La Salle County IL Biographies
BE-BO

 

Aaron Beardsley

Henry Beardsley

Henry G. Beardsley

William Beardsley

Jedediah Beckwith
Volney Beckwith
Frank W. Bedard

Henry S. Beebe

Benjamin Beem

Mr. Beers

John Beeson

Stephen R. Beggs

William E. Bell

Myron B. Bennett

Philip R. Bennett

Harvey Benson

Abraham S. Bergen

Barzillai Bishop

Daniel Blake
Christian Blend

Russel Bliss

Moses Booth 
Abner Boyle

 Aaron Beardsley

Aaron Beardsley, with his family, came from Massachusetts to La Salle County, in 1835, and first lived in the town of Serena, and moved into Adams in 1836, buying a claim of Disney, on S. 23-some say it was in 1838.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 455 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry Beardsley

Henry Beardsley, half-brother of William, from Williamstown, Mass., came in the fall of 1837. His children are: Lovina Blake, now in Adams; one son, William, in Mendota; Chester, married Miss Wheeler.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 440 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry G. Beardsley

Henry G. Beardsley came in 1838; married Lavinia Blake ; lives on S. 22 ; has seven children.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 455 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


James B. Beardsley

James B. Beardsley brought out his wife, Laura M. Platt, and settled on his purchase in the spring of 1836. His wife died in July, 1837. The same year he married Prudence Ban.ass, from Saratoga County, New York. In 1850 he sold his farm to Rev. Daniel Baldwin, from Connecticut, and removed to the town of Vermillion, where he now lives, an active member, and Deacon of the Baptist Church. His son, George, and daughter, Harriet. wife of Augustus Hall, live near him. Sidney P., the son of his first wife, died at the age of 19.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 384 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William Beardsley

William Beardsley, from Williamstown, Mass., came in 1837, and settled on Sec. 27 ; Julia, died in the fall of 1838; Lyman, insane ; Harriet, married Dyson Miller.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 440 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Jedediah Beckwith

Jedediah Beckwith, and wife, from Wayne County, Pa., in 1833 came to Hennepin, Putnam County, and to Deer Park in 1834; made a farm on S. 13, T. 32, R. 2. ; died, 1838; leaving two children: Horace, married Miss Collins, and moved to Iowa; Emily, is a seamstress, and lives at Wenona, this county.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 328 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Volney Beckwith

Volney Beckwith, and wife, Mary A. Piper, came from Herkimer County, N. Y., in 1835 ; moved to Ottawa. He died in 1861, leaving three children: Edwin B., married Lizzie Hanfelt, live in Seneca: Daniel, married Josephine B. Ford, live at Ottawa; Mary P. married John Hoag, at Marysville, Cal.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 398 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Frank W. Bedard


Frank W. Bedard, of LaSalle, Illinois, is secretary and general manager of the Peru-LaSalle Gaslight and Power Company, and is one of the trustworthy, self-reliant men who figure largely in the prosperity and growth of the municipality in which they reside. He was ushered into this life in this city, January 27, 1857, his parents being John and Mary M. (Chapin) Bedard. The grandfather, John Napoleon Bedard, was a native of France and later a resident of Ottawa, Canada, where he died in his sixtieth year. John X. Bedard, the father, was one of six children who grew to mature years. While yet in his 'teens he made a visit to the Mississippi valley but returned to Canada, where he remained until 1853, when he took up his residence in LaSalle. He was in the railroad business and also bought grain, but later opened a grocery store which he conducted for several years. During the civil war he was on a gunboat on the Mississippi river, but was not enlisted, and remained but a short time. He was a tax collector here at one time. His death occurred in 1878, when he was but forty-five years old, and surviving him are his widow and six children. The children are: Frank W.; Belle, wife of John W. Dugan, of LaSalle; Adelaide, the wife of Charles Ward, of Chicago; Charles, of LaSalle; George, of Boulder, Colorado; and Edith, wife of B. N. Rhodes, of this city. Mrs. Mary M. Bedard is a resident of LaSalle. She is a member of the Presbyterian church and a lady of noble Christian character. Her father, F. C. Chapin, was a native of New York, where he followed the trade of printer. He came west about the year 1853 and located at Toulon, where he worked at painting a short time and then came to LaSalle, dying in his eighty-eighth year. He was of French and English stock and left seven children to perpetuate his memory.

