a golden tribute in return for his care and labor. In connection with the cultivation of his land, he also carries on stock-raising to a considerable extent, raising horses, cattle and hogs, and all of his grain he uses to feed them. He formerly raised many thoroughbred trotting-horses, but is now giving his attention principally to the breeding of Hereford cattle, of which he now has a herd of about one hundred.

In his social relations Mr. Mason is connected with the Masonic fraternity and with Wheeler Lodge No. 131, I. O. O. F. He is a man of good business ability, and his energetic and enterprising spirit has won him success, he is well known in the county where he has so long made his home and is recognized as one of its substantial citizens. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Mason is the abode of hospitality and they hold an enviable position in social circles.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 550

MARTIN HANNAMAN, who is engaged in farming and stock-raising on section 22, North Muddy Township, Jasper County, was born in West Price, Germany, August 25, 1820. At an early age he was left an orphan. He had two brothers and a sister, but the brothers, Christ and Frederick, both died ere Martin left the Fatherland. Both were married, and the elder left three children at his death, and the younger one child.

Our subject was reared to manhood upon a farm, and from a very early age has made his own way in the world. His educational privileges were quite limited, being confined to a few terms' attendance at the common schools. In his native land he married Miss Caroline Plaguer, daughter of Michael and Caroline Plaguer, and a native of Germany, as were her parents. Three children were born unto them, but one died in infancy. The others are August and Nellie. The mother died in Germany in 1854, and in February, 1857, Mr. Hannaman was again married, his second union being with Miss Henrietta Plaguer. a sister of his first wife. They have three sons and four daughters. Lena, the eldest, is the wife of Fred Penning, of Effingham County, and they have eight children: Fred, John, William, Henry, Millie, Mary, Augusta and an infant daughter. Gusta, the second child of the Hannaman family, is the wife of Conrad Abling, a farmer of North Muddy Township, by whom she has three children: Emma, Henry and Alma. Julia married William Miller, a farmer living two and a-half miles from Wheeler, and they have four children; Ida, Minnie, Julia and Nora. Millie is the next younger. Henry wedded Kate Meurlot, daughter of Edward and Lizzie (Tisehhauser) Meurlot, the former a native of France, and the latter of Clinton County, Ill. Mrs. Meurlot's mother, however, was born in Switzerland. Henry resides upon the old homestead and aids his father in the operation of the home farm. Frederick and Ernest are the youngest members of the family.

In June, 1859, Mr. Hannaman, having crossed the broad Atlantic from Germany to America, landed in Chicago, which was then but a small city. After a few weeks he went into the country and worked by the day. He was employed for three years by "Long John" Wentworth, and one summer by Mr. Justice, who kept the bridewell in Chicago. He afterwards purchased a small place two miles south of Summit, on which was a small shanty, the purchase price being $73. Later he rented one hundred and sixty acres of land, for which he paid $37.50, or merely the taxes. That year he mowed ninety-nine acres of grass with the scythe, and sold that on the remaining sixty-one acres for $1 an acre to parties who cut it themselves. Hay was very high priced, he selling his hay. for $10 per ton in the Chicago market. In 1865, Mr. Hannaman sold his farm and purchased eighty acres four miles distant. He could not get a deed for it, however, and so went to Minnesota, where he made arrangements to buy one hundred and sixty acres. Neither was the title on this clear, and so he returned to Cook County, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. Three years later he sold it at an advance of $500, after which he came to Jasper County and bought two hundred acres in North Muddy Township, one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land and forty acres of timber. This he still owns, in connection with eighty acres which he has since purchased. His land was wild prairie, but he has transformed it into rich and fertile fields. In addition to its cultivation he also raises considerable stock, including horses, cattle and hogs.

In 1892, Mr. Hannaman was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 18th of November, aged sixty-two years and nine months. She was a member of the German Lutheran Church and a lady whose many excellencies of character won her high regard. Mr. Hannaman is also a member of the same church, and in politics he is a Democrat. He possesses good business ability, and in the pursuit which he has followed throughout his entire life he has gained a comfortable competence, which numbers him among the substantial citizens.

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WESLEY CONNER, one of the enterprising and well-to-do farmers of Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, residing on section 31, is a native citizen of Illinois. He was born in Fayette County, May 7, 1840, and is a son of James and Emeline (Huntley) Conner, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of Tennessee. When a lad of eleven years the father came with his family to Illinois, locating in Fayette County, where he grew to manhood and married. There he also made a claim and opened up a farm, to the cultivation and improvement of which he devoted his energies throughout the remainder of his life. He died in 1878, having survived his wife several years.

Wesley Conner is the second in order of birth in their family of three sons and three daughters, all of whom grew to maturity. He spent his youth in the county of his nativity, and remained under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. His educational advantages were very limited, but by experience, observation and reading in later years, he has made himself a well-informed man.

Mr. Conner has been twice married. In his native county, in the fall of 1858, he married Miss Rebecca Bond, who was also born in Fayette County. She died in that county about 1870, leaving two children. John C., the elder, is a well-educated man, and one of Jasper County's most successful teachers. He also owns and operates a farm in Crooked Creek Township. Clara is the wife of Charles Shepley, a farmer of Fayette County.

The second marriage of our subject was celebrated in Clark County, Ill., in April, 1873, when Miss Mary, daughter of Philip Clark, became his wife. Three children grace their union, as follows: Rosella, Philip Oscar and Sophia.

Some time after his marriage, Mr. Conner resided upon the old homestead, operating a portion of it until after his father's death. He then purchased a small farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits in Fayette County until 1880, when he sold out and came to Jasper County. Here he bought the farm on which he now resides. Since that time he has built a neat residence and a good barn and made other improvements, which stand as monuments to his thrift and industry. The place is under a high state of cultivation and the rich and fertile fields yield to him a golden tribute in return for his care and labor.

The cause of education finds in Mr. Conner a warm friend, and all worthy enterprises calculated to prove of public benefit are sure to receive his warm support. He cast his first Presidential vote for Stephen A. Douglas in 1860, and has since been an advocate of the Democracy. He has led a busy and useful life, and by his well-directed efforts, good management and business ability has acquired a comfortable competence. He is fair and upright in all his dealings and thereby has gained universal confidence and esteem.

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JOHN M. PARRENT, who follows farming on section 29, Wade Township, is a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Jasper County. He was born in Tippecanoe County, Ind., January 22, 1840, and the following May was brought to Illinois by his parents, David and Emily C. (Parker) Parrent. The father was born in Illinois, but at an early day went to the Hoosier State. The mother was a native of Kentucky, and a daughter of Samuel Parker. On coining to Jasper County, Mr. Parrent entered land and located where our subject now resides. He was one of the earliest settlers of the community, and the family were forced to endure all the hardships and privations of frontier life. The father cleared his land and made a good farm, upon which he lived until called to the home beyond in 1858. His wife survived him for a number of years and departed this life in 1870.

The Parrent family numbered seven children, four sons and three daughters, who grew to mature years, but only four arc now living. The eldest. Maria M., is the wife of John Flint, and she and her sister, Mrs. Emily J. Hastings, both reside in Lawrence County, Ohio. The brother of our subject, William H., is a well-known farmer of Wade Township, Jasper County.

We now take up the personal history of our subject, John M. Parrent, who has spent nearly his entire life in this county. The days of his boyhood and youth were spent upon the farm which is still his home. He remained with his parents until after his father's death, when he took charge of the farm and later succeeded to the ownership of the old homestead. He thoroughly understands his business in all its details, and is a practical and progressive agriculturist. He has since purchased forty acres of land additional, and now owns and operates a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, whose well-tilled fields, many improvements and neat appearance indicate his thrift and enterprise.

Mr. Parrent was joined in wedlock in Jasper County, December 28, 1864, with Rachel J. Parker, who was born in Crawford County, Ill., and is a daughter of James Parker. Six children grace their union. Marion A., Columbus and Leander aid their father in the cultivation of the home farm; Melinda Eveline, Mary A. and Clara Emma are the daughters of the household. They have also lost three children, who died in infancy or early childhood.

In his political affiliations, Mr. Parrent is a stanch Republican, having supported the men and measures of that party since casting his first Presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. Himself and wife are members of the Christian Church, and arc people whose excellencies of character have won them high regard. Their home is the abode of hospitality, and their many friends and acquaintances are always sure of receiving there a cordial welcome. Thus have we given a sketch of the life of one of Jasper County's honored pioneers, who for more than half a century has been identified with its history and its upbuilding.

