La Salle County IL Biographies
H

(Not Linked to Individual Bios)

 

HAA-HAC
Rev. HELMER T. HAAGENSON
Reuben Hackett

HAL
Bemus Hall
Chester B. Hall
Josiah Hall
Philip Hall
William Hall
Halvar K. Halvarson

HAM-HAN
Abijah Haman
Anthony Haman
Joseph Hamar
Mrs. Sarah Hamilton
Hans O. Hanson

HAR
Charles Harding
Hiram Harding
Goodman Hargus
Patrick Harrigan
John Harrington
John Harrington
Thomas Harrington
Henry F. Hartenbower
John E. Hartenbower
Ira Hartshorn
Heman Harwood
Sanford Harwood

HAS-HAT
William Haskell
Camp Hatch
Harvey Hatch
Jethro Hatch
Johnson Hatch

HAV-HAZ
Fielding Havenhill
George Havenhill
Marshall Havenhill
Ezra Hawley
Nathan Hawley
Gaylord Hayes
John Hays
Charles Hayward
Rev. Mr. Hazard

HEA-HES
Dr. Heath
Samuel H. Heidler
John H. Henderson
John Hendricks
Thomas W. Hennesey
Benjamin Hess

 HIB-HIT
Eleazar Hibbard
Henry Hibbard
William Hickling
William A. Hickok
Stephen G. Hicks
Hiram Higby
John Higgins
John Higgins
John Hill
John Hise
Daniel F. Hitt

HOB-HOG
John R. Hobbs
Solomon Holden
John V. A. Hoes
John Hoffman
Abel Hogaboom
John Hogaboom
Richard Hogaboom
Richard Hogaboom Sr.

HOL
Zophar Holcomb
John Holderman
Asa Holdridge
Edward Holland
John Hollinger
Madison E. Hollister
George W. Holly

HOR-HOX
James Horner
John Hosford
Jeremiah Hough
Yerk Hoveland
G. W. Howe
Allen H. Howland
John Hoxie
John D. Hoxsey

HUB-HYA
John Hubbard
Mr. Hudson
Henry Hull
Kirjeth A. Hunt
John Hupp
Harmon Hurlburt
Henry Hurlburt
Israel Hutchinson
Jonathan Hutchinson
A. Hyatt

HAA-HAC

 Rev. HELMER T. HAAGENSON

Rev. HELMER T. HAAGENSON is a gifted educator and minister of the Lutheran Church, and well known in the Illinois River Valley, where he has been pastor and is now the president and executive head of the Pleasant View Luther College at Ottawa.

Rev. Mr. Haagenson was born at McIntosh, Minnesota, September 8, 1887. His parents were Norwegian pioneers of Minnesota, Lauritz and Kjersten (Rudshaugen) Haagenson, both natives of Norway. His father was a sailor and fisherman and in 1881 came to America, locating in Ottertail County, Minnesota, where he took up a homestead and improved a good farm and made himself one of the sturdy and trusted citizens of that state. He died June 9, 1900, and the mother died in November, 1929. They are both buried at Haagenson. Besides Helmer T. there are two other children, Martin, of McIntosh, and Mrs. Lena Berg, of McIntosh.

Helmer T. Haagenson spent his early life in rural localities in Minnesota, was educated in a country school near McIntosh and in 1909 graduated from high school. All through his school course he worked on a farm, made a good record as a student and participated in athletics and literary affairs in high school, playing basketball. After high school he entered St. Olaf College at Northfield, Minnesota. During 1911 he was on a farm, and then resumed his studies, taking his A. B. degree at St. Olaf in 1914. He was a member of the Sigma Tau fraternity. During summers he made money for his college expenses by work in a real estate office with his brother at McIntosh. Following his literary education he entered the United Church Seminary, now the Luther Seminary at St. Paul, and was graduated with his degree in theology in 1917. For one or two summers he taught in a vacation Bible school, and was pastor of a church at Bainville, Montana, until 1921.