F. W. Bedard has always lived in LaSalle, attended the public schools when a boy. and here gained his business education. When he was seventeen he entered the gas works and may truly be said to have grown up with the plant. Becoming thoroughly conversant with every detail of the business he was placed in charge of the plant as superintendent about fourteen years ago and so acceptably were the duties of the office discharged that he was still farther honored a year ago, by being assigned to the office of secretary and general manager. This plant employs from ten to twenty men, and its interests are carefully looked after by Mr. Bedard, who is very popular with those in his employ.

He was united in marriage, November 26, 1885, to Miss Margaret E. Lininger, daughter of Daniel and Emma (Slyder) Lininger, early settlers of Peru. Mr. Bedard is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and also of the Court of Honor. He has always given his support to the Republicans. During his forty-two years of life in LaSalle he has made a wide circle of acquaintances, all of whom hold him in the highest esteem.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 458-459 - Contributed by Nancy Piper]


William Turner Bedford


William Turner Bedford, editor and proprietor of the LaSalle Tribune, first saw the light of day on September 18, 1863, in Surrey, England, and was a member of one of the most prominent families of that community. His grandfather, Joshua Thomas Bedford, represented the ward of Farrington Without in the London common council for a period of more than thirty years, and at his death was succeeded by his brother, John T. Bedford, who is still a member of that council. His father was William Henry Bedford, who died in 1872. William H. was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Thornton, a daughter of the late General Thornton, who distinguished himself while fighting with the allied armies of England and France, against Russia, in the Crimean war of 1854.

William Turner Bedford received his education in his mother country, graduating in 1879 at Christ's College, London, with the honors of the class. He was an apt pupil and diligent in his studies, and the energy which marked his school days has figured prominently in his business career. His first business experience began on the staff in the correspondence department of the large wholesale dry-goods firm of Copestake, Hughes, Crampton & Company. Having read much of the advantages to be gained in America, he determined to try his fortune in this country and early in 1884 sailed for the United States.

He landed in New York in February of the same year and at once came to LaSalle, where for a short time he was engaged in the insurance business, but not for a long period. His ability in the newspaper field was soon recognized and he was offered the position of editor of the Peru Daily News-Herald. He was the LaSalle editor of this publication for six years, and to his efforts, largely, is attributed the success of that paper. In June, 1891, he succeeded A. L. Hennessy as editor and publisher of the LaSalle Republican. He changed the name of the paper to the LaSalle Weekly Tribune, and on July 1st of that year issued the first number of the LaSalle Daily Tribune. Although started on a very modest scale, the Tribune now occupies a most enviable position among the newspapers of this county and is essentially the people's paper, giving the news in a comprehensive and interesting form. Mr. Bedford's untiring work in making his paper an excellent one is appreciated by the public and has enabled him to place it on a secure financial basis which is flattering in the extreme. The Tribune is Republican in tone and is earnest and fearless in its advocacy of what it considers right, and equally fearless in its denunciation of wrong, gaining it many supporters among Democrats as well as Republicans; for what the people want is honest convictions, boldly uttered.

Mr. Bedford was married October 20, 1892, to Miss Anna Elizabeth, daughter of George B. Treat, of LaSalle. Being of a social disposition he has attached himself to a number of fraternal orders, being a member of De Soto Lodge, Knights of Pythias; LaSalle Lodge, Mystic Workers of the World; and Deer Park Camp, Modern Woodmen of America. He is always prominent in the councils of the Republican party, and for four years has represented his city on the county central committee. Although a young man he has attained a wide degree of popularity, and the industry and perseverance which have characterized his past bespeak for him an even more successful future.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 252-253- Contributed by Nancy Piper]


Henry S. Beebe

Henry S. Beebe, and wife, Lydia Wilcox, from Great Barrington, Massachusetts, in 1838. He kept a livery, was a commission merchant with T. D. Brewster, ran a foundry under the firm of Fitzsimmons & Beebe ; he removed to Chicago about 1861. His children are: George, deceased four years since; Lucy, married a Mr. Weber, in Chicago; Nelly, married; Jennie, and Mary, at home; James, is married, in Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 365 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Benjamin Beem

Benjamin Beem, and wife, Sarah Hoffman, from Licking County, Ohio: came to La Salle County in 1837, and settled on S. 12, on the right bank of Indian creek. Mr. Beem died, 1871, aged 87. Mrs. Beem died, July, 1877, aged 83. Their surviving children are: Mary, who married Levi Tucker, and live in Freedom; Elizabeth, married John Hoxie,of Serena ; Phebe, married Jacob Tucker, of Sheridan; Sarah, married Elijah Knight, of Adams; Rachel, married Charles Brown, and are on the old farm; Daniel, and Jackson, are in California.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 400 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Mr. Beers

