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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
WILLOW HILL TOWNSHIP

Submitted by Barb Ziegenmeyer



M. ALLISON, farmer, was born in Edwards County, Ill., in 1839, and is the second son of John and Sarah J. Allison; the first a native of Kentucky, and the second of Virginia. Our subject remained in the county of Edwards until he was ten years old, at which time he was removed to Willow Hill Township, which was his home until he was nineteen years of age. In August, 1861, he enlisted in the Forty Third Indiana Volunteers, and was engaged in battle at Fort Donelson, Island No. 10, Fort Pillow, Memphis, Helena, Duvall's Bluff, Little Rock, and others. After returning to this township, he purchased his present farm of 240 acres, now in good cultivation. In 1857 he was wedded to Mary Messenger, a native of Indiana, which marriage was productive of five children, John C, Sarah J., Mary E., Francis M., and Milton. Mr. Allison is an intelligent and grounded Republican, a member of the I. O. O- F. and of the G. A. R., and an enterprising and worthy citizen.

JOHN AUSPACH, farmer, is a native of Decatur County, Ind., and is the third son of John and Lydia (Bailey) Auspach, both of whom were natives of Ohio. Our subject was born in the year 1884, and when ten years of age removed to Ohio, where he obtained some educational training and remained until he was twenty years old; he then returned to Decatur County; remained about seven years, and purchased his present farm of 220 acres, which is largely improved and well cultivated. The consort of John Auspach was Mary J. Parkinson, a native of Indiana, by whom he is the father of two children,  George H. and Marion S- In politics he is allied with the Democratic element, and is an enlightened gentleman and a progressive citizen.

H. C. BOLLINGER, physician and surgeon, is a native of Ohio, was born in 1828, and is the eldest son of John and Barbara (Hiser) Bollinger; the former a native of Virginia, the latter of Ohio. Dr. Bollinger was brought up and educated in Licking County, attended Grandville College, and studied medicine, chiefly at Hartford, Ind. When a young man he served in the Mexican war, and was stationed on the Rio Grande. His first efforts in medical practice were at Bell Air, Ill., whence, after three years' experience, he removed to Brockville, in this township. In 1859, he bought the Evermond Mound farm, and in 1864, returned to Willow Hill, where, except for seven years in Hunt City, he has been engaged in practice successfully. In 1851, he married Mary J. Page, who died in 1856. In 1857, he married Maria Rodgers, a native of Jasper County, who also died in 1876. His third marriage was with Louise A. Jones, a native of this township, the fruition of which union was the following children, Homer, Frank, Annetta, Martha E., Jeff, Dora, Clinton and Clyde. Dr. Bollinger is a respected citizen and a grounded Democrat.

S. B. BOWMAN, farmer, was born in Montgomery County, Ind., in 1844, and is the youngest son of John and Sarah (Loop) Bowman, both natives of Virginia. Our subject was reared and educated in Montgomery County. On his twenty first birthday his father died, and he assumed care of the family. In 1863, he enlisted in the Forty Second Indiana Infantry, was sent to Sherman s command, and was through many skirmishes and battles, including Savannah, Goldsboro and Fort Fisher; he was twice wounded, and promoted to be Major. In 1875, he came to this township and purchased a half interest in the Hunt City farm, of which he took charge for three years; afterward, he purchased 200 acres near Hunt City, with timber and improvements. He is a member of the A F. and A. M., of the I. O. O. F., and the Gr. A R. He was vice President of the Council of Montgomery County for two years, and President of the Jasper County Agricultural Association; he has also been representative of many lodges; is a liberal Democrat and a leading citizen. In 1866, he married Rebecca A. Mills, a native of Indiana; this union was productive of five children, Minnie B., Charles M., Cora M., Nellie and Washington L.

WILLIAM J. CHITTENDEN, physician and druggist, was born in Shelbyville, Ind., February 13, 1841, and is the eldest living son of Lyman and Nancy A. (Castator) Chittenden; the former a native of Virginia, the latter of Kentucky. When Dr. Chittenden was five years old his father abandoned his trade of millwright, commenced farming, and later moved to Hazel Dell IllI., where our subject was educated, and whence he enlisted in 1861, in the Thirty Eighth Illinois Volunteers. From Camp Butler they went to Pilot Knob, Mo., and in 1862, to Pittsburgh Landing, a march of 212 miles in nine days; then followed the siege of Corinth and the battles of Perryville, and Stone River. In 1863, he was discharged, owing to an injury to his eyes. In 1864, he recruited a company for guard duty at Memphis and Helena, with which he served as Lieutenant.
    After the war he taught some time; read medicine, formed a partnership with Dr. West, and began practicing. After two years he came to Willow Hill, which he has since made his home and where he built up a good practice; this, however, owing to his ailing vision, he was obliged to relinquish, and now devotes his time to his drug trade, having a fine store and a full stock. In 1870, he married Sarah J. McCray, of Henry County, Ind., which union was favored with four children, Ora, May, Estelle and Bertram. Dr. Chittenden is a Freemason, and Junior Warden of his Lodge; he is also post commander in the G. A. R.; a Republican, and was chairman of the Township Republican Convention and of the Senatorial Convention in 1882. The Doctor once obtained a prize in a county penmanship contest.