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ELISHAMA BEATY, a prominent farmer residing on section 25, Decker Township, Richland County, was born in Harrison County, Va., October 5, 1840, and comes of an old family in that State. His grandfather, Alexander Beaty, Sr., was born on the Emerald Isle, and in an early day accompanied his widowed mother to America, but after a short time they returned to Ireland. When he had attained his majority, Mr. Beaty again crossed the Atlantic, locating in Marion County, Va., where his grandson, Newton Beaty, still lives. Throughout his life he followed farming.

Alexander Beaty, Jr., the father of our subject, was born in Virginia, and became a farmer of West Virginia. He was also a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church for twenty-five years. He married Elizabeth Metz, daughter of Jacob Metz. Both were natives of what is now West Virginia. When a boy her father often had to go to the fort at Morganstown, in order to escape from the Indians, who threatened his life. In his earlier years he was a great hunter, and at one time had a hand-to-hand encounter with a bear, during which he was bitten on the leg, but he at length managed to dispatch the animal with his tomahawk. His home was in what is now Marion County, W. Va.

Alexander Beaty possessed several peculiarities of habit. He always observed the quarterly fast of the Methodist Church by entirely abstaining from food until the noon hour. He would never shave on Sunday. During his minority, our subject never knew him to do so except twice, when he did not arrive at home until after midnight. He followed farming throughout much of his life, and also dealt in stock, shipping hogs, cattle and sheep to Baltimore. In the early days he had to drive these one hundred and fifty miles to Cumberland, Md., and then ship them by rail. In the spring of 1848 he removed to Wirt County, W. Va., where he bought two hundred acres of land, and then purchased one hundred and seventy-five acres additional, for which he went in debt. When the war broke out he took an active part in raising recruits for the Union service, but he did not go to the front himself, on account of his age. Living in a rebel neighborhood, his enemies were almost constantly on the watch for him to take his life for two years. At length, on July 25, 1862, they shot him, while he was on his way to a field to mow. The wound resulted in his death August 11. His wife survived him until 1871, when, at the age of fifty-four years, she also passed away. In their family were twelve children, namely: Emeline, Melissa J., Cyrus, Elishama, Aaron G., Mary C., Irene, James B., Sarah E., Alexander E., Tennessee and Beverly W. Cyrus and Aaron G. died when young. James B. grew to manhood, married, and died in 1878, leaving a family of ten children. The others are all living and are married.

When a lad of eight years, our subject removed with his parents to Burning Springs, W. Va., and remained on the old home farm until he had attained his majority. One winter, about that time, when his father was obliged to be away, he cut all the firewood for the family and drove a three horse team one hundred and twenty-five miles. His early education, acquired in the common schools, was supplemented by a course in the college at Meadville, Pa., but he did not complete his studies, being called home at the time of his father's death.

Ere Mr. Beaty's death, he made a will, placing his property in the hands of his son Elishama, who was to manage the estate as he pleased during the minority of the children, and then to sell it and divide the proceeds equally. For his services he was to receive $200 per year. Through security debts and unfortunate speculations in oil, the property had been reduced to about $3,000, but in the fall of 1864 real estate rose in value and he at length sold the property for $30, 775, and each of the ten children received about $2,000, after all expenses and the cost of educating the family were deducted. After selling out, the family went to Jackson County, W. Va. Our subject then bought a farm worth $17, 800, invested some money in a steamboat and traded for land, but in securing the title of the same he became involved in a law suit which continued for fourteen years. Finally, however, he won the case.

Mr. Beaty was married September 4, 1867, Miss Ella Blake, daughter of James and Maria (Jackson) Blake, natives of Virginia. They had three children: Maria E.; Mary Tennessee, who died in infancy; and Nellie Madge. They made their home in Jackson County until 1889, when they came to Richland County. Mr. Beaty here purchased two hundred acres of land, four mile southwest of Noble, where he still makes his home. He buys and sells stock on a large scale and is also extensively engaged in farming. He has just completed one of the largest barns in the County, and has other fine improvements upon his place. He is now erecting a commodious and pleasant residence.

Our subject has taken a very prominent part in political affairs and belonged to the County 1 or Township Commitee for twenty-four years. He is now President of the Republican League Club of Decker Township, a perpetual organization. Socially, he is a member of Noble Lodge No. 362, A. F. & A. M., and Noble Camp No. 1281, M. W. A. Himself and wife hold membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church of Noble, in which he serves as Class-leader. Mr. Beaty has led a busy and useful life. He is always found on the right side, and his honorable and upright career has gained for him the universal confidence and the warm regard of all with whom business or pleasure has brought him in contact.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 560

NAPOLEON L. McCAULEY, who is engaged in general farming and stock-raising on 5 section 29, Decker Township, Richland County, claims Kentucky as the State of his nativity. He was born in Jefferson County, near Louisville, on the 26th of October, 1833, and is a son of Daniel and Mary A. McCauley, who are mentioned elsewhere in this work. When about three years old, he came with his parents to Richland County, and under the parental roof he remained until he had attained his majority. The subscription schools afforded him his educational advantages.

December 27, 1857, Mr. McCauley was united in marriage with Miss Mary J. Rusk, daughter of Thomas and Cassander Rusk, who were natives of Indiana. They began their domestic life upon a farm, and there continued to reside until after the breaking out of the late war, when Mr. McCauley joined the boys in blue. On the 11th of August, 1862, he became a member of Company H, Ninety-eighth Illinois Infantry, which was afterward mounted, and served until February 13, 1863, when he was discharged on account of disability.

On his return to the North, our subject resumed farming, but after a few months removed to Noble, where he embarked in general merchandising, to which enterprise he devoted his time and attention for a year. On the expiration of that period, he sold his store and began operating a sawmill, three miles from Noble. This business he followed for about ten years, when he sold out and returned to farming. In connection with the raising of grain, he has also dealt in live-stock quite extensively, doing a good business in this line. His farm comprises one hundred acres of good land, well cultivated and improved and pleasantly situated about three miles from Noble.

Mr. McCauley holds membership with Noble Lodge No. 482, 1. O. O. F., and with Noble Post No. 252, G. A. R. In politics, he is a stalwart Republican, having warmly advocated the principles of that party since he cast his first Presidential vote for John C. Fremont in 1856. An honored pioneer of Richland County, he has here made his home for the long period of fifty-seven years, and has therefore been a witness of almost its entire growth and development. The McCauley family have always been identified with the best interests of the community and have never failed to respond to any call for aid, when the object of the enterprise was to promote public welfare.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 561

LOUIS ODER, dealer in live-stock of Noble, Ill., was born in Prussia, Germany, on the 27th of July, 1847, and is a son of Frederick A. and Johanna (Kover) Oder, who are also natives of the Fatherland. They are farming people of Germany and are well-to-do. The grandfather, Gottleib Oder, was a wealthy farmer of the same locality, and in his younger days was one of Napoleon's noble veterans, serving as a soldier for many years in Spain, Russia and at Waterloo. He was a member of the Lutheran Church. His death occurred at the age of eighty-five years, and his wife passed away at the age of eighty. Frederick Oder also belonged to the regular army in Germany for a number of years. Himself and wife are members of the Lutheran Church, and have reached the ages of seventy-five and seventy years, respectively. Four children were born unto them, two sons and two daughters: Christina, Carl Hermann, A. Louis and Selma. With the exception of our subject, all are still living in Germany.

Mr. Oder whose name heads this record was reared on the old home farm in his native land, and after attending the common schools became a student in Halle College and Leipsic University, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1864. He then extensively engaged in farming in Germany until 1869, when he bade adieu to home and friends and crossed the Atlantic to America. The first year after his arrival was spent in the city of New York, and in 1870 he removed to St. Louis, where he lived for about eighteen months. He then removed to Clay City and bought a farm of two hundred and fifty acres, four miles from that place, which he still owns. It was partly improved, and since that time he has added much to its value and attractive appearance by additional improvements. His farm is principally used for grazing. Mr. Oder is one of the best-known stockdealers in this part of the State, and has now carried on business in Noble for twenty years and has a large trade.

