La Salle County IL Biographies
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Ezra H. Baily

J. B. Bailey

John Bailey

Lewis Bailey

Daniel Baird

Jacob H. Baisch

Austin Baker

Amos C. Baldwin
Asahel Baldwin

Elmer Baldwin

Hiram Emmit Baker

William Baldwin

James Ball

D. A. Ballard

Aaron Bane

James Bane

Daniel Barackman

Milam James Barackman

Samuel D. Barbour

William Barbour

 A. G. Bardwell

Robert Baresford

Hiram Barnhart

Jacob Barr

Bailey Barrass

Berkley G. Barratt

Sheldon Bartholomew

John Bascom

Thomas Basnett

Calloway Basore

George Basore

Daniel Bassett

Wesley Batcheller

Robert N. Baughman

June Baxter

Minter Baxter

 Ezra H. Baily


A quarter of a century has passed since Ezra H. Bailey came to Streator, and in the intervening years he has been actively interested in everything affecting the progress and upbuilding of the city. He has been especially prominent in financial circles, and is today the cashier of one of the leading banking institutions of LaSalle county,-the Union National, - which owes its present prosperity in no small degree to the executive ability, keen discernment and sound judgment of Mr. Bailey. He has always been a man of action rather than theory, and determined purpose has characterized his entire career, enabling him to overcome difficulties and work his way steadily upward.

A native of Massachusetts, he was born in the town of Milford, December 25, 1853. His father, James D. Bailey, was a descendant of the John Bailey who in 1635 left his home in Chippenham, England, and, crossing the Atlantic to America, took up his residence in Salisbury, Massachusetts. The family was loyal to the cause of the colonists through the struggle which brought independence to the nation, Eliphalet Bailey, the great-grandfather of our subject, having faithfully served in the American army during the war of the Revolution. On the maternal side Mr. Bailey is descended from -one of the oldest and most prominent families of the Bay state, his mother, Abigail (Tyler) Bailey, tracing her ancestry back to Job Tyler, who was one -of the first settlers in Andover, Massachusetts, the date of his arrival there being 1640. She also was descended from Thomas Dudley, the second governor of the Massachusetts Bay colony, through his daughter Anne, who was the first American poetess and who married Simon Bradstreet, who was governor of the Massachusetts Bay colony for ten years. Fortunate is the man who has back of him an honored ancestry, and happy is he if his lines -of life be cast in harmony therewith. Prominent in the affairs of the colonies the ancestors of our subject engraved their names on the pages of our early American history, and to-day, with equal loyalty and faithfulness, Ezra H. Bailey is performing the duties that fall to him in the walk of life in which he is found.

In the town of his nativity he was reared to manhood, acquiring his education in the excellent schools of the Bay state, for which Massachusetts is justly famed. When fifteen years of age he began working for his father in .a boot and shoe factory, remaining in the east until January, 1874, when he came to Streator and secured employment in the office of Ralph Plumb, then largely interested in railroads and railroad construction. In November of the same year he accepted the position of bookkeeper for the Streator Coal . Company, remaining with them as bookkeeper and cashier, and with their osuccessors, the Luther & Tyler Coal & Coke Company, until 1887, when he was offered the position of cashier in the Streator National Bank. He remained with that concern until 1890, during which time he gained a comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the banking business and the methods pursued therein. In the year mentioned he associated himself with the newly organized City National Bank, as cashier, and in 1892, upon the death -of George L. Richards, he was unanimously elected by the directors of the Union National Bank to the vacant cashiership, which position he accepted and still occupies. To his able and conservative management of the finances of the bank its prosperity is directly traceable in a large measure.

On the 18th of January, 1879, Mr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss Laurett Benson, of Streator, a daughter of Sylvanus H. and Laurett (Howard) Benson, whose ancestors were among the early settlers in and near "Blackstone, Massachusetts. One daughter. Edith Laurett, was born to them, January 19, 1881, and she is now a student in Lasell Seminary, in Auburndale, Massachusetts. Among her ancestors were thirteen Revolutionary soldiers. The wife and mother died July 3, 1883; and on the 23d of October, 1884, Mr. Bailey married Gertrude Canfield, of Streator, who, on the paternal side, is a direct descendant of the Canfield family, of New Milford, Connecticut, and the Ten Broecks, who were among the early Knickerbockers who settled New York, while on the maternal side she is descended from the Luthers, of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, and the Stouts, of New Jersey. Mrs. Bailey is a lady of fine mental and social attainments, being well qualified to grace any station in life to which she might be called. She is a valued member of the Daughters of the American Revolution,. the local chapter of the Eastern Star, the Callere Club and other societies in the city in which she resides.

Though great responsibility rests upon Mr. Bailey in a business way, he finds time, amid the multiplicity of his cares and duties, to properly discharge the obligations and duties of a patriotic citizen. He uses his franchise in favor of the nominees of the Republican party,' but has never sought political preferment, and the only public office he has ever held is that of school treasurer, to which position he was elected twelve years ago, and still retains. He is a Knight Templar Mason, belonging to Streator Lodge, No. 607, F. & A. M.; Streator Chapter, No. 168, R. A. M.; and Ottawa Commandery, No. 10, K. T. His life history exhibits a long and virtuous career of private industry, performed with moderation and crowned with success. It is the record of a well-balanced mental and moral constitution, strongly marked by those traits of character which are of especial value in such a state of society as exists in this country. A community depends upon business activity, its welfare is due to this; and the promoters of legitimate and leading business enterprises may well be termed in its benefactors, in which relation Mr. Bailey stands to the commercial interests of Streator.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 90-92- Contributed by Nancy Piper]


J. B. Bailey


The proprietor of the Ottawa livery, feed and sale stable, J. B. Bailey is one of the native sons of LaSalle County, and has spent his whole life within its boundaries. He is well and favorably known, not only in Ottawa, but in various parts of the county, and bears an excellent reputation as a business man and worthy citizen.

The father of the above-named gentleman was a native of Ireland, born in April, 1812; but he left the land of his birth when he was a youth of about sixteen years, and in 1828 sailed for America, the land of promise. For some time he lived in Oswego, New York, after which he proceeded to Illinois. Arriving in this state in 1835, he settled in LaSalle county, and years afterward he took up his residence in Ottawa. In 1836 Mr. Bailey served on the committee which built the first Catholic Church erected in Ottawa.