EPHRAIM COTTRELL, restaurateur and boarding-house keeper, was born in Wills County, Ill., in 1840, and is the fifth son of John and Catherine (Arnold) Cottrell, natives respectively of Kentucky and Ohio. When Ephraim was ten years old the family removed to Livingston County, where he was reared and educated After his father's death he remained with his mother until 1873, when he came to this township, and purchased ninety seven acres which tract is now largely cultivated. Three years later he exchanged his land for an interest in the store of Curtis & Mason, but soon after he resumed farming. In 1881, he commenced his present business; he is adjacent to the depot, and is a successful caterer. Mr. Cottrell is a member of the A. F. and A. M., and the I. C O. F., also of the United Brethren Church, and the Democratic party. In 1870, he married Matilda Lord, a native of England. They are the parents, by adoption, of one child, Letha. Mr. Cottrell is a worthy man and an esteemed citizen.

ISAAC DEBOW, junior member of the firm of Jones & Debow, owners of the Hunt City Mills, was born in Jasper County,. Ill., in 1847, and is the second son of Robert and Naomi (Gosnold) Debow, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, respectively. Grandville Township was the location of our subject's rearing and education, where he remained until 1866, when the family purchased 117 acres in this township, ninety seven of which are cultivated; here he lived until 1869, since which he has made several exchanges of land. In 1883, in company with Mr. Jones, he built the Hunt City Mills, and since they opened their business, in June last, the same has steadily increased and promises gloriously. They have three "run " of buhrs, and expect to improve and add to their machinery. In 1805, he married Cerilda Chapman, a native of Jasper County, who died in 1870. He next married Sarah M. Parr, a native of Marion County, Ind., and is the parent of two children, Emily A. and Calvin W. Mr. Debow is a Democrat, and an influential citizen. The firm of Jones & Debow are also grain dealers, having charge of the grain house at Hunt City.

JEREMIAH DOTY, farmer, was born at Willow Hill in 1846, and is the youngest son of Daniel and Isabel (Bitter) Doty; the former a native of Kentucky, the latter of North Carolina. Daniel Doty entered the land now owned by his son, in the early days of Illinois. Jeremiah Doty was reared, educated and has done business in Willow Hill. Part of his farm has been platted as town lots, known as "Doty's Addition," said farm now containing seventy five acres, all improved and under good cultivation. In 1865, he married Elizabeth Dickey, a native of Indiana, who died within one year, and in 1867 he wedded Martha J. Smith, likewise of Indiana, which union gave issue to six children, Samuel O., Martha E., George F., James N., Daniel H., and William X. Mr. Doty is a lifelong Democrat, a member of the Predestination Baptist Church, and a much esteemed citizen.

W. H. EIDSON, M. D., postmaster at Willow Hill, was born in Preble County, Ohio, in 1816, and is the youngest son of Henry and Nancy (Bunch) Eidson, natives of Virginia, where they died in 1846 and 1854, respectively. When about twenty two, Dr. Eidson began to study medicine, under Drs. Lynaweaver & Helfenstine, and began practice at twenty five. Soon after he removed to Indiana, and afterward to Marshall, Ill., where he practiced dentistry, and later moved to Willow Hill, being the second physician in the township, where he soon had a successful practice. At the time of war he enlisted in the Thirty Second Illinois Volunteers, serving at Fort Henry, Donelson and Shiloh, and afterward as enrolling officer. He then resumed practice, but from enfeebled health, retired in 1880, and gave the business to his son, devoting his time to post office duties, having served about one half of twenty nine years as postmaster. Dr. Eidson is a Knight Templar in the Masonic Order, and he has been Master of the local Lodge; he is also a member of the G. A. R., the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was Secretary and Director of the D., O. & O. R. R. R. He was for three years County Commissioner, Justice, four years, later Township Treasurer, and has been President of Town Trustees for several years. He was a Democrat, after 1860 a Republican, and is now an Independent.  In 1846, he married Catherine Coffman, of Maryland, with a result of three children, Henry A., Catherine E. and Laura J. Henry A. Eidson, M. D., was born November 9, 1840, at Mexico, Ind., and is a son of Dr. W. H. Eidson. He was reared and educated at Willow Hill, also taught two terms before becoming of age, served as clerk, assisted in the survey of the D., O. & O. R. R. R, and afterward engaged in mercantile business and as agent for the railroad company. Having previously read medicine with his father, he attended and graduated from Rush Medical College in 1880, and succeeded to his father's practice, to which he has added considerably. He belongs to Cooper Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Newton Chapter and Gloria Commandery. He is now Master of Cooper Lodge, and Vice Grand in the I. O. O. F. He is independent in politics and an influential citizen. Dr. Eidson was married the day after his graduation to Anna F. Radcliff, of Ohio, who died December 28, of same year. In 1882, he married Miss Mary J. McCartney, of Neoga, Ill.