On the 31st of October, 1868, Mr. Oder was united in marriage with Miss Caroline, daughter of Carl and Henrietta (Fischer) Feltweg, natives of Germany. Five children have been born unto them: Selma, wife of Delbert Holman, a resident of Pauline, Iowa; Carl, Nettie, Clara and Albert L. The parents are both members of the Lutheran Church, and are well known and highly respected people of this community. In 1874, Mr. Oder returned to his native land to visit the friends and kindred of his youth. The trip proved an enjoyable one, but he would not again take up his residence in the Fatherland. He loves his adopted country, and it has furnished to him as the result of his well-directed efforts and good management a comfortable home and good property.

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G. W. GUESS, a thrifty and well-known agriculturist of Jasper County, who resides on section 23, Smallwood Township, is a native of the Buckeye State. He was born in Butler County, on the 12th of December, 1843, and is a son of Harvey W. and Mary (Jones) Guess, both of whom were of American birth. The father was born March 13, 1811, and the mother April 12, 1816. They were married February 8, 1838, and had born unto them the following children: Emma, who was born December 11, 1838, and was married November 1, 1859; Ellis, who was born August 25, 1842, and died January 29, 1843; George W., our subject; Margaret, who was born April 22, 1845, and was married October 16, 1862; and Cynthia A., who was born December 6, 1849, became Mrs. Judd October 27, 1874, and died December 14, 1875. The father of this family died June 15, 1849, and the mother November 3, 1872. The former was a Mexican soldier and died when George W. was quite small, after which our subject was adopted and reared by Daniel P. Monroe, of Jefferson County, Ind., with whom he remained until seventeen years of age. Mr. Monroe then gave him his time, and, prompted by patriotic impulses, he entered the service of his country, joining the boys in blue of Company B, Sixth Indiana Infantry, with which he served for seventeen months. He then re-enlisted, becoming a member of Company D, One Hundred and Forty-sixth Indiana Infantry, and remained in the service until after the close of the war, having participated in the battles of Shiloh and Pittsburg Landing, and the siege of Corinth, besides several other skirmishes on the picket line and on the march. He was a faithful soldier, ever found at his post of duty, defending the Stars and Stripes.

When hostilities had ceased, Mr. Guess was honorably discharged and returned to what he called his home, in Jefferson County, Ind. His adopted father gave him twenty acres of land in Jasper County, and, coining to this place, he began the cultivation of that tract. Since that time he has resided in Jasper County, and has continuously carried on agricultural pursuits. He now owns a beautiful country home, located about five miles west of West Liberty, and his valuable farm of one hundred and twenty-three acres yields to him a golden tribute in return for the care and cultivation he bestows upon it.

On the 2d of October, 1864, Mr. Guess was united in marriage with Miss Susanna Monroe, who was born in Scott County, Ind., December 9, 1843, and was a daughter of George W. and Sarah (Anderson) Monroe. The former was born in Kentucky in 1822, and is now engaged in farming in this county. The latter was a native of Indiana, and her death occurred in that State. One child blessed the union of our subject and his wife: William Walter, who was born August 30, 1865, and is now operating the home farm. On the 28th of September, 1892, he wedded Miss Nora Wakefield, of Jasper County. March 27, 1893, our subject suffered an irreparable loss in the death of his wife, which was deeply regretted by her friends and neighbors as well as by her own immediate family.

In his political views, Mr. Guess is a Republican and warmly advocates the principles of that party. Socially, he is a member of Charles Morrison Post No. 578, G. A. It., of West Liberty. Public-spirited and progressive, he takes an active interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community, and has ever borne his part in the advancement and progress of the county. The community finds in him a valued citizen, and it is with pleasure that we present this record of his life to our readers.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 564

THOMAS BROOKS, who follows farming on section 7, Crooked Creek Township, Jasper County, is well known throughout this community as an enterprising, progressive agriculturist, and needs no special introduction to the readers of this volume. His life record is as follows: He is a native of the township which is still his home, his birth having occurred on the farm where he now resides on the 2d of April, 1843. His father, Isaac Brooks, was born in Maryland, but was reared in Ohio. When a young man he emigrated further Westward, making a location in Indiana. He was there united in marriage with Patience Spencer, a native of New York State.

Early in 1843 they came to Illinois and took up their residence in Jasper County, where Mr. Brooks entered a tract of land from the Government in Crooked Creek Township. He then began its development and transformed it into the farm upon which our subject now resides. He devoted his energies to agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of his life, which was passed upon the old homestead. Here his death occurred February 23, 1877. His wife was called to her final rest several years previous, and the remains of both were interred in the Brooks Burial-ground, where a neat monument has been erected to their memory.

Thomas Brooks is the youngest in a family of seven children, five sons and two daughters, all of whom grew to mature years and were married and reside in Jasper County. Our subject spent the days of his boyhood and youth upon the old homestead, his time being passed in attendance at the district schools of the neighborhood and in the labors of the farm. He remained with his father until he had attained his majority and then began life for himself, locating upon the part of the old homestead where he now resides. He cleared and fenced the land, built upon it the necessary buildings, and has developed it into a good farm, which is now under a high state of cultivation and well improved. He has set out a good orchard and has added many other improvements which indicate his progressive spirit. His home is a rich and substantial residence, and he is considered one of the well-to-do farmers of Crooked Creek Township.

On the 30th of April, 1865, Mr. Brooks was united in marriage with Miss Eva M., daughter of John Cummins, one of the first settlers of Jasper County, where the lady was born. Five children graced the union of Mr. and Mrs. Brooks, the eldest of whom, Viola, is now the wife of Henderson Nichols, of this county; James L. is married and operates a farm adjoining that of his father; Eliza P. , Elizabeth J. and Minnie A. are the younger members of the family. They also lost one child, a son, John Isaac, who died at the age of six years.

Mr. and Mrs. Brooks are members of the United Brethren Church, and have the respect and esteem of their many friends and acquaintances. In politics, he has been a stanch Republican since casting his first Presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln, in 1864. He warmly advocates the principles of that party, but has never been an office-seeker. Mr. Brooks has spent his entire life in Jasper County , and has therefore seen much of its progress and advancement. He has also aided in its development and upbuilding, and ever bears his part as a representative and valued citizen.

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F. M. ROSS is one of the honored early settlers and prominent farmers of Jasper County. He resides on section 18, Wade Township, where he has a fine home, his well cultivated fields and fertile lands indicating his industry and enterprise. Mr. Ross also has the honor of being a native of this county, his birth having occurred on his present farm October 26, 1844. His father, Robert Ross, was a native of Virginia, and there grew to manhood. When a young man he went to Ohio, and was married in Belmont County to Naomi McKinley, daughter of John McKinley. Soon after their marriage the young couple came to Illinois. This was about 1835. They settled in Jasper County, where the husband entered land from the Government, and began the development of the farm on which our subject now resides. He was a blacksmith by trade and carried on work in that line for himself and neighbors for several years, but at length devoted his entire attention to agricultural pursuits. He followed farming until his death, which occurred in 1849. His wife survived him for many years and reared her family. She passed away August 2, 1876, and was laid to rest by the side, of her husband in Vanderhoof Cemetery, where a monument marks their last resting-place.

F. M. Ross is the youngest of a family of four children who grew to mature years, but Thompson, the eldest, is now deceased. Mary Ann is the wife of Lawrence Banty, and resides in Wade Township, Jasper County. William, the third member of the family, has also departed this life.

We now take up the personal history of our subject, who spent his boyhood days in the usual manner of farmer lads, attending the public schools in the winter season and aiding in the labors of the field during the summer months. He thus became familiar with the business in all its details, and after arriving at years of maturity he took charge of the home farm. He has greatly improved the place, making it one of the best country homes in Jasper County. His dwelling is a substantial and neat residence, in the rear of which are good barns and other outbuildings, and these are surrounded by well-tilled fields, which yield a golden tribute to the care and cultivation of the owner.
Mr. Ross was united in marriage in Wade Township, January 4, 1872, with Miss Kate Banty, a native of Indiana, and a daughter of Daniel Banty. She was reared and educated in Jasper County. Six children have been born of their union: Cora, wife of Joseph Mitchell, a farmer of Marion County, Ill.; Carrie, Harry, Nora, Clyde, Mabel and Everett.