[Biographies from "ILLINOIS, The Heart of the Nation" by Hon. Edward F. Dunne, Volume IV,1933,  Transcribed and Donated by Kim Torp ]


Reuben Hackett


Reuben Hackett, from Indiana, came in 1836, and settled on Section 9 ; sold to Samuel D. Wauchope, and removed to Ottawa and then West; served one term as Justice of the Peace.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 345 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



HAL

Bemus Hall

Bemus Hall, Mrs. Wesley Batcheller's father, arrived here a few days before his daughter's family, and died soon after.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 400 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Chester B. Hall

Chester B. Hall came from Canada in 1832, settled in Ottawa in 1834. He married Jemima Hess; his second wife was Mary Foster; he was a carpenter by trade; he lived in Ottawa twenty-two years; is now living in the town of Adams.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 245 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Josiah Hall

Dr. Josiah Hall, and wife, Elizabeth Arnold; blacksmith by trade; came from New York, 1840; resided here ten years; he died in Ottawa, 1874; his widow is now living in Ottawa.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 401 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Philip Hall

Philip Hall, from New York, in 1838; here five years, clerk to Kinney & Townsend ; went to Aurora, and was Superintendent of Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad ; since dead.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 367 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William Hall

William Hall, born in Georgia, was married to Mary J. R.Wilburs, in Kentucky ; moved to Illinois ; from there to near Springfield, Illinois, in 1825; made a farm at Mackinaw, and then went to the lead mines, near Galena; followed mining three years, then moved to Bureau Creek, and to near Lamoille, Bureau County. In the spring of 1832, sold his claim to Aaron Gunn, and moved to Indian Creek, where he, with his wife, and one child, were killed by Indians, May 20, 1832. His eldest daughter, Temperance, married Peter Cartwright, nephew of Dr. Cartwright. For the others, see narrative of the massacre.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 395 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Halvar K. Halvarson

Halvar K. Halvarson and family, came from Norway in 1838, lived in Rutland first, and removed to Adams in 1840.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 457 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



HAM-HAN

Abijah Haman

Abijah Haman and wife. Bought claim of Dubois in 1836, and sold to Bernard; removed to Newark, and died there. Had two sons: John, removed to Kendall County in 1845; Clark.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 423 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Anthony Haman

Anthony Haman came in 1835, and moved to De Kalb County.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Mission, Page 419 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Joseph Hamar

Joseph Hamar, of Massachusetts, came to Illinois in 1835, in company with Dr. J. S. Bullock; left Massachusetts in October, and came by the way of Albany, Erie canal and steamer to Cleveland, and by canal to Portsmouth, Ohio, and by steamer to St. Louis; took passage for the Illinois river; was detained by ice near Alton. Nov. 30th left the boat, and Mr. Hamar and Edw'd Knapp, also from Massachusetts, started on foot through a deep snow and over an uninhabited prairie for his destination in La Salle County. They reached Springfield Dec. 4, Tremont, on the7th, and Bailey's Grove on the 11th. Dr. Bullock arrived by boat Jan. 2, 1836. In January, Mr. Hamar went to Dixon on foot to enter land, and was gone ten days. In the spring he was joined by his family and found quarters at the hospitable house of Lewis Bailey. He settled on S. 32, where he built a log cabin the following summer, the first in that locality that ventured to settle away from timber on the open prairie. Mr. and Mrs. Hamar, in common with their neighbors from New England, brought with them a high regard for the church and school-house, which they learned among their native hills. Mr. Hamar died Aug., 1846, aged 51. Mrs. Hamar died May, 1876, aged 78, leaving seven children: Elizabeth, now the widow of Samuel Wauchope, of Farm Ridge; Mary Ann, widow of George Kingsbury, living near Tonica; Minerva O., wife of Nathan L. Eaton, living three miles east of Tonica; Joseph E., living in Santa Barbara, Cal.; Geo. E., is in Dodge County, Nebraska; Therestal, died in 1846; Eugene lives in Tonica.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 293-294 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Mrs. Sarah Hamilton

Mrs. Sarah Hamilton, from Ohio to Putnam County in 1846, and here in 1856.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Allen, 477 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Hans O. Hanson

Hans O. Hanson and family, came from Norway in 1839 and settled on Section 15 in 1840 ; the father and mother are both dead. The oldest son, Ole H., lives on the old place ; another son, Alexander, lives near, on Section 20 ; the oldest daughter, Bertha, married Thomas Mosey, and lives in Freedom ; Lovina, married P. H. Peterson ; Helen, is married and lives in Iowa.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 457 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