JOB FITHIAN, farmer, is a native of this county, was born September 7, 1840, and is the eldest son of Glover and Mary (Catt) Fithian, the former a native of Ohio, the latter of Indiana. Job Fithian was reared near Brockville, and there remained until his twenty-first year. In 1811, he enlisted in the Thirty-Eighth Illinois Infantry, and was engaged at Pilot Knob, Shiloh, siege of Corinth, Perryville, Stone River and Chickamauga, where he was wounded in the right arm. He afterward re-enlisted, and was in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and after passing through Louisiana and Texas, was discharged at Victoria. In 1867, he married Eveline Dickey, a native of Indiana, by which nuptials he became the father to five children, Albert, Lizzie, George, Davy and an infant girl-Mr. Fithian has several times been possessor of the old homestead, and now has a farm on Section 30 west, consisting of ninety-six acres, all well improved and being cultivated. Mr. Fithian has long been a Democrat, but is liberal and intelligent, and stands in the foremost rank of citizenship. He is a member of the G. A. R., and has held several township offices.

E. C FLINN, attorney-at-lavv, was born in the year 1818, in the State of North Carolina, being the third son of Josiah and Catherine (Mozer) Flinn, both natives of the "Old North State.'7 When our subject was nine years of age the family moved to Greene County, Ind., where he attended an old-fashioned subscription school for thirty days. In 1855, he was admitted to the bar of Greene County, under Judge McDonald.    In 1861, he removed to Jasper County, Ill., and in 1880, after a State examination, was admitted to the bar of that county, where he has since practiced his profession most successfully. Mr. Flinn, in 1844, married Phebe Christenburg, a native of Indiana, with a result of one child, Amanda Holt. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church several years, and was Justice of the Peace for fourteen years in Indiana, and has been a Republican since the administration of Buchanan. Mr. Flinn is wholly a self-made man, and a valued and deserving citizen.

M. L. GETTINGER, M. D., is a native of Darke County, Ohio, was born in 1858, and is the third son of Henry and Mary (Buff) Gettinger. natives respectively of Maryland and Ohio, who moved to Sullivan County, lad., when the Doctor was about six years of age, and where he was reared. He was educated at the Union Christian College, at Merom, and subsequently became a student of the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, but graduated at the American Medical College of Saint Louis. His first location was at Annapolis, 111., but soon after came to Hunt City, where he has since been engaged in a successful practice, and has grounded a flattering reputation. In 1880, he married Caroline Hoskins, a native of Indiana, which union has given birth to one child, Mary J. Dr. Gettinger is a member of the I. O. O. F. He has always been a Republican, and is an influential and respected citizen.

W. H HIGGINS, deceased farmer and stock-dealer, was a native of Boone County, Ky., having been born in 1835. He was the third son of William and Nancy Higgins, supposed to have been natives of Kentucky. Our subject was reared in Kentucky until he attained his majority, when he emigrated to this township and settled on the estate now the property of his heirs. It contained originally 160 acres of improved land, of which his widow now owns the home and 100 acres. October 14, 1875, he married Mary I. Ireland, a native of Illinois, with an issue of one child, James AY. By a former wife, Margaret Ireland, he was the father of six children, viz.: Dora B. (Ping), Harvey A., Julius W., Mary F-, Orlando A. and John I. Mr. Higgins died April 29, 1880. He was a member of the Masonic Order, in politics a Democrat, a prominent farmer and a highly respected citizen.


G. R. HOPPER, farmer, is a native of Hancock County, Ind., was born in 1845, and is the eldest child of James and Verlinda (Walker) Hopper. Our subject was brought to manhood and educated in this township, and afterward bought the farm of his father, who now resides at Oblong. This farm comprises 134 acres, all improved-and well cultivated, situated in this township, and forty acres in Crawford. In 1865, he enlisted in the Thirty-Second Illinois Volunteers,and served six months. In political matters he has always been identified with the Republican party, and is a member of the G. A. R. and of the Missionary Baptist Church. In 1856, he married Martha J. Hurt, a native of Virginia, who died in 1879. He next married Elvira J. Meritt, a native of Indiana. Mr. Hopper is the parent of six children, viz.: James H., Albert W., Francis M., Estella V., George W. and Roy A. He is also a valuable and worthy citizen.