In his political views, Mr. Ross is a Democrat. He cast his first Presidential vote for John B. McClellan, and has supported every Presidential nominee of the Democracy since that time. Our subject has never been an aspirant for office, but has held several local positions of honor and trust. He served as commissioner for about fifteen years. Socially, he is a Royal Arch Mason, belonging to the Blue Lodge and Chapter of Newton. Himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church of Newton, and are highly respected citizens, whose sterling worth and many excellencies of character have made them prominent and highly esteemed people. Mr. Ross has spent his entire life in Jasper County, and has witnessed much of its growth and upbuilding. He has also aided in its development and has ever borne his part as an upright
and valued citizen.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 568

ANDREW J. ERVIN, M. D., who is engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Latona, Ill., is one of the honored pioneers of Jasper County, where for almost half a century he has made his home. A native of Indiana, he was born near Mt. Carmel, February 18, 1835. His grandfather, Elias Ervin, was a native of Maryland, and was of Irish descent. He was probably not a regular soldier in the Revolutionary War, but took part in many Indian skirmishes. At an early day he removed to Kentucky, where James Ervin, the father of our subject, was born, and later came to Illinois, but after a short residence in Coles County he removed to De Bruin, Mo., where he died in the fall of 1868, at the age of seventy-seven years.

James Ervin was a boot and shoe maker by trade and also followed farming. When a young man he removed to Indiana, locating near Mt. Carmel, where he met and married Miss Mary, daughter of John Hutchinson, who was a native of Maryland, but at an early date went to the Hoosier State. In 1836 he removed to Coles County, Ill., and in 1841 came to Jasper County, settling near the present site of Latona, where he died in 1849.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ervin were born nine children, three sons and six daughters, of whom the sons and two daughters are yet living, namely: Andrew J., of this sketch; Hiram, who is living in De Bruin, Mo.; James L., a resident of Devine, Tex.; Elizabeth, wife of John Trower, of Waynesville, Mo.; and Caroline, wife of Newton Hendricks, of De Bruin, Mo. In 1859 the father of this family removed to De Bruin, Mo., where he followed his trade and also carried on farming until his death, which occurred in the fall of 1882, at the age of seventy-three years. His wife died six years previous. They were both faithful and consistent members of the Christian Church, and Mr. Ervin was one of its Elders for many years.

Dr. Ervin, whose name heads this record, spent his boyhood days upon his father's farm and was educated in the common district schools. He remained at home until twenty years of age and was then married. On the 27th of December, 1854, he wedded Nancy J., daughter of William B. and Elizabeth (Irwin) Bryan, of Indiana. Seven children were born of that union, three sons and four daughters, but live are now deceased, namely: Morris Buford, Rose Elina, Andromeda, Nancy Jane and John. Andrew Jackson married Miss Ida Ellen Brannan, and resides on a farm near Latona. They have four children: Velma Olive, Erma Estella, Arthur Clinton and Iva lona. May is the youngest member of the Ervin family.

The Doctor began the study of medicine in 1861 under the direction of Dr. Franke, of Newton, Ill., and began practicing about 1863. On the breaking out of the late war in April, 1861, he enlisted as a member of the Union army and was assigned to Company K, Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, with which he served for about eight months, when he was discharged on account of disability. He then returned home and resumed the study of medicine, but in March, 1865, he re-enlisted as a member of the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry, and served until the close of the war as Hospital Steward.

When the country no longer needed his services, Dr. Ervin returned to his home and resumed practice. In 1867 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 10th of March. She was a member of the Christian Church and a most devoted Christian lady. On the 14th of August following, the Doctor was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Lucinda, a daughter of Adam and Mary Ann (Waggoner) Holm, formerly of Stark County, Ohio. The Doctor and his wife are both members of the Christian Church and take an active interest in its growth and upbuilding. He is at present serving as Deacon', and while in Missouri he was for some years Elder of the church with which he held membership.

Dr. Ervin has ever been an earnest student of his profession and has enjoyed a liberal practice, but on account of rheumatism he is now unable to ride and so does only office practice. In politics he is a Republican, and socially is a member of Holm Post No. 195, G. A. R., of Latona. He is at present Postmaster of this place, a position which he has held four years, and was its first Postmaster, being commissioned in 1863, when the post office was known as Constantinople. He was also Postmaster in De Bruin, Mo., has been School Director for about eight years, and was elected to the office of Tax Collector, but did not serve on account of his removal to Missouri. Dr. Ervin owns a comfortable and pleasant home in Latona and about thirteen acres of land. As before stated, he is numbered among the honored pioneers of the county, having located here when the county was almost a wilderness. He has seen as many as a hundred deer in one day on the prairies round about, and other kinds of wild game were also found in abundance. In the work of development and transformation that has taken place since he first came to the county, he has ever borne his part and is justly regarded as one of the Jasper County's prominent pioneers, as well as leading physicians.

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THOMAS N. CARPENTER, who owns and operates one hundred and forty acres of good land on section 4, Wade Township, Jasper County, is a prominent farmer of the community and his home is pleasantly located within a mile of Newton. A native of the Buckeye State, he was born in Hocking County, Ohio, November 28, 1843, and is a son of James Carpenter. The father was a native of New York, and in that State married Nancy Cough. For a number of years he followed farming in the East, and in 1843 removed to Ohio, becoming one of the pioneer settlers of Hocking County. In the midst of the forest he hewed out a farm, clearing and fencing the place and making many improvements upon it. There he spent the last years of his life, and was called to his home beyond May 11, 1865. He held various official positions of honor and trust, and was a leading and influential citizen. In politics, he was throughout life identified with the Democratic party. His wife still survives him and lives with her daughter near the old homestead. The family celebrated her eighty-ninth birthday in 1892, on which occasion eight of her children were present, besides numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren, four generations being represented.

Mr. Carpenter of this sketch is the ninth in order of birth in a family of four sons and six daughters. The eldest, William D., died at the age of fifty-five years; Lucinda M., widow of Thomas Plumer, resides in Perry County, Ohio.

James E. came to Illinois in 1846, and lived in Jersey County until 1858, when he went to Kansas, where his death occurred in 1877; Eliza resides near the old homestead; Elizabeth is the wife of Sebastian Runser, and is living in Fairfield County, Ohio; Hulda is the wife of John R. West, of Hocking County, Ohio; Sarah J. is the widow of Joseph Walker, of Warren County, Ohio; O. C. Campbell is a farmer of Douglas County, Ill.; Thomas is the next younger; and Phoebe E. is the wife of J. W. Martin, of Perry County, Ohio.

Our subject was reared to manhood on the old farm in Hocking County, where his education was acquired in the public schools, and he remained under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. It was in 1865 that he came to Illinois, but after six months spent in Montgomery County, he returned to Ohio, and took charge of the farm for his mother, operating the old homestead for two years.

Mr. Carpenter was united in marriage in Hocking County, November 7, 1864, with Miss Margaret E. Anderson, a native of Guernsey County, Ohio, who, when a maiden of fourteen summers, went with her father, George S. Anderson, to Hocking County. She was a successful teacher before her marriage and is a cultured and intelligent lady. By their union have been born five children who are yet living, and they lost one, William N., their first-born, who died at the age of twenty months. Omer O. is at home. George L. is assistant operator at Newton, Ill. Bert B. is at home. Emma B. and Maud A. are both attending the home school.

For many years after his marriage, Mr. Carpenter was successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits and merchandising in Perry and Hocking Counties, Ohio, and farmed for thirteen years previous to coming West. In the spring of 1888, he removed to Jasper County, and located upon the farm which is now his home. It is a valuable and desirable property and he has made many improvements thereon. Ere the publication of this book, however. Mr. Carpenter expects to remove to West Liberty, where he has purchased a creamery. He has rented his farm and will engage in the manufacture of butter, while his sons manufacture brooms. In politics, Mr. Carpenter was formerly identified with the Republican party , but of late years he has voted with the Prohibition party at State and National elections. At local elections he votes independently. Himself and wife are members of the Newton Methodist Episcopal Church, and are among the most highly respected citizens of the community in which they make their home, having the warm regard of all who know them. Their home is ever open for the reception of their many friends, and the stranger too is welcomed, while the poor and needy are never turned from their door empty-handed.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 571

JOHN MYERS, a retired farmer and prominent citizen of Grove Township, Jasper County, residing on section 24, was born in Crab Orchard, Ky., September 13, 1812, while his parents were on their way home to Davidson County, N. C. The Myers family is of German origin, and was founded in this country by the grandparents of our subject, who emigrated from their native Germany and located in North Carolina in Colonial days. The grandmother died at the age of eighty-seven years. The grandfather died in middle life, leaving a son, Jacob, then three years old. This child became the father of our subject. He grew to manhood in his native State and married Catherine Shular, who was born in the same State, as was also her father, Abraham Shular, a farmer and blacksmith of North Carolina, who died in 1828, at the age of sixty-two years, in the faith of the Lutheran Church. For some time Jacob Myers followed agricultural pursuits in the State of his nativity, and in 1830 removed to Fountain County, Ind., where be carried on farming until his death, which occurred in 1870, after a residence there of forty years. He was one of the pioneer settlers of that county and a prominent farmer. He passed away in the eighty-first year of his age, and his wife died on the old homestead in Fountain County, July 24, 1885, in her ninety-second year. Both were members of the Lutheran Church and were highly respected people. They had a family of seven sons and two daughters, of whom John, Eli, Jacob H., Franklin M., Elijah and Mary M. are still living. All are married and have families of their own.