J. B. Bailey was born in 1854, during the period that his parents resided in LaSalle County, and when he had reached a suitable age h~ commenced attending the common schools. Industry and economy were among the lessons which he thoroughly mastered in his youth, and these principles carried out in his later life were the foundations of his present prosperity. Many years ago he embarked in the livery business, and within his spacious stables can be found a large assortment of horses and vehicles, including carriages~ both single and double, hacks~ picnic wagons, etc. In political matters Mr. Bailey is a Democrat, and fraternally he is associated with the Woodmen of America.

When he was a young man of about twenty-three years, in 1877, Mr. Bailey married Miss Cathrine A. O'Conner. This estimable couple have a very nice family, comprising five sons and three daughters, whose names, m the order of birth, are as follows: Christopher R., Elmer E., James B., Mary L., Catherine E., Alice Estella, William Francis and Edmund Joseph Robert.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 190-191- Contributed by Nancy Piper]


John Bailey

Vermillion, Page 290

John Bailey, and wife, Sally Benjamin, came from Windsor, Vermont, in 1831, to Putnam County, and in 1832 bought the claim of Warren's estate on S. 17, T. 32, R. 2, where he lived till his death in 1842. A good citizen, he always cheerfully bore his portion of the public burden of a new settlement. His widow died in 1854. He left seven children: Sarah Ann, married Nelson Alvord, a Baptist preacher ; Mary, married William Laughlin, now a widow ; Rhoda, married Samuel Bullock; Annis, married Bailey Barrass; Maria, married Seth Eaton ; Emily, married Frank Wood, they live in Eden; William, married Janet Potter, adopted daughter of John Rider, and lives on the old farm-is now Town Supervisor.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Lewis Bailey

Lewis Bailey, the first settler in the town of Vermillion, came from Ohio; first to Indiana, and then to Illinois in 1825. He first came to Ottawa, but located on Section 19, at the head of Bailey's Grove, which was called Bailey's Point. His son Augustus is claimed to have been the first male white child born in the county, while a daughter of Christopher Long was the first. George Galloway, son of James Galloway, of Fall River, has claimed the honor of being born before Bailey. The fact seems to be that Bailey's son was a few days the oldest, but he was born at Peoria, where his parents had gone in a canoe, in anticipation of the event, and soon after returned, having been absent from home eighteen days.

The location selected by Bailey was a romantic one, and he said it was a favorite resort of the Indians, who ever evinced a keen appreciation of the beautiful. Mr. Bailey's neighbors at first were only Indians. He always expressed a high opinion of his swarthy friends, and persistently claimed that they were more honest, friendly and trustworthy than the whites. He was doubtless somewhat misanthropic. He with his family left the county in 1844, and died in Oregon. He had two sons: Augustus and Timothy.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 288 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Daniel Baird

Daniel Baird came from Westborough, Mass., in the spring of 1836; kept a boarding-house at Rockwell; his wife, Charlotte B. Field, and her sister, Adeline O. Field, came out in the fall of 1836. Miss Field was married to Elmer Baldwin, of Farm Ridge, in 1838. Mr. Baird and family were all prostrated by the sickness of 1838, and his business broken up. In the spring of 1839 he moved on to a farm near Palestine Grove, in Lee County, where he resided till his death, in 1866. He had three children: Marianne, married Henry C. Chapman; Seth, married Amanda Thompson, second wife, Martha Reese; Carrie, married Newton Pumphrey. They all, with the widow, live on or near the old homestead.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 376 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Jacob H. Baisch


This prominent citizen of Ottawa, LaSalle County, was born November 18, 1858, in this place, which he has always looked upon as his home. He is a son of Jacob Baisch, who was born in Germany, where he passed twenty-seven years of his life. Then crossing the Atlantic, he landed in New York city, where he resided some time. While there he married Miss Caroline Raisling, and in 1850 they came to Ottawa. Later, in 1888, this worthy couple removed to Madison county, Nebraska. The father is a loyal citizen of this his adopted country, and reared his children to the same high standard of patriotism. Two of his sons are now living in Nebraska,- Joseph in the town of Broken Bow, Custer county, and Fred in Madison, Madison county. The only daughter, Christiana, is the wife of William Fletcher.

Jacob H. Baisch, of this sketch, is fortunate in being almost equally proficient and familiar with both the English and German languages. After completing his public school education in Ottawa he commenced learning the trade of cigarmaker, at which calling he was employed from 1874 until 1888. He was associated with W. F. Fletcher in the cigar business from 1886 to 1888, and met with success, and since 1888 he has been located at 800 Jackson street in the saloon business.

At the age of twenty-five years Mr. Baisch married Miss Adaline Meyer, a daughter of Joseph Meyer, of this town. They have one child, Lottie B., now in her fourteenth year, and a promising student in the local schools. Following the example of his father, Mr. Baisch is an ardent adherent of the Republican party. Socially he is identified with the German Benevolent Order and the United American Workmen. He enjoys the friendship of a large circle of acquaintances, who one and all united in wishing him well and in praising his sterling qualities.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 192-193- Contributed by Nancy Piper]


Austin Baker

Austin Baker came in 1839 ; died in Minnesota.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Miller, Page 460 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Hiram Emmit Baker


Hiram Emmit Baker, of Dayton township. LaSalle county, is a prominent farmer and stock dealer and is entitled to more than a passing notice on the pages of this work, devoted as it is to a portrayal of the lives of the representative men and women of LaSalle county.

Mr. Baker may well be termed a self-made man. He began life a poor boy, he toiled and saved, and his industry and good management have brought him the success he now enjoys. He was born in Clinton county, New York, February 4, 1848, the son of a farmer, and was reared and schooled in Plattsburg. His father, Daniel Baker, was born at Thazy, New York, and died in LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1884. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Laura Card, were the parents of the following named children: James, of Allegan, Michigan; Martha, wife of Henry Miller, of Oakland, California; H. E.; George, of Iowa; Oscar, of Dayton township, LaSalle county; Charles, of Des Moines, Iowa; Susan, who married Gideon Ruger; and Nelson, a traveling salesman in Kentucky.