GEORGE W. JONES, senior member of the firm of Jones & Debow, proprietors of the Hunt City Mills, was born in Johnson County, Ind., in 1831, and is the third son of Abraham and Mary (Parr) Jones, natives respectively of Virginia and Tennessee. Mr. Jones was educated at Greenwood, reared in his native county, and there remained until twenty years old, at which period he came to this county and purchased land in Brockville settlement. He has been a resident of Willow Hill ever since, and has been owner of various farms, in extent from 40 to 380 acres, and now is owner of two farms of 140 and 120 acres respectively, which in the main are improved and well situated. Mr. Jones taught school for ten winters, and managed a saw-mill for five years. He is a member of the Baptist Church, was for four years Justice of the Peace, and has held other township offices. He is a Democrat, and one of Willow Hill's best citizens. July 11, 1851, he married Rachel Stretcher, a native of Ohio. Their family consists of seven children, viz.: John Ev Sylman, Tylman W., William, Otis, Allen and Lillie.

J. B. McNAIR, carpenter, was born in 1839 in Rush County, Ind., and is the third son of Thomas and Pruda (Keeler) McNair, natives of New York and Indiana, who came to this township when our subject was ten years old, and entered over 300 acres of land. When J. B. McNair was twenty-two years of age he enlisted in the Thirty-Second Illinois Volunteers, and served at Forts Henry and Donelson, the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, LaGrange, Bolivar, siege of Vicksburg, and others. At Natchez he re-enlisted, after which he was sent up the Ohio and Tennessee rivers, then joined Gen. Sherman's march, appearing in the grand review at Washington, and thence going to Leavenworth, where he was discharged, having risen to be Second Lieutenant. He was wounded while on march, the minie-ball being yet lodged in his face, and from long and arduous service his health is permanently broken. In 1864, on the 7th of April, he married Tempa, daughter of Dr. W. H. Eidson, and native of Ohio; they have one child, Daisy K. Mr. McNair is a Past Master and Chapter Mason, an Odd Fellow, and a member of the G. A. R. He is a liberal Republican, and an esteemed citizen.

W. F. MASON, is a native of Livingston County, Ill., and was born November 20, 1851. His ancestors were Virginians; his parents resided in Marshall, Ill., for four years and afterward moved to Willow Hill about 1851), where our subject was reared and educated. When sixteen years old he began clerking with Haynie, Eidson & Co., at which he continued seven years. In 1874, with Henry Curtis, he began business for himself, having a stock of about $2,800, and has built up a good and increasing business. Mr. Curtis sold his interest, in 1877, to Mr. Cottrell, who in 1878 sold to Mr. Mason, who has since managed the business and has a well selected stock valued at perhaps $6,500. In June, last, he purchased the stock of Stewart Bros., invoiced at $4,088, exclusive of the building. Mr. Mason's business has been a steady, growing one, and his career has been prosperous, with no untoward current except a safe burglary, on March 14, 1883. Mr. Mason is a Republican, a rising merchant, and an esteemed citizen.

J. A. MERRICK, farmer, stock and grain dealer, was born August 19, 1825, in Petersburg, Ind., where he was reared, educated and where he remained until the age of twenty five years, at which period he commenced the dry goods trade at Hutsonville, Ill. In 1858 he came to Willow Hill and purchased 500 acres; he also has 280 acres of timber in Indiana and 280 in addition to his farming land in this county, besides a partnership in other land. In 1854 he married Belle G. Huston, a native of Illinois, who died in 1856. His second wife is Lizzie Moore, also a native of Illinois, and he is the parent of four children, William J., Henry L., George M. and Ira A. Mr. Merrick has dealt very largely in stock and in grain since he came to this county. When the Whig party became defunct he joined the Republican ranks. For four years he was a director of the D., O. & O. R. Railroad, and he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Merrick is a leading and influential citizen.

JOHN MILLER, farmer, is the third son of James and Nancy (Kennedy) Miller, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Kentucky. Our subject was born in Crawford County, 111., in the year 1831 and reared in this township, whither his father came in the early days. When twenty four years of age John Miller married Lucy A. Ping, a native of Vigo County, Ind., who died in 1863, and in 1865 he married his present wife, Elizabeth A. Gold, a native of Tennessee. Mr. Miller is the father of five children, William, Elisha, James E., Mack A. and Redmond. Mr. Miller has bought and exchanged a quantity of farms since he entered his first land. His present farm comprises 120 acres, the major portion of which is arable and productive. Mr. Miller is a member of that most honorable of organizations, Freemasonry; he is a member of the Republican party, once having been a Whig, and is a communicant of the Baptist Church and an enlightened and liberal citizen.