Mr. Beers came from New York at same time with Bartholomew; he married Prudence Hogaboom, and died soon after ; his widow married Peter Minkler, who moved to Kane County ; they are now living at Rochelle, Ogle County.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 262-263 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Beeson

John Beeson, and his wife, came from England to New York, and to Illinois in 1835, and settled on S. 6, T. 32, R. 2. He was a radical abolitionist, and lectured upon anti-slavery, temperance, and other reforms; removed to Oregon, and espoused the cause of the red man, and is now on a mission to the Indian reservations, laboring to get justice done to the poor Indian; an honest, true, but overzealous friend of humanity, and will doubtless find wrongs enough to be righted, to occupy the remainder of his life. He had one son, Welburn, who is residing with his mother, in Oregon.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 333 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Stephen R. Beggs

Stephen R. Beggs, and wife, Elizabeth Heath; a Methodist preacher of note on the frontier. He came in 1834; laid off a town where Triumph now is, and named it La Fayette. It failed to make a town. Beggs moved to Plainfield, and to Chicago. He published "The Early History of the West and Northwest," a sort of autobiography of himself and brother preachers of the Methodist persuasion.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Opher, Page 413 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William E. Bell

Wm. E. Bell, from Virginia to Ohio, and from Ohio to Ottawa in 1836, worked for Lovell Kimball at Marseilles. Married Elmira Headly; has three children: Armina is now the wife of James Hossack; Wm. S., at school; Frank E., at home. Mr. Bell is the author of a standard work on Carpentry.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 254 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Myron B. Bennett

Myron B. Bennett came from Connecticut in 1839; in 1842 he married Mary Stuart; he was an energetic and successful farmer; he died in 1856, leaving a widow and two children; his widow died in 1858. His son, Jasper, married Maggie Ackley, of New Milford, Ct, and lives in Evanston, Ill.; Ella, at present, resides with them.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 388 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Philip R. Bennett

Philip R. Bennett, from Fall River, Massachusetts, here, in 1848; partner with Jacobs & Brush ; went to Ogle County, 1840, and died in 1873.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 236-237 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Harvey Benson

Harvey Benson, and wife, Fanny Northrop, came from New Milford, Connecticut, in 1836; he settled on S. 29, where he died in 1841 ; his widow occupied the same premises till her death, in 1871. Their only child, Adeline, was the first wife of Elmer Baldwin.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 385 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Abraham S. Bergen

Abraham S. Bergen, from Springfield, Illinois, in 1833. He was a merchant here for eight or ten years; he with his wife died in Galesburg.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 265 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Barzillai Bishop

Barzillai Bishop came from Connecticut; his wife was Elizabeth Allen, from Lisbon, Connecticut; settled on S. 29 in 1836 ; died soon after.


Daniel Blake

Daniel Blake, born in Maine, removed to Ohio, and from there here in 1833 ; lived a short time under the hospitable roof of Robert Baresford, and settled on Section 34 ; removed to Ottawa in 1868 ; served as Sheriff from 1871 to 1873. His children are : Joshua M., in Livingston County ; James A., on the old farm; George, a lawyer, in Ottawa ; Mary J., married Havilah Hupp, in Serena; Hattie M., is the wife of Irvin Niles, of Livingston County, and Susie A., is at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 438-439 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Christian Blend

Page 367-368, Manlius Twp
Christian Blend, deceased, is a native of Wurtemberg1 Germany, where he was born Oct. 6, 1821. In his youth he learned the potter's trade which he followed the greater portion of his life. In 1854 he immigrated to America, and for one year he worked at his trade at Cincinnati, Ohio. He carne to La Salle County, Ill., in 1855, and first settled in Deer Park Township, and subsequently settled in Brookfield Township. In the spring of 1875 he moved to Seneca, where he resided till his death, which occurred March. 5, 1884. Aug. 30, 1857, he was married to Mary A. Meeler, a daughter of John and Mary Meelar, natives of Baden, Germany. They came to America in 18554, and in the spring of 1855 they settled in Illinois where Mr. Meelar died. Mr. Blend at his death left his widow a fine farm of 120 acres of land in Brookfield Township. He was a member of the Lutheran church.
[History of La Salle County, Illinois : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens : Chicago: Inter-State Pub. Co., 1886.]