H. E. Baker, on leaving school, entered the employ of a Mr. Benedict, a milkman, with whom he remained two years, beginning at a salary of ten dollars per month, and five years with I. S. Thorn. At the end of the seven years he had assisted his father to the extent of one hundred and thirty dollars and had six hundred dollars in the bank. He then married and rented his father-in-law's farm, which he ran four years, after which he was prevailed upon by Gabe Ruger, his wife's uncle, to emigrate to Illinois. Coming here in 1874, he was employed as the foreman on Mr. Ruger's farm, in which capacity he served two years, receiving four hundred dollars the first year and five hundred dollars the second. The third year he purchased eighty acres of land in Dayton township, the price being four thousand dollars. Half of this amount he paid down. The other half and five hundred dollars worth of stock he went in debt for, paying ten per cent interest on the money, and at the end of five years he had the farm paid for. Then, with the hope of bettering himself, he went to Greene county, Iowa, but returned to his former residence in Dayton township, after an absence of one year. He bought one hundred acres on the bluff, near Ottawa, at sixty-five dollars an acre, on five years' time; built a modern house and barn, and when the five years had elapsed his obligations had all been met. Still another tract of eighty acres he contracted for, at five thousand five hundred dollars, four thousand dollars of which consideration he received four years' time on with the usual results, prompt payment of principal and interest. The last addition he made to his property was the stock yards west of Ottawa, which he purchased from the Phelps estate. These yards he himself used for a time, while he was engaged in buying and shipping stock, but now has them leased. Such rapid accumulation of wealth among the farming classes where the products of the soil are depended upon solely to meet such investment expenses is remarkable, even wonderful; and the instances are rare where such good fortune attends so regularly and so persistently as in this one.

Mr. Baker was married in 1870 at Plattsburg, New York, to Annie Ruger, a daughter of Gideon Ruger. The Ruger family is one of prominence in the townships of Serena and Dayton, where they are classed among the most industrious and progressive people of their respective localities. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have six children, namely: Sadie, Julius, Anna, Florence, Hiram E., Jr., and Glen.

Mr. Baker affiliates with the Republican party and takes an active interest in local affairs. He has served as a member of the board of road commissioners, of which he was the treasurer.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 595-597- Contributed by Nancy Piper]


Amos C. Baldwin


Amos C. Baldwin, of Deer Park township, LaSalle county, was born at the place where he now lives, August 7, 1848; was educated at Jennings Seminary at Aurora, and at Mount Carroll, Illinois, and at the age of twenty three engaged in teaching, a profession he followed for four years. At the oend of that time he decided to return to the labors of the farm and accordingly established himself at the old home, where he has given the best years of his life to the successful and intelligent cultivation of the soil and the raising of live stock.

Mr. Baldwin is a son of Edgar Baldwin, who was born in Litchfield county, Connecticut, in the year 1814, and who spent the early years of his life in his native state and learned the carriage-maker's trade there. In 1843 he came west to Illinois, a journeyman carriage-maker, and located at Ottawa, where he engaged in the carriage business with William Palmer, with whom he was associated for some time. When he left the factory he bought a farm in Deer Park township, where he resided until his death in 1895. In politics he was originally a Whig, but in later life affiliated with the Democratic party. His wife, whose maiden name was Helen Calkins, was a daughter of John W. Calkins, Who came from Connecticut to Illinois in 1838, and was one of the first settlers of Deer Park township. Their children are as follows: Amos C., the direct subject of this sketch; Mrs. I. N. Reed, of Urbana, Illinois; Mrs. J. M. Massey, of Virginia, Illinois; and Mrs. Lucy Williams, deceased.

Amos C. Baldwin married, January 17, 1878, Miss Elizabeth Reynolds, a daughter of Joseph M. Reynolds. The Reynolds family was the first to settle in Deer Park township, Martin Reynolds, Mrs. Baldwin's grandfather, being the first settler. He came from the state of Ohio and his place of location here was on Vermilion river near Deer Park. Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin's children are Agnes R., Jessie, Louise, Marion and Margaret.
Mr. Baldwin is one of the prominent political factors in his township. In politics he has always been a Republican and is at the present time a member of the Republican county central committee. He was elected the supervisor in 1892, having previously been the township clerk and commissioner of highways. He was a member of the county board seven consecutive years, three of the seven years being the chairman of the board, and rendered valuable service to his town and country. He served as the chairman of the committee on paupers and statistics, was on the road and bridge committee and on the special committee of that name. He was on the special committee to erect the county insane asylum. The matter of the reduction of pauper expenses gave him much concern and he labored to bring about such a reform in the administration of the county pauper affairs that would achieve that end. The present plan in vogue was adopted in conformity with a resolution of his own and is expected to produce beneficial results.

Mr. Baldwin takes an active interest in church and Sunday-school affairs. He has been the superintendent of the Sunday-school of his community twenty-five years.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 352-353- Contributed by Nancy Piper]


Asahel Baldwin

Asahel Baldwin, from Colebrook, Connecticut, in the fall of 1832 ; bought the claim of Reynolds, on S. 19. Married Flora Holcomb, and in 1834 moved to Indian creek ; returned for*a short time, and went to Iowa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Opher, Page 411-412 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Elmer Baldwin

Elmer Baldwin brought his family, consisting of his wife, Adeline Benson, and an infant daughter, Mary, now the wife of Rinaldo Williams, in the spring of 1836; his wife died in January, 1837. He married Adeline O. Field, of Worcester County, Massachusetts, in May, 1838, and still resides on the land purchased of the United States in 1835, a farmer and nurseryman. He held the office of Justice of the Peace fourteen consecutive years; Supervisor of the town five years; Postmaster twenty years ; School Treasurer of the town from its first settlement, till 1874; twice a Representative in the Legislature, and once in the State Senate; and a member and President of the Board of State Charities five years. His son, Noble Orlando, married Maggie Jackson, and lives adjoining the old farm. Susan Orvilla is at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 384-385 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William Baldwin

William Baldwin came in 1837; merchant in Rockwell; went to Chicago in 1838 or 9.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 380 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


James Ball

James Ball, from Owego, New York, in 1835; he married Cepha Ball, and lives on Section 26. Has one daughter.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 264 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