CAPT. T. K. MILLER, farmer, stock and grain dealer, was born July 26, 1826, in Crawford County, Ill., and is the eldest son of James and Nancy (Kennedy) Miller, natives of Pennsylvania and Kentucky respectively. The father of Mrs. Miller was a judge of Crawford County for more than twenty years. The father of our subject came to Indiana, then a territory, in 181(3. When Captain Miller was twenty years of age his father died, leaving the family in his care, and in 1849 he entered 120 of the 600 acres that he now owns, 300 of which are improved, the land being about equally prairie and timber, containing, also, stone and stonecoal. For the last twenty years he has been engaged in stock dealing, and has likewise dealt somewhat in grain. In 1850 he married Mary A. Gould, of East Tennessee, which union produced seven children; Rachel Murphy, Columbus .G.-, Sherman, Kimball, John, Gilbert and May. In 1861 Mr. Miller enlisted in the Fifty Fourth Illinois Volunteers, of which he was made Lieutenant, and afterward Captain. They fought Forrest in Tennessee, at the siege of Vicksburg, drove Price out of service, and remained in that department until 1865, when he resigned, having served three years. In politics he has been Whig, Abolitionist and Republican. He is a member of the Baptist Church and of the G. A. R.

WILLIAM H. MUCHMORE, farmer, is a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, was born in 1836, and is the eldest son of Benjamin P. and Louise (Robison) Muchmore, both natives of Ohio. The parents of our subject removed to Indiana when he was young, and in that State he received his rearing and education. After he was fourteen years of age he removed to Crawford County, Ill., where he remained until he was of age, and purchased ninety acres of land, which contains some improvements, and sixty of which are under good cultivation. In 1857 he married Eliza Ireland, a native of Jasper County, which marriage gave being to six children, James William, Leonard, Alvia, Savana and Lillie.    Mr. Muchmore is a member of the Masonic Fraternity and of the Gr. A. R. He is also a grounded Republican, from which principles he never deviates except in comity elections, and he is a valuable citizen.

WILLIAM C PARKS, hotel and boarding-house keeper, was born July 1, 1837, in Breckinridge County, Ky., and is the third son of Seth and Mary (McCoy) Parks, natives respectively of New York and Virginia. He was reared and educated in Kentucky, remaining there until about twenty four years of age, and worked at farming. There he attended Eldorado Seminary and taught two terms of school. In 1863 he enlisted in the Thirty Fifth Kentucky (Mounted) Infantry, which was employed in protecting citizens from guerilla raids; he was Orderly Sergeant, and discharged in 1864. In April, 1865, he removed to Willow Hill Township and purchased 120 acres. May 27 1866, he married Amanda Layman, a native of Kentucky. She died May 2, 1883, leaving three children, Ada, Lorena and Bertha. In November, 1881, he came to Hunt City, and built his present place of business, which is now a first class hotel, of which Mr. Parks is the genial host and liberal caterer. He is a member of the Masonic Order, of the G. A. R. and of the Presbyterian Church. He is politically a Republican, and has held various township offices.

E. W. PARKS, railroad and express agent, also dealer in grain,, was born in Kentucky, in 1845, and is the youngest son of Seth and Mary (McCoy) Parks.  E. W. Parks was reared until his twentieth year, in Breckinridge County, Ky. He then purchased a farm in this township, which he managed eleven years; it contained 120 acres, all cultivated and improved. This he exchanged for a store in Hunt City, having a $3,000 stock, in which he continued until 1881, when he lost, by fire, everything except an insurance of $2,000, after which he built the building now occupied by T. H. Week. November 26, 1868, he married Miss Elizabeth Clemens, a native of Kentucky, with a result of two children, Jesse E. and Claude. Mr. Parks thereafter engaged in the grain trade, in which he has since been an operator. Since the establishment of the D. & O. R. R. he has been its ticket and express agent, and his son, Jesse E., a telegraph operator. Mr. Parks is a member of the I. O. O. F., of the Presbyterian Church, and was postmaster of Hunt City from the time he entered business until July, 1883. In politics he is independent, with a leaning toward the Democrats, and an enterprising and valuable citizen.

I. B. PARR, farmer, is a native of Shelby County, Ind., and was born in 1830.    He is the youngest son of Matthias and Sarah C (Kimball) Parr, the first a native of North Carolina, and the latter of Tennessee. Our subject was reared, educated, and found a home in Johnson County, Ind., until he was twenty three year's of age, and at this period he purchased his farm of 250 acres. In 1849, he married Mary A. Stretcher, a native of Ohio, and his second wife was Mrs. Sarah Stretcher, a native of Virginia. He is the parent of six children, John E., Sarah M., Matthias B., Armilda J. Thomas J. and Willet L. Mr. Parr has taught in all twenty terms, and has held several township offices. He is politically a Democrat, religiously a member of the Predestinarian Baptist Church, and socially an upright and deserving citizen.

