LaSalle County Illinois Biographies, Sketches and Obituaries

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(Index Not linked)


Lars Brenson

Calvin and Peletiah Brewster

Lyman D. Brewster

Theron D. Brewster

Hiram Brock

Solomon Brock

George Bronson

Reuben Bronson

William Bronson

Alexander, Andrew and Allen Brown

A. D. Brown

Charles Brown

George Brown

George Brown
Hiram Brown

John Brown

Joseph Brown

Joshua Brown

Obadiah Brown

Robert Brown

Solomon Brown
Henry Brumback

Joseph Brumback

Henry L. Brush

Downey Buchanan

Aurilla Buck

James T. Bullock

Joseph T. Bullock

Leonard Bullock

N. B. Bullock

Samuel Bullock

Daniel Burdick

Jacob Burgess

Isaac Burgett

Ward B. Burnett

Hannah Burnham

Thomas Burnham

William Burns

Gershom Burr

Kate Bushnell

Stephen Bushnell

Washington Bushnell

A. D. Butterfield

Deacon Button

Lars Brenson

Lars Brenson came from Norway to Illinois in 1836.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Miller, Page 460 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Calvin and Peletiah Brewster

Calvin and Peletiah Brewster, two young men from Baltimore, came to Peru in 1835; Calvin died the same season; Peletiah went South in 1837, and died in Texas.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 363 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Lyman D. Brewster

Lyman D. Brewster came from Nashville, Tenn. In 1832, he traveled on horseback from Nashville, through Ottawa and Chicago, to Salisbury, Ct.; he returned and settled at Peru in 1834, and died at Hennepin in the fall of 1835.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 361 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Theron D. Brewster

Theron D. Brewster came from Salisbury, Ct., in 1835: he first engaged as clerk in the store of Kinney & Spaulding. In 1836 he laid out the Ninawa Addition to Peru, embracing all the business portion of the place. In 1843 he engaged in merchandising and selling town lots. In 1848, built a warehouse and engaged in the grain and shipping business, in company with H. S. Beebe; in 1853 in banking, and in 1858 in manufacturing plows and other agricultural implements; in this last he is still largely engaged.In all these pursuits, Mr. Brewster has been successful, and while he has accumulated wealth, has always been an enterprising, public-spirited citizen and Peru owes much of its prosperity to his efforts. When Peru was made a city in 1851, he was its first Mayor.

Mr. Brewster has been twice married; his first wife was Adeline Mann, who died in January, 1849, leaving two children: Sylvia A., and Frank, both living at home. Mr. Brewster's second wife was Martha Jones, who has four children: Jesse, Margaret, Benjamin L., and Theron D., Jr.-all at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 362-363 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Hiram Brock

Hiram Brock, twin brother of Solomon, came from Ohio in 1835. Went to Iowa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Otter Creek, Page 462 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Solomon Brock

Solomon Brock, born in Kentucky, and came from near Dayton, Ohio, in 1830, to Bailey's Point, and to S. 21 in 1833. He married Jane Moon, daughter of Jacob Moon, and raised a family where he first settled. He died in 1860. His children were : Henry, who is married ; Evans B., married Sarah Birtwell, and occupies the old farm ; Rees B., married Mary Cooper, he was killed at the battle of Hartsville ; Philander B., married Ellen Spencer, he is now insane; Calvin B., married Sarah Hart, and moved to Iowa; Ellen, married Christian Wagoner; Mary, married Jerry Hopple; Orilla Jane, married Wm. H. Gochanour ; Lilly married Daniel Barrackman, she is dead ; Anna, married J. C. Campbell.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Otter Creek, Page 461-462 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George Bronson

George Bronson, from Connecticut, first came to Illinois in 1834, to where Streator now is. Visited Michigan, Ohio and California, and in 1853 married Priscilla A. German, from New York, and settled in Deer Park.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 335 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Reuben Bronson

Reuben Bronson came from Green County, New York, in 1838; lived a few months at Holderman's Grove; settled in Adams in the fall; married Deborah Townsend ; bought the claim of Thove Kettleson on S. 22; has served as Justice of the Peace four years. They have five children: Ruhana, married Theron J. Baresford, and lives in Amboy; Albert, lives near Amboy ; Jay, is at school; Alice, and Arthur, at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 456 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Bronson

William Bronson came from New Preston, Ct., in 1837; he settled on Section 25, where he still lives. He married Eliza Fulwilder, has been Justice of the Peace, and has had five children: William, married Miss Walworth, and lives in Streator; Mary, died; George, is teaching in Streator; Frank and Ida, are at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 346 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Alexander, Andrew and Allen Brown

Alexander Brown, from Cheshire. Mass., July 1838 ; a bachelor ; died 1867. Andrew Brown came in 1838. Allen Brown, and wife Miss Best, in 1838 ; has one son and three daughters.