D. A. Ballard

D. A. Ballard came from Boston, in the fall of 1834 ; his wife was a sister of Mrs. Sutphen ; he returned to Boston in 1842. Two sons remain-one died at Earl two years since ; the other is at Aurora.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 431 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Aaron Bane

Dr. Aaron Bane, from Kinderhook, New York, came with J. V. A. Hoes in 1836, a practicing physician and a young man of much promise; he was drowned by the swamping of the ferry boat crossing the Illinois River in 1840, much regretted.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 231 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


James Bane

A native of Marshall county, West Virginia, born December 30, 1840, James Bane is a son of Nimrod and Leanna (Bowers) Bane, who were among the pioneers of Illinois, settling in Marshall county in 1850. The father was a son of Jesse Bane, a farmer, who was born in Pennsylvania, of English descent. He participated in the war of 1812 and instilled the same principles of patriotism that animated him into the minds of his several children. He passed the later years of his life in West Virginia, his death occurring when he was about sixty-five years of age. The maternal grandfather of our subject, Henry Bowers, likewise was a native of the Keystone state, and was of German extraction. He, too, followed agricultural pursuits, and reared a large number of children. He was about three score and ten years of age when claimed by death, in 1845.
Nimrod Bane, who is still living, is a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania, as was also his wife. They were the parents of nine children, eight of whom were sons. Five of the number are living at this writing, namely: Henry, of Greenwood county, Kansas; James: Ephraim, of Reno county, Kansas: Jacob, of Springfield, Illinois; and Joseph, of Morris county, Kansas. As previously stated, the father removed to this state almost half a century ago, and locating upon a farm of eighty acres in Marshall county he proceeded to improve and cultivate the place, which he transformed into a very desirable homestead. For a number of years they dwelt in the vicinity of Robert's Point, where the children received excellent educational advantages. The devoted wife and mother was summoned to the better land in 1876, when she was in her sixty-second year. She adhered to the religious faith of her ancestors, being a Lutheran. Of late years the father has made his home with his children. He is a Republican, and has ever taken an active part in the affairs of his own locality.

James Bane, whose name heads this sketch, has resided in Illinois since he was about ten years old, and in 1856 he became a citizen of LaSalle county. Here he worked for farmers for several years, or until the civil war was well under way, when he offered his services in the defense of the stars and stripes. Becoming a member of Company H, One hundred and Fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, he continued at the post of duty to which he was assigned until there was no longer need of his aid, the war having ended. He took part in many of the leading and decisive battles of the war, among them being Chickamauga, Lookout -Mountain, Mission Ridge and Hartsville, Tennessee. He then went with Sherman on the world-famed march to the sea, and participated in important campaigns in Georgia, North and South Carolina, and finally went to Richmond and thence to Washington. He was captured at Hartsville, but was soon exchanged, and a second time, at Malden's Ridge, Tennessee, fell into the hands of the Confederates-General Joe Wheeler and his forces. At last he was paroled, and in his possession to-day is the parole which was signed by the adjutant general of the officer just mentioned. After having served three years, lacking two months, he was mustered out of the Union army, in June, 1865, and returned home.

Making a permanent settlement in LaSalle county. Mr. Bane bought a farm of eighty acres in Groveland township, and six years later sold that place. He then leased farms for six years, after which he bought his present homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, two and three-quarters miles northeast of Dana, in Groveland township. As long ago as 1856 he broke prairie on this farm, and at that time there were but a few houses in the township. He is practically a self-made man, as he began earning his own livelihood when he was very young, and has had to rely solely upon himself. He attended the old style subscription schools to a limited extent, in his boyhood, and is in the main self-educated. Fraternally he is a member of Long Point Lodge, No. 552, A. F. & A. M.: a non-affiliated member of Rutland Chapter, No. 112, R. A. M., and Rutland Council. No. 52; and belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic, his membership being with Rutland Post No. 292. For three years he acted in the capacity of high priest of Rutland chapter and for a like period he was master of the Rutland blue lodge. In his political creed he is an ardent Republican. The marriage of Mr. Bane and Miss Eliza Jane White was solemnized February 6, 1867. She is a daughter of John and Mary Ann (Whetzel) White. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bane, nine of the number being sons. Austin H., now of Livingston county, Illinois, married Annie Dunbar, and has three children. Stella, Oakley and Alta. Anna Lee married Silas Blakely and has one son, James. They are residents of Jasper county, Iowa. Arthur J. wedded Cora Bailey, and dwells at Long Point, Illinois. William Orville died at the age of five years and five months. Charles C. at present is in the employ of a farmer of this locality, and all of the younger children are at home, and comprise Herbert C., Gilbert S., Emily H., Edward S., Robert LeRoy and DeWitt Clinton. Mr. and Mrs. Bane, both of whom are members of the Methodist church, have conscientiously performed their duty toward their children, church and community, and are eminently deserving of the genuine esteem in which they are held by everyone.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 685-687 - Contributed by Nancy Piper]


Daniel Barackman

Dan'l Barrackman, came from Licking Co., Ohio, in 1831 ; his wife was Rachel Cramer. He had three sons : Charles and Daniel are on the old farm; Benjamin, went to Iowa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 442 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Milam James Barackman

Both as a patriot and as a business man, Milam James Barackman has an enviable record, and, if for no other reason than for what he suffered and endured that the Union might be preserved, he is entitled to a high place in the annals of his country and state.

Born in Reading township, Livingston county, Illinois, September 26, 1842, he is a son of James and Ellen (Moon) Barackman, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. Their deaths occurred when Milam J. was about four years old, and he became a member of the household of his uncle, Albert Moon. Daniel Barackman, the paternal grandfather of our subject, an early settler of Reading township, and a native of the Blue Grass state, died in 1864. Jacob Moon, the maternal grandfather, was born in Virginia, whence he removed to Ohio, and subsequently to Reading township, Livingston county, Illinois. Daniel, the only brother of Milam J., died at the age of nine years, and his two sisters are Mrs. Gary, of Normal, Illinois, and Mrs. Ellen Latham, of Saginaw, Michigan.