M. H. PERRIN, carpenter and Justice of the Peace, was born in 1838, in Breckinridge County, Ky., and is the youngest son of William and Sally D. (Hardin) Perrin. natives of Virginia and Kentucky. William Perrin lived to be nearly eighty five years of age. M. H. Perrin remained at his home in Breckinridge County, Ky., until 1864, when, having learned the carpenters' trade, he came to Willow Hill, where, except for a period of two years at Mattoon, he has remained and pursued his calling. In addition to the trade, he has contracted successfully, and employs constantly from one to six men. He is the only contractor in the place, and has increased his trade from year to year. In 1866, he married Missouri Cooper, a native of Ohio (who was so named by the editor of the Cincinnati Enquirer; her sister was also named by the said party, Virginia), with an issue of three children, Ida, Washington McL. and Henry K. Mr. Perrin is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities, in which he has held the chief offices. He is also a member of the Mutual Aid Association of Galesburg, and the Good Templars. He is a firm Democrat, and acted as Justice for two years.

J. R. REESE, farmer, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1843, and is the second son of Elias and Mary (Harding) Reese, natives of Pennsylvania. Excepting an absence of three years in Virginia, our subject was reared and educated in Lycoming County, Penn., from which point he emigrated to this State and purchased the Evermond Mound Farm, on which he has since resided. This property is peculiar and superior, lying high, and commanding a fine view of the surrounding landscape. The base of the land is red and white sand, covered with a stratum of fine walnut loam. It embraces between 100 and 200 acres, and is nearly all improved and cultivated. In 1862, Mr. Reese enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty Second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and at once moved to Arlington Heights, thence to Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Harper's Ferry, Warren ton and Chancellorsville, where he was captured, confined at Belle Isle, and later, exchanged and discharged. In 1868, he married Mary J. Moore, of Hutsonville, Ill., which marriage was productive of three children, George L., Maggie B. and Ralph I. Mr. Reese is a firm Republican, a member of the G. A. R., and of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His father was once owner of a farm adjoining the battle-field of Bull Run.

HUGH F. SANDERS, farmer, was born in Orange County, Ind., in the year 1850, and is the fifth child in the family of Wright and Elizabeth (Ashcraft) Sanders, the former a native of Indiana, and the latter of Kentucky. Our subject found a home, education and training, in Orange County, until he attained the age of seventeen, whereupon he came to this township, and in 1876, purchased his present farm of 116 acres, partly improved and cultivated. In 1870, he married Mary E. Downey, a native of Indiana, who died in 1876. His second marriage was with Susan E. Shafer, a native of Illinois. He is the parent of two children, Lydia M. and Daisy A. Mr. Sanders is a grounded Democrat, a consistent member of the Baptist Church, an esteemed member of the I. O. O. F., and one of Willow Hill's reliable and efficient citizens.

G. M. SELBY, farmer, is a native of Rush County, Ind., was born in 1830, and is the eldest living son of Hasty and Rachel (Johnson) Selby, the former a native of Maryland, the latter of Kentucky. Mr. Selby was reared at home until his majority, when he went to Clinton County for three years, after which he returned to Willow Hill, and one year later purchased his present farm, which contains 150 acres, the greater portion of which is well cultivated and improved. In 1851, he married Hester A. Baker, a native of Indiana, who left the world in 1858. He afterward married Elizabeth Stewart, a native of Shelby County, Ind. Mr. Selby is the parent of five children,  Viola, Ann E. and John (twins), and Alvin and Calvin (twins). In politics Mr. Selby has always voted with the Democratic party, and has held several township offices. He is a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity, and is among the township's leading citizens.

FREDERICK A. SEMPSROTT, farmer, is a native of Germany, was born in the year 1829, and is the eldest son of Diedrichand Anna Sempsrott, likewise natives of Germany. Frederick received his schooling and home training in Germany, where he remained until he was seventeen years of age, at which period he removed to America, settled in the commonwealth of Indiana, and lived there five or six years. In 182, he removed to his present location, which embraces 215 acres of land, well improved and mostly cultivated. In 1842, he was joined in matrimony to Anna Steinforth, a native of Germany; this union has given being to seven children, viz.: Charles, Henry, Carrie, Lizzie, Anna, William and John. Mr. Sempsrott is and has been long identified with the principles of the Republican party, and is a useful and respected citizen.