The above three brothers came from Berkshire County. Mass.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 433 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

A. D. Brown

Dea. A. D. Brown, from New York in 1838; settled on a farm back of town; married Cornelia Leonard, who died in October, 1877. His children are: Elizabeth married William Chumasero, now of Helena, Montana; Henry W. married Emily Gibbs, and lives in Chicago; William, married Lucy Rattan, on the old farm; Harvey, married Lydia Tompkins; Charles, died from disease contracted while in the army.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 364-365 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Charles Brown

Charles Brown and wife, Abigail Hogaboom, came from Ulster County, New York, and arrived here November 30th, 1830 ; bought a claim of James McKernan, on S. 32, T. 33, R. 3, where he spent the remainder of his life, a good citizen and honest map; he died in May, 1874 ; his wife died in November, 1874. Their children were: William, who married Betsey Ellsworth, died in 1869, aged forty-nine, leaving six children : Louisa, married Calvin Eells, now deceased; Clarinda, married a Mr. Mills ,is now a widow, in California; Russel, married Susan Hopple, and lives on S. 33, T. 33, R. 3; Ann, married P. C. "Watts ; Jane, married Frank Libbey, and is now a widow, with three daughters and two sons; Edward, lives on the old homestead; Cordelia, married Lyman Cadwell, and lives in Vermillion County.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 257-258 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George Brown

George Brown came in 1824; was here three or four years, and moved to Galena.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 228 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George Brown

George Brown, from New Hampshire, came in 1820; was part owner, with William Seeley, of the first saw mill built at Lowell; he died at Seeley's about 1836.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 298-299 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Hiram Brown

Hiram Brown, and wife, Olive Niles, came from Shaftsbury, Yt., in 1833 ; now in Kane County.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 438 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Brown

John Brown, from Missouri, came in 1829 ; settled at the ford of the Illinois river, two miles above Ottawa, which bears his name. He was drowned in sight of his house while crossing the Illinois in returning from the land sale in 1835. The family left in 1841.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Fall River, Page 391-392 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Joseph Brown

Joseph Brown came in 1824; was here four or five years, and then moved to Wisconsin. His son, Ford, said to have been raised by the Indians, came to Ottawa in 1858; he lived by hunting and trapping, and went West.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 228 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Joshua Brown

Joshua Brown, from Chester County, Pa., to Erie County, N. Y. came here in 1835, and settled on Section 10, at the head of the grove. He died in 1842. His widow kept a tavern, which all the old settlers will remember. She is now living at Rocky Falls; had a large family, none of whom are remaining here: Hannah, married Sylvester Warren ; Lydia, married Martin South ; Thomas, is in Bureau County ; Sarah, is in California.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 409 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Obadiah Brown

Obadiah Brown, from Vermont in 1837 or '8. Settled on S. 26, T. 33, R. 2. Moved West about 1840.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 338 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Robert Brown

Robert Brown, and wife, Anna White, from England, came in 1838, and settled at Vermillionville in 1839, and both died the same year, leaving three children: Mary B., married William Gray, and have resided in Deer Park ; Emma, married a Mr. Davis-her second husband was Mr. Haines ; Robert, died of cholera.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 335-336 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Solomon Brown

Solomon Brown, from New Milford, Connecticut, hi 1836 ; he settled on S. 18; he sold to Moses G. Hallock, in 1842, and moved to S. 13, T. 32, R. 2, where he died, in 1846 ; his widow, Armida Waller, died 1856. His daughter, Jane, married Marvin W. Dimock, now a widow, living with her brother, Henry. His son, Henry, is a minister of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and lives in the State of New York.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 385 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Henry Brumback