The subject of this sketch spent the days of his boyhood in the usual manner of farmer lads. In the summer months he aided his father in the labors of the farm, and in the winter season attended the district schools of the neighborhood, where he acquired his education. After arriving at years of maturity, he chose as a companion and helpmate on life's journey Catherine, daughter of Peter and Catherine (Long) Fine. Their union was celebrated October 11, 1832, and unto them were born seven sons and four daughters, but three sons and two daughters are now deceased. Maria and Jacob A., the two eldest, have passed away. Peter, who resides upon a farm two miles northeast of Gila, married Susie Krout, and has eight children: Ephraim, Nettie, Charles O., Rosa A., Stella, Harry C., Clara C. and Ira E. Susanna is the wife of Michael M. Sowers, of Gila, by whom she has five children: Sarah I., Mary C., Wickliff D., Alva L. and Oscar A. John C. married Miss Lucinda Grimes, who died October 17, 1864, leaving two children, Emma Z. and Edna May, and after her death he wedded Miss Elmira A. McIlvee, by whom he has a son and daughter, Laura B. and John C. Levi F., the next child of the Myers family, is deceased. Noah D., of Decatur, Ill., wedded Mattie Jane Ward, and they have four children: Bessie Lee, Minnie May. Lulu Pearl and Murl M. Noah is a physician and surgeon of Decatur, Ill., where he has practiced for five years. For thirteen years he practiced in Gila and two years in Indiana, and has won an excellent reputation. Mathias H. is deceased, as is also the next child, Mary M. Amanda C., twin sister of Mary, is the wife of James A. Sanders, of Fountain County, Ind., and the mother of four children: Susie, David W., Martha C. and James Leroy. Eli, the youngest member of the Myers family, is County Superintendent of Schools in Fountain County, Ind. He married Polly Wirt and four children grace their union: Lena Leota, Vinnie R., Edith G. and J. Howard. Our subject has thirty grandchildren and twenty-five great grandchildren. In 1891, he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the10th of January, at the age of seventy-nine years, five months and twenty -seven days. She was a consistent member of the Lutheran Church, a faithful and loving wife and mother, and was held in the highest regard by a large circle of acquaintances.

Mr. Myers has followed farming throughout the greater part of his life. On embarking in that pursuit he began the cultivation of a tract of timberland of eighty acres in Fountain County, Ind., which his father deeded to him. This he cleared, plowed and planted, and in course of time had a fine farm, whose rich and fertile fields yielded to him abundant harvests. He lived upon that farm for the long period of forty-seven years, and extended its boundaries until it comprised two hundred acres. On the 6th of June, 1879, he arrived in Jasper County, and at Gila opened a general store and also established the post-office at that place, becoming its first Postmaster. There he resided and carried on business until the death of his wife, when he went to live with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Sowers. He still, however, owns his property in Gila.

Mr. Myers has always led a quiet, unassuming life, never taking a very prominent part in public affairs. However, he has been a good citizen, and while living in Fountain County, Ind., he held the office of School Treasurer. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and for some years was a Deacon, in the Hoosier State. In politics he has been a lifelong Democrat, having supported that party since he cast his first vote for Martin Van Buren. Mr. Myers is now in his eighty-first year, but he is still enjoying quite good health. His life has been well spent, and though he has lived so quietly, he has lived so honorably that in whatever community he has made his home he has had the confidence and good-will of all.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 573

JOSEPH E. WISHARD, who is engaged in farming on section 12, North Muddy Township, has been a resident of Jasper County for over half a century and is numbered among its honored pioneers. He has been an eyewitness of almost its entire growth, has seen its wide prairies transformed into beautiful homes and farms, while towns arid villages have sprung up, railroads have been built, and all the improvements of civilization have been introduced. In the transformation of the county and in its progress and advancement Mr. Wishard has ever borne his part.

Our subject was born August 24, 1818, in Fleming County, Ky., seven miles from Flemingsburg, the county seat, where he lived until his fifteenth year. His father, William Wishard, was a native of Ireland, who was born after his father's death, and in consequence nothing is known of his paternal ancestry. William came to America when seven years old, and for some time lived upon a farm in Pennsylvania. Later he removed to Fleming County, Ky., and purchased five hundred and twenty acres of land, a part of which is situated in Nicholas County, the division line between the two counties dividing the farm. He built his home in Fleming County, where all of his children were born. He married Elizabeth Rhodes, a native of Maryland and a daughter of a Revolutionary soldier. During the War of Independence, her father was badly wounded by an arrow, shot by an Indian. He however recovered and lived to an advanced age. His death occurred in Maryland, his native State. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Wishard were born five sons and five daughters, eight of whom grew to mature years, but our subject is probably the only one living to-day.

In the early days, Mr. Wishard would load grain and provisions on flatboats, which he floated down the Licking, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. He made fifteen trips in this way and fourteen times walked, the entire distance back. On one occasion he paid $100 for a deck passage on a steamer, his trip being from New Orleans to Louisville, Ky. Since then his son, our subject, made the same trip for $2. In 1828, having sold his land in Kentucky, he removed with his family to Indiana, locating on a farm in Marion County, six miles south of Indianapolis, where he died the next year at the age of fifty-seven. His farm in the Hoosier State contained one hundred and sixty acres, which are now almost within the city limits of the State capital. Mrs. Wishard afterward became the wife of William Hooker, a farmer near Indianapolis, and unto them was born a daughter, Mary, who died at the age of four years. Mr. Hooker passed away some years previous to the death of his wife. The mother of our subject died in 1868, in Grove Township, Jasper County, Ill., at the age of seventy-four years.

We now take up the personal history of Joseph E. Wishard, who in his fifteenth year went with his parents to Indiana, and after his father's death continued to operate the farm and reside with his mother until eighteen years of age, when, Mrs. Wishard having again married, he went to live with his brother Henry, whose home was about fifteen miles southeast of Indianapolis. There he remained until after he had attained his majority, when he began working as a farm hand at $6 per month. He also followed teaming and other pursuits whereby he might make an honest livelihood. Later he purchased some timberland and cut logs, which he sawed into lumber and shipped to other places. For four years he followed that business. About 1841, he lost $1, 500 by going security. The following year he came to Illinois to try his fortune and made a claim of two hundred and eighty acres of Government land in Jasper County. He was involved to the amount of about $500 at that time on account of the losses he sustained in paying security debts, and in consequence he had to begin at the bottom of the ladder. But, as one of the old Greek philosophers said, "Nothing is impossible to industry, " and the industrious and energetic nature of Mr. Wishard soon won him success. He paid altogether $2200, for security debts, but notwithstanding this difficulty in his path, he has steadily worked his way upwards, until he is recognized as one of the well-to-do citizens of the community. His farm, now comprising two hundred and thirty acres of land, is under a high state of cultivation and well improved with a substantial residence, good buildings, fences, etc. He raises horses, cattle and hogs on quite an extensive scale and feeds all of his grain to his stock.

Mr. Wishard was married November 14, 1851, to Miss Lydia, daughter of Henry and Martha (McNutt) Presser, who were natives of Indiana. The young wife died in 1853, and on the 24th of November, 1858, our subject wedded Miss Marian Patrick, daughter of Charles Patrick, of Newton, Ill. Three children were born unto them, but Scepter and Minnie died in early childhood. Charles, the eldest, makes his home in Pittsburg, Colo. The mother of this family was called to her final rest September 4, 1872. On the 4th of May, 1873, Mr. Wishard led to the marriage altar Miss Sarah, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Whetstein) Galbreath. Her father was a native of the Emerald Isle, but her mother was born in Virginia. Three children graced the union of our subject and his wife, two of whom are yet living, Lizzie and Robert. Lillie, the second child, died when eight months old.