Until he was about eighteen years of age Milam J. Barackman lived with his uncle, Albert Moon, and attended the local schools of his native township. He then entered Lombard University, at Galesburg, Illinois, and was making good progress in his studies when the outbreak of the war routed all other interests from his mind. Upon the president's first call for volunteers, he enlisted in Company D, Twentieth Illinois Regiment of Infantry, and was filled with chagrin and disappointment when his guardian withheld his permission for him to be mustered into the service on the ground that he was not of age. After remaining at home for two weeks the young man re-enlisted, this time in Company C, Forty-fourth Illinois Infantry, for the term of three years, Colonel Noblesdorff being his commander. With his regiment he was ordered in pursuit of General Price, after which campaign he participated in the battles of Pea Ridge and Perryville, and fought under the leadership of General Rosecrans at the battle of Stone River, that officer then being in charge of the Army of the Cumberland. For his meritorious services in the great battle last mentioned Mr. Barackman's name was placed upon a special roll of honor of non-commissioned officers, to whose daring and fidelity General Rosecrans felt much indebted, and thus acknowledged publicly. Later, when in the Twentieth Army Corps, commanded by General McCook, our subject took an active part in the famous battles of Chickamauga and Mission Ridge. At Stone River, where the Union forces suffered so dreadfully, Mr. Barackman was injured, and lost his right eye, but it was not until 1864, when his regiment veteranized, that the matter came before the notice of the proper authorities, who refused to allow him to re-enter the lists with his comrades, as he desired to do. He was accordingly mustered out of the service and honorably discharged, at the Marine Hospital in Chicago.

Returning to his old home in Reading township, Mr. Barackman became interested in coal operations, to which he gave much of his attention for the succeeding thirty years, then turning the entire business over to his son, Arthur M. In the meantime he had also been successfully engaged in farming, and owns a finely improved homestead of four hundred acres, in his native township. One of the pioneer coal operators of Streator and vicinity, he accomplished a great deal for this great industry, and is well known throughout this region. For some years he was the president of the Barackman Coal Company, and was the senior member of the firm of Barackman & Son, who for a period conducted a grocery in Streator. By his well directed energy and financial ability he accumulated a snug little fortune, and now owns a large amount of valuable property aside from his splendid farm, which he now rents to responsible tenants. Fraternally he belongs to Streator Post, No. 68, G. A. R., and in politics he favors the Republican party.

In 1866 Mr. Barackman and Miss Fanny W. Goodyear, of Parkville, Missouri, were united in marriage. Mrs. Barackman died in 1872, and left two children, Arthur M. and Eulola F., the latter now the wife of Albert Finchman, of Streator. In 1876 Miss Alice C. Tutlow, of Ottawa, Illinois, became the wife of our subject. Their children, in order of birth, are as follows: Harry E., Guy B., Jessie F., William G., and May. They are receiving good educational advantages, and are being well equipped for the battles of life.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 222-224 - Contributed by Nancy Piper]


Samuel D. Barbour

Samuel D. Barbour, from Indiana, came in 1834; settled on S. 17, where he still resides. He married Betsey Neff, and has eight children : Susanna, who married John Abel, of Mission ; Eleanor, is single ; Ebenezer, married Mary Clark, live in Marseilles ; Moses, married Augusta Freeland, of Mission ; Eliphalet, married Emma Blake ; Samuel D., Jr., married Emma Corning ; Marion, married Margaret Mason ; Henry, at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Mission, Page 417 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William Barbour

William Barbour came from Evansville, Ind., in 1834; he married Miss Hinkley; was an active democratic politician: held the office of County Commissioner, and was a member of the Legislature. He died in 1876.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 397 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 A. G. Bardwell
Aaron G. Bardwell is a retired farmer of Erie, Kansas, who by many years of close association with agricultural interests, won a competence that now enables him to rest from his labors. He was born in Wyoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1834, a son of Silas and Mahala (Ball) Bardwell, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Vermont. The father was a farmer and followed that pursuit throughout his entire life. In
1855 he removed to Lasalle county, Illinois, where he made his home until his death which occurred in 1861 when he was sixty-five years of age. His wife died in 1867 also at the age of sixty-five. They were devout and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Our subject was the third in order of birth of their eleven children, five of whom are yet living, namely, Aaron G., of this article; Nelson H.; Silas W., who resides at Great Bend, Kansas; Catherine, the wife of George Greer of Denver, Colorado; and Zachariah of Hutchinson, Kansas.
Those who have passed away are Lovina, the wife of William Barker; Daniel; Irene, the wife of Christopher Osborn; Lydia, the wife of William Julian; Charles, and Helen.

Upon the old farm Mr. Bardwell, of this review, was reared and remained until August, 1862, when he enlisted in the 104th Illinois infantry of which he became orderly sergeant. He was in the Kentucky campaign and at the battle of Hartsville was on detail duty. At Gallatin, being taken ill he was sent home, it was thought to die, but he recovered and rejoined his regiment at Stevenson, Alabama, and after that time never lost a day from the service, participating in the engagements at Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Buzzard's Roost, Rocky Faced Gap, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain [sic], Peach Tree Creek, and the Siege of Atlanta. He was made color bearer by Colonel Hakeman for distinguished military conduct. He also took part in the pursuit of Hood as far as Chatanooga [sic], then joining Sherman, was with him in the march to the sea, the campaign in the Carolinas and the battle of Bentonville, bein [sic] mustered out with his regiment on the 6th of June, 1865. He did valiant service for his country in her hour of trial and deserves the praise due to the old soldier and the upright citizen. He was never wounded or taken prisoner but his health became impaired from the experience and hardships of army life. Before enlisting he was very rugged and no man could boast of better health or a stronger constitution, but the experiences at the front told upon him as upon thousands of others and he has never been a rugged man since.

After the close of the war Mr. Bardwell returned to Illinois and has since followed farming. He yet owns a quarter section of land in Big Creek township, Neosho county. For a number of years he was an active factor in agricultural interests here but at the present time is living retired.