Henry Brumback, and wife, Elizabeth Pitzer, from Licking County, Ohio, in 1829; settled on the N. E. ¼ S. 13. Children: Lizzie, born in 1830-first birth in town, married Frank Bruner, now a widow; and Rachel.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 278 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Joseph Brumback

Joseph Brumback, from Licking Co., Ohio, arrived here Aug. 3, 1832, built a cabin on S. 6, T. 33, R. 5, and lived in it nineteen years. His neighbors very appropriately called him the Patriarch Joseph, as he had nineteen children and eight step-children. His first wife was Mary Parr, who died, leaving four children; George W., lives in Manlius, is County Surveyor of La Salle County; Elizabeth and Mary, are dead ; Samuel, lives at Odell. His second wife was Margaret Oatman ; she died in 1842 ; had one child, Margaret, now dead. His third wife was Comfort Young, who died in 1858 ; had eight children: Newton W., Jervis J., both in Bates County, Mo. ; Ada Perkins, Grundy County ; Joseph Jefferson, Livingston County ; John Howey, Merritt M., and Oby David, all in Odell; Nite E. died. His fourth wife was Margaret Hart ; had six children : Ella, Viola, Mirza, Ira E., Ezra H., and Oliver C., who are all at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 315 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Henry L. Brush

Henry L. Brush, from Vergennes, Vermont, came to Ottawa in 1830, as surveyor in employ of the U. S. Government. Settled in Ottawa in 1833, removed to Galena in 1842, returned to Ottawa in 1846; still here. Married Caroline E. Gridley ; his children are: Charles H., a practicing attorney in Ottawa; William E., died in the army ; Catherine E., Caroline E., Edward P., at home ; Adele E., died recently, aged 16.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 231 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Downey Buchanan

Downey Buchanan, from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, to St. Louis, 1827; came to South Ottawa, October, 1834; a tailor, by trade; kept a boardinghouse and shop; removed to North Ottawa, 1836. Mr. Buchanan was fond of hunting, and kept a pack of greyhounds. Many of the early settlers have shared the rare, exhilarating sport of coursing over the wild, unoccupied prairie, with Buchanan on his white horse, following his pack, led by his pet hound, Speed. A good mechanic, and a worthy man, he was as diligent in business as in chasing the wolf or deer. He died in 1850. His widow survives him, and one son, Ralph, a well-known citizen of Ottawa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 234 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Aurilla Buck

Aurilla Buck, sister of Mrs. Ezra Hawley, came in 1836; she married John Becker; is now a widow, living in Rockford.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 297 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

James T. Bullock

Dr. James T. Bullock, from Rehoboth, Mass. He left there for Illinois in 1835, by the way of Providence, New York, Albany, Cleveland, Portsmouth, Ohio, and the Ohio, Mississippi and Illinois rivers, and reached La Salle County on January 2d, 1836. He settled at Vermillionville, and at once commenced practice as a physician, which he followed successfully for forty years. His literary education was completed at Brown University, Rhode Island, and he took his medical course at Boston. He died October, 1875, highly respected as a man and physician. He married Nancy Barrows of Massachusetts, who survives him. His children are: Sarah, who married Rev. Mr. Dickinson, and lives in Massachusetts; Ella married Robt.Galloway, who died in 1869, she is now the wife of Mr. Hay, and is living at Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory : Frank W. married Agnes Baird, is a physician, and succeeds to his father's practice; Lena lives with her mother.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 326-327 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Joseph T. Bullock

Joseph T. Bullock came from Rehoboth, Mass., in 1837, and settled on S. 36, T. 32, R. 1; he married Catharine Galloway, and with his brother, Leonard, engaged largely in farming and stock-raising; since his brother's death he has continued the same on a large scale. He has two children: Ransom, married Ada Ellsworth, and lives near Tonica; Susan married Henry Foss, now in Colorado.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 350 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Leonard Bullock

Leonard Bullock, from Rehoboth, Mass., in 1837; he first engaged in teaching and then extensively in farming in company with his brother, Joseph, near Tonica. He married Julia Eames, and died in fall of 1856, leaving three children: Henry, married Fanny Laughlin, and lives near Tonica; Eliza and Lura reside with their mother on the old farm.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 293 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

N. B. Bullock

N. B. Bullock, from Cleveland, Ohio, carpenter by trade, came here in 1837. He and his wife both died of cholera in 1852.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 368 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel Bullock