MILTON SIMS, farmer, was born in Kentucky in 1823, and is the second son of Thomas and Lucinda (Hudson) Sims, both natives of Kentucky. Milton was a resident of the commonwealth of Kentucky until his eighteenth year, when the family moved to Rush County, Ind., and about seven years later he entered his present farm of 240 acres, nearly all of which is in good cultivation, and with commodious buildings. In 1849, he married Priscilla Harlen, of Jasper County, who died in 1859, leaving eight children, viz.: Martha A. (Johnson), William, Marion, Richard, Ida, Georgia A., Norah L. and Docia L. Mr. Sims afterward married Sarah (Ireland) Mitchell, a native of Indiana. Mr. Sims was in former times a Whig, but since the decline of that party has been identified with the Democrats. He has been Supervisor, and held other offices in the township; he is an enterprising citizen, and a member of the Baptist Church.

S. C STEWART, proprietor of Willow Hill Mills, is a native of Ohio and was born in February, 1825. His parents, John and Mary Stewart, have traced their lineage backward for about 200 years; they descended from the Anneke Jans, Bogardus and Weber families; the last of the Webers having been supposed to be a grand-daughter of King William IV. Mr. Stewart has a complete chart of these families. The father of our subject lived for a period in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Kentucky. S. G Stewart passed his life until his thirtieth year in Shelby County, Ind., working as a farmer and in a saw-mill. In 1877, he purchased the Willow Hill Mills, at that time the only mills existing in the township; he has two run of buhrs, and does a large business. In 1862, he married Mary East, a native of Washington County, Ill., who died thirteen years subsequently. In 1878, he married Elizabeth Stewart, of Indiana. He is the parent of two children, James R. and Lewis C- Mr. Stewart is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church, and a reliable, respected citizen.

HENRY STEWART, senior of the firm of Stewart Bros., Hunt City, was born in this township in 1855, being the eldest son of James and Elizabeth (Jones) Stewart, both natives of Shelby County, Ind., where our subject was reared and educated, and worked until of age, at which time he, in alliance with his brother, bought the Willow Hill Mills, and afterward had a store which was broken up by burglars, who took from them $1,800, and thus compelled them to sell their stock. Not discouraged, however, they pressed forward and have now a fine store and large stock, valued at $3,000, besides a building worth $1,500, with a steadily growing trade. Mr. Stewart is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities. He is a Democrat, and a very promising young man.

ISAIAH STEWART, junior of the firm of Stewart Bros., was also born in this township in 1857, where he was reared and educated until the age of eighteen, when he began business with his brother at Willow Hill. Mr. Stewart is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. He has been Township Collector and Clerk, the former of which offices he is now filling, and the money taken by the above related burglary being the funds of the township. In July last, he was made postmaster at Hunt City, and has always been identified with the Democratic party. Mr. Isaiah Stewart is a young gentleman having a strongly hopeful prospect; he is chorister of the Willow Hill Sunday school, and prominent in good example.

W. J. SWOPE, grain and stock dealer, was born in Greenfield,. Ind., in the year 1845, and is the only son of Maun and Eliza J. (Chamberlain) Swope, the former a native of Pennsylvania, the latter of Kentucky. In 1858, after his father's death, the family moved to Prairie City, Ill., where he obtained schooling and remained until of age, when he began the grocery, later the livery business, and some time after was in the merchandise trade at Grandville for four years. When the railroad was through to Willow Hill he commenced stock buying and grain dealing, and this has since engaged his attention. Mr. Swope, in 1866, married Emma J. Dare, a native of Shelby County, Ind., the result of which union was six children, viz.: Luna, Lee, Nellie, Lady, Birdie and an infant. Mr. Swope is a member of the A., F. & A. M., also of the I. O. C F., of which he has taken all the degrees, and has been representative and deputy of the lodge, and was its first Noble Grand. He is a Democrat, has been Justice of the Peace for the last six years, and is one of Willow Hill's most prominent citizens.

A. C. TERHUNE, civil engineer of the T., T. & R G. Railway, is a native of Dearborn County, Ind., was born in 1850, and is the eldest son of John S. and Mary A. (Cheek) Terhune, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of Indiana. John S. Terhune was an old settler and carpenter, and a soldier of the Thirty Second Illinois Regiment. He received an injury from a gunboat at Pittsburgh Landing; was thereby disabled and sent to hospitals at Vincennes and Evansville, from which he was discharged. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as are all of the family. He died in 1877, and his widow and two daughters are residing on the place. A. C. Terhune was brought to Willow Hill when seven years of age, and here he received his education and training. He commenced railroading in 1872, with the D., O. & O. R, then on the S., E. & S. E. (now the I. & I S. G), and is now with the T. T. & R. G. Railway. Mr. Terhune is a member of the A., F. & A. M., and in politics is a thorough Republican, as well as an enterprising and well regarded citizen.