HAR

Charles Harding

Rev. Charles Harding, from Lucas County, Pa., came in 1840. He was a Baptist clergyman, and organized the church at Harding, and preached, alternately, there and at Paw Paw. He died in 1843. His widow married Hiram Olmstead. He left one child, Almira, who married Ashbel Fuller.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 403 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Hiram Harding

Hiram Harding, and wife, from Wyoming, Pa., came in 1838, and settled on Sec. 14. He and his wife are both dead. His children are : Mary, who married Mr. Rice, is now dead ; Charles, died single : Ruth, married H. Worcester ; Park, died ; John. lives at Paw Paw ; Christine, married Mr. Goble, and was killed by the fall of the Dixon bridge.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 402 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Goodman Hargus

Goodman Hargus, came from Norway, to New York in 1828; one that came over in the famous sloop ; he married in New York and settled in Rutland in 1834. He died in 1850, leaving five children.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 281 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Patrick Harrigan

Patrick Harrigan, from Ireland to Boston, and came here in 1836 ; died 1872 ; widow, and oldest daughter, live in South Ottawa.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Fall River, Page 393 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Harrington

John Harrington, from New York, 1834, on S. W.1/4S. 34, T. 34, R. 4 ; sold to J. F. Keyes, and moved to western part of the State.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 283 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Harrington

John Harrington, from England to New York in 1836; bachelor; grain dealer in Marseilles.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 315 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Thomas Harrington

Thos. Harrington, brother of above, was drowned at the time of the flood in 1838. The ice gorged on the island below Marseilles, and flooded nearly the whole town.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 315 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry F. Hartenbower

The gentleman whose name appears above is a leading business man of Tonica, dealing in agricultural implements, threshers and engines. He was born in Magnolia township, Putnam County, Illinois, April 11, 1849, a son of Christian and Jerusha (Hiltabrand) Hartenbower. His father was a native of Wittenberg, Germany and his mother was born in Tennessee. They had seven children, six of whom are living, namely: Henry F., George F., Emily, wife of G. J. Williams, of Eagle Grove, Iowa; William F., John E., of Tonica, Illinois and Catherine, the wife of Albert Grant. The father of these children, a farmer by occupation, emigrated to America in 1836, locating in Putnam County, where he followed agricultural pursuits until 1852, and then moved to Hope township, LaSalle County, settling upon a quarter section which he had purchased. To this he subsequently added by further purchases until he had at one time five hundred and seventy acres. It was here that he reared his children and lived until 1886, when he moved to Tonica, where he now lives retired, his son William cultivating the old farm. In his political sympathies he has always been a Democrat, and in public position he has been road commissioner for many years. In religion he and his wife are Baptists.

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Christian Hartenbower, a native of the fatherland, was a shoemaker by trade, and came to America in 1836, settling in Putnam county in Magnolia township, where he followed his trade. He finally died in LaSalle County, at the home of his son, aged about seventy-six years. He had seven children. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Hartenbower, George Hiltabrand, was a native of North Carolina, of German descent, and a farmer by occupation. He emigrated to Illinois in 1829, settling in Putnam County, had a large number of children and died at the old homestead, aged about sixty-eight years.

Mr. Hartenbower, the subject of this sketch, was brought up in LaSalle county from the year 1852, reared to the heavy duties of the farm, attending the public schools in the winter. When a grown man he rented for himself a farm of one hundred and seventy acres, for six years and then bought a hundred acres in Hope township, which he cultivated till 1889, then sold it and moved into Tonica, where he has since made his home. Here he began work in the employ of the firm of R. A. Radle & Company, in their implement store, and afterward for J. E. Morris, and in 1893 he bought out the stock of Mr. Morris and ran business alone until 1896, when he associated with himself G. W. Hartenbower, since which time the firm name has been H. F. & G. W. Hartenbower. These men have a fine reputation as honest and reliable dealers and industrious and enterprising citizens of their chosen town.