Mr. Wishard has served for fifteen years as School Director and has held other township offices. For many years he was a member of the Odd Fellows' fraternity. His wife is a member of the Protestant Methodist Church. In politics he is a Democrat, having supported that party since 1840, when he cast his first Presidential vote for James K. Polk, with the exception of the last election, when he voted for Weaver. Mr. Wishard's long residence in the county has made him widely known, and his upright life has won him universal esteem. He has long been identified with the county and its interests. He located upon his present farm when there were only three houses between it and Newton. The wild prairie grass grew as tall as a man's head, the county was infested with wolves, and wild game of all kinds abounded. Mr. Wishard bore the experience and hardships of pioneer life, but now these have passed away and in his declining years he is enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 578

LOUIS S. RYUN, who is now living a retired life in Granville, Jasper County, has for many years been engaged in the agricultural interests of this community, but is now resting after a busy and well-spent life. He was born
March 16, 1838, in Fayette County, Ohio, and was the eleventh child in a family of six sons and eight daughters born unto Joseph and Priscilla Ryun. The father was born in the Buckeye State March 15, 1792. He was reared to farm work, but in connection with that occupation he also carried on a shop, where he engaged in making chairs and spinning-wheels. He was of Irish extraction. His death occurred November 12, 1849, in Ohio. His wife was born in South Carolina, July 12, 1792, and died December 26, 1866, in Bell Air, Crawford County, Ill. Our subject spent his boyhood upon the home farm with his parents, and learned the carpenter's trade in his youth. The common schools afforded him his educational privileges. Having attained his majority, he left home, starting out in life for himself without a dollar, and worked at the carpenter's trade for some time. He was married October 12, 1852, to Miss Sarah A. Heacocks, who was born in Ohio, April 27, 1831. He then purchased a farm of forty acres of land in Putnam County, Ohio, a tract covered with heavy timber, and began its development, which he continued until 1858. He later sold that farm and came to Jasper County, Ill., where he rented land for a time. On the 1st of December, 1861, Mr. Ryun enlisted in Company K, Sixty-third Illinois Infantry, and with that regiment served until the close of the war. He entered the service as a private, and was promoted to Commissary-Sergeant. He participated in a number of important engagements, including the battle of Missionary Ridge and the siege of Vicksburg. He went with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea, and participated in the Grand Review at Washington, where wave after wave of bayonet-crested blue passed through the streets of the Capitol City. He was never wounded or taken prisoner, and at the close of the war was honorably discharged as a valiant soldier.

On his return to the North, Mr. Ryun located in Bell Air, Crawford County, Ill., where he purchased a residence. Subsequently he sold that property and came to Jasper County, where he rented a farm for two years. He then purchased thirty acres of land adjoining the corporation limits of Granville, and locating thereon devoted his energies to farming and carpentering. He is now living a retired life in the village, where he has a comfortable home and is pleasantly situated.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ryun were born eight children, of whom three are now living: Louis N., a carpenter residing in Chicago; Levander L., a farmer and carpenter residing in Granville Township, Jasper County; and L. E., wife of Thomas Whitmore, a prosperous agriculturist of this community. The mother died October 28, 1875, and on Christmas Day of 1877 Mr. Ryun was united in marriage with Rebecca A. Bliss, a native of Indiana. She died April 6, 1879, leaving a son, Edward C., who is still at home. For his third wife, Mr. Ryun chose Nancy A. Boyd, who was born October 3, 1857, in Indiana. Four children graced this union, of whom three are now living: Clarence A., Myrtie L. and James Arthur.

In the spring of 1873, Mr. Ryun was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he held for twelve years, being re-elected from time to time. He has served as School Director for a number of years, and is now Notary Public. In politics he is a stanch Republican, and served as Chairman of the Republican Central Committee of Granville Township for about five years. He is a member of the Masonic lodge of Casey, and is also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. He holds membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has lived an honorable, upright life.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 579

FRANCIS M. HESLER, deceased, who devoted his time and attention to agricultural pursuits, owned a farm of ninety acres on section 20, Fox Township, Jasper County. The neat appearance of the place well indicated the thrift and enterprise of the owner, who was ranked among the leading farmers of the community, and therefore well deserves representation in this volume. A native of Indiana, he was born in Decatur County, March 24, 1844, and was one of a family of nine children whose parents were Joseph and Fannie (Wynes) Hesler. The mother died in 1850, and three years later the father came with his children to Jasper County, Ill., locating in Willow Hill Township, where he made his home until called to his final rest, in 1860. The members of the Hesler family were John, David, James, Francis M., Margaret, William, Elijah, Daniel and Joseph.

In his early boyhood Mr. Hesler of this sketch spent his time in farm work or in attendance at the district schools of the neighborhood, but his educational privileges were very limited. He was only seventeen years of age when he offered his services to the Government for the late war, enlisting on the 17th of January, 1862, as one of the boys in blue of Company K, Thirty-second Illinois Infantry. He was mustered into service at Words Point, Mo., and three nights afterwards was put on picket duty between Ft. Henry and Ft. Donelson. The first active engagement in which he participated was at Shiloh. He remained in the service until January 17, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. Although so young, he proved a faithful and competent soldier, and was ever found at his post of duty.

Mr. Hesler had accompanied his father on his removal to Jasper County in 1853, but after the close of the war he went to Richland County, and began farming upon rented land in Preston Township. Subsequently he operated a rented farm in Willow Hill Township, Jasper County, until 1873, when he removed to North Muddy Township, where he made his home until 1878. In that year he purchased the farm now occupied by his family, and engaged in its cultivation until the time of his death, which occurred April 9, 1893.

Our subject was married September 4, 1883, to Mrs. Emily J. Hesler, whose maiden name was Kinkade, a daughter of James and Martha A. (Veech) Kinkade, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, where they were married. They located in Coles County, Ill., about 1851, and two years later removed to Richland County. Mr. Kinkade is still living, and resides in Dundas, but Mrs. Kinkade died in February, 1891. Mrs. Hesler, at the time of her marriage, was the widow of David Hesler, by whom she had a family of seven children, as follows: Elva, James L., Allie, Nannie, David W., and Mary and Martha, twins. The latter died at the age of seven years; the other members of the family are all living with their mother.

Mr. Hesler took quite an active interest in politics, and voted with the Democratic party. He was serving as Constable of Fox Township at the time of his death, and the fact that he had filled that office for eight years testifies to his fidelity to duty. Socially he was a member of the Odd Fellows' society and the Grand Army of the Republic. The same spirit which made him a good soldier during the late war characterized his life work, and in the community where he made his home Mr. Hesler was not only widely, but very favorably known.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 582

JACKSON TREXLER, one of the enterprising and representative farmers of Jasper County, who resides on section 33, North Muddy Township, is one of the worthy citizens that Ohio has furnished to Illinois. He was born in Jackson County, of the Buckeye State, June 20, 1828. His grandfather, Emanuel Trexler, was born in Germany, but, for many years resided in Pennsylvania, and his later days were spent in Ohio. By occupation he was a farmer, but he also dealt in salt in Portsmouth, Ohio, and probably built the first house in that place. He reared a large family and died at an advanced age.

His son, Jonathan Trexler, was born in the Keystone State, and during his childhood went with his parents to Jackson County, Ohio. He was reared as a farmer's son, and there followed agricultural pursuits until 1853. In the meantime he married Rachel Martin, a native of Kentucky. They became the parents of ten children, seven sons and three daughters, of whom seven are now living: Jonathan, now a resident of Effingham County, Ill.; Mary, widow of Thomas Foster, of North Muddy Township; Johnson, a farmer of North Muddy Township; Jackson; William, who is farming in Marion County. Ore.; Catherine, wife of Dr. James B. Johnson, of Jackson, Ohio; and Rachel, wife of John Toland, of North Muddy Township. In 1853, Jonathan Trexler emigrated with his family to Jasper County, Ill., and located in North Muddy Township. He entered between two hundred and three hundred acres of land and purchased two hundred acres on section 2, range 8 east, in town 6, developing the same into a fine farm. He was one of the prominent and thrifty farmers of this locality. In the War of 1812 he had served as a soldier. He died in 1878 at the age of eighty-eight years. His wife, who was a member of the Christian Church, passed away about fourteen years previous.