On the 6th of January, 1860, at Ottawa, Illinois, Mr. Bardwell wedded Mary Drake, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Jesse R. and Jemima (Ferguson) Drake, both natives of the Keystone state. Her father, who was born in 1800 served his country in the war of 1812 and died in July, 1869. Her maternal grandfather, William Ferguson, was a drummer of the Revolutionary war and remained with the army for seven years undergoing all the hardships of the memorable winter at Valley Forge.
His wife, Patience (Franklin) Ferguson, was captured by the Indians and many were massacred, including her two brothers but she was released, a girl of twelve years and for two weeks she wandered through the woods, eating berries and whatever she could find, but at length reached civilization and safety. Unto the parents of Mrs. Bardwell were born eight children, but she is the only one now living. The others were Ruth M., the wife of John Wright; William A.; Benjamin F.; Jesse Wells; Adelia, the wife of William Brooker; Isaac O., and James Henry.

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Bardwell has been blessed with six children.
Helen J., born November 1, 1861, died October 18, 1864, at which time her father was marching with Sherman to the sea. Mary D., is the wife of R. B. McCutcheon, editor of the Longton News of Longton, Kansas, who has two children Ruth B. and Charles Herald. Charles H., of Longton, who for the past twelve years has been employed as postal clerk on the railroad, married Cora Ferrell and they had two children - Everett, deceased, and Frank. Dora B., is at home and is a twin sister of Cora B., the latter the wife of O. N. Holly, a traveling salesman, residing in Independence, Kansas, and Frank A., a grain buyer of Longton, married lra M. Ferrell.

In his political views Mr. Bardwell is an ardent Republican, having supported that party since 1856 when he voted for Fremont. He has since cast a ballot for each of its presidential candidates and has firm faith in its principles. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and the Grand Army of the Republic and both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. His worth in the community is widely acknowledged and he commands the warm regard of a very large circle of friends. .
[Source: History of Neosho and Wilson Counties, Kansas, Pub. by L.
Wallace Duncan, Fort Scott, Kansas, Monitor Printing Co., 1902; tr. by VB]


Robert Baresford

Robert Baresford, a native of Deny, Ireland, came to America, and with his wife, Mary Desert, and family, came first to Peoria, and, with Jesse Walker, to Ottawa in 1825 ; assisted Walker in establishing his mission at Mission Point, and in 1829 settled at Holderman' s Grove. He removed to Indian Creek in 1831; he built a saw-mill on the creek, and resided in that locality till his death in 1851. Mrs. Baresford died in 1843. He left three children: John, married, and is now living at Fremont, Nebraska : Mary Ann, married William Cullen, of Ottawa-Mr. Cullen has been Sheriff, and for many years editor of the Ottawa Republican; Lovina, married Mr. Wykoff; James, was killed by Indians while scouting in 1832.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 436 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Berkley G. Barratt

The popular and thoroughly efficient superintendent of the LaSalle County Asylum, Berkley Gillett Barratt, has been an incumbent of this responsible position since March 8, 1898, when he was elected on the Democratic ticket with the aid of Republicans. He is a veteran of the civil war and fought bravely for the preservation of the Union, enlisting in Company K, Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in August, 1862, for three years. Assigned to the Army of the Cumberland, he was always found at his post of duty, and took part in the numerous severe campaigns in which that branch of the army was involved. He was orderly sergeant during the most of the period of his military service, being promoted second lieutenant and serving as such for the remainder of his time in the army. At the battle of Stone river he was seriously wounded in the hand, and was honorably discharged from the service with his regiment at Chicago July 3, 1865, after the close of the war.

After perusing the history of Mr. Barratt in the role of a patriot it is not a surprise to learn that he comes from loyal American ancestry, and that his maternal grandfather, John Farnham, was a soldier of the war of the Revolution. The papers relating to his discharge from the service, when his aid was no longer needed, bear the signature of George Washington, commander of the colonial army, and were dated June, 1782. The father of our subject was Daniel Barratt, born June 3, 1797. He married Permelia, daughter of John Farnham, and to them five sons and seven daughters were born, namely: John F., Caroline, Rebecca Jane, Mary Ann, Phoebe, Caleb, Margaret, Emily, George, Berkley G., Lavinia and Elizabeth. The mother, who was born March 23, 1805, was a most worthy, noble woman, of the best type of the pioneer, courageous, strong and capable, making the best of circumstances, however gloomy and unpromising the outlook. She survived her husband many years, as he died in February, 1849, and her death did not occur until 1891. One of her sons, George, had lived in the south for some time prior to the war, and upon the outbreak of hostilities he was drafted by the rebels. However, he managed to effect an escape and returned to the north.

The birth of B. G. Barratt took place near Springfield, Clark county, Ohio, and when he was ten years of age he came to Illinois. The family at first lived near Paw Paw, Lee county, and there the lad received average educational advantages in the common schools. When he returned from fighting for his country he settled in Earlville, Illinois, and engaged in painting and contracting for a number of years. He was appointed postmaster of Earlville by President Cleveland and officiated in that capacity, and in 1882 he became a deputy sheriff of the county, acting under Sheriffs Milligan and Taylor. In 1886 Mr. Barratt made the run for the nomination for county sheriff and was defeated by only one vote, and at another time he was defeated by just one vote for circuit clerk. When a candidate for city treasurer he was elected by a majority of two votes. He has been an indefatigable worker in the Democratic party, and is recognized as a valuable factor in its success in this community. In the Masonic fraternity he has reached the Knight Templar degree, and is a member of the Ottawa Lodge and Commandery. In the Grand Army of the Republic he is identified with Seth C. Earl Post.

In 1865 Mr. Barratt wedded Miss Emily L. Jones, daughter of James Jones, formerly a respected citizen of Paw Paw and now deceased. Mrs. Barratt was born in Ohio, but grew to womanhood in the town of Paw Paw. Six children-two sons and four daughters-have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Ella, Nina and Louie, who are living. Two sons and one daughter are deceased.