Politically Mr. Hartenbower, our subject has always been a Democrat and in fraternal relations he is a member of Tonica Lodge No. 364, A. F. & A. M.

He was married on the 15th of February, 1872, to Miss Mary Hutchings, a daughter of Martin and Mary (Bolton) Hutchings and they have been blessed with five sons and five daughters, whose names are, in order, Mary J., Charles F., Clara J., Edna, Roy B., Fred, Ella, Nell, Harold and Marion. Mary J. became the wife of Ozer Keller, lives in Coffeyville, Kansas and has two children, Charles F. was a soldier in the Spanish-American War, a member of the Fifth Illinois Volunteers, and is unmarried; Edna married Burton Thompson and resides in Henry, this state; and the other children are at their parental home.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]


John E. Hartenbower

LaSalle County is to be congratulated on the possession of business men and financiers whose enterprise, ability and integrity have contributed in a large measure to the prosperity which this section of the state enjoys. Of this class John E. Hartenbower is a prominent representative. He is one of the leading citizens of Tonica, who not only stands high in the financial world here, but is equally esteemed in the social, political and official circles of the town and locality.

On both the paternal and maternal sides our subject is of German descent and has inherited many of the sterling and reliable qualities of the Teutonic race. His grandfather, Christian Hartenbower, came to the United States from Wertemburg, Germany and settled in Putnam County, Illinois, but died in LaSalle County, about 1875, when almost four-score years of age. He followed the shoemaker's trade in Germany, and in America he gave his attention chiefly to agricultural pursuits. His wife, Catherine Kolbin, died when Christian, Jr., the father of our subject was two years old.

When he was thirteen years of age his parents left their home at Kirchheim, on the Neckar River, in Wertemburg, and came to the New World. He was born February 4, 1825, and on their emigration he accompanied the family and with them became a resident of Putnam County, where he resided for fifteen years. On the expiration of that period he came to LaSalle County, where he purchased eighty acres of land in Hope Township, an d as the years passed by he added to his possessions until at one time he owned nearly eight hundred acres of excellent family property. For the past seventeen years he has made his home in Tonica, and for ten years has lived retired from business cares. In former days he was not only engaged in general family, but also bought and shipped livestock.

He chose for his wife Miss Jerusha G. Hiltabrand, who was born in Tennessee, August 22, 1825, and was the eldest of twelve children of George and Elizabeth (Gunn) Hiltabrand. Her father was born near Camden, Pennsylvania, in June 1799, and was of German lineage. He was reared in North Carolina until 1818, when he removed to Robinson County, Tennessee, and in 1828 he came to Tazewell County, Illinois. The following spring, however, he settled in what is known as Ox Bow, Putnam County.

During the Black Hawk war he served as a sergeant in Captain William Haws' company of mounted volunteers, belonging to the Fortieth Regiment, Fourth Brigade and First Division of the Illinois militia. He was mustered out of the service at Hennepin on the 28th of June, 1832. At one time he purchased four quarter-sections of government land, for which he paid a dollar and a quarter per acre, and by the aid of his sons improved the property which is now estimated to be worth one hundred dollars per acre. Long before his death he was a wealthy man and an extensive landowner, and, although he suffered many hardships and privations in the first years of his residence in this state, in his last years he was enabled to secure all the necessaries and many of the comforts and luxuries of life. He died October 20, 1870, aged seventy-one years.

Seven children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hartenbower, namely: Henry F.; George F.; William F.; Emily, who is the wife of G. J. Williams of Eagle Grove, Iowa; John E.; Catherine C., wife of A. B. Grant, of LaSalle County; and Simeon, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hartenbower are members of the Baptist Church and are held in the highest regard by all who know them.

The birth of J. E. Hartenbower occurred on the parental farm in this county, March 18, 1864, and his childhood and young manhood were passed within five miles of Tonica. He supplemented a district school education by a course at Eureka College, in Woodford County, this state, and subsequently was occupied in teaching for some four years. Later he clerked in a drug store, and in 1887 his connection with the Tonica Exchange Bank began. After acting as a clerk for a period, he became the cashier, and is now the senior member of the firm of Hartenbower & Hiltabrand, owners of this popular banking institution. Austin Hiltabrand was the junior partner for a few years, but since 1896 George D. Hiltabrand has occupied that position in the firm. The Tonica Exchange Bank has transacted business under that title for the past twenty years, and possesses the confidence of the community, as the policy of the gentlemen at its head is conservative, methodical and eminently trustworthy.