Jackson Trexler, whose name heads this record, lived quietly upon his father's farm during the days of his childhood and gained a good English education in the common schools of his native State. After attaining to man's estate he was united in marriage, December 12, 1852, with Miss Louisa Mercer, daughter of Joseph and Anna (Day) Mercer. Her parents were natives of the Keystone State, but in an early day removed to Jackson County, Ohio. After his marriage, Mr. Trexler, in company with his brother Vinton, purchased a farm in Ohio, and his father also gave him a tract of land, but in the fall of 1853 he sold his property in the Buckeye State and came to Illinois to try his fortune. In Jasper County he entered two hundred acres of land from the Government and afterward purchased an additional sixty acres. He has since bought and sold a considerable amount and has given not a little to his children. His landed possessions now aggregate two hundred and seventy acres. The greater part of this is under a high state of cultivation and well improved with all the accessories of a model farm.

In 1867 Mr. Trexler was called upon to mourn the death of his wife, who died on the 22d of December, in the faith of the Christian Church, of which she was a consistent member. They had five children, three sons and two daughters, but Nottingham and Ida Catherine are now deceased, the former having passed away at two years of age, and the latter when a year old. Elizabeth Ann, the eldest child, is the wife of Benjamin Toland, a farmer of North Muddy Township, by whom she has five children: Florence Olive, Gilbert, Arthur, Claude and May. Rachel is the wife of Arthur C. Pickens, who is engaged in farming in North Muddy Township. They have three sons, Darwin, Cecil and Ernest. Stanton is yet at home. On the 26th of January, 1869, Mr. Trexler was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Deborah Lake, widow of James Lake, and a daughter of John and Annie (Chezem) Bonce, who were natives of Indiana. Mrs. Trexler had one child by her former marriage, James A. Lake, who married Miss Viola Gurrell, and is living three and a-half miles from Wheeler. They have one child, a daughter, Verda Edith, born February 17, 1893. Five children graced the second union: Elmer C., who on April 2, 1893, married Miss Naomi D. Gillson, daughter of William C. Gillson, of North Muddy Township; Jane; Nora, deceased; Vinton, also deceased; and Clinton J.

Mr. Trexler has resided upon the farm which is still his home for forty years. When he first came to the county it was in a wild and primitive condition. Deer and all kinds of wild game could be had in abundance and wolves were numerous. The first barrel of flour which he bought after coming here he had to haul by wagon from Terre Haute, Ind., a distance of sixty-five miles. He has seen the entire development of the county and as a good citizen has aided in its development and upbuilding. Success has attended his business efforts and he now has one of the finest farms in North Muddy Township. In politics he is a supporter of the Republican party. Himself and wife are members of the Christian Church and are people whose many excellencies of character have won them an enviable position in social circles and gained them the respect of all with whom they have been brought in contact.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 585

HENRY F. BROOKS owns and operates a good farm of two hundred and forty-eight acres of rich land, situated on section 6, Crooked Creek Township, and is one of the enterprising and progressive agriculturists of Jasper County. He is also one of her native sons, having been born on the old homestead on the 28th of January, 1849. His father, Eliphaz Brooks, was one of the honored early settlers of the county, who located here in 1840. He was a good business man, opened up a large farm, and by his well-directed efforts accumulated a comfortable property. His last days were spent in retirement in Newton, where his death occurred in 1886.

Our subject spent the days of his boyhood and youth upon his father's farm, no event of special importance occurring to vary the daily routine. In the summer months he aided in cultivating the land, for as soon as old enough to handle the plow, he began work in the fields, and in the winter season attended the district schools, which afforded him his educational privileges, he remained with his father until he arrived at man's estate, and then started out in life for himself. He was united in marriage February 19, 1870, with Miss Phoebe Ellen Cowger, a native of Indiana. When three years old she was brought by her father, Jonathan Cowger, to Illinois, the family locating in Jasper County in 1853.

The year after his marriage Mr. Brooks located upon the farm which is still his home. It was then a tract of raw land, entirely destitute of improvement, but he cleared and fenced it, plowed and planted his land, and in the course of time abundant harvests were garnered as the reward of his labors. As his financial resources have increased he has extended the boundaries of his farm until it now comprises two hundred and forty-eight acres, of which one hundred and seventy-five acres are under a high state of cultivation, good buildings and all the accessories of a model farm are there to be found, and the neat and thrifty appearance of the place indicates the enterprise of the owner.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Brooks have been born three children: Rachel Arminda, wife of Ezekiel Nichols, a farmer of Crooked Creek Township, by whom she has one child; Rosa and William Milton. They lost their eldest child, a daughter, Sarah Catherine, who grew to womanhood, became the wife of Fountain Clark, of Jasper County, and died in 1890.

Mr. Brooks exercises his right of franchise in support of the Republican party, with which he has affiliated since casting his first vote for Gen. Grant in 1872. We find in our subject a public-spirited and progressive citizen, who manifests a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community. He is also a self-made man, whose success in life is due to his own efforts. His labor and enterprise have served him as stepping-stones to something higher, and he has steadily worked his way upward until he has accumulated a large and valuable property, and is recognized as one of the substantial citizens of Jasper County. During the fall of 1892 Mr.' Brooks and his wife made a trip through Iowa and Nebraska, spending about three weeks in travel. This worthy couple are well known in this community, and are held in the highest regard by all.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 588

HARRISON H. POSTLEWAIT, who curries on general farming on section 21, Granville Township, Jasper County, where he owns and operates one hundred and seventy acres of land, was born on section 1, of this township, October 26, 1843. The Postlewait family is of English origin. The father of our subject, Isaac Postlewait, was a native of Virginia, and the mother, who bore the maiden name of Lucy Lott, was born in Virginia. Leaving the Old Dominion, Mr. Postlewait removed to Ohio in an early day, and from there came to Illinois in 1840, making the trip Westward by team. He first located in Clark County, where he lived until his removal to Jasper County, in 1843 or '44. Taking up his residence in Granville Township, he began the development of a farm. The family bore all the hardships and experiences of pioneer life. The father died just across the line in Crawford County, August 24, 1858, and the mother was called to her final rest in 1865. They had a family of nine children, of whom James, Hannah, William, Deborah, Rebecca and Ruth are now deceased. Rachel, John, Sarah A. and Harrison are still living at this writing, in the summer of 1893 one in Crawford County, and the other three in Jasper County.

In early childhood, our subject attended the subscription schools, where he acquired a fair education. With his mother he remained until eighteen years of age, when, prompted by patriotic impulses, he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting as a private of Company E, Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, on the 1st of January 1862. He was mustered into service at Camp Dubois. and the first active engagement in which he participated was during the siege of Vicksburg. He aided in besieging that city until its surrender, after which he was under fire at the battle of Paducah. At the battle of Clarenton, August 24, 1864, he was taken prisoner and remained with the enemy about fifteen days, in the northern part of Arkansas. He was then released and went to St. Louis, where he was transferred to the Fifth Company, First Battalion of paroled men. He then went to Little Rock, Ark., but was not again engaged inactive battle. He received his discharge October 15, 1865, and was mustered out as Corporal.

Mr. Postlewait returned to his home to find that Death had visited it and taken from it his mother. She was a widow, and before her death, like a dutiful son, he had sent her his wages to help maintain her. After his return, he spent a few months in Greenup, and then went to Bell Air. For a year he operated rented land, after which he worked in a gristmill in Bell Air for a few months. Subsequently he carried on a rented farm until 1873, when he purchased forty acres of land on section 21, Granville Township, and began the development of the farm which has since been his home. Its boundaries he has since extended until now one hundred and seventy acres pay tribute to his care and cultivation.

In 1867, Mr. Postlewait was united in marriage with Miss Melissa Doolittle, and by their union have been born nine children: Ettie, who is still living; Ida, who died in 1872; James, who died in 1875; John, David, Nora, Wilson, Harlen and Mary. The family is one well known in the community, and its members are highly respected.