Samuel Bullock, from Boston, came here in 1834. He married Rhoda Bailey, daughter of John Bailey, of Vermillion. He left his family in 1850 and went to California, and did not return. Mrs. Bullock died in 1873. Of their children, Elisha married Brintha Hall, in Rutland; Samuel and William are in Indiana; Martha married George Jacobs, in Nebraska.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 320 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Daniel Burdick

Daniel Burdick, and wife, Sally Adams, from Norwich, Ct., in 1837, settled on a farm. He enlisted in the army, and died in 1864,.soon after his return.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 379-380 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jacob Burgess

Jacob Burgess, came from Burlington County, New Jersey, in December, 1837; settled on Section 31. His wife was Olive Clark; they are both dead. Ebenezer. married Mary Seeley, he died in 1841 ; Dorothy, married Jonathan Hutchinson, of Iowa; Jacob, married Betsey Hall, and lives in Tonica; Warren, married Emma Swift; Stokes, married Emma Hiller; Sidney, married Miss Allen, on the old farm ; Mary, married Israel Hutchinson.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 297 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Isaac Burgett

Isaac Burgett and wife, Lydia Fellows, from New York, settled near Buffalo Rock, in 1835; resided here a few years; had three sons; Mandeville went to Missouri; Rodolphus and Orville went to Wisconsin. Three sisters, Misses Burgett, nieces of Isaac, came about the same time. Rebecca married Lorenzo Leland; Betsey was Alson Woodruff's second wife; Jane married E. L. Waterman.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 243 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Ward B. Burnett

Ward B. Burnett came from New York; resided here from 1837 to 1841; was engineer on the canal when building ; now living in New York.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 370 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Hannah Burnham

Hannah Burnham, sister of Thomas, now the oldest settler in the town, lives with Alfred I. Hartshorn, aged 70. She came with her brother, in 1833.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Waltham, Page 465 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Thomas Burnham

Thomas Burnham, and wife, Climena Clark, of Granby, Mass., came from Lisbon, Ct., and settled on the Illinois bottom, opposite Rockwell, in July, 1833. The family were all sick. David Letts moved them to Cedar Point, where they made a claim. In September, 1834, he sold to Lewis Waldo and moved on to S. 30, T. 34, R. 2, now the town of Walthara. He filled the offices of Justice of the Peace and County Commissioner for several years. He died in May, 1845. He and his wife and aged father were buried on the farm, but have been removed to Oakwood Cemetery, La Salle, and a sister has placed a stone to their memory. Mr. Burnham was the first settler ; erected the first dwelling, broke the first prairie, and raised the first crop in the town of Waltham. He left two sons : John, the first male child. born in Waltham, married Sarah Lathrop, and lives at Buckley, Ill. Thomas was killed at the battle of Peach Tree creek.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Waltham, Page 464-465 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Burns

William Burns, and wife, Sarah Harris, from Ireland to Pittsburg, Pa., in 1812, came to La Salle in 1837; was the contractor for building the canal aqueduct over the Little Vermillion, and the lower locks on the canal; a good mechanic, and physically and mentally a superior man. He died in the Sisters' Hospital, in Chicago, in 1873, aged 101 years. His children were: Eliza, who married David L. Gregg; John C., died in the State of Maryland; Sarah, married Mr. O'Conner, of La Salle, and, after his death, married John Higgins, of La Salle-she is now deceased; Joseph, died at St. Louis; two grandchildren only living.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 380-381 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Gershom Burr

Gershom Burr, from Fall River, Mass., and wife, Mary E. Norris, from Bristol, R. I., came in 1836. Married Ophelia Jennings-his second wife-and settled on Section 20, afterwards called Burr's Grove. He removed to Ottawa, in 1844, and engaged in merchandising until his death. His children are : Sellick, married Miss Newton, and lives in Ohio ; Gershom, lives in Ottawa, unmarried ; Mary, is in Rhode Island ; Ophelia, married Dr. Farley ; Charles, married, and lives in Michigan.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 450 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Kate Bushnell