P. A. TERHUNE, merchant, was born in Decatur County, Ind., in 1844, and is the eldest son of James B. and Martha M. (Coff) Terhune, the former a native of Kentucky, the latter of Indiana. When our subject was about fourteen years of age, his parents moved to Willow Hill Township, where he was reared and educated. Except one year's traveling in Kansas and Missouri, he was at home, and worked on the farm until his twenty seventh year. In association with his brother, he bought John Watt's stock of goods, which he sold afterwards to a younger brother. He then farmed for about a year, after which he bought a $ stock of goods at Newton, but soon moved therewith to his present building, where his stock has increased, and his business has prospered, the former aggregating $4,000, and the latter being one of the best of the neighborhood. He also handles grain. Mr. Terhune is a Royal Arch Mason, and has been Master of Cooper Lodge. He is also a member of the I. O. O. F. In 1876, he was a candidate for Circuit Clerk by the Republicans, to which party he has always been allied, and is one of the most enterprising and popular citizens. In 1872, Mr. Terhune married Cyrena Dearnes, a native of Mount Pleasant, Ohio, a union graced by two children, Guy, and James A.

WILLIAM T. WATT is a native of Bowling Green, Ky., was born in the year 1844, and is the eldest son of Fideler N., and Henrietta Watt, both natives of Kentucky. William T. Watt left his native town of Bowling Green, when eighteen years of age. He then traveled through the South as far as Galveston, and upward as far as Lakes Superior and Michigan, on a tour of pleasure. In 1876, he married Alsey K. Jared, a widow, and a native of Kentucky, who had two children by her former husband, Cordelia and Wilbert. Mr. Watt, our subject, has but one child, Bernice. His present farm and home, comprise in area eighty one and a half acres, all of which are under cultivation and fair improvement. He is a member of the great Masonic Fraternity, of the I. O. O. F., of the Grange, and of the Presbyterian Church. Politically, he is a stanch and intelligent Republican, and one of the most enterprising and valued citizens.

JESSE WAY is a native of Orange County, Ind., was born in 1838, and is the eldest son of Anderson and Lenna (Voris) Way, the former a native of North Carolina, and the latter of Indiana. Jesse was reared in his native county, and there remained until he reached his majority, when he began, and continued farming for himself until 1874, and then came to this township and purchased his present farm of 150 acres. In 1858, he married Fanny Sanders, a native of Orange County, a union sanctified by six children, Amanda C- (Holt), Eliza F. (Price), Wilson L., John A., Rosa B. and William H. Mr. Way is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, also of the Odd Fellows and of the Baptist Church. He has held several township offices. Mr. Way is a constant and conscientious Democrat, and is to be regarded as one of the foremost citizens of the township of Willow Hill.

T. H. WECK, merchant, was born in the State of Ohio, and in the year 1851. He is the eldest son of Michael and Julia A. (Booser) Week, both natives of Maryland, who came to Crawford County when the subject of this sketch was six years old, which location continued to be his home until he was about twenty three years old, when his father died, and he took the management of the farm until January, 1883, when he bought his present stock of dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, grain, fowls, etc. His storeroom is one of the best in the township, and he has a well chosen stock and a fast growing trade. In the grain trade Mr. E. W. Parks is associated with him as partner. Mr. Week, in 1874, married Tempa Wright, a native of Jasper County, with, an issue of three children, Maggie, Ida and Susie. Mr. Week is a long standing Republican, a good business man, a worthy citizen, and a member of the New Light Church.

THOMAS J. WISEMAN was born at Cincinnati in 1824, and is the eldest son of Judge John A., and Mary (Harrison) Wiseman, natives of Philadelphia and Cincinnati respectively. Judge John A. Wiseman was once Mayor of Cincinnati, and, with his father, was one of the first settlers of that city. Mrs. Wiseman was a relative of General Harrison. Thomas J. was reared and schooled in Cincinnati, where, at the age of fourteen he commenced the carpenters' trade, and after his apprenticeship began business for himself, which he continued until 1850, when he was appointed auction inspector, remaining such until the office was abolished, three years later, whereupon he was given a clerkship in the Legislature, and afterward made editor of the Democratic organ, Tagesblatt. He afterward farmed until 1865, when he purchased his place in this township, consisting of 300 acres, nearly all of which is cultivated and improved. In 1848, he married Mary Remlinger, a native of Cheviot, Ohio. They are the parents of seven children, viz., John, Emma, George, William L., Lotta, Edward and Harry. Mr. Wiseman is a man of broad and independent thought, as well as intelligent action. He is a liberal Democrat and prominent citizen.

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