In his social relations, Mr. Postlewait is an Odd Fellow, and also belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he has always been a supporter of the Republican party. He holds membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church. All educational, moral and social interests find in him a friend. He is a public-spirited and progressive citizen and manifests a commendable interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community and its upbuilding.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 600

ROBERT T. WILSON, who since 1890 lived a retired life in West Liberty, was an honored veteran of the late war. He was born in Paris, Bourbon County, Ky., April 6, 1828, and was one of a family of thirteen children, whose parents were Daniel and Rebecca (Pierce) Wilson. The father was a native of Maryland, and was of English descent. He followed the trade of carpentering for a livelihood, and lived in Kentucky until 1832, when he went to Wheeling, W. Va., where he spent the succeeding eleven years of his life. In 1843 he removed to Noble County, where he engaged in farming until his death in 1875. His wife survived him for a number of years and died in 1887. The living children of the Wilson family are: Emily, Mary, William, Eliza, Maria, India and Theodore. Friend was killed at the battle of Cross Keys, Va., while serving as a member of Company J, Twenty-first Ohio Infantry.

Robert Wilson acquired the greater part of his education in Wheeling, and by his school privileges was well fitted for the duties of life. In 1843 he accompanied his parents to Ohio, and remained with them until he had attained his majority, when he began working at the wagonmaker's trade, which he followed for about fourteen years. The Civil War having broken out, he then enlisted, in 1861, as a private of Company D, Forty-second Ohio Infantry, and was mustered into service at Camp Chase. His regiment was commanded by President Garfield, and the first active engagement in which he participated was at Middle Creek. He also took part in the battles of Pound (Cumberland Gap, Jackson, Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post and the sieges of Vicksburg and Corinth. After about four years of honorable service he received his discharge in 1865. His faithfulness and bravery had won for him promotion, he having been made Sergeant at Cumberland, and First Lieutenant at Columbus, Ohio.

When the country no longer needed his aid Mr. Wilson returned to the Buckeye State, where he carried on carpenter work until 1878. In that year he came to Jasper County, Ill., and, locating in West Liberty, purchased a farm of one hundred acres in Fox Township, which he still owned at the time of his death. This he operated successfully until 1890, when, wishing to live a more retired life, he leased his farm. He was not long spared to enjoy his leisure, however, as he died, deeply regretted by his family, his friends and his acquaintances, March 27, 1893.

Our subject was married in December, 1849, the lady of his choice being Miss Elizabeth Brown, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Colland) Brown. Six children were born of their union: James B., Thomas G., John W., Charles K., Luella, and Adda, who died in 1872.

Mr. Wilson held membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church, with which his wife is also connected. The family is a highly respected one, and widely and favorably known in this community. In his social relations our subject was connected with the Grand Army of the Republic. In his political views he was a stanch Republican, having supported that party since attaining his majority. Mr. Wilson led a busy and useful life, and by his good management, his enterprise and well-directed efforts he gained a comfortable competence, which, in his latter years, enabled him to live a retired life, resting in the enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 601

FRANK D. RICHARDSON, one of the substantial farmers of Wade Township, Jasper County, residing on section 16, has been a resident of this community since 1869. He was born in Warren County, Ohio, January 10, 1838. His father, Nathan Richardson, was a native of Massachusetts, as was also his grandfather, Asa Richardson. The latter removed with his family to Ohio in 1794. He afterward started on a trip to New Orleans, but as no trace of him could ever be found, he is supposed to have been murdered. Nathan Richardson went with his parents to the Buckeye State, but afterward returned to Massachusetts with his mother and remained with her until a lad of twelve years. He then went to Cincinnati, Ohio, which at that time was a village. His father had purchased land in that vicinity, which tract is now in the heart of the city. Nathan Richardson there grew to manhood, and in early life learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked for some time. Removing to Lebanon he there followed carpentering. He married Rebecca Boothby, a daughter of Esquire Boothby, one of the early settlers of Ohio, who removed to that State from New Jersey. After his marriage, Mr. Richardson located upon a farm in Warren County, where he reared his family and spent the last years of his life. His death occurred about 1863. His wife survived him for a number of years and passed away in 1879, at the advanced age of seventy-nine years.
Frank D. Richardson is the youngest of a family of four sons and two daughters, who grew to mature years. Two sons and two daughters are yet living: Dr. N. S., a practicing physician of Macon City, Mo.; Nancy, wife of Dr. W. G. Brant, of Springfield, Ohio; Martha and Frank.
The subject of this sketch passed the days of his boyhood and youth in the usual manner of farmer lads. He acquired a good education in the public schools and in the National Normal at Lebanon, Ohio, completing a course in the latter institution in 1858. He then engaged in teaching school in Warren County, and after coming to Illinois he also taught for several terms. On the 1st of December, 1860, he was united in marriage with Miss E. A. Weir, a native of Warren County, and a daughter of Philip and Sarah Weir, who are numbered among the pioneer settlers of that locality. Two children have been born of this union: Mamie, wife of Frank S. Shup, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume; and Jessie, wife of J. C. Davidson, a substantial farmer of Wade Township.
During the late war, Mr. Richardson enlisted in the service of his country in the spring of 1864 as a member of the Thirteenth Ohio Cavalry. He joined his command at Petersburgh, Va., and remained at the front until the close of the war. He was never wounded, but was injured by the fall of his horse and permanently disabled. He enlisted as a private, but bravery and meritorious conduct won for him promotion to the rank of First Lieutenant. He was mustered out at Columbus, Ohio, and was discharged from the service in August, 1865.
After his discharge Mr. Richardson returned to his home in Ohio, and there remained until the spring of 1869, when he came to Jasper County, Ill. He located on land which he had previously purchased, and which has since been his home. He first bought three hundred acres, two hundred and eighty acres in the home farm and twenty acres of timber in another tract. He broke and fenced the entire amount and opened up a farm, which is now under a high state of cultivation and well improved. It is pleasantly and conveniently located, and is one of the valuable and desirable farms of the township. Mr. Richardson has since
purchased other lands, and has improved another farm, and is numbered among the leading and progressive agriculturists of Jasper County.
Our subject takes quite an active interest in politics, but has never been an aspirant for office, preferring to devote his time and attention to his business interests. He cast his first Presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1860, and has supported each Presidential nominee of the Republican party since that time. He is a warm advocate of Republican principles. Socially, he is a member of the Newton Grand Army Post. He was a faithful soldier to his country during the late war, and is alike true to every duty of citizenship and to every private trust. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Richardson is the abode of hospitality. They are highly esteemed for their many excellencies of character, and in social circles they hold an enviable position.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 288

DAVID P. OCHS, who is engaged in general farming on section 22, Fox Township, Jasper County, has the honor of being a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in German Township, Richland County, December 30, 1854. His parents, John and Mary (Weeler) Ochs, were both natives of Germany. When six years of age, the father crossed the Atlantic to America, landing in New York City after a voyage of several weeks. This was in 1829. He went to Ohio, where he married and lived until 1845, when he emigrated to Illinois, making the journey by team. Becoming a resident of Richland County, he located in German Township, upon land which he entered from the Government. To the development and improvement of that tract he devoted his time and attention until his death, which occurred in 1888. His wife had passed away seven years previous, dying in 1881. They had a family of ten children: Daniel, who died December 7, 1892; Joseph, Mary, Henry, Frank, Ambrose, Theodore, David, Elizabeth and Josephine.
We now take up the personal history of the gentleman whose name heads this record. Upon the farm where he was born he spent the days of his boyhood and youth, and was early inured to the hard labors of farm life. In the district schools of the neighborhood he acquired his education. Remaining with his father until twenty-two years of age, the latter then gave him a team of horses and he started out in life for himself, for two years renting land in Richland County.
During that period, Mr. Ochs was united in marriage with Miss Matilda Shulte. Their union, which was celebrated in 1877, has been blessed with nine children, and, with the exception of one who died in infancy, all are yet under the parental roof. Those living are Nancy, Martin, Ephraim, Augustus, Louisa, Edward, Theodore and Franz; Andrew is deceased, as before stated.
Mr. Ochs continued his farming operations in Richland County until 1878, when he came to Jasper County, and purchased one hundred and thirty-two acres of land on section 22, Fox Township. This was an unimproved tract, but he at once began its development and cultivation, and now rich and fertile fields take the place of the once wild prairie. The boundaries of his farm he has also extended, until today it comprises one hundred and ninety-two acres of well-improved and valuable land. In addition to general farming he carries on stock-raising. Although he has led a busy life, Mr. Ochs has found time to devote to public interests and has served as Township Clerk and School Director. In politics, he is a supporter of the Democracy. He has also been a Trustee in the Catholic Church, with which he holds membership. Whatever success he has met with in life is due entirely to his own efforts. He began life with no capital, yet steadily worked his way upward, and now has a comfortable competence.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p. 272

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