Russel Bliss

Russel Bliss, came from North Adams to Ohio, and from there here, in 1837.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 434 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Moses Booth

Moses Booth, brother-in-law to Christopher Long, came here in 1827 or 1828, and lived with Long, on Covell creek. His wife died, and he married Miss Alvord. He went to Kendall County, lost a leg and died soon after.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 264 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Abner Boyle

The parents of Edward H. Boyle were Abner and Matilda (Wilson) Boyle. The father was born in Bedford County, Virginia and was but three years old when his parents removed to Kentucky, settling in Todd County, where he grew to manhood. In 1828 they came to Illinois, and, for a few months lived in Danville. In the spring of 1829 they went to Putnam County, where Abner Boyle took up a quarter-section of government land. Improving that place he continued to dwell there until the autumn of 1882, when he retired, and made his home in Lostant until his death, in March, 1886, when he was in his seventy-ninth year. His widow, whose death took place in 1892, was almost ninety years of age at that time. She was a devoted member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Mr. Boyle was a typical pioneer, undaunted by obstacles, hard-working and hopeful. He participated in the Black Hawk war, and was active in all the affairs of his community for years. Several times he served as a supervisor in Putnam County. In former years he was a Whig and later was identified with the Republican Party. At the time that he settled on Ox Bow prairie in 1829, he and his brothers built a cabin of rough logs, rudely piled together, the roof made of "shakes." The spaces between the logs were unfilled and windows and chimneys were not required, as all of the cooking was performed out of doors. The first season, in addition to building this simple cabin, they planted and raised twenty acres of corn, the yield being from fifty to sixty bushels to the acre. This corn was conveyed to the mills on the Mackinaw river, fifty miles away, and, with a plentiful supply of venison, the hardy pioneers fared quite comfortably the ensuing winter. Their needs were few and simple and they really enjoyed their quiet, humble life. In 1830 Mr. Boyle was appointed postmaster of Ox Bow, by President Pierce. It cost twenty-five cents to send letters in those days and the work of postmaster was so nominal that Mr. Boyle soon resigned. He frequently made trips to Chicago with wheat, receiving only forty cents a bushel.

The first circuit court convened in Putnam County was held on the first Monday in May, 1831, and, in accordance with the law, the county commissioners had selected the house of Thomas Gallagher, on the bank of the Illinois River, about a quarter of a mile above the trading post kept by Thomas Hartzell, as the place where the court should be held. On the appointed day the people of that section assembled and as no clerk had as yet been provided the judge appointed Hooper Warren and fixed his official bond at two thousand dollars, his sureties being John Dixon and Henry Thorn. The sheriff then gravely announced that the court was considered in session, and the grand jurors were duly chosen and sworn in. They were as follows: Daniel Dimmick, Elijah Epperson, Henry Thomas, Leonard Roth, Jesse Williams, Israel Archer, James Warnock, john L. Ramsey, William Hames, John Strawn, Samuel Laughlin (foreman), David Boyle, Stephen Willis, Jeremiah Strawn, Abraham Stratten and Nelson Shepherd. After the division of Putnam County, the first election held was on August 1, 1834, the officials to be elected being a member of congress, a justice of the peace, and a constable for each precinct. The vote was small, and each voter called out the name of the person whom he desired to take the office, the clerk, writing this down, opposite the name of the voter, in the poll book. This election was held in Sandy precinct, at the houses of Jesse Robert, John H. Shaw and Abner Boyle.

Edward Harrison Boyle, who was born in Hennepin, Illinois, February 14, 1837, was one of six children, two sons and four daughters. Two of the number are deceased; William A. resides in Burton, Kansas, Caroline is the widow of John Griffith and lives in Lostant, and Artemesa, the youngest,, lives with her brother, our subject, neither of them ever having married. William A. is a hero of the civil war, as for nearly three years he was a member of Vaughn's battery, was stationed at Little Rock for some time, assisted in taking that city, and was in the command of General Steele.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Biography of Edward H. Boyle]


Edward Harrison Boyle

Now living retired, in the town of Lostant, LaSalle County is Edward Harrison Boyle, one of the sterling pioneers of this county and state. In his youth he experienced the hardships of life on the frontier, and during his entire life has been industrious and public spirited, desirous of promoting the welfare of his community.

The paternal grandfather of our subject was David Boyle, who was born in Virginia and was of Irish descent. He was a farmer by occupation, and came to Illinois at an early day. He reared several children and died when in the prime of manhood.