A brief account of the LaSalle County Asylum, of which Mr. Barratt is now superintendent, may be of interest to the reader. Without doubt the buildings are among the most attractive and substantial structures for the occupancy of the poor and helpless wards of the county of all to be found in the state. The buildings are modern; heated by steam and lighted with gas, and every practical device making for the comfort of the inmates of the institution has been provided. The county farm contains two hundred and ten acres of fertile land, and is situated about three and a half miles west of Ottawa. But a short distance to the south flows the Illinois river, and to the north rises a rocky bluff, at the foot of which is the Illinois & Michigan canal. Substantial barns afford shelter to about thirty head of cattle and a dozen horses, and some fifty to sixty hogs are annually raised on the place. There are cared for in the asylum from two hundred and fifty to three hundred persons each year, one-third of the number, perhaps, being insane or feeble-minded.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 86-88 - Contributed by Nancy Piper]




Hiram Barnhart

Hiram Barnhart, and wife, Lucy Swarts, came here in 1837, and left in 1839-removed to the Wabash.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Opher, Page 414 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Jacob Barr

Joel Alvord, Edward Alvord, Nelson Alvord, (sops of Joel), Jacob Barr, William Groom, and Madison Goslin, left Albany County, New York, in wagons, the 15th day of May, 1833, for the West In Chicago, they met Judge Isaac Dimmick, then returning from a tour of exploration, who directed them to this locality. They arrived here July 18th. A journey by land for hundreds of miles at that day through a country, most of it unsettled, without roads or bridges, can hardly be appreciated now. They were compelled to adopt camp life; stopping at night on the bank of some stream, where wood and water could be procured, and sleeping in their wagons, or on the ground, and in some instances were compelled to build bridges to cross the streams. Jacob Barr married Harriet, daughter of John Slater, and is now living at Lowell; has five children : Henry, married Harriet Alydo; Sybil, married Eugene Miller; Imogene, married Samuel Underbill, of Tonica; Ellen, married Benton Crumrin, now in California ; Arthur, is in California.

The author is indebted to Mr. Barr for the history of the colony, of which he was one.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 295-296 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Bailey Barrass

Bailey Barrass, from Saratoga, N. Y., in 1837; a carpenter and joiner by trade, an industrious and good mechanic; he married Annis, daughter of John Bailey. He died in 1864, aged 51, leaving four children: John, died in the army; Orvill, married Anna Fleming; Onslow, married Margaret A. Hosier, of Tonica: Julia, at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 297-298 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Sheldon Bartholomew

Sheldon Bartholomew came from New York with Brown and Hogaboom, married Charlotte Hogaboom, and settled on Section 28; he sold to Thomas Hodgson; died in Ogle County ; his widow came back to La Salle County, and died a few years after.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 262 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Bascom

John Bascom, from Connecticut, in 1831; his mother and sister came in 1834. .He kept a hotel at the foot of the bluff. Bascom and his mother died of cholera, the same night, in June, 1835. The sister married a Mr. Foster, of Earl, and died in Wisconsin.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 265 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Thomas Basnett

Thomas Basnett, from England, came here in 1835; kept a drug store; his first wife was Matilda Buchanan; his second was Sarah Champlin. He now lives in Florida; has one daughter, Elizabeth, now living in Michigan. Mary, sister of Thomas, married James Lafferty.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 242 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Calloway Basore

Calloway Basore, son of the foregoing, married Sotter's sister, and died of cholera, just after returning from the land sale, in 1835. His widow married William Rainey, and after his death, she married Isaac Painter.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 342 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


George Basore

George Basore, a native of Virginia, made a farm in the forests of Alabama, another in the heavy timber of Indiana, and from there moved to the prairie, and settled on S. 24, T. 31, R. 3, in 1831. Mr. Basore had a physical organization and powers of endurance that admirably fitted him for frontier life, and a genius and business capacity that did him good service when living isolated from society on the frontier. He was a successful farmer; his family manufactured all their clothing from cotton and wool, when at the South, and of flax and wool at the North, all of their own raising; he made his sugar and molasses from the maples on his farm, and with honey from his apiary, supplied all his wants in that direction ; he tanned the hides of his own raising, and from the leather thus produced, made his harness, boots and shoes; he owned a blacksmith shop and tools, did his own blacksmithing, and much for his neighbors. He was more independent of the rest of the world than civilized man often is. This capacity for all kinds of business was, from necessity, to some extent, acquired by all the pioneers. Mr. Basore married, for his second wife, the widow of John Wood; he died in 1860.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 342 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Daniel Bassett

Honored and highly esteemed by everyone who knows him, Daniel Bassett, of Groveland township, LaSalle county, is a sterling representative of two of the oldest families of New England, and possesses many of the traits of character for which his sturdy ancestors were renowned. He adheres to the same high principles of daily life, upholds the same ideas of religion and religious liberty, and has the same love for the cause of education and every power making toward the uplifting and progress of the race.

In tracing his lineage it is found, by old records, that his ancestor, William Bassett. emigrated from England to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1639, and located at a village called Hamden, about three miles north of New Haven, Connecticut. He married a Miss Ives. They had one son, John, who was born in 1653, and died February 8, 1714. He served in the state militia, and, being appointed as captain of a company of New Haven troops, always afterward went by the title of Captain Bassett. He married Mercy Grigson, and their son John, born in 1691, became a personage of influence in his time. He represented the town of New Haven in the state legislature for a number of sessions, and was appointed cornet of a company of home guards. He owned considerable property, and was highly respected. He died March 27, 1757, aged sixty-six years. His wife was Elizabeth Thompson, and one of his children, John, was born in 1717, married Sarah Eaton, a granddaughter of the first governor of the New Haven colony, and died when sixty years of age, February 12, 1777. Their son, Levi, born in 1747, married Mabel Atwater, and had five children, namely: Esther, Eaton, Lyman, Sallie and Leverett. He departed this life September 6, 1816, when sixty-nine years old.

Leverett Ives Bassett, the father of our subject, was born in Litchfield county, Connecticut, and died on the same old homestead where he first saw the light. He married Linda Holt, a native of the same county, and they led the peaceful, industrious lives of agriculturists. Her father, Daniel Holt, also a Connecticut farmer, came from one of the oldest families in that state. His ancestor, William Holt, came from England and was one of the early settlers of New Haven, and was one of the seven persons who signed the New Haven constitution on the 1st of July, 1664. He died at Wallingford, Connecticut, September 1, 1683, aged seventy-three years. Daniel Holt, above mentioned, was the eldest of twelve children, and was born in East New Haven, July 5, 1767. On the 12th of January, 1789, he married Hannah, a daughter of Joseph and Hannah Holt, born August 17, 1767, and died December 14, 1839. They were the parents of five children, namely: Daniel, Hiram, Jeremiah, Hannah and Linda. Daniel Holt, who died June 23, 1834, when in his sixty-eighth year, removed to Northbury (subsequently, Plymouth, and now Thomaston) in 1789, and thence to Harwinton, where the remainder of his life was spent. Mrs. Linda (Holt) Bassett was born May 23, 1800, and died on Christmas day, 1854. Later Leverett I. Bassett wedded Hannah, sister of his first wife, and she lived to attain the extreme age of one hundred and one years. Mr. Bassett was called to his reward, April 4, 1863. Of ten children born in his family, four were sons, and of the entire number six survive, namely: Daniel, our subject; Levi; Annis, the widow of Stiles Hotchkis; Mary, the wife of William W. Clemence; Mrs. Lois B. Coe, of Connecticut; and George, of Cleveland, Ohio.