BUSHNELL, Miss Kate, physician and evangelist, born in Peru, Ill., 5th February, 1856. She is a descendant of a prominent family that traces its ancestors to John Rogers, the Smithfield martyr. She received a public-school education in her native State and attended the Northwestern University, in Evanston, Ill. Selecting the medical profession, she became a private pupil of Dr. James S. Jewell, the noted specialist in nerve diseases. Later she finished her medical education in the Chicago Woman's Medical College, was graduated M.D., and became a resident physician in the Hospital for Women and Children. She then went to China, and for nearly three years remained in that country as a medical missionary. Returning to America, she established herself as a physician in Denver, Col. In 1885, complying with earnest requests from the leaders, Dr. Bushnell gave up her practice and entered the field as an evangelist in the social-purity department of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. It was she who laid the foundation of the Anchorage Mission in Chicago, Ill., an institution which has done great good for abandoned women, giving over five-thousand lodgings to women in one year. In 1888 Dr. Bushnell visited the dens and stockades in northern Wisconsin, where women were held in debasing slavery. That undertaking was heroic in its nature, for she took her life in her hand when she dared the opposition of those she encountered. Fearless and undaunted, she finished her investigations, and her report made to the Woman's Christian Temperance Union startled the reading public by its revelations of the utter depravity she had witnessed. As a public speaker Dr. Bushnell is graceful, eloquent and earnest, and as a writer she is well known in her special field. This combination of the woman and the physician, the orator and the author has made her the choice of the World's Woman's Christian Temperance Union for carrying the gospel of the white ribbon to foreign lands. In 1891 she left Chicago to circumnavigate the earth in the interests of humanity, representing over 500,000 women. Dr. Bushnell went as an evangelist to organize, instruct and encourage. She carried with her the " polyglot petition, "a paper that was intended to be signed by at least two-million persons, representing a general protest against legalizing sale of alcoholics and of opium, and it is to be presented to every government on both hemispheres.

(American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies Vol 1 Publ. 1897 Transcribed by Marla Snow)

Stephen Bushnell

Stephen Bushnell, and wife, Vincy Tuttle, from Saybrook, Connecticut, to Madison County, New York, and from there to Kendall County, Illinois, in 1837. They raised ten children. He died in 1869, aged 91. His wife died in 1854, aged 78.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 252 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Washington Bushnell

Washington Bushnell, son of the foregoing, came to Illinois with his father in 1837, graduated at the State and National Law School in Poughkeepsie, New York, and was admitted to the bar in New York in 1853, and came to Ottawa the same year. Practiced law two years, and was a member of the firm of Bushnell & Gray two years, and has since had a large law practice in addition to his official service.

He was elected to the State Senate in 1860, and re-elected in 1864; was elected Attorney General of the State in 1868 for four years; was City Attorney three years, and Prosecuting Attorney four years. Mr. Bushnell married Phebe M. Charles, and has five children. Vincy, at home; Theron D. Brewster, at the military school in Chicago; Julietta, Susan, and Sylvia, at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 252-253 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

A. D. Butterfield

A. D. Butterfield, from Jefferson County, New York. He visited Cuba, New Orleans, and other

places South, and came to Marseilles in April, 1835.Kept a hotel one year, then rented his hotel, and in 1836 bought out Solomon Channel, on S. 36, T. 34, R. 4, where he still resides; has held the office of Town Supervisor. Has had three wives; his first was a Miss Edgar, second Lucy Otis, third Sally A. Rood. Has had nine children: David, married Julia Young, lives on the old farm ; P. A., married Sarah Drackby, is in Marseilles ; Julia C., married Wm. A. Seers, of Odell; Orvill, at home ; Leavitt M., married Ella Pan', of Rutland ; Geo. F., married Mary Allen, and lives in Galesburg ; Chas. W.. Susan and Walter, at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 283 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Deacon Button

Deacon Button came from Ohio to Michigan, and from Michigan to S. 31, T. 32, R. 2, in 1835; in 1844 he moved to Wisconsin. He had a large family; Rosaima, married Peter Schoonover; another daughter married a Mr. Curtis ; Ann, went to Wisconsin ; Aladelphia, died at home. His sons were : Hollis; Ard, married the widow Faro ; Charles, is a Baptist preacher of note ; Asa ; and some younger children. They all went to Wisconsin. Mr.Curtis, son-in-law of Button, came from Michigan with him, was constantly in litigation with his brother-in-law Schoonover till he left for Wisconsin with his wife's father, when Schoonover had to find another opponent.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 299 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]