The maternal grandfather, Thornton Wilson, a native of Kentucky, was of Scotch descent. He came to this state in 1825 and first located near Elkhart Grove and Springfield. At the end of five years he removed to a farm in Putnam County, where he died in March 1835, leaving a large family to mourn his loss.

The parents of Edward H. Boyle were Abner and Matilda (Wilson) Boyle. The father was born in Bedford County, Virginia and was but three years old when his parents removed to Kentucky, settling in Todd County, where he grew to manhood. In 1828 they came to Illinois, and, for a few months lived in Danville. In the spring of 1829 they went to Putnam County, where Abner Boyle took up a quarter-section of government land. Improving that place he continued to dwell there until the autumn of 1882, when he retired, and made his home in Lostant until his death, in March, 1886, when he was in his seventy-ninth year. His widow, whose death took place in 1892, was almost ninety years of age at that time. She was a devoted member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Boyle was a typical pioneer, undaunted by obstacles, hard-working and hopeful. He participated in the Black Hawk war, and was active in all the affairs of his community for years. Several times he served as a supervisor in Putnam County. In former years he was a Whig and later was identified with the Republican Party. At the time that he settled on Ox Bow prairie in 1829, he and his brothers built a cabin of rough logs, rudely piled together, the roof made of "shakes." The spaces between the logs were unfilled and windows and chimneys were not required, as all of the cooking was performed out of doors. The first season, in addition to building this simple cabin, they planted and raised twenty acres of corn, the yield being from fifty to sixty bushels to the acre. This corn was conveyed to the mills on the Mackinaw river, fifty miles away, and, with a plentiful supply of venison, the hardy pioneers fared quite comfortably the ensuing winter. Their needs were few and simple and they really enjoyed their quiet, humble life. In 1830 Mr. Boyle was appointed postmaster of Ox Bow, by President Pierce. It cost twenty-five cents to send letters in those days and the work of postmaster was so nominal that Mr. Boyle soon resigned. He frequently made trips to Chicago with wheat, receiving only forty cents a bushel. The first circuit court convened in Putnam County was held on the first Monday in May, 1831, and, in accordance with the law, the county commissioners had selected the house of Thomas Gallagher, on the bank of the Illinois River, about a quarter of a mile above the trading post kept by Thomas Hartzell, as the place where the court should be held. On the appointed day the people of that section assembled and as no clerk had as yet been provided the judge appointed Hooper Warren and fixed his official bond at two thousand dollars, his sureties being John Dixon and Henry Thorn. The sheriff then gravely announced that the court was considered in session, and the grand jurors were duly chosen and sworn in. They were as follows: Daniel Dimmick, Elijah Epperson, Henry Thomas, Leonard Roth, Jesse Williams, Israel Archer, James Warnock, john L. Ramsey, William Hames, John Strawn, Samuel Laughlin (foreman), David Boyle, Stephen Willis, Jeremiah Strawn, Abraham Stratten and Nelson Shepherd. After the division of Putnam County, the first election held was on August 1, 1834, the officials to be elected being a member of congress, a justice of the peace, and a constable for each precinct. The vote was small, and each voter called out the name of the person whom he desired to take the office, the clerk, writing this down, opposite the name of the voter, in the poll book. This election was held in Sandy precinct, at the houses of Jesse Robert, John H. Shaw and Abner Boyle.

Edward Harrison Boyle, who was born in Hennepin, Illinois, February 14, 1837, was one of six children, two sons and four daughters. Two of the number are deceased; William A. resides in Burton, Kansas, Caroline is the widow of John Griffith and lives in Lostant, and Artemesa, the youngest,, lives with her brother, our subject, neither of them ever having married. William A. is a hero of the civil war, as for nearly three years he was a member of Vaughn's battery, was stationed at Little Rock for some time, assisted in taking that city, and was in the command of General Steele.

In his boyhood, E. H. Boyle attended the district schools of Putnam County, and always dwelt with his parents as long as they lived, giving them loving, filial care and attention, especially in their declining years. Since 1882 he has resided in the village of Lostant. At the time of his father's death his estate of some eight hundred and fifty acres was divided among the heirs. He and his siter, whose interests, plans and aims are one, own the home property in Lostant, and six hundred and thirty acres of fine farm land, three hundred and ten acres of which is situated in Putnam county and half a section in LaSalle County. Mr. Boyle is a loyal citizen, striving to do his duty toward his country and community and since he arrived at his majority he has deposited his ballot in favor of the nominees and principles of the Republican Party.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Biography of Edward H. Boyle]

 

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