The birth of Daniel Bassett took place in the country where so many generations of his forefathers had passed the span of life, the date of this event being February 16, 1823. He grew to manhood on a farm and received a very "common" school education. In August, 1852, he was united in marriage to Miss Amy Elvira Barker, a daughter of Daniel and Amy (Pardy) Barker, and one week afterward the young couple started for the new home which they were to found on the broad prairies of Illinois. They located near West Hallock, Peoria county, buying a quarter-section of land, to the cultivation of which Mr. Bassett devoted his chief energy for many years. In 1865 he removed to his present homestead in Groveland township. Here he has owned, previous to allotting to his children, five hundred and sixty acres, finely improved, having a substantial dwelling and other farm buildings, and all of the comforts and conveniences deemed necessary in modern life. Mr. Bassett has been an industrious, hard-working man, useful in his community, upright and just in all of his transactions, and is wholly worthy the high esteem in which he is held.

For almost forty-six years, Mr. Bassett found a faithful companion and sharer of his joys and sorrows in the person of his devoted wife. She was a lady of rare Christian virtues, and was loved by all who knew her. As is her husband, she was a consistent member of the Congregational church, and nobly strove to do her duty toward all mankind. She received the summons to the mansions above in April, 1898, when she was in her seventy-second year. The three children of Mr. and Mrs. Bassett are: Annis Elvira, Owen B. and Ella A. The elder daughter married Joseph Bane, since deceased, and their children are named respectively Daniel Hubert and Ira Owen. Owen B., the only son of our subject, is unmarried, and resides at home. Ella A. first married Wiley Marshall and had one child, Edna, and is now the wife of C. R. Hinton.

Mr. Bassett has kept posted in all of the public affairs of this country, deeming this the duty of every patriotic citizen, but he has never been an aspirant to official distinction, and has resolutely kept aloof from politics. Since becoming a voter he has cast his ballot for the nominees of the 'Whig and Republican parties.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 704-706 ]


Wesley Batcheller

Rev. Wesley Batcheller, a Methodist clergyman from Brimfield, Hampton County, Mass., was for several years a resident of Homer, Cortland Co., N. Y., and member of the Oneida Conference. With his wife, Martha Hall (daughter of Bemus Hall), and nine children, he came by wagon from New York to Illinois in 1836, and settled on Sec. 11. They encamped with such shelter as could be made while building a house. Mr. Batcheller is endowed with a powerful, healthful physical organization and commanding voice, which has enabled him to perform an amount of labor in his chosen field which few could endure. He commenced preaching in Indian Precinct in 1836, and labored in Washington Precinct two years; in Ottawa in 1839; Hickory Creek in 1840; Princeton in 1842; Newark in 1843; and was Bible Agent for the county for two years. He is now on the superannuated list, yet healthful and vigorous at the age of 77. Manly T. Batcheller, his second son, died in April, 1852; Angeline, died Nov. 4, 1854, and Mrs. Batcheller died Feb. 17, 1868. The children now living are: Noah S., who married Lucy Hitchcock, now at home ; Charles, is in Dacotah ; Martha, married William Haskell; Elijah, married Elizabeth Lawry, now dead ; Mary, married John Stockton, in Kansas; Watson, married Elizabeth Bald*win, near home ; Joseph B., married Louisa Wright, in California. Mr. Batcheller is now living with his second wife, Ruhama Sampson.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 398-400 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Robert N. Baughman


It is edifying to study and to write, even briefly, the life story of a good man who has "fought the good fight" and has gone to his rest after the battle of life. It will be edifying to those who knew Dr. Robert Newton Baughman, of Marseilles, Illinois, to read the few important facts concerning him which are here presented. He was a man whose influence on his day and generation was good, and his works live after him.

Robert Newton Baughman was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, April 22, 1847, and died at Marseilles, Illinois, May 29, 1897. He was a son of Robert and Margaret (Armstrong) Baughman. His father was born in Pennsylvania, his mother in Ohio. Robert Baughman was a painter, and as a child the future dentist naturally became familiar with his work. The lad attended the public schools of Cincinnati, and on completing his English education took up the study of dentistry. He was graduated from the Cincinnati Dental College, and began the practice of his profession in Toledo, Ohio. He located later in southern Illinois, and in 1881 came to Marseilles, where he continued his professional practice successfully until 1892, when he was compelled to relinquish it on account of failing health, and sold his office and practice to Dr. D. F. Cotterman. As a dentist Doctor Baughman was up to-date at all times in his career. He used only the best materials and employed only the best methods, and was a diligent reader of the important literature of his profession, and a frequent contributor to it as well. He was a public-spirited citizen, and his removal in the prime of life was looked upon as a calamity by all who knew him. He was a prominent Mason.

August 11, 1887, Doctor Baughman married Miss Harriet E. Gage, second daughter of Isaac and Lucy (Little) Gage. Isaac Gage came to LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1837, and became one of the prosperous farmers of Brookfield township. There Mrs. Baughman was reared and spent the years of her girlhood. She is a woman of education and many graces and accomplishments, and dispenses a generous hospitality at the family home on West Clark Street, Marseilles. She has a son, Isaac Newton Baughman, who was born December 19, 1888.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 55-56 - Contributed by Nancy Piper]


June Baxter

June Baxter came from New York in 1835 ; moved West.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 402 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Minter Baxter

Minter Baxter came from New York in 1835; died in 1840.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 402 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 

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