Mr. Hartenbower is interested in real estate in this locality, as well as in the west. For twelve years he has been the special agent of the Union Central Life Insurance Company of Cincinnati, and also hancles fire insurance. He is a director in the LaSalle State Bank, of LaSalle. For the past five years he has been a member of the Tonica public school board, and is now acting as its clerk, and was the clerk of the town for three years, township collector for two terms, and since 1887 has been a police magistrate. Politically he is independent, though his vote is usually given to the Democratic party.
In the fraternities our subject belongs to Tonica Lodge, No. 364, A. F. & A. M., of which he is a past master; Peru Chapter, No. 60, R. A. M.; St. John's Commandery, No. 26, K. T.; and Peoria Consistory, thirty-second degree, Scottish-Rite Masons. He also is identified with Tonica Lodge, No. 298, Odd Fellows; Kaiser Camp, No. 707, M. W. of A.; Marshall Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, at Wenona, Illinois and with his wife, is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star.

His marriage to Miss Jennie E., born May 13, 1864, a daughter of James A. Lambert, was solemnized November 28, 1886, and they have two children, Emily J., born July 20, 1888 and J. Delwin, born November 14, 1893. Mr. Hartenbower is a natural musician, and is the leader of the Tonica Woodmen Brass and Reed Band, comprising twenty-two members. As may be inferred, he is one of the most popular men in this section of the county, few being in greater demand in all business, social or public enterprises, and his name seems to be all that is needed to make a success of any local undertaking.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]



Ira Hartshorn

Ira Hartshorn, and wife, Joanna Burnham, came from Lisbon, Ct., to Madison County, N. Y., and from there here in 1836; moved his family in 1837, and settled on Section 6. He died in September, 1859; his widow died in 1875. Joshua P., married Jane Simon, now in Iowa; Erasmus D., married Marietta Meserve; Alfred I. married Terrena Culver, now in La Salle; Pliny, married Sarah Simonton, second wife, Amelia Dean-lives in Waltham; Culvert, married Anna Niles ; Mary, married Frank Dean-her second husband, Eli Strawn, now of Buckley ; Lucy, married Mosely Niles, of Buckley ; Lydia, married Robert V. Dunnary, of Livingston County; Charles B., died in the army, at Pittsburg Landing.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 359-360 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Heman Harwood

Heman Harwood, brother of Sanford, from the same place; married Melissa Ide, and settled on S. 1. Died in 1857 in Deer Park. His widow married a Mr. Lathrop, and moved to Iowa. He had three children: Sarah, married, and is living in Iowa; Charles was killed by the accidental discharge of a gun; the younger daughter is with her mother.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 353 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Sanford Harwood

Sanford Harwood, from Saratoga County, New York, came in 1837; married Keziah Dryer, and moved to Iowa.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 353 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



HAS-HAT

William Haskell

William Haskell, from Boston, Massachusetts,1836, a merchant; died recently in Streator.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 233 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
William Haskell, and wife, Martha Bate Heller, first came to Ottawa in 1837, and to the creek in 1839. Perley & Haskell built Curyea's mill and distillery in 1839. He died recently in Streator.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 440 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Camp Hatch

Camp Hatch, and wife, Miss Ambler, from New Preston, Ct., in the spring of 1831. settled on S. 9, T. 32, R. 2. He died in the fall ot 1835. His widow married Jabez Whiting.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 329 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Harvey Hatch

Harvey Hatch (deaf and dumb), came from New Preston, Conn., a brother of Dr. Jethro Hatch and of Mrs. Bradish Cummings, settled on S. 10; married, and removed to Galesburg, where he is now living.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 330 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Jethro Hatch

Dr. Jethro Hatch, and wife, Ruth Cogswell, cam& from New Preston, Ct., in 1834; was a physician of good practice. Had two daughters: Mary Ann. and Elizabeth. Mrs. Hatch died about 1845; the Doctor died about 1850.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 309-310 Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Johnson Hatch

Dr. Johnson Hatch, and wife, came from New Preston, Ct., in 1837, and bought the farm of Kirjeth A. Hunt. An old experienced physician, his services were in demand during the sickly seasons of 1838 and '39, and the release from labor which he sought by coming West was hardly found ; he returned to Connecticut in 1841.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 389 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



HAV-HAZ

Fielding Havenhill

Fielding Havenhill, son of George, came with his father, and settled on Section 12. in 1834 ; was married in Kentucky.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Mission, Page 421 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


George Havenhill

George Havenhill came from Nelson County, Ky,. to Tazewell County in 1830; in 1832 raised a crop near Holderman' s Grove, which was destroyed by the Indians ; was County Commissioner in 1835; died about 1842.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Mission, Page 420 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Marshall Havenhill

Marshall Havenhill, son of George, came with his father, and settled on S. 12, T. 34, R. 5, in 1834; married Jane Collins.


Ezra Hawley

Ezra Hawley, and wife, Rhoda M. Buck, came from Bennington County, Vermont, to Sangamon County, and to Bailey's Grove, in June, 1835; settled on S. 20, where he is still living. His living children, are: Anson at home ; Myron, who married Emeline Hall, in Vermillion ; Hiram, married Mary Goodwin, lives near the old place.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 296-297 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Nathan Hawley

Nathan Hawley, brother of Ezra, came from Vermont, July, 1836, and died the next October; his widow, Chloe Ann Whiteside, lives near Peoria.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 297 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Gaylord Hayes

Gaylord Hayes, and wife, came from Barkhamstead, Litchfield County, Ct, to Hennepin in 1833, and moved on to S. 4, T. 31, R. 3, in the spring of 1834. He died in 1837; his widow died several years after. He left five children : Humphrey, married Miss Ellsworth and removed to California, now dead; Mary, married Sargeant Cummings, they live in Iowa; Samuel J., married Sophia Cummings, live in Farm Ridge ; Philip C., married Miss Johnson, of Ohio, they live in Morris; he is now Congressman elect from the Seventh Illinois District: E. Timothy, lives in Marseilles; James H., of Cornell, Livingston County.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 345-346 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hays

John Hays, and wife, came from Tennessee in 1830; built a cabin on the Illinois bottom, just above the present location of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad depot; kept the Ferry across the Illinois river till 1840; sold to Hendricks; went to Hennepin, and died there. Hays was from the class at the South that was crushed and kept in ignorance by the institution of slavery. He was a rough and fearless frontiersman. His children were: one daughter, married Mr. Davis, and with her husband, was killed at Indian Creek, in 1832; Harrison is in Bureau County; James, and two other sons.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 361 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Charles Hayward

Charles Hayward, from Lebanon, Connecticut, to. Cleveland, in 1818 ; from Ohio here, 1835 or 1836 ; was School Commissioner of the county. Died July 20, 1849. His widow married Henry J. Reid. Mr. Hayward left two children : George, married Nettie Strickland ; Estella J., at home.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 233 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Rev. Mr. Hazard

Rev. Mr. Hazard, from Clinton County, New York. in 1834; was a minister and missionary; died when returning to Plattsburg.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 265 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



HEA-HES

Samuel H. Heidler

In September 1895, the new superintendent of the public schools of Ottawa, Professor Samuel H. Heidler, entered upon his duties. He has made a most painstaking, efficient, judicious official, and has won the highest praise from our citizens and those interested in the progress of education. His whole mature life has been devoted to study and work along the lines of education, and both by nature and training he is eminently qualified for the responsible position which he occupies. Under his wise management of our local schools great improvement is to be noticed in many directions, and advanced methods, well tried and valuable, are being introduced as rapidly as is practicable.

A young man in the prime of life, Professor Heidler was born September 6, 1861, in the vicinity of Columbia, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, on the old homestead which has been handed down from one generation to the next, and was originally purchased by the paternal ancestor of our subject, of William Penn, the Quaker. There were five sons and five daughters in the Heidler family, the parents being Levi and Martha Heidler.

Subsequent to leaving the common schools Samuel Heidler spent three years in the training school at Millersville, the first state normal in the state of Pennsylvania. Then he taught for two years in his native county, after which he went to Springfield, Illinois and there pursued special lines of study for a year. At the expiration of that period he accepted a position in the schools of Cantrall, a town situated some ten miles from the state capital of Illinois and there he remained two years. His next position was in Pleasant Plains, where he taught until 1889, at that time being offered the principalship of the Stuart school in Springfield, at a salary of twelve hundred dollars a year. This amount was later increased to fourteen hundred dollars a year, the highest salary that had ever been paid to any ward-school principal in the city. In 1893 the Professor went to California, and for two years devoted himself to special study in the State university. Returning he at once entered upon his work as superintendent of the public schools of Ottawa. Keen in intellect, quick to grasp and deal with the difficulties of any situation, thoroughly posted in his chosen profession, he is just the man for the responsible position he holds. Fraternally he stands high in the Masonic order, and politically he is independent in his attitude.

In 1893 Professor Heidler was married in Springfield, Illinois to Miss Delia Bunn, a daughter of Henry and Mary Bunn of that city. Mrs. Heidler is a lady of superior educational and social attainments, and enjoys the friendship of a large circle of acquaintances. She is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, and in company with her husband, is a regular attendant at the services of the Lutheran church.

The Ottawa board of education was organized under a special law passed in the winter of 1845-5, and in the spring of the year last mentioned the people empowered the board to levy a special tax of one per cent for the purpose of building school-houses and paying needed expenses. After much discussion two large buildings were erected, at a cost of twenty-five thousand dollars. One of these, now known as the Columbus school, is in the third ward, and the other, now the Lincoln school, is in the fifth ward. Up to that time only one hundred and twenty-five children had been enrolled as public school pupils, but from the day that the new, well equipped buildings were opened a marked charge was observed and in a short time additional accommodations were required. The intervening years have witnessed many great and notable improvements in our school facilities and educational methods and each year rapid strides are made toward perfection.

[Source: Biographical and genealogical record of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1900. Page 20-21 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John H. Henderson

John H. Henderson, and wife, Elizabeth Powell, came from Tennessee in 1830, he located on Section 11. He was in the field on the south side of Indian creek, planting corn, when the massacre took place by the Sauk Indians, May 20, 1832; he, with others, escaped to Ottawa. He was an active, enterprising citizen, and a leading abolitionist. He died June 17, 1848, much regretted. His widow still survives, living with her children. Her children are : Mary, married A. P. Devereau, of Freedom ; George, in Iowa; Frances, married Richard Scott, in California ; Martha, married James Clark, of Sycamore; Sarah, married George Martin ; Erastus T., married Miss Norton; Annetta, married Charles Martin, of Vermont.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 395-396 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hendricks

John Hendricks, from Virginia, to Indiana, and came here in 1831. His mother was a daughter of a respectable Virginia planter, who eloped with and married her father's coachman, one of his African chattels. Under the laws of Illinois then, he could neither vote nor testify against a white man; yet he was an honest man and a good citizen. He bought the Peru ferry of Hays in 1840, and run it several years; he removed to West Missouri or Kansas, and died there.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 349 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Thomas W. Hennesey

Dr. Thomas W. Hennesey, from Ireland, 1837, was a practicing physician in La Salle for twenty years, then moved on to a farm, in the town of Dimmick, where he now lives ; he married Charlotte Cadwell, daughter of Sheldon Cadwell, of Deer Park.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 379 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Benjamin Hess

Benjamin Hess, and wife, Barbara Ann Simeon, came to Illinois in 1833, and settled on the bluff north of Utica village. Mrs. Hess died in 1848, aged 75 ; Mr. Hess died in August, 1850, aged 77. Jeremiah, married Laura Sevins, and lives on the old farm; Benjamin, died in 1846 ; Susan, married Mr. Mulford, she is now deceased; Abram, married Mary E. Wallrod, and lives at Utica ; Eva, married Edward Holland, and had eleven children-second husband, Henry Gorbet; Elizabeth, married Mr. Wallace, and lives at Bureau Junction ; Jemima, married Chester Hall, then of Ottawa-she is now deceased.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 360 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 

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